NC-2009 MRc2: Construction Waste Management

  • NC_CS_Schools_MRc2-Type3-ConstructionWaste
  • It’s not only about recycling

    This credit focuses on diverting waste from landfills by finding multiple alternatives for end uses of the waste, namely recycling, reuse on site, donation for reuse on another site, or resale. All of these diversion methods count towards credit compliance—50% construction waste diverted for one point, 75% for two points.

    Look for opportunities to prevent the generation of waste on construction sites because the less waste you generate, the less you have to recycle or reuse to earn the credit.

    There are two different approaches to recycling construction and demolition (C&D) waste: separating materials at the source (onsite), or commingling them and sending them to an off-site waste sorting facility. Either approach can work well. Your choice will depend on whether there is room for sorting onsite, whether the contractor is willing to take that on, and if there are good sorting facilities nearby.

    Onsite vs. off-site sorting of construction waste - table

    Factors that affect your likelihood of success

    The ease or difficulty of this credit depends on project-specific and regional conditions.

    • Local infrastructure: Construction waste management (CWMConstruction Waste Management (CWM) diverts construction debris from landfills through the processes of recycling, salvaging and reusing.) is becoming standard practice in many parts of the country; however, in rural or remote areas, it may be more difficult to find recyclers and salvage yards. Whether or not the economics work in your favor depends on the tipping feesTipping fees are charged by a landfill for disposal of waste, typically quoted per ton. for disposing of waste at a landfill: high fees mean high avoided costs for recycling so you come out ahead.
    • Is demolition involved? If so, this can be a relatively easy credit to earn. By donating, reusing, or recycling most of the demolition waste, you’ll have taken care of a significant portion of the project waste. Also, consider that re-use of existing buildings can save resources and cut down on waste when choosing a site for the project. However, this depends on the building type and the materials that will be demolished. For example, a site that previously had a concrete parking lot and no building will provide for a lot of heavy recyclable material. But, a site that had an old wood structure may be more difficult to divert. 
    • Have your contractors and waste haulers done it before? Their experience and commitment to making it work can make all the difference. It is crucial to educate contractors and subcontractors and to enable constant communication with field personnel in order to achieve these credit goals. Some contractors are regularly hitting a 90% target (versus a LEED target of 50% or 75%) whereas others can barely get to the 50% target.

    Construction waste dumpstersThe general contractor (GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. ) is responsible for developing the CWM plan early in the construction process, if not before (during preconstruction). The GC does this in collaboration with the project team and is then responsible for implementing it, verifying that it is being followed throughout the construction process, and documenting the results.

    FAQs for MRc2

    How is construction waste accounted for when utilizing off-site construction, like modular construction or pre-fabrication of assemblies?

    Waste generated off-site, even for modular construction and pre-fabrication of major assemblies is not accounted for in the MRc2 calculations. MRc2  looks only at the management of waste generated onsite.

    How does MRc2 work for projects pursuing a campus approach, or any project where waste management will be shared with other construction projects?

    LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #10265 made on 01/01/2013 provides the best official guidance for this situation. The approach that is approved in that situation involves multiple buildings, all being certified to LEED-NC. The ruling allows the project to track together all demolition and construction waste diverted, and to then apply a weighted average based on gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. to each LEED project. Each building must meet the required threshold for waste diversion in order to earn the credit and in addition, the Construction Waste Management (CWM) Plan must outline goals for diversion for each building, not just as an aggregate across all projects.

    If your project is in a similar situation but with different specific circumstances, LEEDuser would recommend adopting that advice as closely as possible, while accounting for any differences in a way that meets the LEED credit intent. Some projects may want to get an official ruling—either a CIR or LEED Interpretation.

    Can materials that have been unused and returned to the manufacturer as part of a “take-back” program contribute to the credit?

    Yes, materials that would otherwise be waste, but that are diverted from the landfill to be salvaged or reused can contribute to MRc2.

    Should I include hazardous material such as lead-based paint in MRc2 calculations?

    No. Hazardous waste does not count and it is excluded from the numerator and denominator portions of the credit calculations. You may want to include a brief narrative on the hazardous waste you found and how your project abated the material.

    Should household-type trash from workers' lunches and office use be included in MRc2 diversion and calculations?

    There has been some debate about this, since on the one hand this waste does not qualify as typical C&D waste, but on the other hand it is waste generated onsite, which this credit is intended to address. LEEDuser's experts recommend including this waste because it falls under the broader definition of waste generated onsite, and because reduction, recycling and diversion programs can be extremely effective in reducing the quantity of this waste. Having workers pay attention to this waste makes them more aware of overall job-site recycling, and not mixing lunch waste with construction waste like scrap metal increases the recyclability of the construction waste.

    Can sending material to waste-to-energy plants count toward MRc2?

    USGBC has ruled (for example, see LEED Interpretation #10061) that diverting waste to incineration facilities does not contribute to MRc2, but that Wood Derived Fuel (WDF) does meet the intent of this credit. As that ruling states, "The WDF process differs from incineration processes that are not allowed in this credit because the recycling facility provides a value-added process; it is a service that exists to sort and distribute materials appropriate to the highest end uses possible. In addition, the revenue generated by the WDF commodity helps to make this business successful and thus facilitates recycling of wood to other end uses as well as recycling of other materials."

    The requirements of this credit say that land-clearing debris does not contribute to the percentage of materials diverted from the landfill. What exactly is considered "land clearing debris"?

    According to the LEED Reference Guide, land-clearing debris includes soil, vegetation, and rocks.

    Oops! Our trash was measured by both weight and volume at different times. How do I standardize this?

    Use the solid waste conversion factorsEstimates are presented in customary U.S. units. Floorspace estimates may be converted to metric units by using the relationship: 1 square foot is approximately equal to 0.0929 square meters. Energy estimates may be converted to metric units by using the relationship: 1 Btu is approximately equal to 1,055 joules; one kilowatthour is exactly equal to 3,600,000 joules; and one gigajoule (109 joules) is approximately 278 kilowatthours (kWh). in the LEED Reference Guide to account for recycled materials in dumpsters billed by volume.

    The waste management facility we are using is providing us with monthly documentation specific to our waste, showing 80% diversion. They also have a published, facility-wide rate of roughly 20%, and they have no published rate for construction waste. Will our diversion rate be accepted, or do we need to use a facility with an appropriate published rate?

    It is typically better to use project-specific diversion data when you can get it, and this data should typically be accepted in a LEED review. However, there are other options.

    There are LEED Interpretations such as LEED Interpretation #10060  made on 5/9/2011 that allow use of a facility-wide recycling rate, if approved by local regulators. On similar lines, a 5/9/2011 addendum added this note to the LEED Reference Guide: “For commingled recycling the average annual recycling rate for a sorting facility is acceptable for recording diversion rates only when the facility's method of recording and calculating the recycling rate is regulated by a local or state government authority.”

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Research Phase


  • Either identify a hauler with a strong recycling program, or research and find local recycling facilities to which you can send your hauler.


  • Research the waste management system:

    • What are the local recycling facilities?
    • What materials do they sort and recycle?
    • Do specific haulers go there?
    • What haulers are available and will they agree to transport the waste to the recycling facility you choose for this project? If they are used to going only to the landfill, they may not want to add this extra trip for one project.
    • Consult with haulers about costs for recycling versus waste hauling to the landfill. It is good to have this knowledge to understand cost impacts on the contractor.
    • If sorting onsite, the contractor has to find a hauler who will agree to take the sorted waste to the chosen recycling facility.
    • Consider the size of your site when choosing to sort onsite or off-site. Compact urban sites may not have the room on site for multiple dumpsters and may need to sort off-site.

  • Check local government websites for recycling programs. Also search for other ways to put materials back in circulation, such as exchange programs and brokers. For example, pallets and packaging can be sold or given away through these programs.


  • Construction materials vary with project location and building type. Some materials are easier to recycle than others. For example, copper wire and steel studs are readily recycled into new products, but vinyl tiles may not be. Research and specify what materials can be recycled, reused, or salvaged in the project’s municipality or region—and design with these materials so that waste scrap can be diverted from the landfill. For example, specify carpet from a manufacturer that has a take-back program, or ceiling tiles that are easily recyclable. Using precast concrete will avoid waste generation from in-situ concrete that will help in total waste generated.


