NC-2009 IEQc5: Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control

  • NC_Schools_IEQc5_Type1_IndoorPollutant Diagram
  • A smorgasbord of requirements

    This credit requires compliance with a varied group of items that cumulatively help keep pollutants out of the indoor air. These requirements include self-closing doors on janitors' closets, MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filtration on mechanical equipment, and entryway trackoff systems.

    Compliance will require the coordination of team members—including the mechanical engineer, architect, plumbing engineer, and contractor—and also impact project design and operations. The basic requirements are:

    • Permanent entryway walk-off systems at least 10 feet long (up from 6 feet in previous versions of LEED) at all regularly used, exterior-to-interior entrances and entrances from covered parking garages. (Roll-out mats are acceptable only if maintained on a weekly basis.) 
    • Designated exhaust of all hazardous gas and chemical use areas—including garages, housekeeping, janitors’ closets, laundry areas, science labs, art rooms, workshops, copy and printing rooms, and prep rooms.
    • An exhaust rate of 0.5 CFM/SF, with no air recirculation, in hazardous gas and chemical use areas.
    • Self-closing doors on all spaces outlined above.
    • Deck-to-deck partitions or hard-lid ceilings on all spaces outlined above.
    • MERV 13 filtration for each ventilation system serving regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. with outdoor air.
  • Keep dirt out!

    In addition to tobacco smoke, covered in IEQp2, one of the greatest sources of indoor pollutants is the dirt and other contaminants brought into buildings on people’s shoes. This material is tracked through the building interior, increasing the need and frequency for cleaning, and the wear on interior finishes. Dust can also be introduced into ventilation systems and distributed throughout a building, negatively effecting indoor air quality. 

    Fairly straightforward, but some pitfalls

    While it takes a lot of coordination to meet the many credit requirements, this is generally a low-cost credit. The most significant impact may come if MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13-compatible air-handling equipment is not initially specified, as redesigning mechanical systems can be costly. In some situations, especially when using heat pumps, HVAC systems cannot accept MERV 13 filters because they are not able to draw air through such a thick filter.

    MERV 13 filtration results in an energy-use trade-off. While MERV 13 filters offer a greater level of air filtration and, consequently, increased indoor air quality, they also increase resistance to airflow and fan energy loads. If you can separate space conditioning from ventilation and use radiant systems for all or most of the space conditioning, you can minimize this energy penalty.

  • Multifamily and hotel

    Multifamily residential and hotel projects may have difficulty achieving this credit due to the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filtration requirement. These projects often do not have base-building HVAC systems; they use PTACs instead, which generally cannot be fitted with MERV 13 filters. If a project has forced air systems and MERV-13 filtration is not used, then you cannot pursue or achieve this credit. Naturally ventilated buildings do not have to meet the MERV 13 filtration requirement, as air filtration will not be part of system design.

  • Containment requirement has been removed

    When LEED 2009 was launched, this credit included language calling for containment drains in laboratory spaces where chemicals are mixed. However, the requirement was vague and it wasn't clear how to document it. Fortunately, in the July 2010 LEED addenda issued by USGBC, this requirement was removed.

    FAQs for IEQc5

    Should track-off mats being used on the project to meet IEQc5 requirements be included in IEQc4.3 credit requirements?

    There is no definitive information from USGBC on this one way or another. It is recommended that project teams do their best to find low-emitting options for IEQc5, and that IEQc4.3 compliance is recommended.

    However, LEEDuser has heard that project teams have had success not including track-off mats, such as the type with grilles and small strips of carpeting. Also, mats that are removed for cleaning are not permanently installed and thus not subject to credit requirements. If used as track-off surfaces, carpet tiles should be certified, however, and are available with the requisite certifications.

    What is the definition of a high-volume copier?

    There is not an official glossary definition that LEEDuser is aware of. However, various references indicate that LEED views "high volume" as one or more printers in an area totaling more than 40,000 copies (20,000 double sided) per month. The number is based on "expected" use, not capacity. This definition can be found in LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #1938 issued 1/7/2008, for example, and although that Interpretation is not applicable to LEED 2009, the number 40,000 has appeared in enough places that we view it as a solid number.

    Do I need to provide dedicated exhaust for my printer or copier?

    If the copiers print less than 40,000 pages/month (20,000 pages double-sided) you do not need to install dedicated exhaust, self-closing doors and deck-to-deck partitions. Additionally, if you use printers that do not emit VOC’s or other harmful contaminants into the indoor environment, you can make a case for exemption.

    I do not have 10' of space inside my building entrance to install a walk-off system. Can I include one on the exterior? Can the shape be irregular?

    LEED Interpretation #10098, dated 8/1/2011, states that "The intent for the entryway system (grilles, grates, walk-off mats) is to capture dirt and dust. An exception to the 10 foot length and/or indoor location is acceptable provided your alternative solution meets this intent and is thoroughly justified."

    Project teams have been successful including exterior mats that are protected from the weather and regularly cleaned. LEEDuser has not heard of a project successfully gaining an exception to the 10-foot requirement, however. In situations where an irregular shaped mat makes sense, teams should consider whether people entering the building will travel at least 10 feet over a mat, and not be able to short-circuit it. A short narrative explaining the impediments and how your solution meets the standard established by the LEED Interpretation is recommended.

    What does ‘regularly used exterior entrance’ mean and how do I know which of my building entrances falls under this category?

    These entrances are those that are used by building occupants on a regular basis. If your project has unique circumstances where certain building entrances are not regularly used or do not serve building occupants, they may be excluded. For example, emergency exits that are not used as regular entrances can often be excluded.

    Are entryway mats required for a building entrance from another building?

    LEED Interpretation #5266 made on 05/30/2007 states that the requirements are applicable only to entrances from the outdoors.

    Can I use carpet tile as a track-off system? What about carpet?

    Yes, carpet tile applies per LEED Interpretation Ruling #10252. Some project teams have preferred to use carpet tile due to ease of maintenance and avoidance of trip hazards. The carpet tile must be specifically designed for entryway systems. Regular carpeting that is not designed for this purpose and does not have regular cleaning is not applicable.

