NC-2009 IEQp2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control

  • Multi-rating system IEQp2 Credit Requirements Diagram
  • May be the only legal option

    Interior smoking is not allowed in many building types, and for those projects, this prerequisite should be easy and not add costs. It may even be the only legal option. To comply, you may need to establish a nonsmoking policy in and around the building (including entrances and balconies), and install appropriate signage.

    If smoking is allowed, stringent measures needed

    Multifamily residences and hotels may feel compelled to allow smoking in some or all units, and some projects, like airports, have designated smoking rooms. In these cases, stringent measures will be needed to stop movement of smoke from smoking to nonsmoking areas. These measures include air barriers between units, negative air pressure in smoking areas, separate exhaust systems, and blower-door testing, all of which may add design and construction costs. The added trouble of these measures is offset by some added benefits. The air barrier in particular can improve energy efficiency as well as acoustical privacy.

    Warning: Get ready for your blower door test

    Meeting the air leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). requirements for projects that must perform blower-door testing (multi-family and hotel projects allowing smoking) can be extremely challenging and a major barrier toward achieving LEED certification. The leakage rates require construction practices for unit sealing that are far beyond standard practice and as a result, many projects have failed the blower door tests and have not been eligible for certification.

    It is critical that a blower-door-testing consultant be brought onboard during design development or early duing construction documents to ensure that drawings are detailed enough to properly seal units. Get the whole team, including the commissioning agent, general contractor, and subcontractors on board with the necessary practices, and keep this same expert involved during construction to ensure proper sealing techniques are being followed.

    Project teams should perform a mock test of a typical unit to ensure sealing techniques are being followed and to identify any potential locations of air leakage. This ensures that problem areas are identified early on in the construction process so that problems can be corrected for the remainder of units. It can be very costly to correct common problem areas across a project if the testing is only done at the completion of the project.

    Use these questions to assess your project's compliance with this prerequisite

    • What is the project’s smoking policy?

    Smoking Not Allowed

    • If designated smoking areas are used, are they located 25 feet from entrances (primary and secondary), operable windows, and ventilation intakes?
    • Has the building indicated smoking areas and nonsmoking areas with appropriate signage?
    • Will smoking be prohibited on all areas of balconies and decks, even for private residences and hotel rooms, that are within 25 feet of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows of common spaces or other units?

    Smoking Allowed in Designated Interior Spaces

    • Has the mechanical system been designed to meet the necessary negative pressure requirements?
    • Have designated smoking areas been designed to adequately seal and minimize smoke transfer?
    • Have deck-to-deck partitions and other air-sealing construction practices been integrated into construction specifications?
    • Has a blower door or equivalent testing agent reviewed the construction documents to identify areas for potential air leakage?
    • Has the client been informed of the potential expense for blower door testing?
    • Has the contractor briefed subcontractors and installers about best practices for sealing smoking units?
    • Have air testing schedules been integrated in to the general construction schedule?

    FAQs for IEQp2

    Do I have to provide a designated smoking area?

    No—this is optional.

    Municipal law requires that our building be completely smoke-free inside. It also bans smoking next to the building, but it’s not as stringent as the 25 foot LEED requirement. Do we have to make another policy that bans smoking within 25 feet?

    Yes, if local regulations are not as strict as LEED, you must create a policy that complies with LEED standards (and communicate this policy to building users) to achieve this prerequisite. Exterior signage which communicates the policy is required so that all occupants, visitors, and passersby are made aware of the exterior smoking policy.

    How can I prohibit smoking 25 feet from the entrance of my project when it is a zero lot line and its entrance abuts a public sidewalk?

    Although projects may not have complete control over the public space that surrounds their building, at minimum, provide adequate signage that communicates smoking is prohibited 25 feet from the entrance. Signage can help deter people from standing outside of the door to smoke.

    Additionally, do not have designated smoking areas or ash trays outside the entrance to further discourage smoking by the entrance. For documentation purposes, provide a photo or plan indicating where the signage will be installed, and note any additional efforts (such as no ashtray by entrance or security that may enforce the no smoking within 25 feet rule).

    Our outside smoking area is located less than 25 feet from an emergency exit. Is this okay since that door is rarely (if ever) used?

    This is acceptable as long as the emergency exit has an alarm. Emergency exits without alarms qualify as building openings and must have signage.

    How do you calculate the 25 ft. rule from designated smoking areas to building openings?

    The 25 feet should be calculated from the closest point within the smoking area to the building opening, going around any solid objects (balconies, walls, etc.) as needed. For calculating distances between a lower level smoking area and an upper floor building opening, it should be calculated starting from the ceiling of the lower floor to the nearest (lowest) point in the upper floor opening.

    We have a strict no-smoking policy and local smoking laws that all our employees are familiar with. Can we skip the signage?

    No. Visitors and other non-employees might not be familiar with the building policies or local smoking laws.

    Does this prerequisite apply to e-cigarettes? What about marijuana?

    Yes. As of 7/1/2014, with LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #10388, the environmental tobacco smoke (ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer.) prerequisite applies to e-cigarettes as well as conventional cigarettes. USGBC cites the World Health Organization, stating that "e-cigarettes should be prohibited anywhere where the use of conventional cigarettes is prohibited." The interpretation also updated the definition of smoke to include “smoke produced from the combustion of cannabis and controlled substances and the vapors produced by electronic smoking devices."