  • Demolition projects can give away furniture, computers, and other equipment. Projects can also reuse items like doors, and crush demolished concrete and other paving materials to be reused as fill onsite. Demolition and renovation jobs can present many opportunities for salvaging items like wood timbers, architectural detailing, stonework, and millwork for reuse on another project, sale, or donation.


  • Research and use manufacturer “take-back” programs as much as possible. Manufacturers increasingly take back equipment and materials at no or low cost to the project. These programs are common with certain equipment and computers, ceiling tiles, and carpeting, for example.


  • Choose the right strategy for your project


  • Develop a list of construction materials from the budget estimate.


  • Determine if the waste will be measured by volume or by weight and keep it consistent. (Most projects pursue measurement by weight instead of volume.)


  • Target materials that are plentiful and either heavy or voluminous, depending on your documentation approach, and that are easy to recover and recycle to meet the 50% or 75% credit thresholds.


  • If discarding a lot of heavy stone, metal or masonry products, it will probably be more advantageous to track weight.


  • If discarding lots of packaging, insulating foam, and other light materials, you may prefer to track volume.


  • Selecting the right waste processor can minimize cost, but you have to strike a balance between cost and the feasibility of using that waste processing plant based on distance from the site and whether the hauler will agree to use that facility.


  • Recycling often generates revenue for the hauler who may then reduce the fee for the project. It also generates savings by reducing landfill tipping fees, which is beneficial to the contractor.


  • Contractors may claim that the CWM coordination and administrative oversight cost more money than recycling is worth, but many good contractors have figured out how to do CWM and can make it work for the same amount or less than typical trash hauling. This is somewhat dependent on the location of the project and available local resources.


  • If dealing with an existing building and a large amount of material is salvageable, consider deconstruction and materials salvage as an alternative to demolition. The contractor will have to oversee the process carefully. Many resources are available on deconstruction. (See Resources.)


  • Deconstruction will add extra cost to the project due to the additional labor required to take materials apart, remove nails from wood, and maintain material integrity. Ideally, the contractor will find a buyer for the materials to help offset these costs.


  • Thinking long term, consider what design decisions can increase the likelihood of deconstruction further down the road when specifying materials and systems to be used in the current project. Material selection and assembly type can impact how materials may be deconstructed and reused at the end of the building’s life-cycle.


  • Deconstruction


  • Perform a site survey to decide whether deconstruction makes sense. This will depend on how the building was assembled and the value of the materials to be salvaged.


  • Deconstruction is a good practice for maintaining a building material’s integrity so it can be reused. It certainly diverts waste from landfill and contributes to credit compliance as waste diversion.


  • Typically, good materials to salvage via deconstruction include wood framing, steel columns and beams, hardwood flooring, multi-paned windows, architectural details, plumbing and electrical fixtures, hardware and cabinetry, and high-quality brick work.


  • Renovation and restoration projects are good candidates for deconstruction.


  • There are industry standards on good practices for deconstruction as well as directories of experienced contractors, such as the Deconstruction Institute (see Resources).


  • Deconstruction can take longer than demolition. Project teams should estimate whether the extra labor spent on deconstruction can be offset by the value of the salvaged materials. Other benefits to weigh include the environmental benefits of reduced waste and avoiding use of new resources, and publicity benefits for materials reuse.

Schematic Design

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  • The project team should discuss the appropriate recycling process, including whether sorting will occur on or off site. This decision may be made after the general contractor joins the team. Both options have pros and cons (see table).



  • Early in the project, the architect should be involved in the plan to schedule construction and deconstruction with the contractor.

Design Development

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  • Hire a general contractor early in the project to discuss the deconstruction process and phasing.

Construction Documents

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  • Integrate CWM plan and MRc2 requirements into the construction specifications.


  • For guidance on how to write LEED specifications and CWM requirements into construction documents, see MasterSpec (see Resources).


  • If separation is occurring off-site at a comingled or mixed-debris processing plant, make sure the processor or recycling facility can provide documentation for the amount of waste processed, by weight or by volume, as agreed, as well as a diversion rate from the facility. This could be either a project-specific diversion rate supplied by the facility, or a letter from the state regulating body with the facility's average rate of recycling.


  • Waste prevention is an important part of CWM.


  • Orienting the GC to the tracking tools early on and providing on-going support to the CWM effort is critical to success.


  • The GC and project team should hold an orientation meeting to review all LEED-specific issues related not only to recycling and reuse, or salvaging, but also to reducing waste onsite in general.


  • The GC develops the CWM plan.


  • A CWM plan is an action plan for how to deal with construction and demolition (C&D) waste. At a minimum, it needs to identify what the recycling goals are, what materials will be recycled, reused or salvaged, which materials will be landfilled, and the estimated amounts of each (either by volume or by weight, but consistently throughout the project), processors that will receive the construction and demolition waste, and onsite procedures for achieving the stated goals.


  • Developing the CWM plan is the responsibility of the contractor but, ideally, the project team should work together to come up with a thorough CWM plan that addresses not only recycling, but also reusing and salvaging as many materials as possible.


  • In developing a CWM plan, take into account regional constraints, and weigh the feasibility of recycling or salvaging materials against other environmental factors, such as the impact of hauling waste long distances if recyclers are far from the project site. In such an instance, if site conditions allow, one strategy would be to stockpile material to be hauled only once or twice during a project to cut down on transportation cost and associated environmental impact.


  • Source separating, or onsite sorting, can yield the highest recycling rate and the best price for materials. Try to encourage the contractor to locate separate containers onsite to sort the materials.


  • Providing a sample CWM plan and guidelines on how to communicate it to subcontractors and workers can help to minimize any hesitation on the part of the GC.


  • Hiring construction teams that already have LEED experience and are familiar with CWM is helpful for credit achievement. They may already have developed CWM plans, have existing relationships with haulers and recyclers, and know how to train construction field personnel in CWM practices and track diversion rates.


  • Review LEED requirements with contractors during the bidding process so that they understand their responsibilities.


  • Subcontractors should be contractually required to implement their part of the CWM plan. Accountability is key to successfully implementing a CWM plan.


  • Deconstruction


  • Hire a special deconstruction contractor if required.


  • Provide a deconstruction-detailed drawing and specification with specific handling instructions for each material to be removed, such as whether it will be salvaged and sold, reused onsite, or marked for recycling.


  • Require measures for deconstruction in the CWM plan.

Construction

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  • The GC is responsible for implementing the CWM plan and making sure the recycling and reuse goals are met. (The GC should make sure to review the action steps and tips associated with developing the CWM plan, above.)


  • Provide training for each contractor and subcontractor about the CWM plan and the importance of documenting it. Make sure everyone is on the same page regarding recycling goals. Make each training session specific to that trade.


  • As new subcontractors start work on site, have a LEED orientation session as part of safety trainings or other jobsite orientation meetings.


  • Consider designating a recycling coordinator (most likely someone in the GC’s office) to deal with all issues both onsite and off-site pertaining to CWM and making sure the plan is implemented properly and followed by all involved.


  • Weekly construction meetings should include an update, with a biweekly or monthly report collected by the LEED consultant, architect or owner. The CWM plan should outline this step, but it is important to make sure that all subcontractors and the GC are working together to comply during construction.


  • The contractor should communicate with all subcontractors about the recycling policy to make sure it is being followed. Recycling activities should be discussed regularly at job meetings.


  • A designated recycling coordinator can facilitate communication with all field personnel and address problems in the field promptly. This can reduce the risk of getting to the end of construction and falling short of diversion goals when it is too late to do anything about it.


  • Deconstruction


  • The GC and recycling coordinator should track the deconstruction process and make sure requirements and specifications are being met.


  • The deconstruction contractor submits sales receipts, donation receipts, and recycling weight tickets to the GC or recycling coordinator, so the diversion rates can be included in the CWM tally.


  • Preserving materials for reuse reduces waste disposal fees.