    Our building has a green cleaning program and is earning an ID credit for it, based on the LEED-EBOM IEQc3 requiremets. Can we skip the exhaust requirements for our janitor rooms?

    LEEDuser has not seen an official ruling on this, but our expert consensus is no.

    One, replacing a physical control with a policy control is a bit of a downgrade. Two, 100% avoidance of hazardous chemicals in cleaning is unlikely. The green cleaning purchasing credit in EBOM, for example, considers 30% good enough to earn the credit. Also, the thresholds, categories, and standards referenced in that credit will only go so far in preventing use of any cleaning supplies that might generate gases or chemicals that should be exhausted.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

Expand All

  • Identify programming requirements for special-use spaces such as high-volume copy rooms (40,000 pages or more per month), laboratories, art rooms, chemical storage, housekeeping areas, and other spaces that may expose occupants to hazardous materials. 

    • Remember that if you need additional ductwork for designated exhaust systems for these areas, you’ll need to allow space for it.
    • Include deck-to-deck partitions or hard-lid ceilings, and self-closing doors, in these spaces. 
    • Battery banks, such as uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), have to be segregated from other use areas.

  • Identify space requirements for entryway walk-off mats. Review the impact that the required ten-foot entryway systems will have on common areas, lobbies, and other interior spaces adjacent to building entries. Remember that the entryway systems have to be installed at all regularly used entrances from exterior spaces, including entrances from a covered parking garage into the building. 


  • The LEED Reference Guide states that entryway systems need to be on the interior of the building or in an interior vestibule. It is recommended that projects pursuing this credit with the intent of using an exterior entryway system (either permanent or rollout) consult the GBCI or your certification board via email to verify credit compliance. It is usually accepted that exterior walk-off systems are allowed if they are properly sheltered from weather; that would typically mean some kind of roof, but additional shelter may be warranted depending on local conditions.


  • Review the potential for using MERV 13 filtration on ventilation systems. Systems with low fan power or filtration size limits may not be able to accommodate MERV 13 filters. Also, many residential and hotel projects use PTACs, or similar packaged systems, which cannot accommodate MERV 13 filters. Any mechanical ventilation must be designed with MERV 13 filters in mind. 


  • If you can use radiant heating and cooling for space conditioning and separate that function from ventilation, you’ll be moving a lot less air and meeting the MERV 13 requirement won’t be nearly as big a deal, due to fewer and smaller ducts and filters.


  • Include mechanical engineers and design consultants for special-use spaces such as science labs early in the design process. 


  • This is usually a low-cost credit. However, the MERV 13 filtration requirement can increase operational costs for added energy use and more frequent filter changes. If your ventilation system is not typically sized to accommodate a MERV 13 filter, you may have to choose a new system or have one custom-designed, which can add cost. Customization may include resizing ductwork, increasing fan capacity to maintain air delivery despite the added resistance of MERV 13 filtration, or other modifications to system design

Schematic Design

Expand All

  • Design an adequate space for ten-foot entryway systems at all regularly accessed building entries. Evaluate all other building entrances—such as employee and service doors—for regular use, which may require entryway systems or roll-out mats.


  • Determine the type of entryway system that's best for your project. If you install permanent grates, grilles, or slotted entry systems, you will not be required to have a plan for cleaning, although those systems will still need periodic cleaning (less frequently than roll-off mats). However, if you decide to use rollout mats, you'll need to have a contract in place for weekly cleaning. The contract for weekly cleaning can be incorporated into any existing contract but must be clearly spelled out. 


  • While roll-off mats are acceptable, additional documentation (service contracts and schedules) is required to confirm that the mats will be cleaned on a weekly basis. They cost more up-front, but permanent entryway systems provide better performance, require less maintenance, and are easier to document for LEED compliance.


  • Entryway systems should be climate-specific. For example, regions with high rainfall may choose high void-volume mats—for trapping dirt below the mat surface and fast drying. In regions where mud and snow are a greater source of contaminants, open-loop entry mats may be more appropriate. 


  • Design in space for additional ductwork that might be needed to provide designated exhaust for all garages, high-volume copy rooms, janitors’ closets, science labs, workshops, art rooms, or any other spaces that may be used for mixing and storage of chemicals or hazardous materials. You need to design the exhaust system so that each space with hazardous material has negative pressure in respect to adjacent spaces. For each of these spaces, be sure to include self-closing doors, and deck-to-deck partitions or hard-lid ceilings. 


  • Strategies for space planning may include:

    • Stack common-use areas so that all janitors’ closets are located in the same place on each floor, then run a single exhaust duct vertically through the building for each exhaust fan to tie into.    
    • Add height to the deck-to-deck elevation to provide extra space above finished ceilings for ductwork.
    • Locate rooms identified as containing hazardous material adjacent to outside walls to reduce the need for more ductwork.

  • When planning for space allocation to meet credit requirements, consider strategies like merging exhaust systems into a single, main, designated exhaust, or stacking chemical use areas over each other on different floors to minimize ductwork. 


  • Provide adequate space for storage and containment of hazardous liquids. 


  • Hazardous storage containers should be located in a secure area outdoors and away from air intakes. 


  • Develop an outline of all the IEQc5 requirements that apply to your project, and confirm that the schematic design accommodates each one. 


  • Adding ductwork to meet credit requirements can add costs; incorporate space-planning strategies to minimize this issue. 

Design Development

Expand All

  • Once programming and space allocations have been determined, confirm that each of the relevant credit requirements is met, as detailed below.


  • Confirm that all mechanical ventilation systems can accommodate MERV 13 filtration on outdoor and make-up air supply. 


  • If roll-out mats are used, make selections appropriate to the climate. The following specifics are also recommended in the LEED Reference Guide: 

    • fire retardant ratings better than DOC-FF-1-70, such as NFPA-253, Class I and II   
    • electrostatic propensity levels < 2.5 kV 
    • a contract for weekly cleaning of roll-out mats (required).