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Establish the smoking policies for interior spaces and exterior spaces, including balconies, by working with the building owner. Many municipal codes do not permit smoking in public buildings, so banning smoking (Option 1) may be the only legal option in some cases.


  • Additional consultant costs may arise from documentation and testing processes, if projects choose to have interior designated smoking areas.


  • For residential applications, adopting a no-smoking policy in Homeowners Association policies has been a good strategy for reducing ETS transfer between units. In past versions of LEED, this type of policy has also been sufficient to demonstrate compliance with the prerequisite requirements. However, because of changes to the credit language and LEED Online credit form, it is unclear if this strategy would be accepted as compliant without conducting blower door testing as well. Any multi-family project pursuing this type of strategy should be prepared to submit a CIR to confirm that the approach will be acceptable to the GBCI review team.


  • Air sealing between units is recommended for several reasons, even if smoking is banned.  In multifamily buildings and hotels it is common for occupants to smoke inside their units despite nonsmoking policies. Without air sealing between units, other occupants may be exposed to secondhand smoke and odors. Air sealing between units also improves energy performance, particularly in high rises subject to the stack effect, in which warm, buoyant air rises upward, leading to thermal losses and ventilation problems. Acoustic privacy is also improved by air sealing, and air sealing also reduces pathways for vermin.


  • High quality construction using air sealing can be marketed as a building feature for multi-unit construction, and has been shown to attract premium rents and sales prices.


  • Banning smoking on private balconies is necessary if they are within 25 feet of a neighbor’s operable window or another building opening, even if smoking is allowed inside the unit. Multifamily tenants may be unhappy with these rules, so owners should carefully consider their policies, the needs and habits of their tenants, and the design and location of balconies and openings.

Schematic Design

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  • If allowing smoking in some units, clustering those rooms on one floor can keep the need for special air sealing and hallway pressurization strategies (which can be used in lieu of weatherstripping) relatively contained.


  • Incorporate smoking-related requirements into the commissioning documentation, including the Owner’s Project Requirements and the Basis of Design for EAp1: Fundamental Commissioning.


  • Designate the location of outdoor smoking areas, if any, on design drawings. Ensure that these areas are appropriately removed from building windows, ventilation opens, and entrances, and entrance paths.

Design Development

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  • The mechanical engineer ensures that the HVAC design meets the exhaust and pressure levels of the LEED requirements. Also ensure that all units will receive adequate fresh air. A certain amount of air infiltration may be assumed, but the careful air-sealing associated with this credit may reduce the infiltration below expected levels. Ensure that mechanical systems, operable windows, or a combination, are able to provide enough ventilation. Make sure that pressure differences between the hallway and unit are enough to prevent cross contamination, but not so much that doors slam doors shut or are difficult to operate.


  • Operating energy use may be increased by maintaining the negative pressure requirements for interior designated smoking rooms. Designated smoking rooms in commercial properties can also add upfront costs associated with construction and design, added ventilation loads, and air sealing and deck-to-deck partitions. On the other hand, increased air sealing can decrease energy costs and increase rents, as noted earlier.


  • Eliminating smoking in a building costs virtually nothing and is the simplest way to control environmental tobacco smoke (ETS).  Possible associated costs would be the cost of signage indicating that the building is non-smoking and the development of a nonsmoking policy. Benefits include occupant health and productivity, and reduced cleaning and maintenance.

Construction Documents

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  • In non-residential construction when smoking will be banned (Case 1, Option 1), incorporate smoking-related signage into plans and construction specifications. Fill out LEED Credit Form and upload all supporting documentation to LEED Online.


  • If smoking is to be allowed in certain areas (Case 1, Option 2 and Case 2), integrate deck-to-deck partitions and weatherstripping or pressurization into plans and construction document specifications.


  • Identify potential air leakage points in design and construction plans early. Common examples of areas where leakage occur include electrical boxes, air registers, window frames, and where walls meet the floor.


  • Ask a blower-door or air-barrier expert to review construction documents and shop drawings prior to the actual testing to ensure that problem areas, including deck to deck partitions, are likely to be sealed according to specifications.


  • Ensure that the blower door test is included in the contractor’s or any other responsible parties’ scope of work.

Construction

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  • If smoking is to be allowed in certain areas (Case 1, Option 2 and Case 2), fill out LEED template and upload all supporting documentation to LEED Online.


  • A no-smoking policy for construction workers is not required for this prerequisite, but is a good practice, especially after the enclosure is installed, and will help achieve IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management


  • Orient all subcontractors to air-sealing goals and quality-control practices.


  • The contractor schedules any necessary air pressure or blower door tests in their proper sequence. Testing occurs at various construction phases and ideally with a test unit to identify any leakages and opportunities for improvement in other units.


  • Involve an experienced blower-door testing agent in visual inspections before drywall is installed in any of the units. This will ensure that problem areas are addressed while they are still easily accessible. Also bring the blower-door expert in for early testing, once the drywall is installed, but before painting, finish materials, and appliances are installed. This will point out penetrations that need to be sealed between units and allow contractors to address those penetrations in the remaining units to ensure that all units meet the standard.


  • Conduct blower door tests, which in multifamily and hotel applications typically require a sampling of one out of every seven units. See the Home Energy Rating System program (link) for details on sampling rates. For any spaces that do not pass the blower door pressure test, correct any potential problems and retest, or another space has to be tested until 100 percent of the requisite number of spaces have successfully passed.


