NC-2009 MPR2: Must be a complete, permanent building or space

  • MPR2 Supplemental Guidance from USGBC

    This Bird's Eye View text is from USGBC's MPR Supplemental Guidance Revision #2. See the Credit Language tab for the MPR requirements.

    Intent

    The LEED rating systems were designed to evaluate complete buildings and spaces in fixed locations. Partial buildings or spaces are unsuitable for LEED certification because when analyzed under the requirements of LEED prerequisites and credits, they create results inconsistent with those of whole buildings or spaces. Also, partial certification can easily appear to encompass an entire building or space, sending a false message to the occupants.

    Permanency is important because a significant percentage of LEED prerequisites and credits are dependent on location, making a mobile building or space unacceptable. The stipulation for already existing land responds to the fact that artificial land masses displace and disrupt marine ecosystems. Buildings that generate the need to develop such land do not meet the overall intent of the LEED rating system. Anything less than a distinct, complete, and permanent project on existing land will not be able to accurately demonstrate compliance with LEED.

    SPECIFIC ALLOWED EXCEPTIONS

    Attached Buildings

    MPR#2 requires a LEED project to be a building in its entirety for use of all but the Commercial Interiors Rating Systems. This section allows for buildings (such as additions) that do not meet the definition of entirety to comply with MPR#2 if certain conditions are met. The conditions listed below are written to prevent two kinds of problems that attached buildings can lead to: 1) compromised technical integrity of LEED certification and 2) misperception of certification boundaries.

    This section lists conditions and guidance in three parts. All attached buildings should comply with part I, and those buildings attached to buildings that are already LEED-certified should comply with part II; whereas those attached to buildings that are not already LEED-certified should comply with part III.

    I.    ALL attached buildings

    II.    Buildings attached to LEED-certified buildings

    III.    Buildings attached to non LEED-certified buildings

    I.    ALL ATTACHED BUILDINGS

    1)    DRAWING A PROJECT BOUNDARY

    The majority of the certifying floor area vs. the non-certifying floor area is often clear, as a result of construction, ownership, management, or space usage type boundaries. Often, one or more of the following occurs, making it difficult to draw the exact line of the LEED project boundary:

    1.    Minor construction work is occurring outside of the area intended to be LEED certified

    2.    Circulation space serves several attached buildings 3.    New core mechanical systems that serve several attached buildings are being
    installed

    Project teams must use their own judgment to make reasonable decisions about these situations on a case by case basis. Generally, construction work or space that serves buildings other than the one certifying should be excluded from the LEED project boundary. Note that construction work extending into non-certifying area must be consistently excluded from the certification process.

    See guidance under MPR #3 for more information on determining the LEED project boundary in terms of surrounding land.

    2)    TREATING ENERGY SYSTEMS

    For prerequisites and credits that deal with mechanical systems, the project team has three choices:

    a)    Separate systems Mechanical systems are completely separate from those in the existing building (emergency generators excepted) and can be modeled separately.

    b)    Shared central systems located outside of the structures in question The District and Campus Thermal Energy Treatment guidance, available at usgbc.org under the ‘Energy and Atmosphere’ section of any whole building rating system page, explains how to create an energy model in this situation.

    c)    Shared central systems located inside the structures in question LEED-CI EAc1.3 Option 2 gives guidance on modeling the entire addition and all systems serving the addition.

    3)    CHOOSING A RATING SYSTEM

    As with any project that does not clearly fit into a given rating system, the project team should consult the Rating System Selection Guidance (at usgbc.org, under ‘rating systems’). The certifying gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.), and only that area, should be used to determine which rating system is appropriate.

    4)    ALLOWING FOR A SMOOTH REVIEW

    The documentation of the certifying project must not create technical barriers to the completion of the certification review. It is incumbent upon the project team to ensure the following:

    a)    The distinction between the certifying and non-certifying gross floor area (in particular, the LEED project boundary) is clearly delineated on all relevant documents.

    b)    All building components of the LEED project that are addressed by LEED prerequisites and pursued credits (systems, materials, etc) are separate or separable for the purposes of the LEED review, from the building to which it is attached.

    5)    The LEED project, as defined by the LEED project boundary, must meet all MPR, prerequisite, and credit requirements independent of any building it may be attached to.

    6)    The certifying gross floor area must be contiguous. Multiple floors are acceptable, but non-certifying floors between certifying floors are not.
    NOTE: please see page 19 for multiple floor exceptions.

    7)    Fire safety infrastructure such as sprinklers, stairwells, and alarm systems may be shared with the non-certifying building.

    8)    LEED-EB: O&M project teams are encouraged to carefully review the requirements for EA Prerequisite 2 and Credit 1: Minimum/Optimize Energy Efficiency Performance before registering an attached building.

    II.    BUILDINGS ATTACHED TO LEED CERTIFIED BUILDINGS

    If a wing or tower is connected to a building that is already LEED certified, the addition/attached building may be considered a separate building for LEED purposes if the following conditions are met.

    1)    RESTRICTION ON RATING SYSTEMS

    The existing, previously certified building may have been certified under any version of one of the following rating systems.

    • LEED-EB: O&M
    • LEED-NC
    • LEED-CS
    • LEED-SCH
    • LEED-HC
    • LEED-Retail: NC
    • LEED-CI &/or LEED-Retail: CI (ONLY if at least 90% of the existing building’s total gross floor area was certified)

    The currently certifying attached building should use a design and construction whole building rating system.

    2)    PREVIOUS LEED CERTIFICATION

    All buildings physically attached to the building currently pursuing certification must already be LEED certified. In the plan view below, this exception applies to Addition A in relation to the main building ONLY– the project team would need to meet the conditions listed for buildings attached to non-LEED certified buildings for the Wing A/Wing B connection.

    III. BUILDINGS ATTACHED TO NON-LEED CERTIFIED BUILDINGS

    1)    VERTICALLY ATTACHED, LEED-EB: O&M, AND MAJOR RENOVATION PROJECTS

    If the certifying project is certifying under LEED-EB: O&M OR is a major renovation AND/OR is vertically attached to the non-certifying building, then it must be separated from the attached building by the following: a) Ownership
    AND b)    Management OR space usage type

    2)    SEPARATE NAME

    A separate name (including, if a horizontally attached project, a word such as ‘addition’, or ‘wing’ that indicates a physical difference) must be given to the certifying building. The same name must be used for all purposes – title of the LEED project as registered with USGBC / GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)., in formal publications, internal and external property listings and databases, signage, etc.