  • Onsite sorting


  • Train the staff on how to streamline onsite waste sorting. Identify champions within each subcontractor’s team to lead the CWM effort for their teams.


  • Designate a separate area to place bins for recycling. If waste is commingled (for off-site separation by the recycling center), some additional space is still required to keep wet waste and other garbage apart from recyclables.


  • A good CWM plan will include measures for waste prevention so that less waste is created in the first place. Consider requesting subcontractors to ask their vendors to use minimal or take-back packaging. As an incentive, specify that all subcontractors are responsible for returning pallets or recycling their packaging.


  • Use signage to support the CWM plan—reminding subcontractors to sort waste appropriately. Post signs on the sorting bins, garbage cans, and throughout the site. Signs should include whatever languages are needed to communicate with workers on the jobsite.


  • The recycling coordinator tracks onsite waste recycling every month, or with every filled bin, to stay on track. The bins may fill at different times, depending on the material. Every time a bin is emptied and weighed, fill in the data on the tracking sheet.


  • In cities where tipping fees are high, a lot of waste haulers separate waste automatically, just to avoid the fees, so contractors and subcontractors may have to source-separate onsite anyway.


  • Consider fencing recycling areas, screening recycling and trash dumpsters from the public or locating them in an inconspicuous area. Neighborhood “use” of dumpsters to dispose of old mattresses and other furnishings is a problem that contractors deal with regularly, especially in cities where disposal of bulky items is expensive. On the other hand, in areas where there are limited resources for construction waste recycling, projects can stockpile wood and other potentially desirable construction waste and make it available to workers and the community to take home. This material can then count towards diversion.


  • Off-site sorting


  • If separation is occurring off-site, make sure recyclables are not contaminated with other garbage and wet waste. Provide separate containers for food waste and miscellaneous garbage and mark all containers clearly and prominently.


  • Keeping coffee cups and food waste out of recycling bins can be especially challenging. Use clear signage to prevent this and make it easy for food waste to be properly disposed of by providing trash cans clearly marked and in various locations on the site or at each building level.


  • If separation is occurring off-site at a mixed-debris processing plant, make sure the recycling facility can provide documentation for the amount of waste processed, by weight or by volume, as well as monthly recycling rate information, which is required for documentation purposes.


  • Keep an ongoing log of weight tickets and receipts. The GC needs to track construction waste throughout the construction process. It is crucial that contractors request and keep all receipts and weight tickets from recycling companies to prove that diversion goals were achieved, as well as letters from recycling companies certifying their monthly recycling rates.


  • Maintain a project log to input all the monthly reports in one place. This will track project waste recycling rates and provide an alert if the average is lower than the target of 50% or 75%. Address these shortfalls early in the process to ensure that final diversion rates can be met.


  • LEED project managers should provide contractors with tracking or log-book forms to simplify the tracking process. See the Resources section for the LEEDuser CWM tracking calculator.





  • Waste amounts must be tracked consistently, either by weight or volume. If materials are very heavy, it is best to use the weight approach. Most waste processors track by weight, anyway. But this will depend on what the bulk of the project’s waste is made of.


  • Do not include land-clearing debris or excavated soil or rock in your calculations. Even if diverted from landfill, it is not to be included in the credit calculations. Contractors often think that trees and stumps are still part of the diverted waste, but take them out of the LEED credit form and supporting documentation if the contractor includes them.


  • Compile construction waste recycling data from all the monthly reports, and complete your LEED documentation online for submission to the USGBC.


  • Monthly reports from recycling facilities, showing their average monthly recycling rates, are an appropriate form of documentation for this credit.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Build on construction waste management practices for future renovations and remodeling.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    MR Credit 2: Construction waste management

    1–2 Points

    Intent

    To divert construction and demolition debris from disposal in landfills and incineration facilities. Redirect recyclable recovered resources back to the manufacturing process and reusable materials to appropriate sites.

    Requirements

    Recycle and/or salvage nonhazardous construction and demolition debris. Develop and implement a construction waste management plan that, at a minimum, identifies the materials to be diverted from disposal and whether the materials will be sorted on-site or comingledA process of recycling materials that allows consumers to dispose of various materials (such as paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal) in one container that is separate from waste. The recyclable materials are not sorted until they are collected and brought to a sorting facility.. Excavated soil and land-clearing debris do not contribute to this credit. Calculations can be done by weight or volume, but must be consistent throughout. The minimum percentage debris to be recycled or salvaged for each point threshold is as follows:

    Recycled or Salvaged Points
    50% 1
    75% 2



    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    SITES-LEED Equivalency

    This LEED credit (or a component of this credit) has been established as equivalent to a SITES v2 credit or component. For more information on using the equivalency as a substitution in your LEED or SITES project, see this article and guidance document.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Establish goals for diversion from disposal in landfills and incineration facilities and adopt a construction waste management plan to achieve these goals. Consider recycling cardboard, metal, brick, mineral fiber panel, concrete, plastic, clean wood, glass, gypsum wallboard, carpet and insulation. Construction debris processed into a recycled content commodity that has an open market value (e.g., wood derived fuel [WDF], alternative daily coverMaterial other than earthen material placed on the surface of the active face of a municipal solid waste landfill at the end of each operating day to control vectors, fires, odors, blowing litter, and scavenging. Generally these materials must be processed so they do not allow gaps in the exposed landfill face. material, etc.) may be applied to the construction waste calculation. Designate a specific area(s) on the construction site for segregated or comingledA process of recycling materials that allows consumers to dispose of various materials (such as paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal) in one container that is separate from waste. The recyclable materials are not sorted until they are collected and brought to a sorting facility. collection of recyclable materials, and track recycling efforts throughout the construction process. Identify construction haulers and recyclers to handle the designated materials. Note that diversion may include donation of materials to charitable organizations and salvage of materials on-site.

Organizations

Habitat for Humanity

Source for receiving salvaged or deconstructed materials.


New York WasteMatch

Waste management solutions - New York only.


Build It Green NYC

New York City's only non-profit retail outlet for salvaged and surplus building materials.

Technical Guides

A Guide to Deconstruction

A step-by-step guide on deconstruction for contractors.


MasterSpec Section 01 74 19

Template for writing specifications on construction waste management as part of the MasterSpec licensed spec system.


01 74 19 (01351) Construction Waste Management

Federal Green Construction Guide for Specifiers sample spec language.


Contractor’s Guide – Seattle/ King County 2002-2003

Sample CWMConstruction Waste Management (CWM) diverts construction debris from landfills through the processes of recycling, salvaging and reusing. Plan.


Resource Venture – Construction Waste Management Guide

Resources Guide to developing a CWMConstruction Waste Management (CWM) diverts construction debris from landfills through the processes of recycling, salvaging and reusing. plan.

Web Tools

Deconstruction Institute

This is a resource database of contractors proficient with deconstruction and organizations, distributors, or contractors seeking material to salvage.


Construction and Demolition Debris Recycling

This website from the California Integrated Waste Management Board contains information on recycling and the use of recycled-content materials. The site includes many publications available for free download, such as sample construction and demolition debris recycling specifications.


Construction Waste Management Database

This online database contains information on companies that haul, collect and process recyclable debris from construction projects sorted by zip code.


Construction Waste Depot

CMDepot is a place where you can buy & sell excess construction material, tools, & equipment. You simply login, submit a listing of your excess material, and wait for a buyer. If a buyer contacts you, you can work out payment details and a delivery method.


Construction Waste Management

Comprehensive web page on construction waste management for large projects, with links to other resources.


WasteCapTRACE

WasteCapTRACE is an online documentation program for tracking construction and demolition debris recycling. It generates a custom construction waste management plan, provides a forum in which multiple team members can record data, and outputs reports and charts for your LEED submission. WasteCapTRACE is priced on a per-project basis, with fees linked to project square footage (like LEED application fees).


Reclaimed Material Consultant, Broker

PlanetReuse is a nationwide reclaimed construction material broker and consultant company. They make it easier to use a wide variety of reclaimed materials in new projects as well as help find new projects for building materials being deconstructed, guiding owners and contractors through every step of the process. LEED documents are also provided for waste management documentation.