  • The cost of a blower door test will vary by region and project, but expect an average of  $500–$800 per test.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Uphold and enforce the nonsmoking policy, if applicable. Nonsmoking policies can be enforced with documented building policies, and building signage.


  • Additional policies to support a nonsmoking building may include providing smokers with alternatives such as outdoor smoking areas, giving employees incentives to quit smoking, and if smoking is permitted in parts of the building, developing a phase-out plan.


  • Nonsmoking policies can be implemented with homeowners association policies, building signage, and other means of communicating with occupants.


  • Additional costs from maintaining designated smoking areas within a building may include more frequent and more rigorous cleaning, disposal of ashes and butts, and frequent change-out of  ventilation system filters. Light fixtures and finishes may also need to be replaced more frequently in designated smoking areas.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    IEQ Prerequisite 2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control

    Required

    Intent

    To prevent or minimize exposure of building occupants, indoor surfaces and ventilation air distribution systems to environmental tobacco smoke (ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer.).

    Requirements

    Option 1

    Prohibit smoking in the building.

    Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows. Provide signage to allow smoking in designated areas, prohibit smoking in designated areas or prohibit smoking on the entire property.

    OR

    Option 2

    CASE 1. Non-Residential Projects

    Prohibit smoking in the building except in designated smoking areas.

    Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows. Provide signage to allow smoking in designated areas, prohibit smoking in designated areas or prohibit smoking on the entire property.

    Provide designated smoking rooms designed to contain, capture and remove ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer. from the building. At a minimum, the smoking room must be directly exhausted to the outdoors, away from air intakes and building entry paths, with no recirculation of ETS-containing air to nonsmoking areas and enclosed with impermeable deck-to-deck partitions. Operate exhaust sufficient to create a negative pressure differential with the surrounding spaces of at least an average of 5 Pascals (Pa) (0.02 inches of water gauge) and a minimum of 1 Pa (0.004 inches of water gauge) when the doors to the smoking rooms are closed.

    Verify performance of the smoking rooms’ differential air pressures by conducting 15 minutes of measurement, with a minimum of 1 measurement every 10 seconds, of the differential pressure in the smoking room with respect to each adjacent area and in each adjacent vertical chase with the doors to the smoking room closed. Conduct the testing with each space configured for worst-case conditions of transport of air from the smoking rooms (with closed doors) to adjacent spaces.

    CASE 2. Residential and Hospitality Projects

    Prohibit smoking in all common areas of the building.

    Locate any exterior designated smoking areas, including balconies where smoking is permitted, at least 25 feet from entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows opening to common areas.

    Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows. Provide signage to allow smoking in designated areas, prohibit smoking in designated areas or prohibit smoking on the entire property.

    Weather-strip all exterior doors and operable windows in the residential units to minimize leakage from outdoors.

    Minimize uncontrolled pathways for ETS transfer between individual residential units by sealing penetrations in walls, ceilings and floors in the residential units and by sealing vertical chases adjacent to the units. Weather-strip all doors in the residential units leading to common hallways to minimize air leakage into the hallway1.

    Demonstrate acceptable sealing of residential units by a blower door testA blower door test gives an overall value for airtightness of a space, and can help identify air leaks. The testing unit consists of a calibrated fan that is sealed onto the unit entrance. The fan creates a continuous flow of pressure into the unit (or out of the unit when using theatrical fog to locate leaks). Devices detect the rate of pressure retention and loss due to possible air leaks in the construction. conducted in accordance with ANSI/ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services-E779-03, Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage RateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). By Fan Pressurization. Use the progressive sampling methodology defined in Chapter 4 (Compliance Through Quality Construction) of the Residential Manual for Compliance with California’s 2001 Energy Efficiency Standards. Residential units must demonstrate less than 1.25 square inches leakage area per 100 square feet of enclosure area (i.e., sum of all wall, ceiling and floor areas). Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ANSI/ASTM-Control E779-03, Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage Rate By Fan Pressurization.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Prohibit smoking in commercial buildings or effectively control the ventilation air in smoking rooms. For residential buildings, prohibit smoking in common areas and design building envelope and systems to minimize ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer. transfer among dwelling units.

    FOOTNOTE

    1 If the common hallways are pressurized with respect to the residential units then doors in the residential units leading to the common hallways need not be weather-stripped provided that the positive differential pressure is demonstrated as in Option 2, Case 1 above, considering the residential unit as the smoking room.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.


U.S. Dept. of Energy - Air Sealing

Guidelines for proper air sealing techniques.


U.S. Dept. of Energy - Blower Door Tests

Provides general background on blower door tests.

Publications

Smoking In The Workplace: Guidelines For Implementing A Smoke Free Policy

This publication from Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights details the legal basis for constructing a smoke-free workplace policy.


The Percentage of Gamblers Who Smoke: A Study of Nevada Casinos and other Gaming Venues (Chris A. Pritsos)

This study finds that the percentage of gamblers who smoke is not significantly different from the percentage of the general population who smoke, undermining claims that barring smoking in casinos would have a devastating economic impact.


Environmental Tobacco Smoke

This EPA document summarizes environmental tobacco smoke research and provides information on national laws targeting the issue.

Organizations

Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights

ANR advocates for non-smokers' interests and provides information for those wishing to prohibit smoking in public places.

Smoking Policy

All Options

Establish and communicate a policy prohibiting smoking within 25 feet of building openings.

Smoking Area Plan

All Options

Provide a map showing that designated outdoor smoking areas are 25 feet or more from building openings.