  • Confirm that all mechanical ventilation systems can accommodate MERV 13 filtration on outdoor and make-up air supply. 


  • Confirm that chemical disposal areas meet local codes for separate drain lines or containment drains. 


  • Confirm that all chemical storage areas, high-volume copy rooms, etc. have:

    • deck-to-deck partition walls or hard-lid ceilings;
    • self-closing doors;
    • designated exhaust (no recirculation); and 
    • an exhaust rate of 0.5 CFM/SF, with a pressure differential in relation to surrounding spaces of at least 5 Pa (0.02 inches on water gauge), on average or, when doors are closed, 1 Pa (0.004 inches on water gauge), at a minimum.

  • Locate hazardous waste storage containers away from outdoor air intakes. 

Construction Documents

Expand All

  • Develop all required documentation for LEED submittal, including floor plans indicating locations and lengths of entryway systems, wall details (for deck-to-deck partitions), mechanical drawings showing locations of designated exhaust systems, and mechanical schedules specifying MERV 13 filtration. 


  • For all spaces that may contain hazardous gas (such as garages, janitors' closets, and labs), calculate exhaust rates to confirm adequate negative pressurization. The pressurization requirements are: 

    • an exhaust rate of 0.5 CFM/SF with a pressure differential in relation to surrounding spaces of at least 5 Pascals (Pa)—.02 inches on water gauge—on average;
    • and when doors are closed, 1 Pa—.004 inches on water gauge—at a minimum.

  • Include credit requirements in all appropriate specification sections. Include the general requirements in Division 1 and others in specialties or furnishings (for the entryway systems) and HVAC (for filtration and other mechanical requirements).


  • Projects that use their own maintenance staff for regular cleaning of rollout entryway systems must provide a cleaning schedule and narrative along with their documentation. 


  • Develop documentation customized for LEED submission—complete with LEED-related notes, callouts, and details—concurrently with the finalized construction documents. 


  • The contractor is the signatory for IEQc5, even though it's a design credit. Have the contractor review 100% of the construction documents to confirm compliance before completing the design submittal. Otherwise, the credit may have to be deferred until the construction submittal. 

Construction

Expand All

  • Use temporary ventilation systems instead of the permanent HVAC units during construction. This prevents contamination of new ductwork during the construction process. 


  • Use MERV 8 filtration on any permanent mechanical system equipment used during construction. This adds to construction management tasks and could easily be overlooked and lead to loss of the credit. (This requirement appears in the LEED Online credit form as of 10/09, even though it does not appear in the credit language or LEED Reference Guide.)


  • Make sure that compliance and coordination with this credit is called out in the IAQ management plan if your project is pursuing IEQc3.1: Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan—During Construction


  • Ventilation and exhaust systems and proper filtration should be included in the commissioning scope for the commissioning credits EAp1 and EAc3.  

Operations & Maintenance

Expand All

  • Provide appropriate training for maintaining entryway systems. If roll-out mats are used, maintain a weekly schedule for cleaning.


  • Provide adequate training and education for all O&M and cleaning staff in appropriate handling, use, storage, and disposal of hazardous liquids.


  • Provide appropriate resources and training for O&M personnel to maintain mechanical equipment with MERV 13 filters. 


  • Mechanical systems have to be commissioned to meet the commissioning prerequisite EAp1. The commissioning agent's scope should include confirming appropriate MERV ratings on filtration media and proper operation of designated exhaust systems. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    IEQ Credit 5: Indoor chemical and pollutant source control

    1 Point

    Intent

    To minimize building occupant exposure to potentially hazardous particulates and chemical pollutants.

    Requirements

    Design to minimize and control the entry of pollutants into buildings and later cross-contamination of regularly occupied areas through the following strategies:

    • Employ permanent entryway systems at least 10 feet (3 meters) long in the primary direction of travel to capture dirt and particulates entering the building at regularly used exterior entrances. Acceptable entryway systems include permanently installed grates, grill s and slotted systems that allow for cleaning underneath. Roll-out mats are acceptable only when maintained on a weekly basis by a contracted service organization.
    • Sufficiently exhaust each space where hazardous gases or chemicals may be present or used (e.g., garages, housekeeping and laundry areas, copying and printing rooms) to create negative pressure with respect to adjacent spaces when the doors to the room are closed. For each of these spaces, provide self-closing doors and deck-to-deck partitions or a hard-lid ceiling. The exhaust rate must be at least 0.50 cubic feet per minute (cfm) per square foot (0.15 cubic meters per minute per square meter) with no air recirculation. The pressure differential with the surrounding spaces must be at least 5 Pascals (Pa) (0.02 inches of water gauge) on average and 1 Pa (0.004 inches of water) at a minimum when the doors to the rooms are closed.
    • In mechanically ventilated buildings, each ventilation system that supplies outdoor air shall comply with the following:
      • Particle filters or air cleaning devices shall be provided to clean the outdoor air at any location prior to its introduction to occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space..
      • These filters or devices shall meet one of the following criteria:
        • Filtration media is rated at a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value.) of 13 or higher in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 52.2
        • Filtration media is Class F7 or higher, as defined by CEN Standard EN 779: 2002, Particulate air filters for general ventilation, Determination of the filtration performance
        • [East Asia ACP: Filtration Media]
        • Filtration media has a minimum dust spot efficiency of 80% or higher and greater than 98% arrestance on a particle size of 3–10 µg.
      • Clean air filtration media shall be installed in all air systems after completion of construction and prior to occupancy.

      Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

      East Asia ACP: Filtration Media

      Projects in East Asia may use filtration media classified as high efficiency (高中效过滤器) or higher as defined by Chinese standard GB/T 14295-2008 (空气过滤器).

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Design facility cleaning and maintenance areas with isolated exhaust systems for contaminants. Maintain physical isolation from the rest of the regularly occupied areas of the building. Install permanent architectural entryway systems such as grills or grates to prevent occupant-borne contaminants from entering the building. Install high-level filtration systems in air handling units processing both return air and outside supply air. Ensure that air handling units can accommodate required filter sizes and pressure drops.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Web Tools

Janitorial Products Pollution Prevention Project

The Janitorial Products Pollution Prevention Project is a governmental and nonprofit project that provides fact sheets, tools, and links.