    3)    ACCURATE LEED REPRESENTATION

    LEED certification must be accurately communicated to building users. All promotional and descriptive material produced by the owner or on the owner’s behalf clearly distinguish the LEED certified building from any other that it is attached to. This includes clearly marking the distinction between the two spaces with signage. Alternatively, if the LEED certification of the building is confidential, the project team may opt to not communicate the achievement of LEED certification. In this situation, no signage, marketing, or publicity of any kind would announce the LEED certification.

    4)    VERTICALLY ATTACHED BUILDINGS ONLY: 20% OF THE TOTAL GROSS FLOOR AREA REQUIRED

    The certifying gross floor area must include at least 20% of the gross floor area of the overall structure. If the entirety of the certifying project OR the entirety of the non- certifying gross floor area is public infrastructure (such as a subway station) then this rule does not apply.

    5)    VERTICALLY ATTACHED BUILDINGS ONLY: METERS REQUIRED TO BE SEPARATE

    a. Energy usage meter - Every energy source servicing the building must be separately metered (emergency generators excepted).

    b. Water usage meter

    The definitions of vertically and horizontally attached buildings are further illustrated below.

    Previously developedAltered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Land that is not previously developed and landscapes altered by current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development. support structures and artificial land mass

    Buildings located on previously constructed docks, piers, jetties, infill, and other manufactured structures in or above water are permissible, provided that artificial land is previously developed (i.e., the land once supported another building or hardscapeThe inanimate elements of the building landscaping. It includes pavement, roadways, stonewalls, wood and synthetic decking, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. constructed for a purpose other than the development of the LEED project).

    Buildings cantilevered over water, highways, or other bodies are acceptable. o    Existing dry land (i.e. not wetlands) to which soil or other material has been added complies with this MPR.

    10% exemption for multi-tenant buildings certifying under LEED-EB: O&M

    Multi-tenant buildings certifying under LEED-EB: O&M may exclude up to 10% of the gross floor area from some prerequisites and credits as outlined in the LEED-EB: O&M reference guide and the submittal forms in LEED Online v3.

    Construction scope that may be excluded from a LEED-CI project boundary

    Sometimes elements of the exterior shell, primary structural components, or core mechanical systems that are being renovated or installed in parallel to the interior fit-out or alteration make up the bulk of the LEED project. Spaces containing these elements may be excluded from the LEED project space if those elements are not under the control of the entity conducting the interior fit-out or alteration.

    The line between certifying floor area and non-certifying floor area is not always clear. Project teams must use their own judgment to make reasonable decisions about these situations on a case by case basis. Generally, construction work or space that serves spaces other than the one certifying may be excluded from the LEED project boundary. Note that construction work extending into non-certifying area must be consistently excluded from the certification process.

    Understanding “complete interior space”

    Basic Definition For commercial interiors projects, this MPR states:

    “The LEED project scope must include a complete interior space distinct from other spaces within the same building with regards to at least one of the following characteristics: ownership, management, lease, or party wall separation.”

    The glossary gives the definition of ‘complete interior space’ as “At a minimum, all the gross floor area within the exterior walls of a building that is within a single occupant’s control and contains all building components altered as part of the same construction scope.” In addition to those attributes listed above, floors can be used to distinguish a complete interior space, if one floor is unaffected by construction work. This is illustrated below.

    This is a section drawing of a three story office building, all under the same ownership and management.





    Scenario 1: Only the third floor is undergoing construction (shaded), so it can be considered a complete interior space by itself, and the LEED project boundary will be limited to that floor.

    Scenario 2: Both the second and third floors are undergoing construction, so one floor by itself cannot be considered a complete interior space. They both must be included within the LEED project boundary.

     

     

     

     

    Exceptions

    There are many situations in which a single entity owns, manages, and/or occupies an entire building, and wishes to certify a renovated portion of the building that is not separate from other portions by one of the attributes listed above. This can include, but is not limited to, the following:

    Part of one floor Multiple, non-contiguous parts of one floor Multiple certifying floors separated by non-certifying floors
    For example, multiple unconnected office spaces within a warehouse may be renovated, but not the main warehouse floor area. In the section drawing of an academic science building below, only the labs (shaded) on the first and third floors are undergoing an alteration:

    Such spaces are not automatically disqualified from attempting to certify under LEED-CI. Project teams with this situation must submit a narrative in PIf1 in LEED Online v3 confirming that the conditions below are met.

    a)    It is unreasonable or impossible to draw a project boundary where there is separation by ownership, management, lease, or party wall separation. This often happens when the edge of the construction work does not coincide with such a boundary.

    b)    The construction work is being conducted under a single contract.

    c)    The project boundary includes 100% of the construction scope (it may extend beyond the construction scope. However, at least 60% of the total certifying gross floor area must be undergoing alteration).

    d)    The LEED project boundary is drawn at a clear, functional, AND physical barrier.

    e)    Signage will be provided to clearly demarcate the LEED space.

    f)    The LEED project boundary is not drawn in such a way as to create an unreasonably
    difficult review process that results from the reviewer’s inability to distinguish between strategies, services, or materials in the LEED certifying space and the non- LEED certifying space. For example, it would be best if the LEED project boundary coincided with an HVAC zone boundary.

    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND CLARIFICATION

    Ensuring compliance with the ‘entirety’ requirement

    For whole building rating systems (all but LEED-CI), this MPR states: “LEED projects must include the new, ground-up design and construction, or major renovation, of at least one commercial, institutional, or high-rise residential building in its entirety.”
    In the glossary, relevant definitions include:

    • Entirety
    • Physically distinct
    • Party wall
    • Major renovation

    Relevant additional guidance includes:

    • The attached buildings guidance above, which defines exceptions for horizontally and vertically connected buildings.

    The “already existing land” requirement is applicable to the entire LEED project

    This MPR requires that “All LEED projects must be designed for, constructed on, and operated on a permanent location on already existing land.” This requirement is applicable to all land within the LEED project boundary. See additional guidance for artificial land masses on page 18 of this document.

    How to treat parking garages

    Parking garages may not earn LEED certification A revised May 9, 2011 LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. states “Parking garages for cars and trucks may not pursue LEED certification. More specifically, buildings that dedicate more than 75% of floor area all square footage, to the storage and circulation of cars and/or trucks are ineligible for LEED. Square footage should be considered even if it is not covered, enclosed, or conditioned. This LEED Interpretation does NOT apply to vehicle maintenance shops of any kind, airport hangers, border facilities, car salesrooms, transit centers, or other buildings that deal with cars and trucks in a capacity other than parking, OR with vehicles other than cars and trucks.”

    Parking garages may not be included in the gross floor area of the LEED project building The definition of gross floor area in the glossary specifically disallows the inclusion of parking.