Publications

Deconstruction: The First Step in Green Building

This guide is developed by wastematch.org, an organization that matches donors to recipients.


Waste Spec: Model Specifications for Construction Waste Reduction, Reuse, and Recycling

Model specification language that can be used by architects and engineers who want to reduce waste during construction.

Construction Waste Signs

Use clear signage such as in these example to keep construction and demolition waste separated for diversion purposes.

Commingled Waste Diversion

If you use commingled construction waste management, in which CWMConstruction Waste Management (CWM) diverts construction debris from landfills through the processes of recycling, salvaging and reusing. is commingled and weighed off-site or calculated using a recycling facility's average diversion rate, you'll need special documentation to justify your rates for LEED. This sample was provided by Sustainable Solutions Corporation.

Construction Waste Management Tracking Sheet

Use a tracking sheet and calculator like this one to monitor your credit compliance.

Creating a Construction Waste Management Plan

This document provides key tips and sample tracking sheets and checklists for your project's construction waste management (CWMConstruction Waste Management (CWM) diverts construction debris from landfills through the processes of recycling, salvaging and reusing.) plan.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 MR

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

487 Comments

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Ibrahim El-Shair LEED AP BD+C DAR AL HANDASAH
Mar 18 2017
LEEDuser Member
128 Thumbs Up

Mixed waste definition

What is the exact definition of MIXED WASTE that mentioned in the table of volume/ weight conversion table for 2009 version?
Noting that if we took the average numbers of all numbers of all materials listed other than MIXED WASTE, it will be double of MIXED WASTE itself.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Mar 21 2017 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Ibrahim - There is not a definition for "mixed waste" in the LEED 2009 or v4 Reference Guides. I've always considered this to be solid waste from a construction site that has not been source separated (a mixture of construction and demolition debris). In addition, the LEED 2009 definition for Construction and Demolition Debris, which "includes waste and recyclables generated from construction and from the renovation, demolition, or deconstruction of preexisting structures." would be a good basic definition too.

(I tried following the link in footnote #4 (http://www.epa.gov/osw/nonhaz/municipal/pubs/msw07-rpt.pdf that is now located at https://archive.epa.gov/epawaste/nonhaz/municipal/web/pdf/msw07-rpt.pdf) for the Materials and Resources overview section of the 2009 Reference Guide that references mixed waste but there is no definition of mixed waste there. This report is based on the EPA's study of municipal solid waste from 1960-2007. It does say on page 147: "Mixed waste processing facilities receive mixed solid waste (including recyclable and non-recyclable materials), which is then loaded on conveyors. Using both mechanical and manual (high and low technology) sorting, recyclable materials are removed for further processing.")

I can't speak to the differences in weights but will say that rubble's weight could skew the averages.

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Lewis Hewton Cundall
Feb 07 2017
Guest
877 Thumbs Up

Commingled Reporting / Recording Method

Hello,

I understand that a whole of facility commingled recycling rate is acceptable only when the method of recording and reporting is regulated by a local or state government authority.

The method of measuring and recording recycling rates for our project is a condition of its EPA license. Sounds acceptable however the problem we have is that the EPA doesn't publish any figures nor is the facility required to regularly report to EPA (unless they are audited I guess).

The Leedonline form asks for reporting FROM the local authority.

We can provide reports from the facility that have been created in accordance with their license conditions. I believe this should comply but is a bit messy from a documentation point of view.

If anybody has had a similar situation I would appreciate your views.

Thanks.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Feb 09 2017 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Lewis - I don't have experience with the situation you describe. As a LEEDuser Guest you can't read the Bird's Eye View info above where we discuss LI ID #10060 that that was the basis for the 5/9/11 correction to the Reference Guide regarding commingled waste. I would encourage you to review it - http://www.usgbc.org/content/li-10060 - and the referenced LI ID #3000 - http://www.usgbc.org/content/li-3000. Review LI ID #3000 for compliance with what LEED is defining as "regulated" and see if you feel the facility you are working with meets that definition. As a documentation idea, I would suggest that you utilize the Special Circumstances area of the form and explain the situation regarding the facility's reporting requirements of the its license and explain why the report comes from the facility. If you have time before the project submits its LEED application, you could also consider a Project CIR.

If other LEEDusers have experiences with this situation, I hope they will chime in.

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Lewis Hewton Cundall Feb 09 2017 Guest 877 Thumbs Up

Thanks Michelle.

Just to clarify my situation - the method of recording waste for our facility is regulated by the local authority (as defined by ID#3000) and we can show that - but the leedonline form asks for reporting from the local authority which i don't believe is addressed by ID#3000. #10060 doesn't seem to be applicable to our particular situation.

I think we will use the special circumstances option as advised.

Thanks.

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Sundararaj Subburaman Director Ecopro Design Consultancy Private Limited
Dec 27 2016
Guest
32 Thumbs Up

Commingled waste

Project Location: United States

I have NC Retail 2007 project. The same type of waste is grouped together. For example, the metal includes iron, aluminium and etc, But sorting is done off site. Whether this will be a commingled waste or individual materials.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Dec 27 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Sundararaj - I consider commingled to be the combined collection of a variety of different material types (wood, plastic, metal, etc.). (There is no definition in the LEED 2009 Reference Guide but the LEED v4 Reference Guide states that commingled waste is "building waste streams that are combined on the project site and hauled away for sorting into recyclable streams. Also known as single-stream recycling.")

Various metals are often collected together on site independent from other materials or streams and then further separated off-site either at the recycling transfer center or the metal recycler. I would count each metal as an individual material; however, either way you classify it (individual or commingled) you'll need to have good backup that justifies the various weights or volumes of the individual metals.

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Ahmad Gabir DC PRO
Nov 29 2016
LEEDuser Member
35 Thumbs Up

Concrete as Temp barriers

Project Location: Saudi Arabia

Hi , We are working on Mega project is Saudi Arabia where we are using the concrete waste to build Safety road/excavation barriers which will be used on site during construction instead of purchasing new barriers. They will be moved out of site and utilized in another project after the project completion. Can they contribute toward MR CR2

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Saud Abdul Rasheed Sustainability/Energy Engineer, CEM, PMP, LEED AP BD+C, LEED AP O+M, Estidama PQP Nov 29 2016 Guest 1356 Thumbs Up

Dear Ahmad,
Yes if the concrete waste will be used somewhere else on another project then it is a technique to divert it from landfill which is the intent of the credit. You will need to track and document the waste.

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Adrian Arenas Architect, Sustainability Consultant, LEED AP BD + C IBALCA
Nov 28 2016
LEEDuser Member
49 Thumbs Up

Definition of Landfill

Project Location: Mexico

What is the definition of a landfill in the USA?

In Mexico, we have what is called “Socavon” which is a site that has been exploited, usually with mining activities. Once the life of the mine expires then an enormous void/hole is left on the ground, known as a “Socavon”. This void, by law, can only be filled by excavation debris and/or CLEAN (not contaminated) construction or demolition debris.
This includes: demolished concrete, masonry units, bricks or similar materials.

And excludes: hazardous waste, municipal solid waste, organic waste, or any other not in the category above.

At the end of the process when the site reaches natural ground level, a minimum 8 inches of fertile organic soil material is placed and the site shall be strictly used (by law) for agriculture purposes only.

My question: Would this be considered a landfill for the purposes of LEED 2009 (MRc2)? or can it count as construction waste diversion?

Anything similar in other countries?

Thanks in advance

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Dec 03 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Adrian - I thought that the LEED Reference Guide would have a definition for landfill but it is does not. (Neither is landfill in the v4 glossary - http://www.usgbc.org/glossary.) Since there's no referenced standard for this credit, I'm not sure what the best resource would be to refer to but here is the definition from the US EPA - https://www.epa.gov/landfills/basic-information-about-landfills#whatis.

What you are describing seems similar to other posts related to mine rehabilitation. Have you read the posts on this forum regarding mine rehabilitation? Open http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/MRc2?all-comments=true in your browser and then search for mine. One in particular to look at is http://www.leeduser.com/comment/redirect/63778.

If this search doesn't help you, please repost a question here.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Dec 27 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Adrian - Somehow I missed the definition of landfills in the Reference Guide that is in MRp1 (and in the Glossary). :( It states: "Landfills are waste disposal sites for solid waste from human activities."