Design Tools for Schools - U.S. EPA

According to the website, IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Design Tools for Schools “provides both detailed guidance as well as links to other information resources to help design new schools as well as repair, renovate, and maintain existing facilities. Though its primary focus is on indoor air quality, it is also intended to encourage school districts to embrace the concept of designing High Performance Schools, an integrated, whole building approach to addressing a myriad of important—and sometimes competing—priorities, such as energy efficiency, indoor air quality, daylighting, materials efficiency, and safety, and doing so in the context of tight budgets and limited staff."

Publications

Keeping Pollutants Out: Entryway Design for Green Buildings

Environmental Building News feature article describing the benefits and design choices for entryway walk-off systems.


Air Filtration in Buildings

Environmental Building News feature article explaining the various types of air filters, how their performance is measured, and ways to optimize their effectiveness.


Air Filtration Can Make Breathing Easier

Facilitiesnet article covering the basics of air filtration, drawbacks and benefits, standard practices and basic concepts.


Air Filter, Inc. Table

Table of filtration efficiencies and their subsequent filtration properties and common applications. Good background on MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filtration.

Entryway Systems

A floor plan like this project example is required to document the presence of entryway track-off systems, length and location. Note that this sample shows six-foot entryway systems because the project predated LEED 2009. For LEED 2009, the systems need to be ten feet in length.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 IEQ

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 IEQ credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

342 Comments

1
1
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Jun 08 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

The fume hood alone does not provide the required enclosure for LEED. You may be able to argue that the laboratory space as a whole is separated, depending on the occupancy within the space. You would need to enclosed the whole space with full height walls and self-closing doors.

Post a Reply
0
0
Kenneth Van Riper Associate Principal Commonwealth Architects
May 31 2012
Guest
224 Thumbs Up

Washer/Dryer closets in student housing project

I'm working on a university student housing project where the dwelling units each contain a small closet to house a stackable washer and dryer. There isn't really any designated storage area for detergents, etc., but would I have to consider these closets as spaces "where hazardous gases or chemicals may be present or used" and provide separate exhaust? These are not even spaces that one can walk into; just large enough to accommodate the appliances. Thanks!

1
2
0
Keith Amann Senior Sustainability Manager, YR&G May 31 2012 LEEDuser Member 829 Thumbs Up

Kenneth,
In this scenario your stacked washer/dryer will have designated exhaust, which is the important element for these space types. We have never been asked by reviewers to provide additional exhaust for these closets where you may store laundry detergent. That requirement is more for janitors closets where hazardous chemicals would be stored, and I do not think laundry detergent would classify as such.

2
2
0
Kenneth Van Riper Associate Principal, Commonwealth Architects May 31 2012 Guest 224 Thumbs Up

Keith,
Thanks for your reply! That's what I was figuring, but wanted to get some reassurance before deciding to definitely pursue this credit.

Post a Reply
0
0
TJ Schenkel Intern Sustainable Solutions Corporation
May 15 2012
LEEDuser Member
473 Thumbs Up

Non-Enclosed Garage

We have a non-enclosed above ground garage space on the first few floors of a multi-family building which is naturally ventilated. Would a non-enclosed garage still require exhaust fans to meet the requirements of this credit?

1
3
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group May 15 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

Debatable, are there any regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. adjacent to the garage spaces? E.g. Lobbies, tenant spaces.

Also, check your local code and ASHRAE to ensure you meet the natural ventilation requirements based on free area of the perimeter walls.

2
3
0
TJ Schenkel Intern, Sustainable Solutions Corporation May 16 2012 LEEDuser Member 473 Thumbs Up

There are residential units adjacent to the garage.

The project started out with garage exhaust fans in place sufficient to meet the 0.5 cfm/sf, however they found out that they did not require this to meet local code so they removed some of the fans.

3
3
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group May 16 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

In this case you probably don't comply. You could submit under Alternative Compliance by stating that you are meeting local ventilation codes. However, you aren't keeping the differential pressure requirements and it is unlikely that the tenant spaces have self closing doors.

Post a Reply
0
0
Ellen Mitchell Director of Sustainability HKS, Inc.
May 14 2012
LEEDuser Expert
4281 Thumbs Up

Residential Walk-Off Mats

I have a university dorm project that has 1 or 2 residential units on ground level opening to the outside and I"m not sure how to advise on the walk off mat requirement. One the one hand, I can see the need to mitigate pollutants that are tracked into the space but on the other hand, 10' does not seem like an appropriate solution. Does anyone have experience with this?

1
2
0
Keith Amann Senior Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jun 14 2012 LEEDuser Member 829 Thumbs Up

Ellen,
This is one of many examples where the rating system and this credit was intended for commercial buildings and does not adequately address residential project types. Are there other main entrances to the building that serve the majority of other units? If so, I would ensure that all of those entrances contain adequate walk off mats and attempt the credit with an explanation that these other entrances are for individual units (not main entrances) and it would be absurd to include 10' mats within them. Hopefully, common sense prevails and the reviewer would approve this approach. If not, you could always submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide.

2
2
0
Lyle Axelarris Civil/Structural Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Design Alaska Dec 19 2013 LEEDuser Member 988 Thumbs Up

Ellen, it may be too late, but you may want to consider using the credit that addresses this in LEED for Homes (as an ACP). This would meet the intent of the credit, and is better suited for this situation. I haven't looked at the credit in a long time, but I think it involves providing a seated entry area for taking off your shoes.

Post a Reply
0
0
eric jendro mechanical engineer widseth smith nolting
Apr 18 2012
Guest
108 Thumbs Up

IEQ Credit 5 - Air Recirculation

I have school with a wood shop. There is a dust collector that exhausts saw dust from the equipment and recirculates the air back to the space after being filtered. The credit says "sufficiently exhaust hazardous gases or chemicals....in shops of any kind... with no air recirulation."

