NC-2009 IEQc8.2: Daylight and Views—Views

  • IEQc8.2 diagram
  • Easy credit for most buildings

    Buildings that provide views to the outdoors have proven to enhance productivity, testing performance, and overall occupant comfort and well-being. This credit is easy to achieve if you also plan to design for open space planning, placing occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. near exterior windows with large glazing areas. and design  spaces to use furniture that does not block views from a seated position, such as low or transparent partitions between workstations.  If there is a standard design for every floor or standard spaces that are repeated throughout the design, this credit calculation may be relatively easier as calculations can be duplicated for each floor. Designing for compliance with this credit will likely be complementary with IEQc8.1: Daylight and Views—Daylight. Expect some tradeoffs associated with increasing window area, such as heat loss and gain through larger windows, increased glare, and privacy issues with open space planning and low furniture partitions.

    Documentation can be time-consuming

    The documentation for this credit does not involve complicated formulas. You are simply figuring out the floor area that has access to views and comparing it with the floor areas that do not have access to views.   However, the larger the project the more time-consuming the documentation will be, especially if spaces are varied.

    FAQs for IEQc8.2

    For Exemplary Performance, what is a View Factor?

    View Factor has been determined per the Heschone Mahone Group Study "Windows and Offices: A Study of Office Worker Performance and the Indoor Environment," page 47 (see Resources). A component to achieving Exemplary Performance for IEQc8.2 is having 90% of project's regularly occupied spaces achieve a View Factor of 3+. View Factors are assigned 1–5 and are based on Primary View and Break View. See the study for further detail, including a visual depiction of View Factors 1–5.

    Does furniture need to be included in floor plan when completing views calculations?

    No. According to a 5/9/2011 addendum, movable furniture and movable partitions are not included in the scope of this credit calculation. Movable furniture and partitions are those that can be moved to provide access to the view by the user without the need for tools or assistance from special trades and facilities management.

    If views are accessible from a seated position, yet above 42”, can these contribute to the views calculations?

    Yes. LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 10254, made on 10/1/2012, allows sloped view lines starting at 42 inches in IEQc8.2 and specifically states that the view line is not required to be horizontal: "To determine direct lines of sight in section, provide one or more representative sight lines from a point at eye height (42 inches) in the regularly occupied space to perimeter vision glazing between 30 inches and 90 inches above the finished floor of the building. The direct line of sight may be slope from 42 inches at the seated area to any unobstructed area of the vision glazing. The direct line of sight is not required to be horizontal at 42 inches only."

    Why does the LEED Reference Guide call for vision glazing between 30 and 90 inches, but I have to show compliance at 42 inches?

    The standard eye height for an adult while seated is 42". Depending on the use of the space, the eye height may be at 5’9” or lower. The idea is that the occupant should not have to move their head significantly to view outside. Also, with having access to view at this height, the peripheral vision is not affected. Occupants still receive glimpses of the outside.

    What is considered a regularly occupied space?

    The latest definition for a regularly occupied space (per a 2011 addendum) is “an area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building."

    What can I do if my prescriptive method calculation results in a value less than 0.150?

    Recalculate zone floor area (ZFA) = (WA xVLT)/0.150. So if, for example, you have a window area of 120 ft2 and a VLT of 0.4, ZFA = (WA xVLT)/0.150 = (120 x 0.4)/0.150 = 320. There is one caveat and that is that your ZFA must be equal to or greater than your zone width. Otherwise you must enter 0 for this ZFA.

    What can I do if my prescriptive method calculation results in a value greater than 0.180?

    None of this area qualifies. You should take is as a cue that your area is likely to have glare issues, and consider either lowering your glazing visual light transmittance, or reducing your window size.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Analyze building orientation and site selection for opportunities to provide access to views to the outside.


  • Too much glazing, particularly east- and west-facing glazing exposed to low-angle morning and afternoon sun, may cause glare and overheating. Use overhangs, energy-efficient glazing, and daylighting designs that control glare, such as interior shades or lightshelves.


  • High performance glazing and increased glazing area may add additional costs unless they can be offset by integrated design solutions like right sizing of mechanical equipment, or in some cases the elimination of perimeter heating.


  • When selecting windows for maximizing views, consider also using operable windows for natural ventilation. This can contribute to credits IEQp1: Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance and IEQc2: Increased Ventilation.


  • While LEED does not dictate the quality of the view outside the window, considering this can help a project achieve exemplary performance. Also, occupants will likely prefer view of interesting objects, views with movement (though not too busy), and views of nature. In other words, a view of a brick wall may meet the letter of the LEED requirement, but not the spirit.

Schematic Design

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  • Determine which spaces in a project are “regularly occupied” (per LEED definition) and need to be included in the views calculations.