Pressurization and Air Leakage Testing

Provide drawings, data, and a narrative explaining pressurization and leakage rate testing protocols.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 IEQ

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

316 Comments

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Vibha Pai Student University of Cincinnati
Jun 25 2016
Guest
67 Thumbs Up

Master's Research Survey

Project Location: United States

I am conducting a survey in affiliation with University of Cincinnati for my Master's thesis which would take just 10-15 minutes of your time. By answering the questions that are relevant to your experience, would help me in giving my research the required depth in understanding the achievability of the credit points in the Material and Resource category of LEED v2009 and v2013.

The following is the link to complete the web based questionnaire.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/XR3ZVZN
Thank you in advance for your time!

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Jun 26 2016 LEEDuser Member 7735 Thumbs Up

I appreciate your need for info and posting on this forum. There are lots of great knowledgeable people here, some of whom may be able and willing to help. However posting your request on every different credit rather than just in the Material and Resources category has flooded my inbox with undesirable emails. I assume you did not realize this unintended consequence. Please keep your request to the area it pertains. Thank you.

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Vibha Pai Student, University of Cincinnati Jun 26 2016 Guest 67 Thumbs Up

Sorry I didn't realize that! My apologies.

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Magda Aghababyan CEO Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
May 13 2016
LEEDuser Member
1008 Thumbs Up

Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ET S) Control Required

Hi,
We are working on a new construction hotel project. During our analysis of prerequisite of smoking analysis we have been noticed LEED NC-2009 guide option 2 case 2 has been guided to have the smoking area at least 25 feet (8 meters) from entries.
Can we please get define whether the 8 meters counting from the entrance door of the gust room or from the entrance door of the outdoor balcony?

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. May 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 2973 Thumbs Up

From all entrances, openings, and air intakes. In your case, the smoking spot should be at least 25 feet from BOTH guest room and balcony entrances.

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Magda Aghababyan CEO, Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd. May 25 2016 LEEDuser Member 1008 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your advice.

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Gabriela Crespo CxA, LEED AP BD+C, O+M Revitaliza Consultores
Feb 29 2016
Guest
239 Thumbs Up

Smoking Room, Smoking Cabin

Project Location: Mexico

Dear all,

I have a question regarding the use of smoking cabins in a LEED project, has anyone ever tried to install one or is willing to share their experience? Would the requirement be met if the cabin can provide the negative pressure difference of 5 Pa?
There is an example diagram on page 419 of the BD+C V3 reference guide, where there is an Ante-Room for the smoking room, would this requirement also be necessary given the cabin is a stand alone unit?
Thanks!

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. May 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 2973 Thumbs Up

Hola! The ante-rooms are not required, but may be good practice. It is OK to use the cabin as long as it can keep the minimum negative pressure and exhaust directly to the outdoors 25 feet away of any openings.

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Marcelo Maciel de Santa Helena Eficiente Gestão de Engenharia e Projetos
Dec 18 2015
LEEDuser Member
55 Thumbs Up

Anti Smoking Sign

Project Location: Brazil

We have a question about the location of the anti smoking signs.
Leed requires that the signs are installed in certain areas, such as elevator, circulation, rooms? Are there a minimum number of signs to be installed?
Thanks!

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator, Lake/Flato Architects Dec 29 2015 LEEDuser Member 1875 Thumbs Up

No minimum number, but the locations you're naming don't sound right. Check out the reference guide language for guidance on this.

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Chris Wisniewski NORESCO
Dec 02 2015
LEEDuser Member
11 Thumbs Up

Elevator Shafts in high rise condo

Project Location: United States

I am the HERS rater working on a 80+ story condominium high rise. It is intended to be a "smoking permitted" building. Some of the residential units have in-unit access to the elevators. The elevator shafts cause massive amounts of infiltration such that the units cannot pass blower door testing. RESNET MFHR guidelines do not allow the elevator doors/shafts to be sealed for testing. Everything I see indicates that the design simply does not meet the intent of the prerequisite requirements. Has anybody encountered this, and what did you do?
Thanks!

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. May 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 2973 Thumbs Up

I guess you can make a case with USGBC/GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). and use different rules for the door blower test, if ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer. being carried through the elevator shaft is not an issue. They might ask you to submit this as a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide though.

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Francis McNulty OCSC
Oct 29 2015
LEEDuser Member
108 Thumbs Up

Smoking Areas - Beside a Storage Room

Project Location: Ireland

Hi All,
We are building a NC Campus Project that has a non smoking policy except in one designated outside area. The designated non smoking area is being proposed to be positioned beside a storage room, does the 25ft rule still apply from openable doors, windows and air intakes as the room is not an occupied space?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Oct 29 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2810 Thumbs Up

yes, the rule still applies.

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Kim Wajda Business Manager Voith & Mactavish Architects
Sep 10 2015
LEEDuser Member
71 Thumbs Up

Smoke-free Campus

The project in question is part of a high school campus with a strict campus-wide smoke-free policy. The primary users of the building will be faculty, staff, and students who are well aware of the policy. Is additional signage on this building still required?

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Peter Doo President, Doo Consulting, LLC Sep 11 2015 LEEDuser Member 3514 Thumbs Up

We recently certified a project with the same condition. Our project was on a public school campus with a state-wide smoke free school zone law.
We did install no smoking signs at building entrances but did not indicate "within 25' of the building" as the implication would be that you could smoke elsewhere on the campus.
We discussed posting campus entrances with our review team but, we were in a neighborhood where people could wander onto the campus from anywhere. We made the case through our narrative that this was well understood in the State and that anyone would be just as likely to enforce this policy on the school grounds. GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). agreed that additional signage was not necessary. The credit was approved.
You may want to submit a "Feedback" to see whether your building signs could be more discreet or eliminated entirely.