Saw dust is not hazardous gases or chemicals, and I have dedicated exhaust in the storage rooms where those types would be kept.

Would I still be able to pursue IEQc5?

1
1
0
Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Apr 26 2012 Guest 8494 Thumbs Up

My first instinct would be no. You cannot have air recirculation in shops... however I have not worked on a wood shop specifically. Anyone else?

Post a Reply
0
0
Sunayana Jain Energy Engineering Specialist FTC&H
Mar 28 2012
Guest
149 Thumbs Up

Average Pressure Differential Calculation

How is average pressure differential calculated?
What is the condition of door assumed to calculate above. Thanks!

1
7
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Apr 04 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

If you have a constant exhaust system serving an enclosed space with a self closing door than your min, max and average differential calculation will be the same value.
If you have a variable exhaust and/or VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. (variable air volume) box providing make up air to the space then you would have a different min, max and average differential pressure.

Assume the door is closed.

An ASHRAE equation for Differential Pressure (∆P) in PA is:
Q=165.5*A*√∆P

Here is an example scenario:
3 foot wide closed door with a 0.5" undercut
A=0.125 ft
∆P=5
Solve for Q (Air Flow in CFM)
Q=165.5*0.125*√5 = 46.3 CFM

In order to ensure a room has a negative 5 PA differential pressure to an adjacent space you need to have roughly 50 CFM total exhaust (Exhaust CFM - Supply CFM). Area of the room is irrelevant for this equation but for LEED and local building codes you may also need to ensure that you have at least 0.5 CFM/SF exhaust.

2
7
0
Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator, JALRW Eng. Group Inc. Aug 29 2012 LEEDuser Member 3601 Thumbs Up

What if there is no undercut in the doors? How should I represent it on the template?

3
7
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Aug 29 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

Victor,
The template just wants you to check off a box that you did a design calculation and submit a drawing highlighting which rooms have chemicals/hazardous gases.

If you don't have an undercut in the door the air has to come from somewhere if the space isn't air tight. Could be spaces in the door, cracks in the ceiling grid, etc.

4
7
0
Mara Baum Healthcare Sustainable Design Leader, LEED Fellow, HOK Mar 15 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8753 Thumbs Up

Dylan, some of our reviewers also ask for detailed calculations/charts with cfm and pressurization for every room -- not just checking a box.

5
7
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Apr 03 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

There isn't a spot to upload those calculations specifically. But if they do ask for those calculations or you find a spot to upload them, just follow the formula above.

6
7
0
Margaret McColl Sustainability Specialist Aug 27 2013 Guest 79 Thumbs Up

Dylan,
Thanks for posting that equation. Which ASHRAE standard is it from?

7
7
0
Ilona Johnson, PE, CEM, LEED AP Associate, Lilker EMO Energy Solutions Oct 11 2013 Guest 425 Thumbs Up

Margaret,
See ASHRAE Applications Chapter 52 on Fire and Smoke Management.

Post a Reply
0
0
Sunayana Jain Energy Engineering Specialist FTC&H
Mar 20 2012
Guest
149 Thumbs Up

Retail Loading docks

According to LEED for Retail, "employ permanent entryways systems for all entrances including back-of-house areas such as loading docks or service areas."

In my case loading docks will only used for deliveries, as such it will not be used by any staff or visitors, will it still require permanent entryway system?

1
5
0
Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Mar 20 2012 LEEDuser Expert 6650 Thumbs Up

The reviewers have been pretty consistent that any door that is regularly used, even if only for deliveries, needs to have entryway systems. The only time I have seen them exempt doors on a regular basis is for doors that are only to be used as emergency exits.

2
5
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 06 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

LI#5177 made on 01/23/2009 states  that loading docks are exempt. This Interpretation doesn't seem to have been considered for LEED 2009, though—it's applicable to v2.2.

3
5
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Dec 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 2831 Thumbs Up

Does anyone have a recent update on the need for mats in industrial buildings? The v4 requirements for mats appear to mirror the v2.2 LI and we are entering the design phase for a v3 office/industrial building.

4
5
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Dec 04 2014 LEEDuser Member 1924 Thumbs Up

As Tristan noted in his February 2013 post, LI#5177 had not been deemed applicable to LEED-2009. However, this has changed. The current Interpretation Database indicates that the list of applicable credits for LI#5177 was updated in October 2013 to include LEED-2009: http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=5177.
This link also includes an related update to LI#2021. These updates appear to align with v4 reqirements.

Still, when you submit your documentation for IEQc5, be sure to indentify all exterior doors, indicate which are “regularly-used” entrances requiring walk-off systems, and provide justification for anywhere that you have omitted them. Cite LI#5177 or #2021 explicitly at loading docks.

Case in point: In a June 2013 review of a LEED NC-2009 lab project, LEED Reviewers challenged us for not including walk-off systems at a pair of delivery doors at the loading dock. We had done so based on LI#5177 and that this was not a regularly-used entrance, but we failed to explain our rationale in the initial submittal.

In our response, we did not try to argue the point. We just documented that the Owner was providing roll-up mats at this door. We might have avoided this if we had made our reasons clear in the first place.)

(Note: This was a regular pair of hinged doors. Reviewers did not require mats at the roll-up truck dock door.)

5
5
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Dec 04 2014 LEEDuser Member 1924 Thumbs Up

Note that the LI#2021 update DOES require walk-off systems at doorways connecting the loading dock to the adjacent, occupied building.

Post a Reply
0
0
Elle Brown
Mar 07 2012
Guest
500 Thumbs Up

Entry Way Systems: Floor mats

I am working on a government project and half of our building is a garage space.
1. Do we have to put 10 ft long floor mats at each exterior door to the garage? We have very large overhead door openings for the vehicles and in atleast one location a floor mat that long would be in the path of vehicular traffic. would we be able to put shorter pats (6 feet) in the garage and perhaps an additional mat at the door between the garage and the administrative portion of the building?
2. Would it be permissible to exclude these floor mats from the contract but include them in our drawings (N.I.C.) and create a cleaning and maintenance plan for the owner? We do have permanent recessed grilles at the main entrance but because the roll mats aren't attached to the floor (and can't be) we may not be able to include them in the project budget.