    Parking garages may be included within the LEED project boundary If parking is within, connected to, or on the site of the LEED project building, it may be (and sometimes, must be) included within the LEED project boundary. The MPR #3 section gives more guidance on this issue.

    Modular buildings elements are allowed

    Prefabricated or modular structures and building elements of any variation may be certified once permanently installed and/or established as part of the LEED project building in the location that they are intended to stay for the life of the entire structure.

    Buildings with movable parts are allowed

    Large movable parts, such as a retracting ceiling in a stadium, do not violate this MPR.

    Movable buildings are prohibited

    Structures not compliant with this MPR include cars, motor homes, trains, boats, ships, planes, and transient exhibits of any kind.

    If for any reason a LEED 2009 certified building is moved from the location cited at the time of LEED certification, it will no longer be in compliance with this MPR and the certification will become invalid.

    Special considerations for commercial interiors projects

    MOBILITY

    Buildings in which commercial interior projects are located, must be immobile and are subject to the same guidance on the subject of permanency as projects that are certifying under whole building rating systems.

    ALREADY EXISTING LAND

    Buildings in which commercial interiors projects are located are NOT required to be built on already existing land.

    Planned obsolescence

    While USGBC does not encourage planned obsolescence, the amount of time that a building or space is intended to remain standing does not affect compliance with this MPR. The purpose is to disallow a project to certify that is intended to be mobile over the course of its lifetime.

    Multi-party ownership

    Multiple-party ownership of a certifying building or space is acceptable. Proper accountability for MPR and rating system conformance must be in place.

    No exceptions for projects with IEQp2 conflicts

    Some project buildings, such as casinos, typically have difficulty achieving LEED certification due to a smoking policy that conflicts with Indoor Environmental Quality prerequisite 2, Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control (IEQp2). There will be no exceptions to this MPR to allow for partial building certification of such buildings. Project teams are encouraged to carefully review Option 2 in IEQp2 to explore opportunities to achieve LEED certification despite a smoking room located within a project.

    Multiple buildings

    This MPR states that “LEED projects must include the new, ground-up design and construction, or major renovation, of at least one....building in its entirety”, thus, a LEED project may only include ONE building unless the project qualifies for a multiple-building submission through the 2010 Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects (AGMBC). Part 2 of the 2010 AGMBC (due to be released by the end of 2011), which will contain additional guidance to help project teams certify a group of buildings as a package where the entire building set will receive a single rating, can be located at usgbc.org/campusguidance.

    Defining ‘one building’

    Super-structures can often be perceived as either a string of multiple buildings, or as a single building. This is typically due to light physical connections, such as a single hallway between buildings that are otherwise physically distinct. Such super-structures may, for the purposes of LEED, be considered a single building if both of the following criteria are met.

    a)    Space that can be included in the gross floor area of the project that serves a purpose other than parking or the circulation of people is contiguous throughout the structure.

    b)    All building components of the LEED project that are addressed by LEED prerequisites and pursued credits (systems, materials, etc) can be treated as one, such that separate reviews of the same issues are not required for different portions of the super- structure.

    If these criteria are not met, the project may be considered a set of multiple buildings, regardless of whether or not it can satisfy the ‘attached building’ criteria on pages 13-16. The AGMBC gives direction on the certification process for such projects.

    LEED for Core & Shell projects and ‘entirety’

    For a project certifying under LEED-CS, the project is considered a ‘building in its entirety’ without interior fit-outs being complete.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    MPR 2: Must be a complete, permanent building or space

    Intent

    Requirements

    All rating systems

    All LEED projects must be designed for, constructed on, and operated on a permanent location on already existing land. LEED projects shall not consist of mobile structures, equipment, or vehicles. No building or space that is designed to move at any point in its lifetime may pursue LEED Certification.

    New Construction, Core & Shell, Schools, Retail – New Construction, Healthcare

    LEED projects must include the new, ground-up design and construction, or major renovation, of at least one commercial, institutional, or high-rise residential building in its entirety.

    Commercial Interiors, Retail – Commercial Interiors

    The LEED project scope must include a complete interior space distinct from other spaces within the same building with regards to at least one of the following characteristics: ownership, management, lease, or party wall separation.

    Existing Buildings: O&M

    LEED projects must include at least one existing commercial, institutional, or high-rise residential building in its entirety.

223 Comments

0
0
Brian Bartholomew
Jan 24 2017
LEEDuser Member

MPR Supplemental Guidance Clarification

Project Location: United States

Regarding MPR2, the "Supplemental Guidance to the Minimum Program Requirements (Revision 2)", on page17 Article III.1) is titled "VERTICALLY ATTACHED, LEED-EB: O&M, AND MAJOR RENOVATION PROJECTS". My reading of Article III.1) is that it does NOT apply to LEED NC projects. Is this correct? My client is considering certification of a horizontal addition to an existing non-LEED certified building and it's not clear to me whether this Article III.1) applies. The client will own and manage both the original building and the addition.

Post a Reply
0
0
Jonathan Landry Director of sales and engineering Chaac Simulaciones Inc (Chaac Inc(
Jan 18 2017
Guest

Technical service building - Healthcare v2009

Project Location: Turkey

Hello fellow LEED experts, my client is confused on wether or not their services buildings has to be include in the current certification or could be certificated separately.

Details:
1.The building is beside the hospital on the other side of the parking. It contains cooling tower, transformers, trigeneration and other hvac supportive systems serving to the hospital building. The reason for that is to insulate all these technical premises from the hospital to minimize the sound emissions and any other interactions with the main building and that is a general approach for most of the hospital buildings in the region.

2. So, if our cooling tower, laundry/dishwashers, kitchens, cold rooms, food storage rooms (in summary most of the technical spaces) are located in the technical service building(TSB) which is a separate building outside the LEED boundary and larger than 25,000 sq.ft , could we still apply to WEc4.2 ? And could we count the water savings from washers/dishwashers in TSB for WEc3 credit?

3. There is an underground connection between technical service building and main hospital building consisting in cableway tunnels.

1
1
0
David Posada Integrated Design & LEED Specialist, SERA Architects Jan 23 2017 Guest 21388 Thumbs Up

Jonathan,
For a 2009 project, you might start with the MPR Supplemental Guidance document updated Sept 2011 at:
http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-2009-mpr-supplemental-guidance-revis...
especially pages 23 -27 regarding the site boundary. You'll find criteria there for when supporting service buildings and infrastructure can be included in the submission.
If the TSB is a pre-existing building, you'll want to see if your project meets the criteria for including the facilities in the submittals, but not the project boundary (pg 25 top).