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Mario S.
Nov 28 2016
LEEDuser Member
791 Thumbs Up

Wood Derived Fuel - Used in Home Fireplace

Project Location: Lebanon

We are working on a project that generates a lot of scrap wood from formwork. The contractor is sending us receipts for construction waste management credit which include wood that will be used for domestic heating in fireplaces. Does this qualifies as Wood-Derived Fuel? And is this accepted by GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). as a waste diversion strategy?

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Nov 28 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Mario - Please access http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/MRc2?all-comments=true and search for the word "fuel" from your browser. There are several previous posts (specifically 3/14/14 from Kathryn West - http://www.leeduser.com/comment/redirect/48555) that might be of use to you. If you still have a question, please repost to this thread.

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Mario S. Dec 01 2016 LEEDuser Member 791 Thumbs Up

Thank you Michelle for your reply.

Actually, i have already checked these posts but it is still not clear to me if using the wood waste in home fireplace can be considered as wood derived fuel, and if it is accepted bu USGBC as a waste diversion method.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Dec 13 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Mario - I don't have any personal experience with wood derived fuel as a waste diversion tactic. Nor have I ever included waste wood that is burned as diversion for MRc2 so I am not sure if GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). will accept it.

So when you first posted, I spent quite a bit of time trying to find a definition for wood-derived fuel and it is not in either the LEED v2009 or v4 Reference Guides. So then I looked in the LEED Interpretations and LI ID #1685 - http://www.usgbc.org/content/li-1685 - was the oldest one that was applicable to LEED-NC v2009. As Kathryn notes it is referring to a situation where wood is processed into a fuel that is used in industrial applications. It is not the same as wood waste that is burned in a home.

I don't work on LEED for Homes projects so the LI that Kathryn cites (LI ID #2629 http://www.usgbc.org/content/li-2629) was new to me since it is from LEED for Homes. So while it is not listed as not LEED-NC, it is interesting that it specifically states that waste used at an industrial facility as Wood Derived Fuel can be counted at half its value towards diversion. The only other LI mentioning WDF is #5375 (http://www.usgbc.org/content/li-5375), which mentions MR TASC rulings that are in a spreadsheet of LEED for Homes CIRS that must have preceded the current Addenda Database. See www.usgbc.org/redirect.php?DocumentID=2903 for a download and look specifically at MR 03-28, which allows donated wood to count as diversion for LEED FOR HOMES. However, they draw a distinction between this donated wood that is burned and WDF (see MR 03-29).

You may have found LI ID #10061, which states that "only wood derived fuel can contribute to MRc2 in this manner." (I think the "in this manner" refers to waste to energy in the inquiry so this doesn't seem applicable to your situation.)

So, maybe we should not be calling your situation wood derived fuel because it's really just wood. I think you could argue that this wood is indeed being diverted from the landfill. The sticky part is that the wood is burned and the glossary states that an incinerator is a furnace or container for burning waste materials. And the glossary states that waste disposal eliminates waste by means of burial in a landfill, combustion in an incinerator, or any other way that is not recycling or reuse. Burning the wood is not recycling. Can you argue that burning the wood in home fireplaces is reuse? Not when you look at the definition of reuse in the glossary (Reuse returns materials to active use in the same or a related capacity as their original use, thus extending the lifetime of materials that would otherwise be discarded.)

My advice to you would be to try and reach your CWMConstruction Waste Management (CWM) diverts construction debris from landfills through the processes of recycling, salvaging and reusing. goal without including this wood as diversion (count it as waste) and see if you can get there. Although I hope if other LEEDusers have experience they will chime in.

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James Goldfield Student
Nov 10 2016
Guest
14 Thumbs Up

Achieving Innovation Design: MRc2 (95%)

Project Location: United States

Hello Everyone,

I am currently on a project where one of our goals is to achieve Innovation Design: MRc2 Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. (95%). Right now we are tracking at 92% of recycled content.

I wanted to know if it was possible to count packaging of materials ie. cardboard and wood pallets as part of our recycling efforts in an attempt to achieve our 95% goal. My mindset was that I could argue that even though it is not a physical product of the building the packaging does play an important role of the project and an effort to reduce any and all waste going back to the landfill should be considered.

If anyone has further insight on how to achieve this your information/insight would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for your help!!

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Nov 10 2016 Guest 207 Thumbs Up

it was always my understanding that the building materials included packaging in what needed to be counted under the MRc2 C&D waste credit. On the project I'm working on I'm also including the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. 's office waste in our calculations since we're only working on this one LEED project and i'm including any haz/universal waste we generate from the construction such as tool/ equipt. batteries, recycled solvents, oil, etc.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Nov 13 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

James - I agree with Debra regarding packaging being included (as well as office waste, which some consider a bit of a gray area. Expand this forum by clicking Single-Page view at the bottom and read some previous forums on this. As a guest to LEEDuser, you can't see the FAQ above regarding office waste.) However, I disagree with Debra on her comment about including hazardous/universal waste. The LEED Reference Guide states: "Hazardous waste should be excluded from calculations and should be disposed of according to relevant regulations."

Bottom line: If the waste is generated from activities within the LEED Site, then it can be counted toward this credit - the only exceptions in LEED 2009 are land-clearing debris and hazardous waste.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Nov 14 2016 Guest 207 Thumbs Up

Hi All,

As a clarification: when I said:
"I'm including any haz/universal waste we generate from the construction such as tool/ equipt. batteries, recycled solvents, oil, etc."

I meant that as a GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. - our company is going to make sure we recycle &/or legally dispose of any hazardous waste that we or our subs generate. I'm not planning on putting weights for such into our C&D tracking calcs for LEED however.

Thank you,
Debra

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ethen mcmanus
Nov 10 2016
Guest
97 Thumbs Up

CWM Campus Credit

My project is composed of 10 buildings on a college campus. I know for a fact the CWMConstruction Waste Management (CWM) diverts construction debris from landfills through the processes of recycling, salvaging and reusing. credit is a campus credit. How do I document this? Do i go to each building on LEEDONLINE and upload? There is also something called "Master Site". Could someone please explain what that is? Is that where I upload all campus credits? And how do I tell if a specific credit is registered as a campus credit or not? Please note that the waste diverted was for the entire site (the entire campus), and not building by building. Could someone please explain how and where I could upload this CWM campus credit?

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Nov 10 2016 LEEDuser Member 8982 Thumbs Up

Hi Ethan,
A campus project is typically registered as a master site with associated building projects. I am assuming your project is registered that way. If so, yes CWMConstruction Waste Management (CWM) diverts construction debris from landfills through the processes of recycling, salvaging and reusing. is a campus credit. You would designate it that way on line in the master site credit for MR2 and in each corresponding building credit MR2. Then you'd upload the documentation that includes all the buildings into the Master Site credit one time.

This process is much more convoluted if your project was on the older platform and was converted. Not all credits can be pursued on the campus level. For guidance on all of these issues, you need to consult the multiple buildings guidance document. (http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-campus-guidance)

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Nov 13 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Michelle - Thanks for jumping in on this answer. Here's a few things I would add:
1. This is a link to some FAQs on campus that might help Ethan with some of the intricacies of LEED Online - http://www.usgbc.org/help-topic/campus-projects.
2. I've also heard that some people have experienced some issues with campus projects in LEED Online since the upgrade in January 2016.
3. Ethan - As a guest to LEEDuser, you can't see the FAQ above regarding LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #10265. Check that out in the Addenda Database - http://www.usgbc.org/content/li-10265.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator Bywater Woodworks, Inc.
Nov 03 2016
Guest
207 Thumbs Up

C&D Waste Recycling Calculations for 200 yr-old bldg renovation

Project Location: United States

C&D Waste Recycling Calculations for 200 yr-old bldg renovation:

This 200 yr-old brick building had a tremendous amount of old brick that was falling apart and needed to be taken out and re-pointed with "new" salvaged brick and new mortar.