1
2
0
Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Mar 07 2012 Guest 8494 Thumbs Up

Misty,

I may be mistaken here, but I believe you only need walk-off mats at enterances to your building. I would not include the garage, in this case, as part of the building. So you would only need the mats at the enterances of the building and in the direction of travel, so inside the building, not the garage in the case of the two being attached.

2
2
0
Elle Brown Mar 08 2012 Guest 500 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your response. I was concerned because the garage will be used for vehicle maintenance and people will probably be walking in and out of the overhead doors and there isn't much we can do about peventing people from dragging in debris that way. The exterior pedestrian doors are more for emergency exits and we dont anticipate them being used that much but we weren't sure how LEED would view it.

Post a Reply
0
0
Heather Schafer
Mar 01 2012
Guest
39 Thumbs Up

Walk-off at Loading Docks?

I am working on 2 University projects, both seeking LEED certification. Both buildings have loading docks with a back-of-house entry. This entry will not be used by anyone other than drivers and staff working with deliveries.

Is a walk-off required at these locations? It is not a primary entrance, but the doors do have hardware on the exterior of the door, so it can technically be considered an entrance, just not for the public.

1
1
0
Keith Amann Senior Sustainability Manager, YR&G Mar 01 2012 LEEDuser Member 829 Thumbs Up

I would think that if staff use this loading dock as their main ingress and egress, in addition to daily deliveries, than walk-off mats should be included. If it is an entrance used only for the purpose of deliveries, it is not considered regularly used and therefore could be exempt. It's important to ensure the intent of the credit is being achieved. I.e., if there is a possibility that based on the frequency and use of this loading dock, dirt and other contaminants can be brought into the building regularly, then walk-off mats should be added.

Post a Reply
0
0
Sam Keehn Environmental and Sustainability Manager Energy Management Services, Int.
Feb 27 2012
Guest
547 Thumbs Up

Mats

We are working on a Mosque in Qatar. All visitors to the mosque remove their shoes prior to entering the building. We would like to avoid placing mats at the entrance due to aesthetic reasons. Anyone have experience with this?

There is also an adjacent building used as a gathering place (formally when large numbers of attendees are present). This is basically a rectangular building with a courtyard in the middle. There doors everywhere, both entering the courtyard and on the outer walls, to the exterior. There is no "main entry points," they will all be used. Any advice on requirements for mats in this situation?

Thanks,
Sam

1
3
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Feb 27 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

You could consider installing grilles or grates as an alternative to mats These are allowed as well. On one project we cut groves into the concrete entrance way to create something similar to a grated entryway.
You would likely need to have entrance treatments entering from the courtyard as well.
If you are unable to find a solution, then this may just not be the right credit to choose for the project.

2
3
0
Sam Keehn Environmental and Sustainability Manager, Energy Management Services, Int. Mar 19 2012 Guest 547 Thumbs Up

What about an exclusion to the mat requirement to the mosque, since it is customary for all people entering the space to remove their shoes?

3
3
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Mar 19 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

You could ask for a special exception. Will there be signage?

Post a Reply
0
0
Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal ecocentric cc
Feb 20 2012
LEEDuser Member
1735 Thumbs Up

small back-up laundry in hotel?

in our hotel project all laundry is outsourced to an external laundry service but we have a small area for back-up laundry requirements for the odd items that may have to be laundered. there will be one domestic washing machine installed (such as a Miele). do we have to treat this as a "laundry" as per the reference guide?

Many thanks!

1
4
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 21 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Jutta, did you mean to post this comment somewhere else? I'm not sure how laundry applies to IEQc5.

2
4
0
Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal , ecocentric cc Feb 21 2012 LEEDuser Member 1735 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan. No, this was correctly posted here, given that the requirements in the credit state: "Sufficiently exhaust each space where hazardous gases or chemicals may be present or used (e.g., garages,housekeeping and laundry areas, copying and printing rooms) [...]."
Maybe I did not phrase the question correctly: there will be a room dedicated to laundry (back-up as stated) and the question is whether we need to comply with the requirements for separate ventilation, negative pressurisation and self-closing doors?
Many thanks!

3
4
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Feb 21 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

The LEED manual does not specify how large a laundry area needs to be to necessitate meeting the requirements. The idea is that if you could be using bleach, etc then they want that room separated.

The reference guide states "Housekeeping facilities that are part of a common laundry room in residential or hospitality buildings must meet the chemical storage requirements."

I would recommend separating the space and providing dedicated exhaust if you are pursuing this credit.

4
4
0
Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal , ecocentric cc Feb 21 2012 LEEDuser Member 1735 Thumbs Up

Thanks Dylan. I agree. We are pursuing the credit and I will brief the team accordingly.

Post a Reply
0
0
Dave Wortman Program Manager Brendle Group
Feb 16 2012
LEEDuser Member
326 Thumbs Up

Rubber Walk-Off Mats

We are contemplating the use of a rubber walk-off mat for a high traffic area at a winter resort with lots of snow. The guidelines don't say either way whether a rubber mat would be acceptable- any experience with this specific material?

1
3
0
Keith Amann Senior Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Member 829 Thumbs Up

We have not used rubber mats, but I believe any roll-out type mat should be acceptable, provided it meets the needs of the project for capturing dirt and particulates, is 10' long in the direction of travel, and is maintained weekly (at a minimum) by a contracted vendor. You will need to show service contracts and maintenance schedules as supporting documentation.

2
3
0
Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Expert 6650 Thumbs Up

I have always used fiber loop/rubber mats. I wouldn't think that all rubber would be a problem, but page 513 of the BD+C reference guide does mention that the mat system should be appropriate to the project climate. So, you may want to be prepared to show that all rubber mats are typical/appropriate for your climate to be safe.