  • Some spaces can be exempt from being considered “regularly occupied” due to the nature of their use. Previously published CIR’s offer some guidance. Provide a narrative explanation of why a given space should be exempt based on use of the space as views and daylight may negatively affect the use of the space, not the frequency or time that the space is actually used. For example, museum gallery spaces, high security and privacy areas, dark rooms for photo development, and others can all be exempt from the calculation.


  • The calculation of regularly occupied space can be fine-tuned as decisions for “fixed” (attached to a wall) counters with overhead cabinets and equipment are integrated into the design. The square footage where the cabinets and equipment are located is not considered occupiable space, and therefore is not included as part of the view or the daylight calculation. For example, if an office is 500 ft2 in total, but fixed counters and cabinets occupy 100 ft2, the regularly occupied space of the room is only 400 ft2.


  • Ensure that the spaces identified as “regularly occupied” are consistent across credits, especially for IEQc8.1: Daylighting and Views—Daylighting.


  • Enter the names of the regularly occupied spaces in the LEED credit form along with the total floor area for each regularly occupied space.


  • Hold an integrated design meeting with the architect, interior designers, mechanical engineer, lighting designer, contractor, cost estimator and the end user to explore and resolve possible benefits and tradeoffs that increased glazing and access to views strategies could have on daylight, glare, heat gain and loss, furniture design and layout, and other design decisions.


  • Place regularly occupied spaces such as offices, classrooms and conference rooms near exterior glazing and perimeter windows to increase opportunity for access to views and daylight.


  • When considering office space layout and workstations, consider partitions and moveable furniture that are equal to or less than 42 inches high on all sides or incorporate transparent surfaces in upper sections to allow access to views while seated.


  • Window-to-wall ratios may be fixed if your project is pursuing a prescriptive compliance path for EAp2: Minimum Energy Performance and EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance. These fixed ratios will impact access to views and glazing areas. Check the ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guide and the Advanced Buildings Core Performance Guide for required window-to-wall ratios. If a building envelope window-to-wall ratio is over 40% there will be a penalty in the energy model for EAc1. The same is true if skylight-to-roof ratio is more than 5%. These requirements are based on ASHRAE 90.1.

Design Development

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  • Explore a combination of strategies that increase views such as low-partition furniture, space-planning techniques, and interior glazing.


  • Identify available products and furniture that combine glazing and building elements for optimum access to views while maintaining privacy—for example, workstations with low partition heights and interior perimeter glazing.


  • By increasing glazing and designing for natural light, projects can reduce the number of ambient light fixtures or the frequency with which they are used, reducing the cost of electric lighting both upfront and for ongoing operations.


  • Ensure that glare controls are factored into the design of daylighting and views.

Construction Documents

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  • Plan View Direct Line of Sight to Perimeter Glazing Calculations:


  • Calculate the floor area with direct-line-of-sight to perimeter vision glazing for each regularly occupied space. Moveable partitions must be included in your calculations.


  • Direct-line-of-sight is determined by visibility between the vision glazing (between 2’6” and 7’6” inches above the floor) without obstructions such as full-height partitions or solid doorways. 


  • Direct-line-of-sight can pass through two interior glazing surfaces before reaching exterior glazing, but not through solid doors, walls, or partitions taller than 42”. 


  • Create a floor plan showing areas with access to views as distinct from areas with no access to views.


  • Include more than one sight line if necessary to meet the requirement for all spaces.


  • Private offices where more than 75% of the floor area has a direct-line-of-sight to views can include the entire square footage in the calculations.


  • Total the square footage with access to views and enter it in the LEED credit form.


  • Section View Direct Line of Sight Height Confirmation:


  • Create a representative building section for each type of area included in the calculation.


  • For each section, draw a line originating from 42” above the floor (typical eye height) to the perimeter glazing demonstrating access to vision glazing and views to the outside.


  • Show typical furniture heights in the sections if applicable.


  • Total the areas of regularly occupied spaces that have both direct-line-of-sight to perimeter glazing and access to views while seated (at 42”). Divide this value by the total area of regularly occupied spaces to confirm if the design provides greater than 90% of occupied areas with access to views. This is done in the LEED credit form. Upload plans to LEED Online.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    IEQ Credit 8.2: Daylight and views - views

    1 Point

    Intent

    To provide building occupants a connection to the outdoors through the introduction of daylight and views into the regularly occupied areas of the building.

    Requirements

    Achieve a direct line of sight to the outdoor environment via vision glazing between 30 inches and 90 inches (between 0.8 meters and 2.3 meters) above the finish floor for building occupants in 90% of all regularly occupied areas. Determine the area with a direct line of sight by totaling the regularly occupied floor area that meets the following criteria:

    • In plan view, the area is within sight lines drawn from perimeter vision glazing.
    • In section view, a direct sight line can be drawn from the area to perimeter vision glazing.