The old brick that was structurally unsound and had to come out, was falling apart, full of old sandy mortar and was in now way able to be taken out without being covered in dirty, old sandy mortar. This "waste" was taken to the brick/ concrete recycler who rejected it saying it was too dirty. Since we tried to have it recycled but it was turned down by them, can we not include this material in our C&D Waste Calcs - like excavated soil is not included? Does anyone know for sure about deducting or not including this in our LEED calcs for MRc2? We can support this with photos of the removed brick/mortar. Thank you! Debra Lombard

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Nov 04 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Debra - I am not personally aware of any exceptions to exclude materials from the MRc2 (other than hazardous materials and land-clearing debris). I think this credit is one that can be hard for existing building with a lot of demolition because typically the materials cannot be easily recycled or diverted from the landfill, which is the intent of this credit. And as you know, not all credits are applicable to and achievable by all projects types.

Have you looked at the Related Credit text in MRc1.1 that allows credit in MRc2 if you haven't utilized MRc1? (It's also listed in MRc2 under Related Credits.) This might ease your pain if you're not already pursuing MRc1.

Another thing to consider might be to look at the LEED v4 credit substitution for LEED 2009 projects - http://www.usgbc.org/articles/new-leed-v4-credit-substitutions-2009-proj....

If other LEEDusers have any insights, I hope they will chime in.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

I would agree with Michelle.

You may be pressed for time now but there may be other opportunities, even someone in the area who would want the brick as fill.

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Risto Beatty
Oct 21 2016
LEEDuser Member
13 Thumbs Up

Commingled or Source Separated

Project Location: United States

Could someone please help define the meaning of 'source separated' in terms of the Material Stream credit calculator? The project I'm working on collects all of its recyclable waste in a single container due to site area constraints. The waste is then taken to a recycling facility where it is separated into its constituent components, weighed by material, and recycled accordingly. Are we allowed to claim credit for each of the materials within our commingled load since they are sorted before they are weighed, or is this still considered a single waste stream since it is commingled on the site?

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Oct 24 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Risto - As I see it, materials streams are part of the LEED v4 version of this credit. If your question does pertain to LEED v4, consider reposting at http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-v4/MRc5. But first, review that forum as there might already be a similar question under that credit. Also, as a guest and not a LEEDuser member, you can't see the Bird's Eye View information that explains material streams in more detail and might be additionally helpful. Read more about becoming a member here - http://www.leeduser.com/select.

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Faith Wilbert Pathfinder Engineers & Architects
Aug 08 2016
LEEDuser Member
80 Thumbs Up

Building Demoliton outside my LEED Boundary

Project Location: United States

Hello,
I'm currently working on a project where we are building a new dormitory. When the new dorm is up and running the existing dorm down the road will be demolished. Do I need to include that is the construction waste management plan? I do believe the plan is to bulldoze it after the building has been abated.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Aug 14 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Faith -

No - you do not need to include it in your plan as it is outside of the LEED Project Boundary. That said, the green building best practice would be to deconstruct it and reuse or recycle materials from the building instead of bulldozing it.

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Adrian Arenas Architect, Sustainability Consultant, LEED AP BD + C IBALCA
Jul 28 2016
LEEDuser Member
49 Thumbs Up

Waste Material reused "on-site"

Project Location: Mexico

Construction Waste Management- Regarding waste material reused on site, our project is currently reusing wood and concrete on site. The wood reused on site is reused at least 3 times or even more during the construction process (formwork, support, etc) after this process the reused wood exits the project site. The Concrete is reused (leftover after every concrete casting on site) elsewhere in the project where concrete is needed and the concrete stays on site there is no end waste leaving the site. My question is, can both these reused “on site” waste materials count towards construction waste diversion from landfill? (since we are diverting waste that will otherwise end up in a landfill by giving it a second use on site) Or does the end waste leaving the site (in the case of wood) affect this documentation?
Regards,

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Jul 29 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Adrian - Reuse of materials on site is a laudable activity.

Re: Concrete - If I am understanding what you are describing I don't think that this is actually waste and hence would not count in the overall construction waste calculations.

Re: Wood Plant-based materials that are eligible for certification under the Forest Stewardship Council. Examples include bamboo and palm (monocots) as well as hardwoods (angiosperms) and softwoods (gymnosperms).- To clarify: When you say that "the reused wood exits the project site" - do you mean it leaves to be used elsewhere? Or does it get landfilled? If it does get landfilled then the wood would need to be included in the construction waste counts.

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Abdalla Anwar Lead Design Architect | Leed Green associate, Nesma & Partners Jul 31 2016 LEEDuser Member 56 Thumbs Up

Shall it considered as reducing wastes? and shall be counted and documented?

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Jul 31 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Abdalla - For the concrete: no it would not be counted in MRc2's calculations and documentation. It was used as a building material and it not waste. If the wood is leaves the site to be used elsewhere: yes because it was diverted from the landfill. However, if the wood leaves the site and gets landfilled, then yes it would be counted in MRc2's calculations and documentation. It would be considered waste and not material diverted from the landfill.

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Adrian Arenas Architect, Sustainability Consultant, LEED AP BD + C, IBALCA Aug 02 2016 LEEDuser Member 49 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your reply Michelle- However i still have some inquiries

WOOD: It is clear to me now, regarding wood, what counts towards the MRc2 calculation is the final waste material leaving the site. When i say "reused wood exits the project site" i mean (after it is reused on site) the leftover small pieces which can no longer be used, these have been both landfilled or donated/recycled externally throughout the project. Will this wood "waste material" count towards landfill calculation or diverted from landfill calculation respectively?

CONCRETE: If i understand correctly, this leftover concrete after every on site casting is not considered a waste but a building material. Will this material then be able to contribute to MRc3 as a reused material? Or to any other MR credti? Or is it no more than a laudable activity or a Best Management Practice?

another thought: (Hypothetically speaking, if this left over concrete was not reused on site and exited the project site to be landfilled, would it be considered as a waste in the MRc2 calculation?)

the project is LEED CSv3

Regards,

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Abdalla Anwar Lead Design Architect | Leed Green associate, Nesma & Partners Aug 04 2016 LEEDuser Member 56 Thumbs Up

in Addition, if the project has pile cap demolitions, how it be considered in MRc2 calculations?

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Aug 07 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Adrian - To answer your questions:

Wood: Landfilled material is counted in the landfilled calculation for MRc2. Reused material that you can document its final disposition as not being landfilled is counted as diverted.

Concrete: While you are avoiding waste generation, under the LEED 2009 version of MRc2, this is just a best practice as source reduction. However, when you start using LEED v4, you can be rewarded for source reduction A decrease in the amount of unnecessary material brought into a building in order to produce less waste. For example, purchasing products with less packaging is a source reduction strategy.- http://www.usgbc.org/node/2601031?return=/credits/new-construction/v4.

Hypothetical situation: Yes - landfilled material from on-site activities are included as waste in MRc2.

Abdalla - Pile caps (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pile_cap)are manmade and hence should be considered in the calculations and documentation for MRc2 - even though they would have been dug up.

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Adrian Arenas Architect, Sustainability Consultant, LEED AP BD + C, IBALCA Aug 09 2016 LEEDuser Member 49 Thumbs Up

Michelle, it is clear to me now.
Thanks!

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Abdalla Anwar Lead Design Architect | Leed Green associate, Nesma & Partners Aug 15 2016 LEEDuser Member 56 Thumbs Up

Michelle, please advise how to consider pile cap demolitions in Mr2 since the concrete weight is about of 1600 ton, that means that credit cannot be achieved.

OR, as per my information, this material cannot be used for further application, OR is there a method for reuse? please advise.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Aug 19 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Abdalla - Projects with large amounts of demolition can have a hard time achieving MRc2 if there are not recycled material markets. If this is the case you have, then MRc2 might not be achievable.

In the United States, concrete from demolition is often crushed and used for aggregate for new concrete or as a base or sub-base material. Consider looking at http://www.cdrecycling.org/concrete-recycling or http://www.concretenetwork.com/concrete/demolition/recycling_concrete.htm for additional information.