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LEEDme STRATEGIE SRL STRATEGIE SRL
Jul 14 2015
Guest
318 Thumbs Up

Historic residential building

We are renovating a historic residential building and windows will not be replaced. We think it will be difficult to perform a blower door testA blower door test gives an overall value for airtightness of a space, and can help identify air leaks. The testing unit consists of a calibrated fan that is sealed onto the unit entrance. The fan creates a continuous flow of pressure into the unit (or out of the unit when using theatrical fog to locate leaks). Devices detect the rate of pressure retention and loss due to possible air leaks in the construction.. We intend to ban smoke on all property and in all internal spaces comprised residential units. Is installing no smoking signage and no smoking requirements incorporated in contractual language of lease agreements sufficient for this prerequisite?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

LEEDme, just go with Option 1 to ban smoking in the building, as you suggest.

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Leanne Niu
May 18 2015
LEEDuser Member
58 Thumbs Up

How to claifiy a permanet no-smoking signate

We recently got a mid-review for IEQp2. The exterior smoking policy of the project is entirely composed of a taped-on sheet of paper. The review team think that this signage system appears to be temporary in nature and can be easily removed, and it is not clear if the non-smoking policy will be reasonably viewable by all building occupants over time. But actually the non-smoking policy will be managed by the Property management staff to ensure that this signage system will stay there permanetly and every occupants will know this policy.
What should we do to clarification this credit, or some other pernament signage should we provided?

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Kevin Li EMSI Aug 19 2015 Guest 9 Thumbs Up

I also got a similar review comment and still wondering how to decide a permanent signage. Have u got the solution?

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Ilana Judah Director of Sustainability FXFOWLE
Apr 30 2015
LEEDuser Member
488 Thumbs Up

Testing of units with the same layout

Project Location: United States

We are working on a large high-end high-rise residential project with a variety of unit sizes and layouts. Almost every unit is a unique layout to some degree, whether it be the location or size of a closet or adjacency of the kitchen to another space. Testing every unit in the building would be onerous and costly. If units has the same number of bedrooms and approximate square footages, would that constitute an acceptable testing sample?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Ilana, sorry for the slow reply. I would advise creating a testing plan that reasonably balances the design variations, as you suggest, and then run it by GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).. I wouldn't want this to get knocked back after it's too late to fix.

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Abena Darden Project Director Thornton Tomasetti / Sustainability
Feb 02 2015
LEEDuser Member
4305 Thumbs Up

Number of Units Required to be Sampled

We are working on a high-rise residential project in San Francisco. I see a question relating to how many residential units need to be blower door tested dating from June 24 2014. We do not see a reply to that question, however. The HERS 2.2 methodology states 1 in 7 units of the same layout, but we are hearing of more narrow sampling protocols. GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). has not responded to our questions on this. We have not seen a specific addenda addressing this, either. We are hoping a fellow LEED User out there might have an example of successfully submitted and approved documentation they are willing to share with us. Many thanks in advance!

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3135 Thumbs Up

Refer to LEED Interpretations #1740, 5209 and 10222. 1 in 7 seven is the correct sampling rate. I don't have first hand experience with this for IEQp2 so hopefully the interpretations help. LEED does reference the HERS sampling methodology.

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Tamara Quiroz Architect, Efizity Mar 17 2015 Guest 45 Thumbs Up

In reference to the question about number of units required to be sampled we would like to have a response to an applied case (as an example).

This is a multifamily residential building with natural ventilation where smoking is permitted only in residential units.
This building has 3 types (A, B and C) of units which are identical.
There are 35 A type units, 21 B type units and 7 C type units.
The total of units in the building are 63.

According to HOME ENERGY RATING SYSTEMS (HERS) FIELD VERIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTING REGULATIONS and the
LEED Interpretations #10222 and #1740, it is allowed to sample 1 in 7 identical units, but also a minimum of 3 tests are allowed when you have more than 21 units of one type.

In the example, we understand therefore, that we need to make:

Type A (35 units): 3 initial field verification, 3 sample field verification, 3 re-sample test (if necessary)
Type B (21 units): 3 initial field verification, 3 sample field verification, 3 re-sample test (if necessary)
Type C (7 units): 1 initial field verification, 1 sample field verification, 1 re-sample test (if necessary)

Total: 21 tests

Is this ok?

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jorge calderon earth lab
Dec 08 2014
Guest
501 Thumbs Up

language

Since all the visitors to our project speaks Spanish, I wonder if is accepted to meet this credit that signage be written in Spanish?

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Jens Apel Dec 09 2014 LEEDuser Member 1302 Thumbs Up

I do quite some projects in German speaking countries. We always have the signage in the local language. For submission, I give translations on the PDFs showing the signage. We never had an issue with this approach.

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jorge calderon earth lab Dec 09 2014 Guest 501 Thumbs Up

Thank you Jens

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3135 Thumbs Up

Signage in the primary local language is definiately acceptable / preferred.

