NC-2009 MPR3: Must use a reasonable site boundary

  • MPR3 Supplemental Guidance from USGBC

    This Bird's Eye View text is from USGBC's MPR Supplemental Guidance Revision #2. See the Credit Language tab for the MPR requirements.

    INTENT

    In order to ensure fair and consistent evaluation for all projects - particularly under the Sustainable Sites credit category - it is necessary to have guidelines for an acceptable LEED project boundary. All site conditions and impacts related to a building must be considered and addressed in the certification process to ensure a complete and thorough examination of the environmental impacts of a building.

    SPECIFIC ALLOWED EXCEPTIONS

    Land assigned to previous projects may be re-assigned to LEED-EB: O&M projects

    Any land associated with a previous LEED project may be re-assigned to a LEED-EB: O&M project with no restrictions.

    When non-contiguous parcels may be included in the LEED project boundary

    Non-contiguous parcels of land may be included within the LEED project boundary if the conditions below are met.

    a)    The parcel(s) where the LEED project building resides is separated by land that is owned or controlled by an entity different than the owner of the land associated with the LEED project building (e.g. a public right-of-way through the site controlled by the city).

    b)    Those parcels separated from the parcel on which the LEED building resides directly supports or are associated with normal building operations of the LEED building. See additional guidance on the following page of this document.

    c)    The non-contiguous parcels are no more than 1⁄4 mile (0.40 kilometer) walking distance apart.

    d)    There is a clear and safe walking path between the parcels.

    e)    In aggregate, the parcels meet the requirements of all MPRs, prerequisites, and attempted credits

    f)    All parcels share the same common regulatory jurisdiction and are owned, leased, or managed by the same organizational entity.

    g)    The project team provides a narrative and a map to demonstrate compliance with
    items (a) through (f) above.

    The Additional Details section of PIf1 LEED Online v3 should be used for this purpose.

    When land included in submittals may be excluded from the LEED project boundary Land described in this section is not required to be included in the LEED project boundary, and therefore is not subject to consideration for prerequisite, other credit, or other MPR compliance.

    ALL RATING SYSTEMS: STORM WATER DESIGN CREDITS

    Any land used solely to earn this credit, but not otherwise required to be included by MPR #3.

    LEED-EB: O&M, SUSTAINABLE SITES CREDIT 5 SITE DEVELOPMENT-PROTECT OR RESTORE HABITAT

    Any land used solely to earn this credit, but not otherwise required to be included by MPR #3.

    LEED–RETAIL: NC, SUSTAINABLE SITES CREDIT 5.1 SITE DEVELOPMENT-PROTECT OR RESTORE HABITAT

    Any land donated to a land trust to meet the requirements of option 2

    When facilities included in submittals may be excluded from the LEED project boundary

    Occasionally, project buildings use facilities (e.g. parking lots) that are outside of the LEED project boundary as part of their calculations the parking, bicycle storage, shower/changing rooms, and/or on-site renewable energy credits. This is allowable when the facilities serve the LEED project, and at least one of the following two conditions is met:

    a)    The facilities are not a part of the LEED project construction scope.

    b)    The facilities are physically separate from the LEED project by land not owned by the LEED project owner (or, if on a campus, physically separate such that the inclusion of the facilities in the LEED project boundary would be difficult or unreasonable).

    If the facilities meet one of these conditions, they may be excluded from the LEED project boundary, and therefore they will not be considered for other prerequisite, credit, or MPR compliance. However, those facilities also cannot be used to show compliance for other LEED projects, unless the sufficient capacity is present.

    EXAMPLE

    There are showers in a building adjacent to the LEED project building. The showers may be excluded from the LEED project boundary even if they are used to show compliance with Sustainable Sites credit 4.2: Alternative Transportation, Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms in LEED-NC, but they may not be included in the calculations for Water Efficiency prerequisite 1. In addition, the showers cannot be used to earn this credit for an additional LEED project unless the required shower-to- Full Time Equivalent (FTE) ratio is met for both projects.

    Real property no longer attributed to a certified building

    If a certified building is demolished, all property attributed to that LEED project may be assigned to another LEED project.

    When land not owned by the LEED project owner may be included

    Land that the LEED project owner does not own (i.e., leases, has an easement on, or has no claim to) may be included within the LEED project boundary if it can very clearly be shown to support building functions (this includes stormwater management strategies) or is a part of the construction scope. Otherwise, it should be excluded.

    Project boundaries that include other buildings

    There are many situations in which it is appropriate for the LEED project boundary to include another building. These include:

    • An addition to an existing building, when the entire structure is surrounded by land that supports the addition and therefore could be included within the LEED project boundary.
    • The site of the LEED project includes several smaller, supporting buildings.

    In such cases, the LEED rating will only officially apply to the project building, although the ancillary structures (other buildings) may have to be accounted for in the calculations for the LEED project. The following guidance addresses these situations, breaking them into two categories: 1) LEED-certifiable building on site and 2) not LEED-certifiable building on site.

    LEED-CERTIFIABLE BUILDING ON SITE

    If there is another LEED-certifiable building on the same site as the LEED project building, it is not required to certify, but in order to take credit for aspects of the site that are shared between the buildings, the project(s) should refer to the 2010 Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects (AGMBC). The 2010 AGMBC describes the certification process for multiple building situations. It allows for all site attributes to contribute to LEED certification by the use of a Master Site project to document shared Campus Credit strategies. Note that this guidance can be applied to vertically attached buildings, in which case the master site boundary and the individual site boundaries can coincide on all edges.