    The line of sight may be drawn through interior glazing. For private offices, the entire floor area of the office may be counted if 75% or more of the area has a direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazingThe approach used to determine the calculated area of regularly occupied areas with direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing. The area determination includes full height partitions and other fixed construction prior to installation of furniture.. For multi-occupant spacesMulti-occupant spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces., the actual floor area with a direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing is counted.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Design the space to maximize daylighting and view opportunities. Strategies to consider include lower partitions, interior shading devices, interior glazing and automatic photocell-based controls.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Publications

The Biophilia Hypothesis (Stephen R. Kellert, ed.)

This collection of papers on elements of biophilia includes consideration of daylighting's effects on people.


Windows and Offices: A Study of Office Worker Performance and the Indoor Environment

The Heschone Mahone Group Study "Windows and Offices: A Study of Office Worker Performance and the Indoor Environment" defines “View Factor” criteria related to Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. compliance.

Articles

New York City Audubon

This Audubon chapter takes a leadership role in reducing bird collisions with buildings.  The chapter publishes Bird-Safe Building Guidelines, conducts monitoring, and, through its Project Safe Flight, promotes bird-friendly design.

Organizations

Fatal Light Awareness Program

Initiated the Bird-Friendly Building Development Program for the City of Toronto, FLAP monitors and promotes bird-friendly design.

Web Tools

Sight Line Simulator

Technologists at LMN architects have created a tool to calculate sightlines and views in a performing arts theater.

Views Documentation

These samples of views documentation demonstrate how to sucessfully document access to views via plan drawing, section drawing, and spreadsheet. Depending on the rating system and version, not all of these may be required. Samples generously provided by LEEDuser guest expert Allison Beer McKenzie.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 IEQ

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

450 Comments

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Nate Steeber Project Manager, Sustainability Sol design + consulting
May 23 2017
Guest
319 Thumbs Up

Possible Exclusion??

Project Location: United States

My team has a unique project (I suppose most are) - part of it is a cheese processing facility. There are parts on the spaces (like curing spaces) that can be removed because they just hold the cheese. But there are other areas that are occupied more frequently. However, windows are not included in the design because of the adverse affects it can have on the process. I would like to exclude those areas from the calculation, but I don't know if I can.

Has anyone had experience with excluding spaces in their calculation due to the nature of the space? If so, would the same exclusion apply to LEEDv4 as well?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group May 24 2017 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

A space can be excluded from the calculations if daylight is detrimental to the activity within. It is very common for labs to be excluded because sunlight is detrimental to the work. Write a narrative when you submit as to why certain areas within the project are being excluded from the calculations.

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James Bell Senior Associate Bohlin Cywinski Jackson
Apr 04 2017
Guest
7 Thumbs Up

View Factor 3

Project Location: United States

I have seen several references to View Factor 3 and cannot find any definition.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Apr 05 2017 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

Read Heschong and Mahone Group study: Windows and Offices;A Study of Office Worker Performance and the Indoor Environment. Reference and definitions of view factor start after page 40.

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Leslee Randolph Designer MWA Architects
Jan 12 2017
LEEDuser Member
10 Thumbs Up

NC Credit IEQ 8.2-Views Maintenance Shop

Project Location: United States

I am working in V2009 (post 2014). For IEQ credit 8.2-Views, I determined that LEED will indeed count a maintenance shop as a regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use.; however, we are running into some design issues regarding this credit. I will alter the 42" high standard for views because this is a workshop not an office, and people will be standing not sitting while working. From what I read, that is allowed as long as I illustrate that modification. We have intentionally kept windows to a minimum for safety reasons. We do have a couple of windows, but I was wondering if I write a narrative explaining why we kept the windows to a minimum, would LEED allow us to use the coiling door as a part of the glazing toward this credit? Due to climate, the occupants keep the coiling door open all year round while the shop is operational allowing views to the outside. Does anyone have any experience with this approach? Is this even worth pursuing by writing a narrative and showing an interior perspective with the door open? Any help is appreciated. Thank you.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Jan 13 2017 LEEDuser Member 11072 Thumbs Up

This sounds well grounded. I would give it the nod.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jan 13 2017 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

Doors must be in the closed position while calculating views. Your argument would be the same as saying the coiling doors on the docks are always open in the summer time, etc. etc. You must use the worst case scenario, and that is the door closed. If it has glazing in one of the panels then you can use that area towards your views.

It is acceptable now to not have to meet the 42" threshold and it is very common in spaces where the worker stands or sits at a high counter to alter the view line to the 60" mark, so you will have no issue there.