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Omar ElRawy Building Engineer, LEED AP BD+C EA Building Consultants
Nov 05 2014
Guest
1121 Thumbs Up

Deck to Deck Partition

Project Location: Egypt

Dear all,
I have a gypsum board partitions with a false ceiling all over the floor. I need to know if I can use the Hard-lid ceiling as an alternative to the Deck to deck partitions or not?

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3135 Thumbs Up

Omar,
I am guessing that hard-lid ceilings would not be acceptable, as they are not noted as an option. For IEQc5, hard-lid ceilings or deck-to-deck partitions are acceptable, and are noted as such. Additionally, it seems that deck-to-deck partitions would better isolate each room, whereas hard lid ceilings may leave above ceiling areas open.

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David Hubka Director - Operations Transwestern Sustainability Services
Sep 18 2014
LEEDuser Expert
2810 Thumbs Up

Emergency Exits

Hello all,

Regarding emergency exits, we recieved the following review comment on our LEED Volume program submission:

"Emergency exits must prohibit smoking within 25 feet. The only exception is alarmed emergency exits, which do not qualify as building openings."

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Radwa Amin LEED specialist , Hill International, Africa Oct 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 251 Thumbs Up

would you please clarify what does it mean "alarmed emergency exits"? Does it require certain alarm, and software interface?
Thank you.

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Oct 15 2014 LEEDuser Expert 20595 Thumbs Up

Yes, alarmed exits are usually connected to the fire alarm / life safety. When a building occupant uses that exit and there is not a fire alarm going off, the door rings alerting people to a problem.

David, your review comments are consistent with what I've always understood to be the case. Can you alarm some of your exits? They want to ensure that people don't come and go through those doors to smoke. If there is a short cut, people will find it and exploit it.

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Jens Apel
Sep 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
1302 Thumbs Up

Smoking room - separate AHU system?

This is an office building. The designer is proposing to use a single exaust system for one smoking room and other smoke free rooms. It is a 100% outdoor air system with a plate heat recovery, so there will be no ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer. recirculation at all.
The IEQp2 requirements Option 2, Case 1 doesn't require a separate system. But in the implementation section it says "install separate ventilation systems must be installed" (seems to be an erroneous wording here).
Do we need a separate, standalone exhaust system for indoor smoking rooms? I think no and the proposed design is ok, as it fulfills the requirements and the intent of the prerequisite, as there will be no ETS contamination outside the smoking room.
Thanks

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Jens Apel Dec 09 2014 LEEDuser Member 1302 Thumbs Up

I put in a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for this question. If someone ever has the same question, here are the general questions and answers:
Questions:
2. In general, is a separate supply and exhaust air system required that serves only the smoking room(s)?
3. In general, is a separate exhaust air system required that exhausts only the smoking room(s) with supply air being transferred from non-smoking areas?

Responses:
Response 2: No, a separate/dedicated supply and exhaust system is not required to serve the smoking room if under normal operating conditions there is no recirculation of the smoking room air within any air handling unit that serves other non-smoking spaces.
Response 3: No. See response to Question 2.

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Razan Nejem Environmental Engineer, LEED AP BD+C
Sep 10 2014
Guest
428 Thumbs Up

Smoking Area in the Basement

can the smoking area be placed in the basement if its 25 feet away from any operable windows and doors

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator, Lake/Flato Architects Dec 17 2014 LEEDuser Member 1875 Thumbs Up

That seems like it is "in the building" (this is the name of option 1) to me.

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Bradley Konkel Student
Aug 25 2014
Guest
11 Thumbs Up

IEQp2 Implementation Timeframe

At what point of the project do the standards regarding IEQp2 take effect? Are there any standards that need to be followed during the construction process, before the building envelope is sealed?

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3135 Thumbs Up

If pursuing IEQc3.1 there should be no smoking in the building during construction. That is certainly best practice, esp. once anything beyond structural materials are installed. IEQp2 is oriented to operations and planning for a no smoking building in the design phase, so you are touching on a grey area here, but no smoking in the building during construction is common and best practice for a number of reasons.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Aug 18 2014
LEEDuser Member
2973 Thumbs Up

Worst condition?

From the requirements: "Verify performance of the smoking rooms’ differential air pressures by conducting 15 minutes of measurement, with a minimum of 1 measurement every 10 seconds, of the differential pressure in the smoking room with respect to each adjacent area and in each adjacent vertical chase with the doors to the smoking room closed. Conduct the testing with each space configured for worst-case conditions of transport of air from the smoking rooms (with closed doors) to adjacent spaces."

It seems to me that having doors open is the worst case, not doors closed. Any opinions on that?

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3135 Thumbs Up

I agree that the language is confusing, but could any pressure differential be established and maintained with doors open? I think the message is, create and test at the doors-closed worst case condition.

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Renee Shirey
Aug 18 2014
LEEDuser Member
3745 Thumbs Up

Non-smoking campus - are exterior signs required?

My project is on a college campus that is non-smoking on the entire campus, there are no areas with permitted smoking. The streets themselves are university property, not public streets.

If everything and everywhere is non-smoking, and there are "no smoking/tobacco inside and out" on exterior doors (for this building and every other building on campus), would there be any requirement to place free-standing signs on the edges of the site? Or are the signs on the doors enough?

The campus is willing to put up free-standing sign in areas that expercience difficulties with tobacco use, but I don't want to put up signs by default if I don't have to. Thanks!

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Aug 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 2973 Thumbs Up

Renee,

There is no need to place free standing sings if you have signs on the building itself stating it is prohibited to smoke within 25 feet of the building.