    NON-LEED-CERTIFIABLE BUILDING ON SITE

    If there is a non-LEED-certifiable building within the LEED project boundary, the project team can include the non-certifying building within the project boundary in ALL relevant submittals that are allowed and appropriate for each individual credit and prerequisite, essentially treating the non-certifying building as an extension of the certifying building.

    Temporary structures

    Temporary structures erected for the purposes of supporting construction administration work that will be removed at construction completion, are not subject to this MPR and will not be required to certify.

    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND CLARIFICATIONS

    How to define land that is associated with and directly supports a building

    This MPR requires that ‘The LEED project boundary must include all contiguous land that is associated with and supports normal building operations for the LEED project building....’. This includes land altered in any way as a result of the LEED project construction, with exceptions as detailed above, and features enjoyed primarily by the building users, such as:

    • Hardscape, such as parking and sidewalks
    • Septic treatment equipment
    • Stormwater treatment equipment
    • Landscaping

    Often, land is shared with other buildings, extends into large areas of land, or has other attributes such that it is unclear where the project boundary should be drawn. Although many of these situations are addressed in this document, there will always be unique circumstances that cannot be anticipated. In this case, it is the responsibility of the project team to determine a reasonable boundary that meets the intent of LEED and the available guidance as much possible.

    EXAMPLE

    Two neighboring stores are being constructed, and one is pursuing LEED certification. A new parking lot with fifty spaces will be shared by the two stores. The certifying store estimates that it will use twenty parking spaces on a regular basis to serve its employees and customers. Therefore, the project team must draw its LEED project boundary to include twenty spaces and forty percent (20/50 = 40%) of the supporting hardscape (driveways, sidewalks, etc).

    EXAMPLE

    A construction project on a college campus will result in a new student center and a new storm-water infrastructure, including drainage pipes and a retention pond. The infrastructure will serve the new building as well as other buildings on campus. It is at the project team’s discretion to include this infrastructure in their LEED project boundary or not.    However, if it is included it must be included consistently for all applicable prerequisites and attempted credits.

    Understanding gerrymandering

    Gerrymandering is defined in the document’s glossary below as ‘To divide and assign land in such a way as to give unfair, inconsistent representation to one parcel over another.’ Gerrymandering can also be described as the exclusion of site area from the LEED Project Boundary that is associated with or directly supports building functions in order to achieve a LEED prerequisite or credit.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    MPR 3: Must use a reasonable site boundary

    Intent

    Requirements

    New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools, Existing Buildings: O&M, Retail – New Construction, Healthcare
    1. The LEED project boundary must include all contiguous land that is associated with and supports normal building operations for the LEED project building, including all land that was or will be disturbed for the purpose of undertaking the LEED project.
    2. The LEED project boundary may not include land that is owned by a party other than that which owns the LEED project unless that land is associated with and supports normal building operations for the LEED project building.
    3. LEED projects located on a campus must have project boundaries such that if all the buildings on campus become LEED certified, then 100% of the gross land area on the campus would be included within a LEED boundary. If this requirement is in conflict with MPR #7, Must Comply with Minimum Building Area to Site Area Ratio, then MPR #7 will take precedence.
    4. Any given parcel of real property may only be attributed to a single LEED project building.
    5. Gerrymandering of a LEED project boundary is prohibited: the boundary may not unreasonably exclude sections of land to create boundaries in unreasonable shapes for the sole purpose of complying with prerequisites or credits.
    Commercial Interiors, Retail – Commercial Interiors

    If any land was or will be disturbed for the purpose of undertaking the LEED project, then that land must be included within the LEED project boundary.

171 Comments

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GABRIEL MORALES Architect Grupo Syasa
Apr 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
553 Thumbs Up

LEED Baundary Campus - parking lot

We have a campus project consists of 2 towers with retail corporate considered LEED CS and 2 residential towers that are not LEED certified , is underground parking on 5 levels with a design criterion of energy-efficient lighting from standard ASHRAE 90.1-2007 .

For the operation and functioning of parking lots, are separated as follows :

The distribution of the parking lot corresponding to the residential towers are located in the basement 1, 2 and 3 to 50 %

The distribution of the parking lot corresponding to the office towers and retail are located in the basement 1, 2, 3 to 50% and 4, 5 in 100% of the entire parking lot.

It is important, the separation of parking from levels 1 , 2 and 3 are physically divided by a wall.

Our question is :
How do we consider our LEED Baundary , as parking in residential towers do not apply for LEED?

Regards

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 16 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Gabriel, I am going to focus on the question you asked at the end and the put aside the other detail for now. Let me know if this approach is confusing.

Are you referring to the LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. stating that parking garages cannot be LEED certified? If so, that only applies to certifying parking garages on their own.

Parking supports the normal operations of a building and should be included within the boundary. In your situation it is typical to divide up parking areas and levels among individual LEED projects.

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GABRIEL MORALES Architect, Grupo Syasa Apr 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 553 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan,
The question we have is in the EAp2 in the energy model, considering the parking garage of the residential towers will not be LEED certified.

We do not want to benefit from an area that is not for us.

Reviewing the forum mentioned that there was no problem in dividing the parking garage operation.

What do you recommend?