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Piotr Podhajny LEED AP BD+C Midtconsult
Jul 22 2016
Guest
14 Thumbs Up

Construction Waste management

Project Location: Denmark

What if you have two buildings each persuing LEED certification both build by the same contractor but two owners. How do you seperate the waste amount from both building? Is a floor area distribution possible? To make it even more tricky, one building is a new construction and the other is a core and shelle project. Anyone had a similar chalenge?

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Jul 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Piotr - As a LEEDuser guest, you can't see the Bird's Eye View above, which provides additional details and tips.

One of those tips discusses multiple buildings and construction waste. Please review this LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. - http://www.usgbc.org/content/li-10265. Also, click the Single-page view at the bottom of this page and search this forum for answers to similar questions.

If you still have questions, please post again.

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SSG_India SSG
Jul 21 2016
LEEDuser Member
22 Thumbs Up

Re-use of excavated rocks onsite for construction.

Project Location: India

Project Location: India.

The project construction site has rock bed. These rock are excavated, broken and re-used in construction on-site. The larger pieces are used for Gabion Wall in construction and smaller pieces are used for Plum Concrete. Can we use this re-used rocks part of the CWMConstruction Waste Management (CWM) diverts construction debris from landfills through the processes of recycling, salvaging and reusing. submission calculations in consideration the efforts being put to reuse instead of sending to landfill. We have photographs of how this construction is happening on-site however there is no option for uploading photographs. Thank you.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Jul 30 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Hi - The credit requirements state: "Excavated soil and land-clearing debris do not contribute to this credit." While using on-site materials is laudable, I think that since the credit requirements exclude land-clearing debris (which is further defined as soil, vegetation, and rocks) you cannot count this for MRc2; however, reuse of material can be counted under MRc3 and regionally extracted material can be counted under MRc5. Please note that materials that are reprocessed might better be captured under MRc4 instead of MRc3. Please see MRc3 (http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/MRc3)(specifically “Reused” vs. “recycled” FAQ) and MRc4 (http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/MRc4) for additional information.

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SSG_India SSG Aug 01 2016 LEEDuser Member 22 Thumbs Up

Thank you Michelle.

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Vibha Pai Student University of Cincinnati
Jun 19 2016
Guest
466 Thumbs Up

Master's Research Survey

Project Location: United States

I am conducting this survey in affiliation with University of Cincinnati in support of my hypothesis for my Master's thesis. It would just take 10-15 minutes of your time. By completing this survey you would help me in giving my research the required depth in understanding the achievability of the credit points in the Material and Resource category of LEED v2009 and v2013. I will send in the end results of this survey to you, which could potentially make your decision process easier on any future LEED registered projects you intend to work on.

The following is the link to my survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/XR3ZVZN
Thank you in advance for taking the time!

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal ecocentric cc
Apr 12 2016
LEEDuser Member
2068 Thumbs Up

using construction rubble for mine rehabilitation

we have a project where the waste management contractor is proposing to use clean construction rubble (non-hazardous rubble, where all recyclable components, eg steel, and hazardous materials have been removed) to fill an old open pit mine, which is undergoing rehabilitation. substantial quantities of clean construction rubble/fill are being procured for this rehabilitation project.

we are wondering whether this can be considered "diversion from landfill" given it fulfills the purpose of mine rehabilitation? is this something that has been done before? We cannot find any reference to open pit mine rehabilitation in the context of this credit in any of the LEED documentation.

Any guidance will be greatly appreciated.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Apr 16 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Jutta - Sorry for my delayed response. I don't have any experience with your situation (waste used for mine reclamation) so I had to do some research.

You should review LI ID #2191 - http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=2191 - and see how it compares to what your waste management contractor is proposing. Based on what I read there, mine backfilling is not an equivalent means of accomplishing construction waste management; however, the ruling is based on potentially recyclable materials being in the mine fill material.

If other LEEDusers have experience with this, please chime in.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Apr 18 2016 Guest 207 Thumbs Up

I have a similar but slightly different variation on this theme.
Our C&D Waste hauler typically uses the following process to "recycle" sheetrock.

In a letter that I received from them:
"xyz Landfill. In accordance with our Type III Construction and Demolition Debris Permit and Wood Waste Management Plan, we beneficially use the following C&D debris materials...
Homogeneous loads of Concrete debris, roofing materials, and sheet-rock are acceptable for on-site use as road materials within the Permit Area. This reduces the need for virgin rock or stone to be mined and transported to our facility."

Has anyone had this same type of "recycling" approved by LEED either through the CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide process or just by submitting such documented use from the recycler." Like they say, the waste is a direct substitution for virgin material they'd need to acquire for that same purpose. There are no known local sheetrock recyclers in the project area other than this facility above. Therefore, there are really no other local options to having the sheetrock recycled in other means and besides to grind the sheetrock up to use a soil amendment would only then require more energy to grind it whereas, the sheetrock used as road base requires less energy to use in that manner.

Thank you,

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ May 06 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Debra - My apologies for not getting back to you sooner as I was traveling for work.

I also was hoping that if any other LEEDusers had direct experience with your situation they would chime in.

The closest my experience comes to this is when waste concrete and masonry have been used by a landfill for its roads. (I've never seen sheet rock or roofing included.)I've not had a problem with this being accepted as it is diverted from the landfill and is replacing using virgin materials.

I think you can utilize the information contained in the LEED Reference Guide and cited in various LEED Interpretations including LI ID #2256: "Any construction debris processed into a recycled content commodity which has an open market value (e.g. alternative daily coverMaterial other than earthen material placed on the surface of the active face of a municipal solid waste landfill at the end of each operating day to control vectors, fires, odors, blowing litter, and scavenging. Generally these materials must be processed so they do not allow gaps in the exposed landfill face. material) may be applied to the construction waste calculation."

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Susan Di Giulio Project Manager, Zinner Consultants May 24 2016 LEEDuser Member 2113 Thumbs Up

I agree. This is called "crushed base" here and it is always accepted. It's essentially making a stable layer under the road.

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Margaret Montgomery Principal NBBJ
Apr 11 2016
LEEDuser Member
451 Thumbs Up

Separate Demolition Package from Construction Package

I saw a comment from several years ago that appears not to have been answered; a response would be useful to me now! Can anyone address this question? Here it is:
A large project with a building(actually buildings and parking lots) slated for demolition - the demo package contract is completely separate from the construction package, and will take place half/full year in advance of construction. The right thing to do is to include the demo in CWMConstruction Waste Management (CWM) diverts construction debris from landfills through the processes of recycling, salvaging and reusing., but is it technically required?

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Apr 14 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Margaret - When I first saw your question, I went to the Reference Guide (no guidance on this issue there) and then to the MPRs. At first glance I didn’t see anything applicable.

So, I went to find the question you indicated was unanswered, which I think is http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/MRc2?all-comments=true#comment-2641. I see that Tristan included Valerie Walsh’s skillfully articulated answer from the LEED-CI MRc2 forum - http://www.leeduser.com/credit/CI-2009/MRc2?all-comments=true#comment-2554. If you look at the thread in LEED-CI, you’ll see that is followed up by a well-written response by Susan Walter - http://www.leeduser.com/credit/CI-2009/MRc2?all-comments=true#comment-17257. I think that Susan is referring to the intent of MPR # 3 - Must Use a Reasonable Site Boundary, which is: “All site conditions and impacts related to a building must be considered and addressed in the certification process to ensure a complete and thorough examination of the environmental impacts of a building.” (See Supplemental Guidance to MPRs - http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-2009-mpr-supplemental-guidance-revis....)

I agree with Susan that it is technically required. My approach has always been that if the demolition work is occurring within the LEED project boundary and it is being done in order to complete the LEED project, then it should be included. (And it is the right thing to do too!)

You could read a similar response in this thread: http://www.leeduser.com/credit/CI-2009/MRc2?all-comments=true#comment-55217.

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Margaret Montgomery Principal, NBBJ Apr 14 2016 LEEDuser Member 451 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Michelle. That sure looks like the question I saw and I don't know how I missed the response.
Good answers - this will help!