3
3
0
Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Expert 17213 Thumbs Up

I'm less certain because the intent of the mat is to capture the dirt, grime and other items and prevent them from entering the building. Not knowing the specific product, most rubber products tend to be a little slick from that aspect and without a fiber loop, they don't tend to scrub much dirt of your shoe/boot/ice skating blades.

Being originally from the great snowy north, I'd have to ask why you wouldn't be contemplating some sort of grille system that would catch, melt and drain the snow that will come into the building. The rubber mats work great when you're stepping off the ice skating rink and don't want to damage your blades. If you are walking across them in ski boots, they can be a little slippery. You're also likely providing more than 10' of mats as they become quickly squishy with melting snow.

Post a Reply
0
0
Elizabeth Powers Principal O'Brien & Company
Jan 09 2012
LEEDuser Member
477 Thumbs Up

Toner-less copiers

Would copiers (Xerox ColorQube 9303, specifically) that don't use toner but solid ink technology need to be kept in exhausted rooms, per IEQc5? This question assumes they are high-volume copiers.

1
2
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Jan 10 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

I would suspect the LEED review won't have heard of the benefits of using solid ink technology. If you can prove that the technology emits little to no VOCsA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate., etc and has no adverse effect on IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. then you may be able to get away with not exhausting the room.
I'd recommend including a detailed document showing measured IAQ benefits of using solid ink technology.

2
2
0
Ludmilla Pavlova-Gillham Senior Facilities Planner, University of Massachusetts Amherst Apr 03 2012 LEEDuser Member 163 Thumbs Up

Elizabeth, I am glad you posted this on this forum, as we are in the process of remodeling an existing building and it didn't make sense to vent a closet space just to try to address the VOC emissions from an office copier. So your recommendation of the Xerox ColorQube 9300 series made me look it up and I think we will have elliminated approximately $10K from the fit-out budget by choosing a copier that doesn't introduce hazardous materials into the work environment. Please let us know if your efforts to meet this portion of the credits are successful!

Post a Reply
0
0
GreenShape Expert Employee Consulting Firm
Dec 21 2011
LEEDuser Member
906 Thumbs Up

MERV 13 in residences

Has anyone submitted a residential project that has pursued the intent of the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filters in an alternate compliance path? As far as I'm aware, there are no LEED Interpretations that deal with the difficulty residences have in meeting the MERV requirements.

1
4
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 04 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Green Builder, first question is whether you should be doing LEED for Homes since it's residential. But assuming you made the right call there, the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 requirement has always been a bugaboo for multifamily and hotels, as we note in our guidance above under the Bird's Eye View. I am not aware that this has been resolved.

2
4
0
Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Jan 04 2012 LEEDuser Expert 6650 Thumbs Up

I agree Tristan- I have never seen anyone successfully implement an alternative compliance path to using MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filters, except potentially in the case of electrostatic filters which seem to be potentially acceptable, but I have not seen a fast and hard example of those being accepted yet either. Reviewers have, in the past, simply said that this credit is unavailable if you can't meet the MERV 13 requirement.

3
4
0
Wing Ho Associate, Arup Jan 30 2012 Guest 147 Thumbs Up

I'm facing the same difficulties for LEED Homes which the duplex is using VRV system. We can't find any VRV product can install MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 and provide sufficent static pressure...

Any suggestion is welcome.

4
4
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Feb 01 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

Medium or High Static Ducted Fan Coil units (Mitsubishi, Daikin, LG, etc) have 0.6-1.0" of static on some of the larger models. To allow for the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 you could potentially build an oversized plenum box behind the unit that is big enough to reduce the FPM across the filter. Then you may have enough static.
You don't have to get every credit. That's why LEED give you many credits to choose from.

Post a Reply
0
0
Dario Ibarguengoitia Ambiente Regenerativo Integral
Dec 15 2011
LEEDuser Member
580 Thumbs Up

entryway systems for hospitals

Does anybody know wich option (roll out mats or permanent entryway systems ) is more efficient/clean for an hospital?
I asume entryway systems but if anyone had been in this situation I would apreciate if you share your experiences.
Thank you vert much

1
1
0
Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Dec 16 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17213 Thumbs Up

Dario,

We do have conversations regarding this earlier and in the v2.2 forum. The entryway systems are best if used with a floor drain. I think roll out mats are a viable option if they can be combined with the same Schools requirement for self-maintained mats.

Post a Reply
0
0
Keith Amann Senior Sustainability Manager YR&G
Dec 07 2011
LEEDuser Member
829 Thumbs Up

Electrostatic Filtration

A project is considering using electrostatic filters in lieu of media-based filters (typically measured in MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value.). Due to the nature of this technology, these electrostatic filters are measured using Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR), which is recognized by the FTC and EPA as a fair and objective measure of air cleaner technologies. Has anyone successfully used CADR as a way to measure effectiveness of an air filtration system as an alternative approach to meet the intent of this credit? If so, what CADR rating would demonstrate equivalent filtration effectiveness to MERV-13?

1
1
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Dec 09 2011 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

We used a combination electrostatic and media filter called Strion. That product is rated for MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 15.
http://www.strion.com/productdetails.asp

Post a Reply
0
0
Renee Shirey
Nov 28 2011
LEEDuser Member
3269 Thumbs Up

Definition of hard-lid ceiling?

I have a situation where I cannot eliminate a sloped acoustic ceiling with a gyp ceiling, and the walls do not go up to the deck (they go to the underside of trusses). To enclose the room, I would like to sheath the underside of the trusses with plywood, taping and sealing all the joints to create the hard-lid ceiling. This would be hidden by the acoustic ceiling below. Does anyone have any idea if this approach would be acceptable, and would it satisfy the definition of a hard-lid ceiling in lieu of using actual gyp? I feel like we are meeting the intent, without sacrificing the acoustics and the asthetics of the room.

1
1
0
Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Nov 28 2011 LEEDuser Expert 6650 Thumbs Up

I think that as long as you can show that you have at least matched if not exceeded the ability of a gyp. board hard lid ceiling to prevent air movement between spaces you should be successful with the credit.