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Kelly Duepner LEED BD+C Christner Inc.
Apr 02 2014
LEEDuser Member
91 Thumbs Up

Overlapping LEED boundaries - Future development

I posted this in the PIf1 forum before seeing this one. I tried to delete it there, but couldn't see how. Sorry for the repost.

The project in question is being constructed on an dense, urban medical campus. All future buildings on campus are to be LEED.

The site was originally a surface parking lot. This project is using half the site. Apx half the parking lot is to remain and is being disturbed by rework (some new islands, etc) for updated traffic flow, repair as the existing lot is being used as construction layoff space, and some utility work. The original LEED boundary we drew was the same as the construction limit line on the drawings - including everything I described above. In the future though, there has been some initial planning for another building on an adjacent lot. At that time the remaining parking lot from our project would be demo'd for part of future building footprintBuilding footprint is the area on a project site used by the building structure, defined by the perimeter of the building plan. Parking lots, parking garages, landscapes, and other nonbuilding facilities are not included in the building footprint. and vegetated, pedestrian plaza. The LEED boundary required for that future project overlaps with disturbed area from this project (and our current LEED boundary). This seems like a typical situation for urban campus' as the next project might not be for 10 years and the site needs to look finished in the interim.

It seems no matter how we draw the boundary we are in conflict with requirement 1 or 4 of MPR #3.

MPR #3 requirement 1 states that 1.The LEED project boundary must include... all land that was or will be disturbed for the purpose of undertaking the LEED project

MPR #3 requirement 4 states "no given parcel of real property within the LEED project boundary has ever been or ever will be attributed to another LEED project building"

Thoughts?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Apr 02 2014 LEEDuser Expert 12092 Thumbs Up

I have many, many thoughts about this exact issue and have discussed this with USGBC and GBCI people. Here are some thoughts beyond yes, this is a problem.

1. Carefully consider declaring this a campus and using the associated guidelines. This keeps you out of MPR3, requirement 4 issues. However, there are some very real downsides to making the hospital a campus.
2. Review any site items that were done or will be done for the project years prior to the building occupancy. One of our projects had a road constructed in a separate project that I included in the LEED boundary for a current project. The road had to be built for the LEED project to occur so for me this fell into requirement #1. While talking to the GBCI, they were surprised that I had had that interpretation and they were going to discuss this kind of issue internally. In short, there may be some leeway, which leads to my next thought.
3. Talk to the GBCI and get them to pre-approve your LEED project boundary. Hospitals have some of the trickiest project boundaries around and it is going to take a conversation with them. Getting something from them in writing will help when your in final review and the reviewers have all changed. You know it takes years for hospital project to get built.
4. I interpret requirement 4 on hospital campuses to mean those credits like storm water that are meant to be 'lifetime'. Avoiding those kind of credits with your current project should help your future arguments if you do not declare the hospital as a campus.

As for what we do here, we tend to avoid the campus declaration if we can. We don't like the thought that the whole existing building / collection of buildings would need to be considered. We have been able to work around MPR issues by talking with the GBCI and in some ways, getting lucky. We do have one urban hospital with a campus since there was no way around it. Fortunately, it is not a massive urban campus.

Good luck,

Susan

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Kelly Duepner LEED BD+C, Christner Inc. Apr 02 2014 LEEDuser Member 91 Thumbs Up

Susan,

Thanks for all your insight. This is not the first LEED project on the campus for this organization (making it more confusing is the campus is made up of multiple organizations) and I doubt at the current design/construction phase registering a Master Site is a viable option.

I believe we will need to push forward as a single building certification.

You recommended to talk to the GBCI and get them to pre-approve your LEED project boundary. What channels have you used to communicate with GBCI/USGBC? Did you have it approved as a formal inquiry?

I have used the contact us link from the website, but those response emails seem to take weeks if not a month to receive. I hear you can have a representative assigned to your project but only after the design submission has been made? Any information you have about quickly and efficiently communicating with GBCI would be appreciated.

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Cassandra Coffin
Mar 25 2014
LEEDuser Member

LEED Project Boundary for Site Prepped by Previous Project

I am working on a new residence hall for a college campus and have a couple of questions in regards to the LEED project boundary.

Due to multiple scheduling impacts, the site work and deep foundations for the project was done prior to completion of the building documents, and due to overlapping construction on campus, a portion of a future project to re-route the campus chilled water loop was included. I understand the LEED project boundary should include any site disturbed by the construction of the project, but all of this was done ahead of time under a separate project contract, completed by a separate contractor while the building documents were being completed. The building documents were then bid out separately.

In addition, an adjacent street that was to have minimal disturbance was completely redone to accommodate the new campus chilled-water loop, which was only done to minimize the construction at this location after the completion of the new residence hall. Had it not been added, it would have been done with the rest of the chilled water loop project in the future. It just seemed easier and cheaper for the University to add that section now while the area was already being disturbed.

My question is if we need to include that street as part of the LEED project boundary? It is rather steep and downstream of our water quality unit, thus making it impossible to achieve the storm water quality water credit. I don't want to exclude it if it is going to be viewed as gerrymandering the site, but if that portion of the chilled water loop project had not been included into the site and deep foundations project, I do not think we would have included it anyway. Is that, along with the fact that it was done as a separate project/contract enough to exclude it from the LEED project boundary? Or would it just be considered a phase of the building project and thus need to be included?