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Renee Shirey Aug 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 3745 Thumbs Up

But there is NO smoking on the entire campus, anywhere. A sign with the language no smoking "within 25 feet of the building" would go against their more stringent policy, and would imply that the students/visitors/professors CAN smoke at 26, 27, 28+ feet, etc. - which they definitely are not.

Would "no smoking/tobacco inside and out" and "tobacco free on entire campus" signs on the building actually not meet the requirements, simply because the sign doesn't mention 25'?

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Aug 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 1587 Thumbs Up

Hi Renee,
Using language that indicates there is no smoking allowed on campus is perfectly acceptable - it does not specifically have to state 25.' We have used that approach on many campus projects. The language we have typically seen is "Tobacco Free Campus" or "This is a Nonsmoking Campus"

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Renee Shirey Aug 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 3745 Thumbs Up

Thanks Heather. Did you just provide signage on the doors/in the building, or did you still post fre-standing signs on the site? I feel like we have peppered new buildings in the past with these signs, when maybe we don't need to.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Aug 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 1587 Thumbs Up

Hi Renee. The signs have usually just been on the main entry/exit doors of the building (including doors to upper level terraces). No free standing signs on site. We have sometimes included the Campus's non-smoking policy as back-up.

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Renee Shirey Aug 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 3745 Thumbs Up

THANK YOU!!! That is what I was hoping for. The university's policy also clearly states that signs (wall-mounted or free-standing) can be added wherever problems with adherance may arise, so hopefully that should satisfy any reviewer that thinks there should be more signs. The client will be very happy.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Aug 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 1587 Thumbs Up

Glad it helped! :)

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Aug 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 2973 Thumbs Up

Heather, thanks for sharing your experience.

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Renee Shirey Dec 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 3745 Thumbs Up

Another addition to this awesome thread...
Heather, when you reference signage being placed on "main entry/exit doors" are you putting signage on the outside and inside surface of the main door, or just the outside (to let people know as they are coming towards/into the building)?
Thanks!

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Dec 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 1587 Thumbs Up

Hi Renee,

The wording typically faces to the outside, to let people know as they are coming toward the building. I can't think of an instance when we included it on the inside as well, but it certainly wouldn't hurt. However, it would not be required by LEED.

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Jiri Dobias
Aug 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
1831 Thumbs Up

Site plan without smoking areas

Hello LEEDusers!
We are supposed to upload a site plan/map that shows the location of the designated outdoor smoking /nonsmoking areas. Since we have no smoking areas we upload a site plan highlighting only the 25ft distance from the building and position of all signs communicating the 25 ft rule. However, the building's facade is very close to the LEEDboundary. Shall we mark the non-smoking area beyond the LEEDboundary in the site plan or keep it within?

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Aug 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 7735 Thumbs Up

Hi Jiri,
I have done dozens of projects in WA where smoking is not allowed in most places. In all cases, I have simply uploaded a statement that we have no designated smoking areas. It's a bit frustrating that item is a mandatory upload. Despite many other issues with reviewers about smoking sign verbiage and locations, no one has ever commented on that simple statement.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Aug 14 2014
LEEDuser Member
2973 Thumbs Up

"Vertical chase" meaning

The term "vertical chase" is present on the definition of "differential air pressureThe difference in air pressure between two spaces, potentially leading, in the case of a pressure difference, to the migration of contaminants from one space to another. When using a designated smoking room ror environmental tobacco smoke control, you may need to test the differential air pressure in the smoking room with respect to each adjacent area and in each adjacent vertical chase with the doors to the smoking room closed. The testing will be conducted with each space configured for worst case conditions of transport of air from the smoking rooms to adjacent spaces with the smoking rooms' doors closed to the adjacent spaces. The test can be conducted by a mechanical engineer. The test should involve 15 minutes of measurement, with a minimum of one measurement every 10 seconds. With the doors to the smoking room closed, operate exhaust sufficient to create a negative pressure with respect to the adjacent spaces of at least an average of 5 Pa (0.02 inches of water gauge) and with a minimum of 1 Pa (0.004 inches of water gauge).". Does "vertical chase" refers to pipe shafts adjacent to the room or to the ceiling plenum?

The definition of differential air pressure is copied below:

Differential air pressure
The difference in air pressure between two spaces, potentially leading, in the case of a pressure difference, to the migration of contaminants from one space to another. When using a designated smoking room nor environmental tobacco smoke control, you may need to test the differential air pressure in the smoking room with respect to each adjacent area and in each adjacent vertical chase with the doors to the smoking room closed. The testing will be conducted with each space configured for worst case conditions of transport of air from the smoking rooms to adjacent spaces with the smoking rooms' doors closed to the adjacent spaces. The test can be conducted by a mechanical engineer. The test should involve 15 minutes of measurement, with a minimum of one measurement every 10 seconds. With the doors to the smoking room closed, operate exhaust sufficient to create a negative pressure with respect to the adjacent spaces of at least an average of 5 Pa (0.02 inches of water gauge) and with a minimum of 1 Pa (0.004 inches of water gauge).

Thanks in advance!

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Aug 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 2973 Thumbs Up

I realized that vertical chase does not refer to plenum, as I asked above.

I have a follow up question though: does this prerequisite require that a differential pressure measurement is conducted for each adjacent space or vertical chase that HAS a door to the smoking room?

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Susan Coy LEED Administrator GMB Architecture + Engineering
Jul 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
117 Thumbs Up

Does it have to be a Permanent Sign?