Post a Reply
0
0
Eric Bautista Managing Consultant, LEED™ AP (BD+C Specialty) EB Project Management
Sep 14 2016
Guest
87 Thumbs Up

Reviewer's comment on MPR2

I am handling a new LEED building addition horizontally attached to a non-LEED existing building. We have submitted for Preliminary review and here are the comments from the reviewer (I put numbering to separate each sentences):

1.0 If the existing buildings to which a LEED project is attached are not LEED certified, then the project name must include a word such as "addition" or "wing" or otherwise identify itself as separate from the other buildings to which it is attached.

2.0 And signage must be installed to mark the distinction between the LEED project and the existing non-LEED buildings to which it is attached.

3.0 Provide documentation confirming that the LEED project building is separated from the attached buildings by both ownership and management or space usage type.

4.0 If the existing buildings are not LEED certified, revise or clarify the LEED project title and provide documentation (example signage or narrative) that demonstrates how the LEED project will be distinguished from the existing non-LEED buildings.

5.0 Examples of acceptable signage include providing the identifying project name and/or key plan adjacent to the LEED plaque display.

My inquiry for now:

Item No. 3: How can I document or write that the project is separated by ownership and management? And where exactly can I upload the documentation required by PIf1?

Post a Reply
0
0
Bo Slendak Owner, C.O.O. Delta Engineering Group LLC
Aug 26 2016
Guest
5 Thumbs Up

new building

Project Location: United States

We are currently doing a government facility and the project requires a LEED notebook be kept. Not having done this prior I need some guidance as to what and how to complete. The assumed LEED goal is silver and not be registered. Need some help

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 18 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Bo, I don't know what you mean by a LEED notebook but it sounds like you're starting a LEED certification from scratch and are not familiar with the process.

Get the LEED Reference Guide and read it, especially sections that touch on your work. Get a scorecard and run through it one credit at a time. Get a membership here on LEEDuser and read everything, use our sample documents, and post questions to the forum.

Post a Reply
0
0
Garrett Ferguson ARCH I, LEED AP BD+C Perkins+Will
Aug 25 2016
LEEDuser Member
194 Thumbs Up

Vertically attached - vertical expansion

I have a 4-5 story non-LEED building that will be adding 4-5 stories to the new project. I'm confused as to why they would require that the addition be of different ownership. We've worked with this company for some time, and they have developed a policy to achieve LEED certification on all new construction. Since it's the same owner, does that make this project entirely ineligible for certification? That seems like it would limit project types significantly, as this type of project certainly saves green space and takes advantage of already in-place infrastructure.
Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 18 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Garrett, NC is typically a whole building rating system, so you really need some way of distinguishing the addition from the existing building, whether it's through ownership or other characteristics like mechanicals being separate, or it has a separate identity, etc. Or, you can certify the entire building.

Post a Reply
0
0
Martin Meehan Principal Meehan Associates
May 30 2016
LEEDuser Member
435 Thumbs Up

Vertically attached - clarifications

Quoting MPR Supplemental Guidance document (Buildings attached to non-certified buildings, page 17):

"1) VERTICALLY ATTACHED, LEED-EB: O&M, AND MAJOR RENOVATION PROJECTS
If the certifying project is certifying under LEED-EB: O&M OR is a major renovation AND/OR is vertically attached to the non-certifying building, then it must be separated from the attached building by the following:
a) Ownership
AND
b) Management OR space usage type"

1. Does this mean that ANY certifying vertically attached building (i.e. a commercial C&S project) must comply with these two requirements?

2. Can a C&S building that is all new exclude a retail portion on the ground floor if the ownership and management are different?

This considering that ALL the other requirements for attached buildings are met.

Thanks

1
2
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 18 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

1) Yes

2) In my opinion, yes.

Best to double-check with GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). since these are make-or-break issues for pursuing certification.

2
2
0
Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jan 20 2017 LEEDuser Expert 3308 Thumbs Up

I agree with Tristan on both points. For #2, if the retail space is owned separately and not leased, has stand-alone systems, etc. then you should be able to exclude it. Definitely something to confirm with GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). though, and you'd want to give them more of the specifics related to that space and the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings)..

Post a Reply
0
0
al-emran hossain Green Associate & MEP consultant Bangladesh Green Building Academy
Mar 27 2016
Guest
52 Thumbs Up

Permanent Land /Space Requirement (MPRPp2)

Project Location: Bangladesh

Hi LEED Expert ,
We want to know about Minimum Program Requirement (MPRPp2)of permanent space/land matter. Our client has 20 years lease land from BD Gov and build NC factory as a LEED Project . Is it acceptable of lease land for LEED project what already given BD Gov for 20 years lease ?

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 27 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, that is fine. The LEED requirement doesn't mean that you have to have permanent access/possession of the land. It means that the building should be on permanent land, that is, not sea or land reclaimed from the sea.

Post a Reply
0
0
Aswin M Conserve Consultants Private Limited
Dec 23 2015
Guest
149 Thumbs Up

Single Building Certification_LEED New Construction 2009

Project Location: India

We have a Garment factory project that has three blocks with connectivity bridge.
 The three blocks are namely Cutting block, Sewing block, and Fabric store block. The gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) of Cutting block, Sewing block, Fabric store are 1,50,000 sq.ft, 1,00,000 sq.ft,and 24,000 sq.ft respectively (The connecting bridge area is included in the gross floor area of the project)
 Each blocks are mutually dependent on each other functionally that one single block cannot function without the other.
 Thus, the project has been designed in such a way that, all the blocks are interconnected by means of structural connectivity through bridge at each floor levels of the blocks making the building a single entity to perform its function.

Can anyone clarify, whether this project can be registered as Single building under LEED NC 2009 rating system.

Thanks in advance!..

1
7
0
Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Dec 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 9120 Thumbs Up

The LEED MPR Supplemental Guidance states that multiple buildings on a project site may only be considered a single building if both of the following criteria are met:

a) Space that can be included in the gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) of the project that serves a purpose other than parking or the circulation of people is contiguous throughout the structure.

AND

b) All building components of the LEED project that are addressed by LEED prerequisites and pursued credits (systems, materials, etc) can be treated as one, such that separate reviews of the same issues are not required for different portions of the superstructure.

By my understanding you don't meet the first requirement. Since each block is only connected by circulation space, it sounds to me like three projects on a master site.

2
7
0
Aswin M Conserve Consultants Private Limited Dec 24 2015 Guest 149 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your valuable suggestion Christopher!..

But referring to the Supplemental Guidance to the Minimum Program requirements(Revision 2), “LEED rating systems do not specifically address many building types, such as manufacturing facilities. Buildings types that are not specifically accommodated for may still apply for LEED certification if they meet all of the MPRs”

Can the factory building exempt the ancillary buildings as such it is exempted for Resorts, K-12 School, Hospitals to include multiple buildings below 25000 sq.ft to be registered under the Single Building.