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Leslee Randolph Designer, MWA Architects Jan 13 2017 LEEDuser Member 10 Thumbs Up

Thank you for the input Jean and Todd. Much appreciated. This gives me a good idea of what we need to do.

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Alex Barrera Assoc. AIA, LEED GA Giuliani Associates Archtiects
Jun 15 2016
Guest
31 Thumbs Up

Regularily Occupied or not?

Project Location: United States

I'm working on an industrial building in Virginia. One of the rooms is a Quiet/Sleep room, where employees can rest in between their shifts. Is this room considered to be a regularly occupied room?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jun 17 2016 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

A review of the regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use. matrix indicates that any type of bedroom, bunk room, or sleeping quarters is considered regularly occupied. However, one can always submit a narrative for the exclusion of any space from being considered.

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Peter Sushch
Jun 07 2016
LEEDuser Member
51 Thumbs Up

Perimeter Glazing

Hi,
We're working on an MOB which has ribbon window glazing at the whole perimeter for every level with the exception of level 1. Would it be ok to provide the section view with 42" view for only one room for all the upper levels since the sill height is typical all around?

Thanks!

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jun 08 2016 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

That would be acceptable, but I would also provide a narrative to ensure that the reviewer knows this.

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GISELA FARHAT DE ARAUJO
May 16 2016
Guest
122 Thumbs Up

ieqc8.1 x ieqc 8.2

Hi
To achieve this credit we must have won the ieqc8.1 credit? or credits are independent?

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David Browne Architect, CRA Associates, Inc. May 16 2016 LEEDuser Member 217 Thumbs Up

Yes, they are completely independent. They are documented on the same spreadsheet, but you don't have to attempt IEQc8.1 to go after IEQc8.2.

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GISELA FARHAT DE ARAUJO May 16 2016 Guest 122 Thumbs Up

Thank you David.

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GISELA FARHAT DE ARAUJO
May 16 2016
Guest
122 Thumbs Up

ieqc8.1 x ieqc 8.2

Project Location: Brazil

to achieve this credit we must have won the ieqc8.1 credit? or credits are independent?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 18 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Gisela, the credits are independent.

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Qiongwen Kong Architect COOPER CARRY
May 12 2016
LEEDuser Member
62 Thumbs Up

Views for Ballroom (Conference Center)

Project Location: United States

We have a project that consists of a 17-story and a large conference center on lower levers. The floor plans on level 3 and 4 have large ballrooms in the center, small conference rooms on the exterior. The ballrooms are designed according to hotel brand (requires no windows). As the main usage of the ballrooms are for conferencing agendas when necessary for presentations requiring high quality image projection, we feel like we can take an exception for these rooms.

However, we received review comments from GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)., the reviewer mentioned the ballrooms are not dedicated to activities that would be hindered by views (such as an auditorium or theater, for example). Note that only support areas (such as copy rooms, storage, mechanical rooms, laundry, and restrooms) may be excluded from the regularly occupied square footage.

Anyone can share any experience?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group May 12 2016 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

Even if you go back through previous versions of the regular occupied space matrix, space like dance halls, and presentation halls, all were considered regularly occupied for EQc8.2. An as noted in October 2015 space matrix, only spaces that are solely dedicated to video conferencing may be excluded. So unless your plans label the space as video conferencing, it will need to be included.

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VICTOR MORENO TECHNICAL DIRECTOR ISOLANA AHORRO ENERGÉTICO SL
Apr 27 2016
Guest
506 Thumbs Up

Standing human activity

Project Location: Spain

Hello,

I am working in a Museum project. The human activity is standing (walking in the museum).
So, the direct line of sight to the outdoor environment via vision glazing could be 60´´, instead of 42´´?

Thanks

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Apr 27 2016 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

Yes, if the occupants of the space are typically standing, then a view line at standing height can be used. The 42" requirement has been relaxed over the past year or so.

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Miriam Ramirez Baumgarten M.Sc. LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, WELL AP, EDGE Auditor Baumarch
Mar 10 2016
Guest
119 Thumbs Up

Shopping mall

Hi, we have a project where the first 4 floors are retail (shopping center, including bowling and movie theatres).

Because of the design of the shopping mall, most retail spaces do not have views to the outside, only to an interior circulation space that is closed with a dome. Has anyone been able to document the credit with spaces with views to an interior, completely daylit common space such as this dome area?

Also, the regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. matrix provided in the USGBC website does not mention bowling areas, would it be possible to exclude this area from calculations with a narrative?

Thanks!

Miriam

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Mar 11 2016 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

The only possible way would be if the commercial spaces were looking into an atrium with vegetation and other natural elements.