Post a Reply
0
0
Shelley Duan Jr. Sustainability consultant CDML Consulting Ltd.
Nov 24 2011
Guest
14 Thumbs Up

Advice on acceptable approach to credit achievement for IEQc5

Is a covered exterior grate system (e.g, outside a vestibule) at all high volume entryways an acceptable approach to credit achievement for IEQc5? Any advice or guidance would be most appreciated.

Note that our project is pursuing LEED v1.0 NC certification through the CaGBC.

1
1
0
BH . Nov 25 2011 Guest 1061 Thumbs Up

Hi Shelley,

In my opinion unfortunately not. User guide has on page 513 description of entryway systems says that:
"entryway system must extend 10 feet from the building entrance into the building interior..."

Of course you can go threw special circumstances path bacuse it might depend i.e. on project location or design of entrance overhang.

Post a Reply
0
0
Doyoon Kim
Nov 17 2011
Guest
14 Thumbs Up

Building's occupants using a neighboring car park

We have a project were we are not building any new car parks,
The project building has its origins from late 19th century, so it doesn’t even have the potential, space or local government approval to build a car park.

So we are using a parking deck (indoor) in the neighboring building (already existing building) to provide for the tenants in our building.

My question is that, in IEQ cr. 5 there are several goals that need to be met. Everything from 10 feet long entry system to sufficient exhaust systems (in areas from printer rooms to parking decks)

Do we need to have the airflow and pressure differential in the parking deck, in this neighboring building, as described in LEED? (which is also outside of the LEED PROJECT BOUNDARY)

The neighboring building does by a chance, have the same owner as the project building, BUT we have NOT made any adjustments in the neighboring building whatsoever.

Post a Reply
0
0
EunChung Kim Founder SPMA
Nov 08 2011
Guest
55 Thumbs Up

MERV 13 Filters on both Return and Outside Air (Re-Amended?)

So it seems that as of July 2010, MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filters were only required on the outside supply air. However, according to October 2011 update, it seems that the MERV 13 Filter requirement has been revised to once again include return supply air:

"Filtration should be applied to process both return and outside air that is delivered as supply air."

Anybody else have any experience with this?

Thanks

1
1
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Nov 08 2011 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

EunChung,
It seems as though you are correct. Here is a link to the "LEED Addenda" website.
http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=2200#BD+C
Because this is new legislation I can only give you my interpretation:
The intention of the correction is to clarify where the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filters should be located inside an AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. that supplies OSA and recirculate air. The filter should not be at the OSA damper, but instead downstream of the mixing of the return air and the OSA to filter both the OSA and recirculated air.
However, an indoor fan coiling unit or heat pumpA type of heating and/or cooling equipment that draws heat into a building from outside and, during the cooling season, ejects heat from the building to the outside. Heat pumps are vapor-compression refrigeration systems whose indoor/outdoor coils are used reversibly as condensers or evaporators, depending on the need for heating or cooling. In the 2003 CBECS, specific information was collected on whether the heat pump system was a packaged unit, residential-type split system, or individual room heat pump, and whether the heat pump was air source, ground source, or water source. that is recirculating air to condition a space would not require MERV 13 if it is not pulling air directly from outside. Even if there is a DOAS providing OSA air into a mixing boxing in the back of the FCU/heat pump, it should still not require a MERV 13 filter (only MERV 8 for ASHRAE). The MERV 13 filter would be in the DOAS.

Post a Reply
0
0
Edward Clark Sustainable Designer ZGF Architects
Oct 14 2011
LEEDuser Member
593 Thumbs Up

Future retail - walk off mat requirements

I am working on a multi-family residential project that includes some shell & core future retail space on the ground floor. The client does not want to provide permanent entry systems, because the entry configuration may change depending on the tenant. If we are meeting all other requirements, can we pursue this credit? Is it sufficient for the client to require future tenants provide a walk off mat in lease agreements? If so, how do we document?
Does it make a difference that these spaces are small compared to the overall size of the project?

1
1
0
Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Nov 03 2011 LEEDuser Expert 6650 Thumbs Up

Walk Off Mats along with a contract for regular cleaning have historically been acceptable for this credit. So, I think that you should have a very strong case for compliance as long as the lease language requires 10 feet of mat at each entry as well as regular cleaning. You won't know for sure until you submit the credit this way or pay for a LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org., but based on past interpretations, you should have a high chance of acceptance. I do not believe that the size of these spaces will help or hurt you in any way, since the credit requires systems at all entries.

Post a Reply
0
0
BH .
Aug 30 2011
Guest
1061 Thumbs Up

Garage and technical rooms

Hello,

We are dealing with project with underground garage, where adjacent spaces are technical rooms. Can we transfer the air from the garage to the technical rooms to ventilate them? Do we need to keep positive pressure in these rooms if they are not occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space.?

Thanks for help

1
1
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Sep 22 2011 LEEDuser Expert 7702 Thumbs Up

If the technical rooms are occupied regularly or even occasionally, I wouldn't recommend transferring air from an underground garage as a means of ventilation. Air from an underground garage (unless open on 2 sides/what code requires locally for the garage to be considered naturally ventilated) isn't fresh air.

I don't know if this question applies to IEQc5?

Post a Reply
0
0
Caroline Hedin Architect studio point253
Aug 18 2011
LEEDuser Member
1223 Thumbs Up

Roll-out Mats

As I'm writing an e-mail to a client regarding the requirements for roll-out mats to meet LEED requirements, I'm questioning the following - if we have walk-off carpet installed over the entire Lobby floor do we really need to add a roll-out mat to boot over this space?

Opinions?

1
1
0
Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Aug 18 2011 LEEDuser Expert 6650 Thumbs Up

Caroline- the requirements for this credit as written are a little vague about the acceptability of walk-off carpet. However, we have had many projects where we have used it without additional roll-out mats and received the credit with no problems.

Post a Reply

Start a new LEED comment thread

Jun 03 2015
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2015 – BuildingGreen, Inc.