3
7
0
Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Dec 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 9120 Thumbs Up

Your project can still apply for LEED, but you have to meet the MPRs. And to meet the MPRs you'll have to be three buildings.

May I suggest you reach out directly to the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). to discuss? We've done this on complex projects like this and it saves a lot of headaches.

4
7
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Dec 26 2015 LEEDuser Expert 6721 Thumbs Up

Aswin—As Christopher suggests, if the connecting links between the buildings are only for circulation of people, your project may not meet the ‘one building’ definition described in the MPR Supplemental Guidance. If you cannot qualify as one building, you may consider using the Group Approach described in the LEED Campus Guidance for Projects on a Shared Site. If your buildings are as interdependent as you say, the Group approach (which is sort of a hybrid) may be simpler to document than the Master Site approach.

5
7
0
Aswin M Conserve Consultants Private Limited Dec 29 2015 Guest 149 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your suggestions Christopher & Jon!!..

As per your suggestion & reference to the guide, we are heading with Group Approach as per LEED Campus Guidance.
Kindly clarify:
For Group Approach, the project needs to be registered individually (three buildings) and documented individually after creating a Block
The project shall be reviewed together under a Block and shall receive a single review comments for the entire Block. Each attempted credit threshold has to be achieved by all the three buildings in the Group.

Kindly correct me if I am wrong in my understandings about Group approach and provide your valuable additional guidance on the same.

Thanks!..

6
7
0
Aswin M Conserve Consultants Private Limited Dec 29 2015 Guest 149 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your suggestions Christopher & Jon!!..

As per your suggestion & reference to the guide, we are heading with Group Approach as per LEED Campus Guidance.
Kindly clarify:
For Group Approach, the project needs to be registered individually (three buildings) and documented individually after creating a Block
The project shall be reviewed together under a Block and shall receive a single review comments for the entire Block. Each attempted credit threshold has to be achieved by all the three buildings in the Group.

Kindly correct me if I am wrong in my understandings about Group approach and provide your valuable additional guidance on the same.

Thanks!..

7
7
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Dec 30 2015 LEEDuser Expert 6721 Thumbs Up

Aswin—The Group Approach is a single certification, so the review process is similar to a single-building review. I don’t recall all the intricacies of how to enter the documentation into LEEDonline, but Pages 10 through 13 of the Campus Guidance (http://www.usgbc.org/resources/campus-guidance) spell out the process. (I suspect that the latest version of LEEDonline may differ somewhat.)

For many of the credits, the documentation is the same as for a single-building project, but for some credits, you must complete separate forms for each building as outlined on Page 11.

Pages 18 through 53 spell out the special campus documentation for each LEED BD+C & ID+C prerequisite and credit. Follow the instructions for “Group Certification” listed under each item.

Post a Reply
0
0
John Zehren Zehren and Associates
Nov 30 2015
LEEDuser Member
104 Thumbs Up

Resort Hotel and Condo

Project Location: United States

I am working on a 7 story resort hotel and condo under LEED 2009 NC. We just received word that the 9 Condos on floors 6 and 7 will be finished at a future date. Floors 1-5 are under construction and will be completed in a year. I have reviewed the LI # 10102 and believe we can go with a Letter of Commitment when the owner finishes the spaces in about a year (market dependent). The TI condo spaces will be completed by the same contractor. We are ready to submit the preliminary design submittal in January 2016.

My question is:
1.- Can we get LEED certification without the TI complete in the condos?
2.-To what extent do we need to finish out the MEP in these condos in order to get the LEED certification without the completion of the Condos. (Do we include these spaces in the energy model?)
3. - Is a Letter of Commitment and Narrative all that is necessary?

thanks!
Melissa

1
4
0
John Zehren Zehren and Associates Dec 03 2015 LEEDuser Member 104 Thumbs Up

Still awaiting a response, but in the meantime maybe more information would help. The total GSF is 144,184 SF, the area to be built out at a future date is 32,510 (22.5%) of total. Do we include the total GSF for these residential areas in all the LEED credits (i.e.SSc4.2) since we are mixed use (commercial and residential) even though they will not be finished immediately. I am thinking of this in terms of future total build out.
thanks-
Melissa

2
4
0
Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Dec 11 2015 LEEDuser Expert 9120 Thumbs Up

1 - Yes, NC projects can have some unfinished spaces. 22% is well under the threshold that would move you to CS.
2 - include everything in the energy model. Model the unfinished spaces identical to the baseline, or provide an owner commitment letter if you want to take credit for improvement.
3 - Tenant Sales/Lease Agreement or Commitment letter.

Include the entire building.

3
4
0
John Zehren Zehren and Associates Dec 17 2015 LEEDuser Member 104 Thumbs Up

Thanks Christopher! We are going in the direction you have suggested. I am also including the temporary heaters/ equipment needed in the spaces in the energy model.

cheers!
Melissa

4
4
0
Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Dec 17 2015 LEEDuser Expert 9120 Thumbs Up

I would not model temp heat - just the finished condition.

Post a Reply
0
0
Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores
Nov 16 2015
LEEDuser Member
1581 Thumbs Up

Office tower on a shopping center "plinth"

I'm working on a project that consists of an office building tower that will be erected on top of a shopping center built 20 years ago.

If we consider the total building footprintBuilding footprint is the area on a project site used by the building structure, defined by the perimeter of the building plan. Parking lots, parking garages, landscapes, and other nonbuilding facilities are not included in the building footprint. for the shopping center this new tower will occupy less than 10% of the gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) of the shopping center. However, if we consider only the structural part of the shopping center that will be used to build the office tower (from one end of the shopping center up to an expansion joint) the new tower will account for more than 20% of gross floor area.

MPR Supplemental Guidance Revision #2, page 17, states that "the certifying gross floor area must include at least 20% of the gross floor area of the overall structure".

In this particular case what "overall struture" mean?

Additionally, MPR also states that "if the entirety of the non-certifying gross floor area is public infrastructure (such as a subway station) then this rule does not apply".

Since the non-certifying gross floor area is a shopping center may we consider that it is public infrastructure?

Regards.

1
2
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Nov 29 2015 LEEDuser Expert 6721 Thumbs Up

Pedro—You ask a lot, but let’s take first things first. You have either used incorrect terminology or you have calculated your area ratios incorrectly.