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sompoche sirichote
Mar 24 2014
LEEDuser Member
160 Thumbs Up

LEED NC - Project Boundary

We are working on a project that consists of 2 buildings: office building and workshop building. The owner wants to certify only the office building.

The land is all owned by the same entity and there is no property line to divide the 2 buildings. The buildings have a shared parking lot, pedestrian hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios., roadways around the buildings, and utilities area (with separate meters).

Can we draw a boundary line directly through the pedestrian hardscape where the office is separated from the workshop? If so, how should we include the shared parking lot, hardscape, utilities area in the LEED project boundary?

Thank you.

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Kimberlyn Caoagas
Mar 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
5 Thumbs Up

LEED Project Boundary for a Transit Station

BACKGROUND INFO:
- Attempting LEED EB: O&M Certification for a historical train/transit station
- The first floor of the station has an opening/threshold (no enclosures) that connects to an underground tunnel that lead to the railway terminals/portals.
- The first floor of the station has a separate MEP system from that of the connecting tunnel

QUESTION:
- Even though the station and tunnel are technically connected, can the LEED Project Boundary exclude the tunnel since it's only purpose is for circulation and the MEP systems are separate?

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Kent Liu
Mar 10 2014
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

LPB for underground parking area shared between several projects

I am currently defining LPB for 3 different LEED projects under the same developer. The underground parking area is shared between the buildings in these projects.

I understand that an LPB can be 3 dimensional. However, the basement is of irregular shape and there are no demarcations of dedicated lots for the users of each building.

I am at risk of "invading" into the basement of a building from another LEED project while I am trying to get enough parking lots for my current one. Is this acceptable?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 10 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Kent, I would avoid "invasions." Draw your current project's LEED boundary in a way that will allow for reasonable boundaries for the other projects as well.

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Xavier Valladares Sustainability Consultant ECOstudio XV LTD
Mar 08 2014
Guest
2 Thumbs Up

Existing Office Building not part of the contract

Dear LEED User Team.

We have a client who is interested in certifying NC a new industrial plant.Adjacent to the future new plant is an existing office building which obviuously supports the administrative operation of the future new plant. However this existinb building will not be part of the LEED assessment or the contract.

Can you confirm the existing office building can be excluded from the LEED project boundary and scope.

Many thanks,

Regards

XV

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 08 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Xavier, I would definitely exclude the office building from the LEED boundary and project documentation, as it is a separate building, and existing, etc.

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Xavier Valladares Sustainability Consultant, ECOstudio XV LTD Mar 09 2014 Guest 2 Thumbs Up

Tristan,

Thank you very much for your response. Always very useful.

Just a final check. The existing office building would share the same party wall as the future new build industrial plant. The future new industrial plant and the existing office block have different entrances, however they are not a completely separate building.

Do you still think it will be safe to exclude the building and there would be no trouble with the gerrymandering issue?

Many thanks,

Regards

XV

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 10 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Xavier, for connected buildings I recommend reviewing the guidance posted at the top of this page.

However, a party wall separation, and separation of HVAC, electrical systems, etc, is typically sufficient for LEED purposes.

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Skotieono Johnson The Miller Hull Partnership
Mar 05 2014
LEEDuser Member
5 Thumbs Up

Identifying LEED boundary to exclude portion of project

The registered project includes commercial core and shell space with an adjoining housing tower which will be scored under the Evergreen Sustainable Development Standard. In terms of relative square footage, over 60% of the total project area is associated with the commercial Core and Shell, therefore we have registered the project under core and shell.

The team has currently drawn the LEED boundary to exclude the housing portion of the project because the phasing of the project has the housing portion being constructed after the commercial core and shell space and the housing is potentially part of a separate construction contract and separate set of documents. Please advise if this approach is acceptable.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Skotieono, more information is needed to see if these attached spaces can be separated per LEED. I'd recommend reviewing the guidance above and then posting back here with more specific questions.

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YP Pierce
Feb 16 2014
Guest
258 Thumbs Up

Project Boundary for Shared Parking

I am working on a new construction of a hospital building on a site where a new MOB and a shared parking garage will be also constructed.

The owner is pursuing LEED certification for the hospital but not for MOB. Regarding to the project boundary, I assume the MOB will be excluded from the LEED project area since the MOB is not in part of the LEED project scope. How about shared parking lots and shared parking garage? Do I include 100% of the parking spaces to the project boundary?
The surface parking lots and the parking garage will be used by the building users from both buildings.
Any information you can provide me would be greatly appreciated

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Feb 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 12092 Thumbs Up

How is the project phased? How is the land development happening? If all this work was happening around the same time, I would probably have a campus approach to the site. This would mean I may have to figure and proportion things like parking between the two buildings but I'd want to get the land piece done properly for the LEED project. It would also avoid the gerrymandering problems. Develop what you think is a reasonable approach and reach out to your review team.

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YP Pierce Feb 21 2014 Guest 258 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Susan.

Your advice definitely helped me set the project boundary.

About MPR 3, LEED doesn’t say the project shall include non-certifying building within the project boundary in all relevant submittals. Instead, it says, “…the project team can include…”

Does this mean a parking garage can be excluded from MR and IEQ credits? What happens with EA p1 Energy Performance?