I have a project that the owners want to use stand with the "No Smoking Sign" instead of placing signage on building itself, will that comply?

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator, Lake/Flato Architects Aug 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 1875 Thumbs Up

This should comply. I would just include a narrative that says that the stand is placed so all building visitors and occupants can see it.

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Maggie Hogan Skaug Oct 12 2015 Guest 215 Thumbs Up

Can it be digital signage as part of a digital kiosk within the main lobbies that all visitors will engage with?
Thanks

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator, Lake/Flato Architects Oct 12 2015 LEEDuser Member 1875 Thumbs Up

No. How would visitors outside of the building know not to smoke near doors, operable windows, and outdoor air intakes?

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Glen Phillips Director of Sustainable Education, GreenCE, Inc. Oct 12 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1089 Thumbs Up

Per a literal reading of the rating system text (and without checking Interpretations or Addenda), the signage must achieve one of the following:
1. Allow smoking in designated areas,
2. Prohibit smoking in designated areas, or
3. Prohibit smoking on the entire property.

It is implied, but not clear from the rating system language, that smoking within 25 feet of openings be similarly prohibited with signage.

Assuming signage must both achieve one of the first 3 options, and additionally prohibit smoking within 25 feet of openings, it is further implied that visitors should be exposed to signage before they would otherwise enter an area where smoking is prohibited.

I don't think there is anything which would require building mounted signage, although movable signs could (and probably should) be questioned by the certification reviewer, and signage mounted only indoors would obviously fall short of being visible to visitors prior to entering non-smoking areas.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Jul 02 2014
LEEDuser Moderator

e-cigarettes just like regular cigarettes

USGBC has just issued a LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. clarifying that e-cigarettes should be considered the same as conventional cigarettes for the purpose of this prerequisite. This follows World Health Organization recommendations. See LEED Interpretation #10388 for the exact language.

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Ai Engineering Ai Engineering S.r.l.
Jul 02 2014
Guest
78 Thumbs Up

Alternative compliance with ETS prohibition

We would like to certify a multifamily Residential building. Smoking will be prohibited within the LEED Boundary in common areas, but in some public areas (closer than 25 feet from main entrance) we cannot prohibit smoking because this would contrast local regulations.
The owner doesn't want to prohibit smoking on private balconies (for commercial needs), but most of balconies are closer than 25 feet from operable windows.
The apartments are equipped of mechanical ventilation system (the air intake is on roof, far from any ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer. source) which will be working 24H/24 to renew inside air.
Entrance doors will be equipped with self-closing mechanisms, in order to guarantee that outdoor smoke will be kept out. External windows are equipped with sealings which guarantee air tightness. Blower door tests will be performed according to the Protocol.

Are these systems sufficient to comply with prerequisite requirements?

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3135 Thumbs Up

Based on your description, I would say no. Self-closing doors do not negate the 25' requirement. Nor do local standards. It sounds like this is a smoking building, but the other requirements still apply (as noted under Option 2 case 2).

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Heather Appell LEED Project Manager SEQUIL Systems, Inc.
Jun 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
112 Thumbs Up

How to handle private elevators into residences

We are working on a few high-end/high rise residential projects that are designed to have elevators open into the private residences. A blower door testA blower door test gives an overall value for airtightness of a space, and can help identify air leaks. The testing unit consists of a calibrated fan that is sealed onto the unit entrance. The fan creates a continuous flow of pressure into the unit (or out of the unit when using theatrical fog to locate leaks). Devices detect the rate of pressure retention and loss due to possible air leaks in the construction. was conducted and unfortunately did not pass as smoke can technically leak into the elevator from the residential unit. Has anyone had this issue before and have any recommendations on how to solve it? I appreciate any suggestions and thank you in advance!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 24 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Heather, I don't have experience with this but thinking out loud—can you add another fully weatherstripped door around one or the other end of the elevator? I.e. create a lobby around the elevator entrance to keep out ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer. (or keep it in).

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Heather Appell LEED Project Manager, SEQUIL Systems, Inc. Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Member 112 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Tristan. We actually were able to do just that. It turns out for fire safety purposes there needs to be a door separating the elevator lobby space from the main residence due to pressurization issues. We are now able to pass the blower door testing for these units.

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Nadia Ayala Architect / LEED AP BD+C KILTIK Consultoría
Jun 24 2014
Guest
1620 Thumbs Up

Blower door test for 1 in 7 of each room model

Hi,
I was wondering if the v2.2 option (HERS methodology) would still apply for v2009 in regards to the blower door testA blower door test gives an overall value for airtightness of a space, and can help identify air leaks. The testing unit consists of a calibrated fan that is sealed onto the unit entrance. The fan creates a continuous flow of pressure into the unit (or out of the unit when using theatrical fog to locate leaks). Devices detect the rate of pressure retention and loss due to possible air leaks in the construction. and number of units that must be tested. I read once that you could test only 1 in 7 similar units (same layout).
My project is both a hotel and residential building, and there are different types of apartments and hotel rooms which are obviously repeated throughout the building.
Just as an example, if I had 3 different types of hotel rooms with 10 units each, I would have to test only a total of six units.
Can we still do this and comply with the prerequisite requirements?
If anyone can come up with the official source of this info I recall I'd be glad to hear it.
Thank you.

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3135 Thumbs Up

I believe the HERS sampling protocol still applies. See LEED Interpretations #1740, 5209 and 10222.

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