Your inquiry states that you have considered the “building footprint” of the shopping center when calculating the tower’s percentage of the overall “gross floor area” (GFA). “Building footprint” does not figure into this calculation. Base this percentage on the total GFA of the existing shopping center and the total GFA of the tower:
. . . . . . . 100% . × . ( GFA of tower )
------------------------------------------------------------------- ≥ 20%
( GFA of tower ) + ( GFA of shopping center)

Be sure to include the GFA of each floor of the shopping center and the tower and to exclude non‐enclosed, roofed‐over areas, airshafts, pipe trenches, chimneys, parking areas, and areas with ceiling heights less than 2.2 meters (7’-6”).

If your result is still less than 20% when calculated this way, it may be permissible to exclude portions of the existing shopping center if they are owned separately, if they are clearly distinguishable, or if they meet any of the other criteria outlined in the MPR.

If you choose to exclude portions, your best bet may be to submit an inquiry to USGBC now to verify that your rationale for doing so is sound.

2
2
0
Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability, Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores Nov 30 2015 LEEDuser Member 1581 Thumbs Up

Dear Jon,

thank you for your comment. You've made this issue much clearer.

Regards,
Pedro

Post a Reply
0
0
Veronica Reed Founder SDSARCH CIA. LTDA.
Sep 30 2015
LEEDuser Member
487 Thumbs Up

Major renovations

Project Location: Ecuador

Hello, what level of intervention would constitute as "Major Renovation"? we are renovating a building from the 1890's and need to preserve the shell, interior partitions, structure etc, but are renewing all energy, water, ventilation systems, and of course interiors and furnishings. Can I asume this would be accounted for as major renovation and then be able to certify under NC 2009?

1
2
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 30 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

Yes that certainly sounds like a major renovation.

2
2
0
Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Sep 30 2015 LEEDuser Expert 9120 Thumbs Up

A good rule of thumb - if the work is ongoing while the building is occupied, it's probably not a major renovation. If the spaces has been vacated - major reno.

Post a Reply
0
0
JP Bornholdt
Sep 11 2015
Guest
91 Thumbs Up

Project Excludes Exterior Shell Work

Project Location: United States

Hi,
Is this forum page exclusive for NC-2009? Several comments here seem to imply projects with no exterior shell work may be certified. My interpretation of MPR2 for NC-2009 is that projects with no exterior shell work are excluded from NC due to the definition of a "major renovation". Thanks for your feedback!

1
1
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 11 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

I think you can do an NC project without exterior shell work. It is certainly harder to do so but I don't think it is prohibited. There is a grey area between NC and EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. depending upon the extent of the renovation. An NC project would certainly require some major system replacements (HVAC, lighting, plumbing, etc.). We did a high school a while back that had no major shell work but was able to be NC certified. The hard part was finding enough points to get to the Silver target.

Post a Reply
0
0
Miriam Ramírez Baumgarten ARCH. LEED AP BD+C, ID+C Revitaliza Consultores
Sep 07 2015
Guest
117 Thumbs Up

2 buildings but cannot function independently without the other

Hi,
We have a project that includes a Hangar, with two levels of administrative offices and workshop area in one 250,000sf building. Adjacent to the building (80ft away) and separated only by pavement and greenery, is a 2 floor 25,000sf amenities building which will function as a controlled access (where workers must go through security before getting to the hangar) and will include services such as gym, dining, showers, that will be used daily by the Hangar´s workers (hangar has restrooms but no showers, lockers or cafeteria). Both buildings will be built simultaneously in an isolated area of the airport, where there will be a controlled access (through amenities building) allowing for entry only to hangar workers, office employees, personnel, and a few other transients. Would it be possible to register the project under the same LEED NC certification or would it be necessary to register 2 projects?

Thank you!

1
4
0
Jatuwat Varodompun Dr, Green Building Soultion Sep 08 2015 LEEDuser Member 2171 Thumbs Up

I used to submit this configuration and the review called for the mid-review to clarify the LEED boundary. This cause the project to delay for 2 month and we needed to revise the documents and resubmitted as only one building.

So, you should try to separate them with appropriate boundary or you could submit it as "Multiple Buildings in a campus site" scenario.

2
4
0
Miriam Ramírez Baumgarten ARCH. LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, Revitaliza Consultores Sep 08 2015 Guest 117 Thumbs Up

Jatuwat, thank you for your answer. In the LEEDv4 BD+C Reference Guide is stated: "If the project consists of multiple structures physically connected only by circulation, parking or mechanical/storage rooms, it may be considered a single building for LEED purposes if the structures have programmatic dependency (spaces, not personnel, within the building cannot function independently without the other building)..."

So I thought this might apply, although physical connection between buildings is not enclosed (the pavement and greenery are open space), but the reference guide does not specify on this.

Plus, there definitely is programmatic dependency between both buildings: the amenities building´s purpose is to provide access control, showers and cafeteria services to hangar´s workers, which are necessary and hangar building will not provide them. I don´t know if this would be a valid justification.

3
4
0
CT G Aug 08 2016 LEEDuser Member 723 Thumbs Up

Hi Miriam,

We have a very similar situation with one of our projects - how did you end up proceeding, as one building or multiple buildings?

Thanks for any insight!

4
4
0
Miriam Ramírez Baumgarten ARCH. LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, Revitaliza Consultores Aug 08 2016 Guest 117 Thumbs Up

Hi!

I asked the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). and sent renderings of the project, the conclusion was that they were two physically-distinct buildings and for the purposes of LEED, they had to be considered as two separate buildings.

So the 3 options were:

1. Certify them as completely separate projects, each claiming a portion of the site as its own LEED project boundary
2. Group approach
3. Campus (or Master Site) approach

I hope that helps, but if you still have doubts I would recommend you write a question directly to the GBCI so they can review your particular case. Good luck!

Post a Reply
0
0
John Lee
Aug 31 2015
Guest
83 Thumbs Up

Canopy to building with wall opening (is it a "complete bldg")?

Project Location: United States

We have a project that is an existing canopy converted into a building without a 15' wide wall on one side. There will be a 10'x15' enclosed office inside this building.

Would this be considered a "complete building"? The office itself does not met the 1000sf requirement but the whole building (w/ the 15' wide wall) would.

Would this be considered a "major renovation"?

Thanks!

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

John, I'm not clear from your post if the entire building is being considered, or just the canopy. Can you clarify? What is the SF of the building?

Post a Reply
0
0
Melanie Silver Sustainability Coordinator FXFOWLE
Aug 27 2015
LEEDuser Member
21 Thumbs Up

Tenant Guidelines for CS spaces within NC

Project Location: United States

We are working on a large residential project that has two very tiny retail spaces at the base (one less than 500 sf, and the other about 1500 sf). The residential portion is NC, and we are fitting out the interior. The retail spaces are being treated as CS, as they will be fit out later. For past NC projects that have significant CS spaces, we have had to write Tenant Guidelines in compliance with LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 10102. Is this still required for such small retail spaces that are an extremely small portion of the project? Of course we would still make sure the spaces comply with the LEED requirements and have the Owner sign a letter of commitment, but writing comprehensive Tenant Guidelines for such small spaces seems to be excessive. Has anyone been in a similar situation and not had to submit the Tenant Guidelines? Thank you.