I really appreciate your help.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Feb 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 12092 Thumbs Up

YP

This is posted in the CI forum and most of my work is in NC and HC; caveat emptor! In the Bird's Eye above, they discuss the construction scope. Is the parking garage part of the same construction project and budget as the LEED building? You're in a gray area and at some point you have to make the call. Bear in mind that parking garages can't be LEED certified on their own. Including the garage will muddy up the IEQ and EA credit calculations.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 24 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

To clarify, this just looks like the CI forum but it is the same forum for all v2009 rating systems for MPRs. Which seems to be more confusing than anything, so maybe I will undo that.

But YP, if the parking garage is in your boundary and in your construction scope you have to include it in all applicable credits, including SS, MR, and to the extent that it is consuming energy, EA.

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Sathish Kumar Green projects Conserve Consultants Pvt. ltd.
Feb 11 2014
Guest

LEED EB O&M Project Boundary

There are 3 buildings in a single site and these 3 buildings have a shared basement parking. I would like to know if 2 buildings from this site can be certified together under the LEED EB rating system?

For more information, we referred the certification guidance for attached buildings and it states that the LEED EB system may not use this guidance for horizontally attached buildings. Hence my understanding is that, a horizontally attached building is not eligible for LEED EB O&M Rating system or should I refer any other books/guidance to clarify my doubt.

Please do comment on this.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 24 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Sathish, LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. is typically applied to a single, whole building. There is additional guidance posted above about how to interpret horizontal connections. However, generally speaking if only parking is shared between buildings and not HVAC, etc., they are considered separate buildings.

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Doreen Kruschina Doreen Kruschina Planung+Baumanagement
Feb 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
137 Thumbs Up

construction site facilities outside of LEED project boundary

Hi,
working on an industrial plant located on previous farmland the developer has leased some additional lands where he´s put the site facilities. Do i have to alter the LEED boundary to include these into the LEED project?

In PIForm 1 it says under #3. Must Use a reasonable site boundary
"The LEED project boundary does not include land that is owned by a party other than that which owns the LEED project unless that land is associated with and supports normal building operations for the LEED project building."

The area will be remediated after construction works have been finished.
Thanks for advice

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 11 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Doreen, the LEED boundary should include all land that is supporting the normal operations of the building, and it is also typical to include all land that it is within the construction scope of the project. How does your project fall under these two measures?

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Luciana T.
Feb 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
61 Thumbs Up

CI-2009 LEED Project Boundary when remodel is only one floor

I am remodeling only one floor of a 9-story building. The tenant occupies the whole floor but it is not remodeling all the rooms within their space. The remodel is about 80% of the floor.
My question is: Is the LEED Boundary the full floor being remodeled or only the areas undergoing the remodel?
Thank you,

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 11 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Luciana, in this case where the remodel encompasses the vast majority of the floor, I think it would be simpler and clearer in terms of your LEED project boundary, in defining the LEED-certified space (a key part of the intent behind this MPR) to include the entire floor. If there are clear ways to distinguish between the LEED and non-LEED spaces, then it might make sense to do that, however.

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Luciana T. Feb 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 61 Thumbs Up

Thank you Tristan. So if I include existing walls and finished spaces would those qualify for MRc1.2 Building reuse?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 12 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

That would be a good question to post to that forum on our site. I think the answer is yes, but would want to double-check the info on that page.

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Valerie Molinski Director of Sustainability, Vocon Feb 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 905 Thumbs Up

I think that cutting that little bit of space out could be considered "gerrymandering" the boundary. I would include them and use them as compliance for MRc1.2 if there is enough there to do so.

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Michael McPheron
Feb 05 2014
Guest
4 Thumbs Up

Exempting Space for LEED EBOM

Our building includes offices attached to a manufacturing facility by a hallway and kitchen area. The initial goal was to just get the offices and kitchen area LEED certified for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.. Is this even possible? I would add the manufacturing portion to the exempted areas section of PIf3 however it states that exempted areas cannot be more than 10% the square footage of the entire building. The manufacturing area is definitely more than 10% of the square footage. Is there anything we can do to exempt this space or is there another type of LEED certification we can seek?

Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. is a whole building rating system, and it is typically appropriate to include the whole building. If I wasn't going to include the whole building, I'd want to have a clear distinction between the spaces in terms of HVAC, services, etc., and not just function.

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Michael Johnson Architect Chenevert Architects
Jan 29 2014
LEEDuser Member
371 Thumbs Up

question about a building at a major port

client has a office building (previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development." land) being built along a waterway at a major US port. the building is set back from the water the appropriate amount to comply with regulations. the building is purely an office building, with associated parking. However, the same contractor will also be building a bulkhead at the waterline for barges to dock. the barges that will dock here are related to the company whose office is being built, but the people who work these barges and get on and off will not be using the office building. nor will any "deckhands" that assist at the bulkhead. these people will be using a neighboring other facility.

my question is, would the bulkhead need to be included in the LEED project boundary? The only relation is has to the office building seeking certification is that the land is owned by the same owner, and the same contractor building the office building will also be building the bulkhead. aside from that, they function and operate completely separately.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, it doesn't sound to me like the bulkhead should be included. It is not supporting the main function of the office building, is not connected physically, and only shares owner and contractor only.

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Karen Blust Green Building Consultant, The Cadmus Group Apr 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 559 Thumbs Up

Hi Tristan, I have a related question. I am working on a new construction project that has both a building on land and on the river adjacent to it. The building in the river will NOT be mobile, it will be tethered down. These buildings are being constructed simultaneously by the same owner. They also share an address. Does the building on the river comply with this MPR and if so, can it be included in our single project registration?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 15 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Karen, what are the functions of the two buildings and are they related? Typically LEED-NC is a whole building, i.e. single building, rating system, but there are exceptions to that, particularly if the buildings are closely related in function.