The exclusion of the bowling alley just brought on some very interesting discussion in the office. The overall consensus was there is not anything in regards to bowling that would make having views a detriment to the activity or a safety issue. We have to come to expect bowling alleys to be cave like buildings, but what would hurt by having views. We daylight gyms and they are only excluded from views because of safety issues with glass, so what is the difference between a gym and a bowling alley. Can you really argue the glare issue in the bowling alley with the oiled lanes? I say the oiled lanes are just as reflective as wood gym floor surfaces. I say you cannot exclude from the views calcs.

If you are going to attempt a narrative to exclude them, you will need to show how having views is a detriment to the activity and there is a safety issue for having glass. I highly doubt the glass would be right next to lane or even located in a position where a bowling ball could impact them. I also don't see how having views is a detriment to the activity of bowling. Unless the PBA(Professional Bowlers Assoc.) has guidelines for how bowling alleys are to be constructed to have professional events and these guidelines exclude views, and this facility will be used for professional events, I don't see it. But this is just our opinion.

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Miriam Ramirez Baumgarten M.Sc. LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, WELL AP, EDGE Auditor, Baumarch Mar 11 2016 Guest 119 Thumbs Up

Thanks Todd! We will try doing some more research with the PBA to see if we can justify it with a narrative

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Emma Leonard
Feb 10 2016
Guest
6 Thumbs Up

Dormitory Project- Single Bedrooms like Private Offices

I am working on a dormitory project with mainly single bedrooms. Can I count these rooms like private offices and not have to calculate the actual area in each space? I was planning on finding the actual areas for common rooms and the like, but each bedroom in a dorm with a sprawling footprint is an arduous task.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Feb 16 2016 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

No, only individual offices can use the 75% rule. You will need to determine the compliant area of each room.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Feb 16 2016 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

Also, if it multiple floors and they are same, you only need to document one floor in regards to view lines. For the calculator, you could do just the floor, and not list the individual spaces, but you could get called on this if there is any doubt in what the reviewer is looking at. Then you would have to list the individual spaces anyway. I would suggest at least do one floor listing all spaces, then the other floors can be the gross. Provide a narrative explaining your method.

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting
Nov 17 2015
LEEDuser Member
1195 Thumbs Up

Tint to Reduce Glare

Project Location: United States

We have a project that, after occupancy has taken place, would like to install a tinted film on some of the southern facing windows to reduce glare in work spaces. I am hoping someone can confirm for me that although frosted glazing is not acceptable, tint is acceptable as long as there are still views to the exterior? Is there a specific range of tint that is acceptable in this case? I cannot locate any language on this in the reference guide.

Thanks!

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Nov 17 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

Tint is not an acceptable form of glare control for LEED. So if this is your only form of glare control, then you will not be able to EQc8.1. But for EQc8.2, there is not a required range in the VLT of the opening. So, in regards to this credit, applying a film will not impede in earning the credit.

From a daylighting perspective, glare may not be the issue. You could have a contrast issue which some perceive to be glare. That can be resolved sometime by simply changing interior colors or orientation in the space.

If contrast is not the problem then I would confirm that there really is a glare issue or is the space over daylit. Spaces can be over daylit which is worst than under daylit. Why, because in overdaylit spaces people block up the windows which never results in the right illuminance and then the lights come on. Which defeats the whole purpose of daylight.

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Ashley Love LEED AP BD+C
Oct 08 2015
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

Regularly occupied area included in 8.1 but excluded in 8.2

I am working on credits 8.1 and 8.2 for a school (LEED 2009 Schools). Per the IEQ matrix, our gymnasium is considered a regularly occupied area and should be counted toward 8.1 but can be excluded from 8.2. My question is this - is there anyway to differentiate this on the Daylight and Views Spreadsheet? When I list the gym it is counting the floor area for both credits and is certainly hurting my views percentage. Should I submit 2 spreadsheets, one for daylight, one for views? And if so, how does that work with filling out the online forms because the regularly occupied area (which would be different for 8.1 and 8.2 in my case) is linked on both forms? Any ideas on how to document this?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Oct 08 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

You can do it multiple ways but the one thing you need to do, which ever way you choose is provide a narrative explaining your method.

I just leave it in the spreadsheet and then provide a document with revised calculations showing the exclusion of the gym in EQc8.2. You can do just the opposite by not putting it in then providing a separate calc for EQc8.1.

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David Browne Architect CRA Associates, Inc.
Aug 14 2015
LEEDuser Member
217 Thumbs Up

Extent of Documentation

Project Location: United States

I know from having attempted this credit on other projects that the documentation can be tedious, but I have a current project where it seems ridiculous. I have an open-plan space which in a one story building with windows on all four walls. There will be minimal furnishings, and they will be movable. From every spot in the space there is a direct line-of-site in at least two directions, and as many as four. When I draw the lines of site from every window, the plan becomes a spider's web of crossing lines. Might it fly to just submit the plan with a big note that says "Look: windows on every wall"?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Aug 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

I would not suggest going about it that way. I would provide a plan a draw view lines from at least 2 windows on each façade. Then I would upload elevations to help demonstrate the vastness of glazing. I would also submit a narrative stating exactly what you have said in your post. "Due to the amount of windows per façade, the plan becomes unreadable due to the amount of view lines. To help demonstrate compliance we have submitted some view lines and elevations..........