1
2
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Melanie, unfortunately I have not heard of a minimum SF that would give you an exception in this case.

2
2
0
Melanie Silver Sustainability Coordinator, FXFOWLE Nov 30 2015 LEEDuser Member 21 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan. We didn't think so, but thought it was worth asking.

Post a Reply
0
0
Ilana Judah Director of Sustainability FXFOWLE
Jul 22 2015
LEEDuser Member
547 Thumbs Up

Residential high rise with school at the base

Project Location: United States

We are designing a high-rise residential tower with a school and retail area at the base. There is some entry and service space serving the residential tower on the cellar and ground floor levels. The second through ninth floors are occupied by the school, with the remaining floors (10-35th) occupied by the residential tower.

We are designing the core and shell for the school and retail, and the entirety of the tower portion. The school interior is being designed by a separate team. The building will be built by a single contractor but the school will be managed and operated by the local school construction authority.

In this scenario, is it possible to only certify the residential tower portion of the project?

1
6
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jul 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

Maybe. You might be able to do so but I would question why you would do so? If the same contractor is doing the vast majority of the project it would not be hard to combine the construction documentation. You would need to get on the same page with the school designers for the design credits. You would then treat the retail as shell space and certify the whole building.

2
6
0
Ilana Judah Director of Sustainability, FXFOWLE Jul 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 547 Thumbs Up

Thank you Marcus. The reason for doing so is that the local public school construction authority has their own internal green standards which they self certify to. So there would be some bureaucratic logistics involved in certifying the school component since it would be an "exception" to their standard process.

3
6
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jul 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

You will have logistical complexities with either approach. I would pick the one that gave you the best overall green outcomes.

Could this simply be a core and shell project instead of NC? Are the residential units to be sold or rented?

4
6
0
Ilana Judah Director of Sustainability, FXFOWLE Aug 04 2015 LEEDuser Member 547 Thumbs Up

We are doing the interiors for the residential portion and they will be sold as condos, so I don't think we would fall under LEED CS. Other than separate documentation, I don't seen any advantages to combining the buildings as the School Construction Authority has specific standards they adhere to, which may disadvantage the residential portion from achieving certain points.

5
6
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Aug 04 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

Since you are doing the CS and the residential fitouts I think it could qualify as CS. The condo owners are buying the interior spaces and the "owner" will be left with the core and shell.

Personally I always try to figure out a way to certify the whole building. Trying to certify a part of one is confusing to the market, especially when it is not a separate and distinct addition or something similar.

I also tend not to think in points. This is one of the major failures of the way LEED is structured IMO. It encourages this type of thinking which is just simply non-integrated, fractured and siloed. What approach would produce the best outcomes? Are the school standards more or less stringent than LEED? Could your project influence them or visa verse? Inclusion and collaboration transforms markets. Exclusion is a force of the status quo.

I am, of course, speaking in generalities since I am not familiar with all of the particulars of your situation so I am open to the possibility that I am full of it. Good luck.

6
6
0
Ilana Judah Director of Sustainability, FXFOWLE Aug 05 2015 LEEDuser Member 547 Thumbs Up

Thanks Marcus! Given the construction responsibilities and schedule which vary between the tower and the school interior, we have agreed to proceed with LEED NC and treat the School project as a Core & Shell.

Post a Reply
0
0
John Covello LEED AP BD+C, EBOM, LEED and Sustainability Manager Development Management Group
Jul 22 2015
LEEDuser Member
771 Thumbs Up

Low impact Eco Resort

Hello,

My company is looking to partner with the development of a low impact resort on an island located in Myanmar. It will have safari style rooms which will be part wood Plant-based materials that are eligible for certification under the Forest Stewardship Council. Examples include bamboo and palm (monocots) as well as hardwoods (angiosperms) and softwoods (gymnosperms).(deck & lower wall) and part canvas (upper wall and roof). They will be on a concrete foundation with wooden pilings for support. Can such a half tent building meet this requirement?

There will be a couple of permanent concrete buildings as well. Could the project just certify the concrete structures if the tent structures are not allowable? Thanks for your help.

John

1
1
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jul 24 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

I would think that the tent structure could meet this MPR. What portion of the MPR are you concerned about not meeting?

Post a Reply
0
0
CT G
Jun 21 2015
LEEDuser Member
723 Thumbs Up

LEED-NC and Interior Fitout

An owner is developing an office building which is to 75% occupied by one company (different from the owner developing the building). The rest of the building shall remain vacant until tenants are determined. The building owner is providing all finishes in the portion to be occupied by the already identified company. The project is therefore considered a LEED for New Construction project. However, once construction work by the current building owner is finished, the new company will undertake the remaining interiors work in terms of interior partitions, furniture layout, etc. Since this interiors work is done as a separate construction contract administered by the incoming company, the team understands that these works can be excluded from the New Construction certification scope. Is this correct?

1
12
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 22 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

Sounds to me like a core and shell project. The owner of the building is not occupying any of the building which is the criteria determining if the is NC or CS (more than 50% owner occupied makes it an NC project).

From the CS Rating System document:

"If a project is designed and constructed to be partially occupied by the owner or developer, then the owner or developer has direct influence over that portion of the interior build-out work. For these projects to pursue
LEED for Core & Shell certification, the owner must occupy 50% or less of the building’s leasable square footage. Projects in which more than 50% of the building’s tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. is occupied by a owner should pursue LEED for New Construction certification."

2
12
0
Ralph Bicknese Principal, Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects Jun 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 574 Thumbs Up

I believe you have the option here to determine which system you would like to utilize. Since the one tenant will occupy more than 50% of the building you could make this a LEED-NC project if you like. LEED gives the team the option to determine which LEED system is most appropriate for them and the project within certain limitations. It sounds as if it would be easiest for you to continue with LEED-NC since the core and shell and the large tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. could then be certified together with one system.
Based on CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide 10102 if you pursue the LEED-NC path and since the percentage of space to be finished later is less than 40% of the total you would need to establish tenant criteria for the remaining space(s). The CIR spells out the requirements.

3
12
0
CT G Jun 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 723 Thumbs Up

Thanks both for your responses. What I ommitted to say earlier is that the tenant who will be occupying 75% of the building has actually purchased those floors (which is why we understand this should be a NC project). So the building now has two owners. However, the initial developer (who owns the remaining 25%) is completing its construction scope (which includes the entire building and the interior finishes for the new owner). Afterwards, the new owner will be constructing the interior fitout. That is why we are unsure as to whether the fitout work needs to be included since it is part of a different construction contract.