Part of your question seems to be about MPR2, so I'd post your question there.

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Brenda Stanfield Librarian CBT Architects
Jan 27 2014
LEEDuser Member
8 Thumbs Up

LEED boundary and pre-existing parking structure.

I've been looking through the forums and documentation and get some conflicting information. We're trying to establish an appropriate LEED project boundary for our project. It's an office within a sort of company campus. It will be built and connected to an adjacent parking garage (already built) used by the company and its other office buildings. A small percentage of the parking garage will be allocated for this building. No new parking will be built. The MPR guidelines says we can exclude the parking from our boundary if it is not included within the construction scope. But also states we should include any area that services our building. I would lean towards not including the parking in our boundary, but I'm not sure.

Also if we're providing the preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces for the fuel efficient vehicles for credit SSc4.3 does that have any impact on whether or not to include the spaces within our boundary?

Can someone please clarify? Thank you.

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Kristina Bach CORE Steward, Cooper Carry Jan 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 618 Thumbs Up

For LEED-CI, it's generally more common that the parking areas are excluded from the LEED-CI Project Boundary as that shared area is not really in your scope of work/under the direct control of the LEED-CI tenant. That does not impact your ability to still go for the parking credits (similar to how you'd treat the boundary if you had other shared amenities such as bathrooms or a fitness center).

Note that LEED-CI does not include a credit for providing preferred spaces for low-emitting/fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy.; do you mean that you intend to pursue SSc3.3 (preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for car/vanpools)?

If you mean to go for SSc3.3, you would just want to provide plans and a narrative clarifying how many spaces of the existing parking garage are allocated to your specific LEED-CI project. The signage would then need to designate those spaces as reserved for your tenant's specific use (i.e. "ABC Company/Dept. Car/Vanpool Vehicles Only"). If you cannot reserve the spaces for your specific LEED-CI space, I have heard of LEED-CI projects being allowed to meet this based on the LEED-NC thresholds (5% of the overall parking capacity of the garage/shared parking lots). LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 1669 talks about this somewhat when the number of spaces allocated to the LEED-CI space is limited compared to the number required by the credit. Generally a narrative saying that you cannot reserve them for your space but that the building has now provided the amentity to all occupants would probably be helpful to show that you are still meeting the intent of the credit.

One caution - make sure to read LEED Interpretation 10206 regarding which spaces are considered to meet the definition of "preferred" in parking garages when you do your layouts of the newly reserved preferred spaces. Depending on whether your project registered before the LI was posted (7/1/2012), you might be held to this requirement.

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Brenda Stanfield Librarian, CBT Architects Jan 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 8 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the reply, I think you get linked to the same forum for all corresponding credits in each rating system. This project is a LEED-NC project so would that make a difference in how the boundary is interpreted?

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Severin Lenel
Jan 16 2014
LEEDuser Member
197 Thumbs Up

Parking under the building but not belonging to the same owner

Hi,
We are working on a new construction of an office building located on a site where 3 other buildings will be also constructed. The buildings belong to different owners and the boundaries between the buildings above ground are clearly defined. However the 4 buildings share underfloor parking spaces. The parking spaces belong to another owner and are connected to all buildings but specific parking spaces are dedicated to each building users. In addition in these 3 underfloors of parking spaces under the building to be certified there are storage spaces as well as the central technical room for ventilation belonging to the owner of the building to be certified.
My question is: do we have to exclude the parking spaces from the LEED project boundary? In this case can we still use the parking spaces to earn the credit under SSc4.3 and SSc4.4 and how? or is it possible to include the parking spaces even if it belongs to another owner? In this case, we should maybe make sure that if the other buildings decide to get certified they cannot certify our parking areas with them and the parking floors must be clearly separated. is that right?
What does LEED say about multiple ownership? What does LEED say about using areas to earn credits that will not be certified with the project?

We are welcome to any comment, previous experience or advices.

Thank you!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 16 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Severin, as this is mostly about compliance with SSc4, I would suggest posting your question to SSc4.3 or SSc4.4 (whichever you are most concerned about). It would make more sense to look at the specific issues in that context.

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Jerry Reeves Project Manager Tilsley & Associates Architects
Dec 26 2013
Guest
19 Thumbs Up

Project Boundary for LEED CI project

My project is a renovation of one floor of a 4 story office building. The entire floor is leased by one tenant. No initial fit-out is in the scope of work. We are targeting LEED CI certification.
The renovation is in pockets of work in 5 different areas.

In this situation I understand LEED still wants the certified portion of the project to be clearly definable from areas not included in the project boundary.

I see 2 options for defining the project boundary:
• Link the different pockets into one larger space. This would result in an alteration of less than 60% of the project boundary, which appears to not be enough according to the supplemental guide. It would also be hard to clearly define the project boundary.
• Only certify one chunk of the project, 2,900 square feet of conference rooms & reception, all in one area and easier to define the project boundary. The other smaller pockets of work would not be included in the project boundary.

I believe the second option is the obvious choice. Please comment if you see any issues with this approach.
I plan to upload the plans showing the LEED project boundary for design review.