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Melissa Merryweather Director Green Consult-Asia
Apr 09 2016
LEEDuser Member
3624 Thumbs Up

Project is 1 building, waste is from 3 buildings

I have a building located in a campus. Only the office tower is undergoing LEED certification but all 3 area being built concurrently. Basement is shared but clearly demarcated to each building, buildings have separate owners. I recently discovered that all the waste for the site is being calculated, not just the waste from the office tower. I suspect this credit will be approved, since the methodology of collection is OK, but I just want to see if anyone has had experience submitting waste additional to the project building.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Apr 10 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Melissa - While it is laudable that you are hopefully diverting a lot of the waste from the landfill for all three projects, the total waste does not reflect your LEED project's waste alone.

See my response (http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/MRc2?all-comments=true#comment-57828) under the heading Construction Waste Management-Multiple Buildings below for a similar post on this subject.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Aug 02 2016 LEEDuser Member 3624 Thumbs Up

I should have updated this: our LEED reviewers agreed with you. They required us to separate out the waste for this project only and not to use a pro-rata method. Thanks!

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator Bywater Woodworks, Inc.
Mar 24 2016
Guest
207 Thumbs Up

Historic Bldg Renovation being done in phases, C&D Waste calcs

Project Location: United States

I'm working on behalf of a GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. on a complicated historic renovation and new construction project that's being done in several phases with separate contracts between Owner and GC. The project was registered with LEED NC 2009 during the 1st phase (but after the 1st phase started) so the C&D Waste was not properly documented at the beginning of the 1st phase and the LEED goals were never communicated to the GC until the end of the 1st phase, so C&D Waste Recycling rate will be VERY low. Now the design team has identified the C&D Waste Recycling Credit, 50% as one of the credits the GC needs to pursue. So it'll be complicated to calculate and also unclear as to whether or not waste from the 1st phase of work will need to be included in the C&D Waste Recycling Calcs for the main project contract which is Phase II and will start well after the project registration under v 2009. Any thoughts?

Also, the documentation of what was removed to be reused and what was repaired in situ is also also not properly documented and will be very messy to try & piece together at this point. So this is another issue (The original bldg. dates back to 1823 and much of what was supposed to be reused couldn't due to age/service life of materials.) But I feel that the project should get BOTH of the Bldg Reuse credits just based on the fact that the owner is trying to preserve the bldg. in tact as much as possible and is making repairs to preserve the remaining life of the bldg. Any ideas on this as well is greatly appreciated.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Mar 28 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Debra - I can't answer part two of your question related to building reuse. I encourage you to post your question on the MRc1.1 or MRc1.2 forum(s) - http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/MRc1.1 or http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/MRc1.2. Be sure to review the Related Credits information for MRc1.1 and MRc1.2 in regards to MRc2 and vice versa.

It is unfortunate that the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. was not included in the critical conversation regarding LEED and construction waste and that the waste diversion for the first phase is low and the records are messy. It is also unfortunate that the design team imposed this credit late on the construction team.

Based on what you have shared, my first thought is that you would have to include the waste from the first phase because the project was registered during that phase and the overall project's scope includes the first phase to make a complete project. In my opinion for a renovation project, you can't really pick and choose what to include/exclude - especially if it works to your advantage to exclude it, for instance. I would encourage a conversation with your design team to explain the potentially unrealistic nature of its late request for construction waste for the first phase. Maybe they will work with the construction team to substitute another credit that is more attainable?

(Also, I'm not sure if you mean the project was registered after first phase "had started construction" - but it is fairly typical that projects register after they have started design.)

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Donald Green Operations Manager ai Design Group
Mar 03 2016
Guest
2337 Thumbs Up

Glass Demo

Has anyone had any luck recycling glass taken from a commercial building? They are double pane commercial units removed from the curtainwall system. Our client is replacing a significant amount of glass on a 20 year old building to increase the overall performance of the building but we are having a hard time finding a place to recycle the glass units and this will be a large amount of weight in relation to the total amount of demo debris.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Mar 03 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

Donald - I haven't had success in this arena.

This 2011 blog implies that it can be used to make fiberglass and glassphalt - http://recyclenation.com/2011/09/window-glass-recycling-difficult-not-im.... It might be worth checking with manufacturers in your region. The blog also suggests some ideas for salvaging the windows.

I also found this resource in a quick Google search for window glass recycling - http://www.dlubak.com/ - "one of the largest recyclers of Window Plate and Container glass" with "six plants located in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, Texas, Oklahoma, and Arizona, in addition to numerous depots throughout the US, Canada and Mexico."

If nothing else, removing the frame to recycle it separately from the glass might be an option.

However I hope other LEEDusers who have experience will chime in.

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Ali Scander ECC
Feb 16 2016
Guest
176 Thumbs Up

Waste Management

Hello,

I'm concerned about our project earning points for MRc2. The country our project is in does not recycle very much, and most of the projects waste seems to be diverted to the landfill and not from the landfill. I'm not sure if the municipality recycles wood, plastic, etc... Our project has recycled scrap metal, asphalt, and gypsum.. We separate and sort waste on-site the best we can. Could the project loose points if there is a high percentage of waste going to the landfill ?

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Feb 16 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

AliAverage LED intensity: the illumination output for light-emitting diode lamps, as specified in the International Commission on Illumination Standard 127-2007. - Not all credits are available to all projects. Based on what you've shared of your situation, your project does not appear able to earn MRc2 - as you are not able to meet the intent (diverting debris from disposal in landfills and incineration facilities.) So yes - if you were counting on earning points under MRc2, you would lose them.

But really, you can't lose points that you weren't able to earn in the first place. It sounds like you all should not have been counting on earning points under MRc2 based on the availability of recycling in your project's location.

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Jennifer Preston BKSK Architects
Jan 22 2016
Guest
1157 Thumbs Up

Documenting Donation or Resale of Salvaged Material

Project Location: United States

Our project involves demolition. There are some materials - wood beams, bricks - that will likely be either donated to a reuse center or sold. Has a standard method of documenting this type of diversion been established?

Thanks,
James

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Jan 23 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

James - I am not aware of a standard method. I just select Diverted on the form and provide information on the location where the material ends up. If I feel there is a need to clarify a unique situation, I use the Special Circumstances area of the form.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 25 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

James, are you asking about how to track the weight or volume, or what kind of documentation (like receipts) to track?

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JP Rout
Jan 22 2016
Guest
588 Thumbs Up

Materials in Major Renovation Projects

We have Project intending to be registered under LEED 2009 BD+C for major renovations. This is an existing building which will undergo major renovation work for the interiors, HVAC and a large extent of the external façade (structural systems).
Following is the query related to the Materials category:
Should the documentation for the credits i.e. Construction Waste Management, Recycled Content, Regional Materials, Rapidly RenewableTerm describing a natural material that is grown and harvested on a relatively short-rotation cycle (defined by the LEED rating system to be ten years or less). and Certified WoodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System., only focus on the renovations or should it also include the portions of the existing building.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Jan 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

JP - You inquiry is a little unclear. What do mean by "only focus on the renovations or should it also include the portions of the existing building"? Do you mean there are portions of the existing building that are not being renovated and do you have to deal with existing materials for the MR credits?

Here's some general info: The MR credits apply to all activities within your LEED project boundary. The MRc3-7 credits address purchases made for the LEED project.

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JP Rout Jan 25 2016 Guest 588 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the reply. What I would like to clarify is:

1. When we do credit calculation for MR Credit 2: Construction Waste Management, should we include waste details at the time of construction of existing building, which happened around 10 years back and details are not available as of now. Only waste management details of renovation that is going to happen will be available. So the scope of MR CR 2 calculation is for the entire building or only for renovation works is the specific query that I have.

2. Similarly for MR CR 4 and MR CR 5 will the calculation include material cost details of existing building materials (steel, concrete, cement etc.) details of which are difficult to obtain at this time, if these are to be included it will be difficult to achieve credit points for MR CR 4 & 5 as these materials constitute a major chunk of the total materials cost.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Jan 25 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13078 Thumbs Up

JP - A LEED project covers the extent of the project that is currently being undertaken. In the case of an existing building being rehabilitated under LEED BD+C: NC, you are only dealing with waste generated and materials used for that renovation project - not the original construction of the building. You do NOT have to go back in history to get information on the existing building.

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