If the project is complete or somewhat complete, actual photographs also help a lot.

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David Browne Architect, CRA Associates, Inc. Aug 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 217 Thumbs Up

I appreciate the input, Todd. The building is complete, and I do intend to provide photographs because I'm also trying for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. on this one. The documentation for that was actually easier because fewer windows were involved.

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David Browne Architect CRA Associates, Inc.
Jul 08 2015
LEEDuser Member
217 Thumbs Up

Compliant area

Project Location: United States

Perhaps this a dumb question, but would someone please clarify this for me? I am currently attempting this credit on two projects. In filling out the credit form, I have been using the floor area that actually has direct line-of-sight as the compliant area for most spaces. (I know that I can use the entire area for private offices if more than 75% has a view.) I downloaded the spreadsheet from the LEEDuser toolkit and noticed that it shows as compliant the entire area of a space when the area with direct line-of-sight is somewhat less: for instance, a classroom of 807 sq. ft. has an area with direct line-of-sight of 802 sq. ft. and it shows the former number -807- as the compliant area. What's the rule here? it would certainly boost my percentage to do it that way.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jul 09 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

I would use the Supplemental Daylight and Views Calculator which can be downloaded from the credit library on the USGBC website. This is technically what should be submitted with since it indicates on the form to upload the calculator. I personally have not used the one that can be downloaded here.

Only private offices can use 100% of the of the square footage as being compliant if at least 75% of the square footage has access to views.

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David Browne Architect, CRA Associates, Inc. Jul 09 2015 LEEDuser Member 217 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Todd. That's the way I had read the credit language, and I have been using the USGBC calculator. The Toolkit example just made me think I might have missed something. The example spreadsheet probably needs to be corrected or taken down.

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting
Jun 26 2015
LEEDuser Member
1195 Thumbs Up

Exterior Shading Devices

Project Location: United States

Hello LEED Users,

I am working on a project with a majority of the exterior being composed of aluminum curtain wall. The project will be installing exterior shading devices on most of the curtain wall as well. The reference guide recommends this as a way to ward off birds as well as the other obvious benefit of blocking unwanted sunlight and heat gain. The shades are vertical aluminum panels similar to very large louvers. Is this an acceptable practice while still allowing views to the exterior? In my opinion yes but am curious of others experience.Thanks!

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jun 26 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

You can have exterior shading and still have views. What you will need to do when documenting the credit is to have your view lines start at the outer edge of the vertical shading.

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting Jul 08 2015 LEEDuser Member 1195 Thumbs Up

Great, thank you!

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Anne Harney Principal and Founder Long Green Specs
Jun 17 2015
LEEDuser Member
650 Thumbs Up

Photography Studio

We're working through an arts building on a college campus and the project includes a dark room and film developing space. These space should be identified as regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. because of the students working in them, but the rooms have no windows for obvious functional reasons - windows would preclude these spaces from functioning due to the nature of the work being done in them. Does anyone have any information that would allow me to include them as regularly occupied spaces but not have them count against us for access to views?

Thanks!

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jun 17 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

The only credits that have to be considered regularly occupied are for the EAs and EQs in regards to required ventilation. Otherwise, these spaces should not be considered regularly occupied. They can be excluded based on that daylight is a detriment to the activity, which we all know film processing needs darkness. So in table PIF3-1, when completing the table, these spaces are square footage goes towards the gross, but not towards regularly occupied. If you include their square footage in the table, which is linked to EQc8.1 and 8.2, you will need provide a narrative explanation for the reasons for the exclusion and why the numbers do not match. Its just best to not include them in the table as regularly occupied.

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Erin Holdenried Sustainable Design Manager AECOM
May 11 2015
LEEDuser Member
445 Thumbs Up

Exemplary Performance - Unobstructed View

Project Location: United States

I am having a hard time understanding the criteria for "unobstructed view". Does it have to do with interior space layout and the depth of the space in relation to the exterior window?

Thanks

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting
Apr 29 2015
LEEDuser Member
1195 Thumbs Up

Frit on Glazing for LEED-2009

Project Location: United States

Hello, I posted this question on an older thread but will start a new discussion here. I am confused about frit not being allowed on a project for Views - The LEED Reference guide recommends introducing etching or fritting patterns to ward off birds from flying into a larger areas of glazing but does not state that it is not allowed in order to earn this credit? Where is that information coming from so that I can reference it? We have a project in the middle east with a frit on one façade.