I appreciate the help.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Dec 26 2013 LEEDuser Expert 12092 Thumbs Up

I believe that you can certify the large floor plus the pockets and that there is language on this in LEED. (For some reason the AGMBC comes to mind but doesn't make sense for CI but I'll keep working on it.) Hopefully someone will come back from break and know.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 27 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Jerry, I agree that option 2 is more obvious and clear. However, there is the disadvantage of documenting a smaller space within the context of a larger project. I would explore option 1 a bit more. When you reference the 60% threshold, are you referring to the rating system selection guidance? ... Because that has a flexible threshold of 40%–60% for rating system selection. Perhaps a larger boundary would be a better fit with the rating system, and in terms of your documentation.

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Luciana T. Feb 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 61 Thumbs Up

My case is similar, I am remodeling only one floor of a 9-story building. The tenant occupies the whole floor but it is not remodeling all the rooms within their space. The remodel is about 80% of the floor.
My question is: Is the LEED Boundary the full floor being remodeled or only the areas undergoing the remodel?

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Sara Curlee BWBR
Dec 17 2013
LEEDuser Member
356 Thumbs Up

LEED NCv3 Project Boundary in 3 Dimensions

Hello,

I am reposting this question, hoping to get a response. It was under PIf2, but maybe this is the better area to post it.

I am working on a new building being added to an existing corporate campus. The project includes a new building and a new skyway connection to an existing building. Under the skyway, very minimal work will be done. It will be limited to that required to support the structure.

The skyway is being included within the LPB, but the LPB won't go to the ground in this area. It is my understanding that LPB's can work in three dimensions. When calculating the "total site area within the project boundary," therefore, I am inclined to exclude the square footage of the skyway. Or only include the square footage being disturbed to support the skyway.

Does this seem like a logical approach?

Thanks in advance

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

I would include the skyway itself within the LEED project boundary, and also include any ground support. Seems logical.

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C.M. G.
Dec 12 2013
Guest
4 Thumbs Up

Redrawing Project Boundary AFTER Initial Review

Hello,

We are currently preparing our project for final review, and realized that that we drew our project boundary in such a way that disqualifies us from SSc8. We need this credit to reach Gold, and are therefore considering redrawing the boundary so that the light trespass stays within the 10' allowable boundary. This won't negatively affect other credits (some of which were already approved), but we are concerned that GBCI will disqualify us for redrawing the boundary in order to gain a point.

The reference guide states you can't gerrymander to "exclude" portions of the site, but we want to INCLUDE more of the site. Do you think they will accept our redrawing of the project boundary?

A speedy reply would be much appreciated!

Best,
C.G.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 23 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

CM, as long as you are following the principles in terms of drawing your LEED boundary, i.e. including land within your construction scope and supporting the building activities, and not overreaching in a way that isn't compatible with that, I don't see any issue. 

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Bernard Sagaiyaraj Director Blue Snow Consulting and Engineering Sdn. Bhd.
Oct 23 2013
LEEDuser Member
147 Thumbs Up

LEED Project Boundary

My project is an office tower located on a plot of land housing 5 other buildings. All hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. and landscape on the ground outside these buildings are not within the scope of work of my project. However, the underground parking for the tower extends way beyond the building boundary. What should be the correct LEED boundary when above ground does not belong to me, but below does?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Bernard, your LEED boundary can go in three dimensions, and include space below ground while excluding space above that. (Although it seems a bit unusual to building underground parking without disturbing and working on the hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. above it within the same scope of work.)

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Santiago Rodriguez Consultant, REVITALIZA CONSULTORES Nov 28 2013 LEEDuser Member 731 Thumbs Up

I have a similar situation, for LEED C&S 2009, we want to certify the office spaces of a tower, the bottom part will be a shopping mall, with separate owner, separate entrances and separate systems. We also want to include the underground parking levels that will be designated for office users. Is this LEED Boundary division allowed?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Santiago, start by reviewing the MPR supplemental guidance above. What's your opinion from that? Remaining uncertainties?

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kelly ryan
Oct 07 2013
LEEDuser Member
79 Thumbs Up

Project boundary for addition and major renovation

I am Working on a project with a 2 story addition. A portion of the project includes a major renovation to the building entry. My question lies with where to define the project boundary. The addition has been designed with new Mechanical equipment reflective of the LEED requirements, however the entry renovation is supported through the existing buildings mechanical system. The existing building is not a LEED certified building and is not be up to LEED standards.
Will I need to include the lobby area in my project boundary or can this be excluded?
With the completion of the construction there will not be a definitive line to where this separation between where the existing and addition takes place which makes the delineation difficult. However my concern is that the existing mechanical system will compromise the ability to achieve the LEED status for the addition.
The existing building is approximately 9,00 sf. the addition is approximately 5,000 sf and the lobby major renovation area is approximately 1,200 sf.
Any comments/suggestions would be much appreciated.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Oct 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 16280 Thumbs Up

If the lobby connects to the addition, you would probably want to include that area in your project boundary. The MR credits will be harder to calculate if you need to exclude the value of those materials from your calculations. GBCI can be concerned with what area "gets a plaque, and they want a clear demarcation between LEED certified and non-certified areas. If the lobby is not connected to the addition, then they might prefer to exclude it.

You should probably contact the LEED customer service through the GBCI website, and indicate you have a technical certification question. The support for such questions has dramatically improved and it will make the documentation easier if you can clear this up.