4
12
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 22 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

Since the work under both "projects" is being undertaken by an owner of the building I do not think you can exclude the fit out work. You should combine both scopes of work in the LEED submission.

5
12
0
Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist, HGA Architects and Engineers Jun 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 2599 Thumbs Up

Make sure to also look at LI 10102.

In order to pursue NC, you have to meet that definition of "complete": "no further work is needed and the project is ready for occupancy." Based on your description, it does not sound like the Initial Developer is delivering a "complete" space to the New Owner and so you would need to include both scopes of work to be eligible to pursue NC.

It sounds to me like you could perhaps have the case for a CS project (where the Initial Developer delivers the core+shell and common spaces to the New Owner who then does their final fit-out under a separate construction contract). In that case, you could do CS for the whole base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings)., and then the New Owner could do a CI project to certify their final fit-out. CI is open to "tenants" who own or rent their space, so the fact that New Owner bought their floors is not an issue..

If you stay in NC - make sure to also refer to the extra requirements that LI 10102 puts in place for the other portion of the building (25%) and to make sure you are appropriately documenting that incomplete space throughout your NC application (WEp1 and EAp2 specifically as well as the Owner Commitment Letter/Tenant Guidelines).

6
12
0
CT G Jun 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 723 Thumbs Up

Thanks again for your responses. The original idea was to go with CS. However, because the tenant has already purchased 75% of the building (the building is still under construction), and some of the floors have been modified by the developer in order to suit the tenant´s needs (auditorium, for example), we understood we had to go with NC. Do you think we can still go with CS?

7
12
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 22 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

There are cases where more than one system could apply. Look over the CS requirements and the Interpretation Ralph mentioned and select the system which fits the best.

8
12
0
Ralph Bicknese Principal, Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects Jun 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 574 Thumbs Up

Make sure you read CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide 10102 carefully and read between the lines. It took me a while to figure out that the Owner Letter of Commitment only applies to spaces to be finished (later) by the Owner. The non-binding Tenant Design and Construction Guidelines only apply to incomplete or future tenant spaces. The Owner Lertter of Commitment does NOT apply to tenant spaces.

9
12
0
Ralph Bicknese Principal, Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects Jun 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 574 Thumbs Up

I have been rereading this thread. As I understand, a developer is building the building (core and shell). Another group has 'puchased' portions of the building interior. This sounds like an office condo situation and the second group would actually own that space and would be able to sell it in th efuture if they wanted to.

Would the interior space be built by others than the construction team that built the building? If so it may make sense to go ahead with certification as a core and shell project. Joining submittals by two different owners and contractors into one LEED project is very difficult and probably an undue burden on the Owner/Construction teams and not generally required by LEED. And you would still have the option of certifying the 75% interior finish space as LEED-CI.

But if the Construction teams are the same for both spaces you may choose to certify under LEED-NC (fllowing CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide 10102 for the future tenant fit out - the last 25%). That has the added advantage of having more of the building actually meet LEED than LEED-CI only and more cost effective than separate certifications under LEED-CS and (the optional) LEED-CI.

10
12
0
CT G Jun 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 723 Thumbs Up

Ralph, thanks again for your response. You are correct in your assumption regarding the condo situation.
Yes, the interior space would be built by others than the construction team that built the building. However, we understood that because one of the current owners (even though not the one developing the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings).) is to occupy more than 50% of the building, and since the building as developed includes some spaces to be used exclusively by the second group and includes the interior finishes for those interior spaces to be occupied by the second group (though not the construction of the interior layout itself), then we had to opt for NC. Nevertheless, if we understand correctly, we could still go to CS?

11
12
0
Ralph Bicknese Principal, Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects Jun 23 2015 LEEDuser Member 574 Thumbs Up

Yes, after all discussion, I believe it would be legitimate and most appropriate to use LEED-CS for the building and core spaces.

The large interior tenant/owner could then use LEED-CI for their fit out but would not be required to.

The difficulties of combining the design and construction documentation and coordinating the submittals for two separate projects; the core and shell building owned, designed and built by one entity and the 75% interior space owned, designed and built by separate design and construction teams, is huge. The complexity could pose a serious hurdle that could jeopardize certification of the building.

There may be something I have missed and the choice of the rating system to use is a big decision. It would make sense to contact the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). and discuss this with a reviewer.

12
12
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 23 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

It does look like you could go either way depending upon how you present the "ownership" issue.

I have not had as much difficulty combining two scopes of work by two separate teams on the same project as Ralph. It is almost twice the work to make sure both teams provided the necessary information. It is an added layer of difficulty for sure, but it certainly can be done and is not a huge obstacle in my experience. If you separate the projects into CS and CI it is twice the work as well.

Talking to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). is a good idea as you are in a grey area.

Post a Reply
0
0
Catherine Adams Architectural Associate Astorino|CannonDesign
Jun 09 2015
Guest
78 Thumbs Up

Existing Building Renovation and Site Work

Project Location: United States

We have an existing two-story community recreation center with an adjacent parking lot. Most(about 75%) of the building interior will be renovated, with some new windows added to the perimeter. Since the project includes renovation to the parking lot (removing spaces to add vegetation), we have assumed the project falls under NC v2009. The building contains a two-story gymnasium which is about 25% of the building area; no work will be performed in this room. It's in the corner of the building, so two walls border interior spaces and two walls border the outside. Can we exclude the gym from the LEED project boundary? If so, where do we draw the line and what of the walls, slab, roof do we include/exclude?

1
3
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 09 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

Why exclude it?

2
3
0
Catherine Adams Architectural Associate, Astorino|CannonDesign Jun 09 2015 Guest 78 Thumbs Up

The gym is a disproportionate consumer of power and HVAC. The existing building is only 10 years old, so the owner doesn't want to pay to upgrade the gym's lighting, etc, if the room can be excluded from the LEED scope.

3
3
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 09 2015 LEEDuser Expert 68681 Thumbs Up

Gyms generally have relatively low energy use. No lighting or HVAC upgrade would be required by LEED or any energy codes. The gym would be included in the energy model in a neutral manner (modeled the same in the proposed and baseline) so it would only slightly affect the overall results. So no cost implications and next to no impact on the energy savings.

MPR2 encourages projects to certify whole buildings, not parts of them. There are exceptions for certain situations like additions. Seek not exclusions but look for opportunities to benefit the whole.

Post a Reply

Start a new LEED comment thread

Feb 25 2017
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2017 – BuildingGreen, Inc.