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting Apr 29 2015 LEEDuser Member 1195 Thumbs Up

Just as a follow-up, I am pretty sure LEED v2009 only calls out Frosted Glass as not being allowed.. hopefully someone can confirm either way with a resource.

Thanks!

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Apr 29 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

See my post in the older thread. But I will expand in regards to reference. The intent and requirement is to provide a clear view to the outside for the occupants. Anything other than clear glass between the occupant and the outside does not allow for a clear view. The use of fritted and frosted glass goes against the intent and does not provide a clear view. You can have it on the façade, it just cannot be within the cone of visions.

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LEED Pro Consultant Bioconstruccion & Energia Alternativa
Feb 27 2015
LEEDuser Member
2755 Thumbs Up

3 glazed panels - LEEDv2009

Hello,
We have a layout configuration in which working spaces (offices) have glazed panels, allowing views to the exterior through other spaces that include also glazed panels. I would like to know what would be the maximum glazed panels that could be counted towards views to the exterior.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Feb 27 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

No more than two interior glazing panels. Page 568 of the LEED Reference Guide.

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LEED Pro Consultant Bioconstruccion & Energia Alternativa
Feb 24 2015
LEEDuser Member
2755 Thumbs Up

Lactation room

Hello,
I would like to know if a lactation room in an office building would be excluded in the calculation, due to privacy issues for this type of space.
Thank you.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

This topic has come up before, in fact awhile ago. I believe the final agreement was that it should. Since there is no office of this type listed in the regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use. matrix there is no definitive answer. However, since exam rooms are considered regularly occupied and must be included, so would a space with this type of activity. You would think privacy for an exam room, especially even more privacy then a nursing room.

Here is the other thing, I would say that privacy would be more of an issue from the interior. You would want mothers to have views to the exterior while they nurse.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 1924 Thumbs Up

We have successfully excluded the lactation room on a number of recent projects. All of the nursing moms (current or in the past) that we surveyed did not want a window with a view in the lactation room. Also, all of the mother stated they did not think they would ever use the room for an hour or more at a time.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

Heather, is that the narrative you used for the argument for the exclusion of the space?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

I can see the time limit as a valid. In discussion with the mother's in the office, that is about all you will be in there.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 1924 Thumbs Up

Hi Todd, yes the determining factor was really that we considered the space not regularly occupied, so it was excluded from all the credits where the spaces only have to be regularly occupied. We weren't asked about its exclusion, so we did not have to provide a narrative. So maybe we just got lucky that we weren't asked about it?

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up

The AIA's Best Practices guideline for Lactation Room Design indicates 15 to 30 minutes as the typical usage period:
http://www.aia.org/aiaucmp/groups/secure/documents/pdf/aiap037226.pdf.

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Anna Korinkova
Feb 18 2015
LEEDuser Member
2319 Thumbs Up

Are windows on one side, at large hall, sufficient?

Project Location: Czech Republic

“Hello, I am working on IEQc8.2 (views) for large logistic center. The hall dimensions are 230x60 metres. Question A) On the groundfloor, only the shorter side has windows which leads to the atrium (exterior). I would like to ask you if I can use whole lengh of building as a view from atrium. Trucks will be loaded with goods on this floor. If it is not possible to considered the atrium as a viewout, can we use another approach - to design windows from plastic materials in the garage doors? Question B) The other floors are glazed around both shorter sides and the longer one. Perpendicullar to the longer side, there will be regales with goods. Can I consider that people will have view out from the back part of the hall, i. e. from the distance of 60 metres?”

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

Atriums opened up to the exterior can be used. There is no minimum or maximum distance for view lines. Only permanent equipment or partitions would need to be considered in the line of sight. The trucks in the loading bays could be excluded.

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LEED Pro Consultant Bioconstruccion & Energia Alternativa
Feb 10 2015
LEEDuser Member
2755 Thumbs Up

Massage/Sauna/Swimming pool

Project Location: Mexico

Hello, we are working on a residential project and we would like to know if amenities such as sauna, massage and swimming pool areas are considered as regularly occupied areas.
Thank you.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Feb 10 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

The swimming pool area is definitely considered regularly occupied. Saunas and massage rooms are not listed in the regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use. matrix dated October 2013 so you will have to make an argument for why they would not be considered regularly occupied.

I personally would have the saunas excluded from the calculations based on their use and how they are built. These rooms are typically located within the locker room areas (which are not considered regularly occupied). There is the issue of privacy with these types of spaces.

Massage rooms would have to be included. Most massage take an hour or so and they are given outside or out in the public, so there really is not argument as to why these spaces should be excluded.