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Sarah Dahman Environment and Energy Engineer White Arkitekter AB
Sep 14 2013
LEEDuser Member
21 Thumbs Up

Project boundary

Hi!
I'm working on a project which is a new office building. It includes underground parking for the building users. The owner, a private developer, only owns the site corresponding to the exact footprint of the building . The streets that are surrounding the building are under the ownership of the municipality. The tricky thing is that the underground parking will extend a little under one of the streets. Therefore, the developer will rebuild the street on behalf of the city after building the underground parking. The street will remain under the municipalitie's ownership.
Should the portion of street that we be rebuilt within the project for the city be included in the project boundary?
Thanks in advance for your help.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Sarah, I think you could go either way on this, relative to the street—include it because it is in the construction scope, or exclude it because it is not under ownership and doesn't support the function of the project building (aside from being public infrastructure).

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Sarah Dahman Environment and Energy Engineer, White Arkitekter AB Nov 17 2013 LEEDuser Member 21 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan for your answer. We'll try excluding it and see if it is accepted this way.

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Jason Roberdeau Architect Williams & Associates Architecture, Inc.
Sep 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
14 Thumbs Up

College campus LEED boundary

We are working on a new residence hall which is located between two existing (non-certified) residence halls on a college campus. The parking and therefore some of the landscaping associated with the new hall is located on the opposite side of the existing parking lot furthest away from the new hall. In the end, all the parking lots will serve all three residence halls and most likely the new lot will be used more by one of the existing halls and the old parking lot will be used more by the new hall. Our question is how to determine the LEED boundary which will take on a very complex shape in order to include the new hall, new parking lot and some connected landscaping while jogging in and around the existing halls and existing parking lots. Is this approach typically well received as long as I can associate proportionally equal parking with building? In part I'm trying to think ahead as the two existing residence halls are slated for future remodel and would therefore be seeking future LEED certifications. I want to draw appropriate boundaries so when tasked with a future project, there's some logic to the established boundaries. Thanks for your help!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Jason, you're on the right track. You're thinking about exactly the right issues, and although the LEED boundary will end up looking odd, if you follow the logic you are already aware of, and consult with the MPR guidance, I think you'll get there.

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Husam Haron Principal, LEED AP BD+C, GBIF, PQP PBRS Creative Environments, Kuala Lumpur, MALAYSIA
Aug 21 2013
LEEDuser Member
45 Thumbs Up

New LEED project inside an already certified LEED Project

An office building was constructed and awarded LEED Silver. Now, a new building is being planned to be constructed inside the LEED project boundary of the the already certified LEED project. Is this possible? how do we demarcate the LPB for the new building?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Husam, it is possible to do this. What you need to watch out for is double-dipping, i.e. taking credit for site features that contributed to the original LEED certification.

Most likely a very tight project boundary is going to make sense. Consult the Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects (AGMBC) for more guidance.

Please post back here with specific issues or obstacles.

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Qiang Zhang professional
Aug 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
25 Thumbs Up

LEED certification separate or whole?

A campus have several projects, and 4 of the projects are connected with sidewalk/spatial corridors, seems a whole building, but they have different functions, in this situation, can we still certify the 4 projects as one or we only can certify 4 projects separat?

while lining the boundary on the map, can the LEED certification project boundary line overlap with other building footprintBuilding footprint is the area on a project site used by the building structure, defined by the perimeter of the building plan. Parking lots, parking garages, landscapes, and other nonbuilding facilities are not included in the building footprint.? or keep some distance with other facilities?

Looking forwards to your reply.
Thanks!

Best regards
Michael

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, buildings that are basically separate but just connected by corridors should probably be certified separately. See MPR2.

The LEED boundary for each project should be distinct.

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Gary Caraway
Jun 24 2013
Guest
21 Thumbs Up

LEED project Boundary different from Construction Documents?

Is it possible to have a LEED boundary that differs from the actual limit of disturbance shown in the construction documents?

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Michelle Reott LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC Jul 23 2013 LEEDuser Expert 3472 Thumbs Up

Yes. Sometimes limits of disturbance on stormwater management plans cover a larger development of which only 1 building and part of the property is seeking certification.

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Mauricio J Perez R
Jun 12 2013
LEEDuser Member
34 Thumbs Up

Is it possible to modify a LEED boundary already registered?

Dear all,

We are developing the design phase of a LEED Project which is already registered in the LEED online. This project is an adittion to an existing building (same owner) and in the LEED Boundary registered is only including the new construction. The designers of the Domestic Hot Water system are planning to use an existing boiler located within the Existing Building because the hot water systems of this Building is able to provide it to the new construction. Considering this issue, is it necessary to modify the LEED Boundary including the part of the existing building which the boiler is located? And considering this issue, is it possible to modify the LEED Boundary into the LEED Registration data of this project?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Mauricio, it is possible to modify the LEED boundary. If you can't edit this yourself, contact GBCI for assistance.

I don't necessarily think you need to include the boiler in your boundary, but that's another question....

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Orçun Özhelvacı Quality Engineer - LEED Project Manager VEN ESCO
Jun 05 2013
LEEDuser Member
48 Thumbs Up

LPB for a Residential Building Excluding the Shopping Mall

Dear experts, I would like to hear about your comments on the following issue:
In one of our projects, a residential building is being constructed on top of a shopping mall both of which are constructed at the same time and belong to the same owner. However, we would like to certify only the residential building, not taking into account the energy consumption and water use of the shopping mall? Is this possible? and if so, how can we determine the LEED project boundary?
Thanks in advance

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