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Eric White Sustainability Coordinator Group2 Architecture Interior Design Ltd.
Jan 19 2015
Guest
62 Thumbs Up

Coat area - regularly occupied?

Project Location: Canada

We have an K-6 school project which is mostly views-compliant. One issue we are having in getting above 90% views requirement is the coat area at the rear of the classroom.

The students enter the classroom from the rear (facing the windows) and immediately adjacent to the door is a 1300 mm high coat rack. This area is obviously not a teaching space, and students are not expected to spend any time there when not hanging up coats.

Does anyone have experience in sub-dividing a space such as this, where the views requirement for the occupied space is more than met, but the overall 'access to views area' is decreased by an unoccupied portion of the room?

Thanks for your input!

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jan 20 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

Eric,

We have done quite a few projects with the similar classroom layouts. These are typically the kindergarten classes. The areas within those classrooms, such as the coat/locker area, are considered not regularly occupied and therefore do not need to be included in the calculations.

You can exclude areas such as circulation within a space. Typically, the entire space of a standard classroom is counted. But when it comes to classrooms such as kindergarten, pre-school, or special needs, that have these types of areas, we exclude them from the regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use..

We include a narrative in our submission to explain to the reviewer our method. Never had any issues with any submissions.

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Raina Tilden Architect Liljewall Arkitekter
Dec 03 2014
Guest
199 Thumbs Up

Open Office Landscape and System Furniture

Project Location: Sweden

Hi everyone,
I have read ever post on this forum twice now, and I am still confused! I feel like what I've read regarding open office landscapes and what I've read about furniture systems contradict each other.

In our case, we have a large open office landscape along a long glass facade. We have drawn a suggested layout for desks and meeting tables and sofas, but the user may or may not use our suggested layout, and even if they do use our layout to begin with, the furniture can always be rearranged to meet future needs.

Workstations consist of raisable/lowerable desk tables which have a bulletin board/screen attached to the back side of the desk. When the desk is high, the screen blocks views. When the desk is low, it is possible to see over the screen.

From what I've read on this forum, it seems like you treat flexible open office landscapes as one large space without furniture.

But when people ask specific questions about system furniture that potentially blocks views, it sounds like you have to take the furniture into account.

Does anyone have an example of views documentation in an open office landscape that they're willing to share? (The example that is posted on this forum doesn't seem relevant as it deals with closed, finite spaces.)

My questions are:
1) Do I need to show our suggested furniture layout on the plan, knowing that the users may or may not arrange the office according to our suggestion?

2) How should I deal with the screens which are attached to raisable/lowerable desks?

Thank you for your guidance!

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Dec 03 2014 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

There is a LI or addenda that revised the language in regards to not having to provide the furniture in this version.

1.No, for this version of LEED,NC, you do not need to include furniture or moveable partitions. So typically modular office setups do not need to be included. In CS and CI you would need to provide a proposed tenant layout.

2.Are the screens clear? Again, if they are part of furniture systems and or a moveable partition, no.

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Raina Tilden Architect, Liljewall Arkitekter Dec 03 2014 Guest 199 Thumbs Up

Thank you!

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Dec 29 2014 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up

I think that Todd is referring to Addenda #100000895 & #100000927, made 05/09/2011. One changed a sentence in the first paragraph of Section 6, Calculations to read, "Movable furniture and partitions are NOT included in the scope of this credit calculation.” The other adds the definition, "Movable furniture and partitionsMovable furniture and partitions are those that can be moved to provide access to the view by the user without the need for tools or assistance from special trades and facilities management. are those that can be moved to provide access to the view by the user without the need for tools or assistance from special trades and facilities management."

Also, LI#5232, made 09/02/2009, addresses how to handle unfinished tenant spaces for various prerequisites and credits. (http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=ID%235232).

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Nena Elise
Nov 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
5200 Thumbs Up

Views from a single occupancy dorm/bed room

Hello,

I am working on a dorm project that has some single occupancy bed rooms with access to views. My question is, if 75% or more of the sq.ft of the single occupancy bedroom has access to views can we count all of the square footage towards compliance like we would for a private office.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Nov 13 2014 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

No, only in offices can you use the 75% compliant rule. You can only count the compliant square footage of the room in your case.

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Nena Elise Nov 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 5200 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the response Todd. It was worth a try.

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Nikhil Kumar Nov 14 2014 Guest 336 Thumbs Up

In office building itself, we need to consider the private offices only. Rest of the spaces of office building can not be applicable.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Dec 03 2014 LEEDuser Expert 15322 Thumbs Up

SS, all regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. must be considered. Refer to the Regularly Occupied Space Matrix dated October 2013 for all spaces that must be used in the calculations.

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