NC-2009 MRc5: Regional Materials

  • NC CS Schools MRc5 Type3 Local Mat Diagram
  • Multiple options for "regional"

    Regional materials are those that are extracted, harvested, and manufactured within a certain distance of your project site.

    How farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters)., exactly? Historically LEED has used a 500-mile radius to define regional products, but that made it difficult or impossible for coastal or remote regions to pursue this credit. A July 2012 LEED addendum added a more flexible approach, and now MRc5 offers two options to LEED 2009 projects:

    • Option 1: The old familiar option, uses a simple 500-mile radius from the site for both extraction and manufacturing distance.
    • Option 2: This new option allows you to do a prorated calculation based on the lower relative impact of shipping materials by rail or water. Calculate a 500 mile (800 km) total travel distance to the project site using a weighted average. Distance by rail can be divided by 3; distance by inland waterway by 2, and distance by sea by 15.

    The Option 2 credit calculation is much more complicated, and finding the necessary information could be a lot of work. It will be a most effective option for projects that really need to earn the credit, and can ideally focus their calculations on a handful "big ticket" items—see below.

    Research early and often

    Begin researching products early—this will help ensure that there are sufficient regional materials available to specify. If you delay your research, you run the risk that non-regional materials may be specified and purchased before you find a regional alternative. Use the estimated project budget to keep tabs on your performance against the credit threshold.

    Many projects fail to earn this credit because they wait until all the materials are purchased before doing the credit calculations.

    500-mile radius map, NYCThe 500-mile radius is big enough to cover a lot of ground, but depending on your location, can be tough to work with. Seeing the radius on a map can help quickly assess the product areas where you might have better luck.

    The 500-mile radius is big enough to cover a lot of ground, but depending on your location, can be tough to work with. Seeing the radius on a map can help quickly assess the product areas where you might have better luck.

    “Big ticket” items are just the ticket

    If there are enough materials available in your region, this credit can be very easy to achieve. Focusing on a few more expensive items that can be sourced regionally—like structural steel or concrete, for example—may represent enough value to earn the credit. If you combine these big-ticket items with the requirements of other MR credits, you can earn multiple points for a relatively small number of product selections. This strategy has the benefit of reducing the number of items you need to track and document.

    Finding the origins of your materials

    Often, product manufacturers will get their materials from a wide variety of sources, making extraction location trickier to determine. It can also be challenging to understand how LEED determines the manufacturing locations for materials that are salvaged onsite or reused, those that contain recycled content, or are part of assemblies. Use the chart below to clarify how you should document the manufacturing and extraction location for these materials.

    You can claim recycled content as a regional material, and you don't have to trace it back to its original extraction location. According to the LEED Reference Guide, the extraction point for recycled materials is the location of the raw material prior to the manufacturing of the final building product. That might be the recycling facility, scrapyard, depository, stockpile, or another location where the material was collected and packaged for market purchase before manufacturing. It is not necessary to track the raw material back to its original point of extraction.

    For a product with multiple points of manufacture, the point of manufacture should be listed as the location farthest from the site.

  • FAQs for MRc5

    Why can’t I include mechanical, electrical and plumbing components in this credit? What if I consistently include MEP materials in the calculations for all of the MR credits I’m attempting?

    LEED is very clear that no MEP or specialty items can be counted in the MR credit calculations. There are several reasons for this, including the fact that MEP items are very expensive relative to their weight, and including these materials skews the calculations and performance thresholds achieved. Also, LEED considers the performance of mechanical equipment paramount, and so consideration of these materials really falls under performance based energy and water credits.

    We are pursuing IEQc4.5 as an ID credit. Are we thus required to include the cost of furniture in MRc3–7?

    No. See LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #3901 for additional information.

    What if different parts of a product are manufactured at different locations?

    All steps of the manufacturing process must be within the required distance in order for the product to qualify. If the product meets this requirement, you must list the manufacture location farthest from the project site as the “manufacture distance” for the material.

    What is the purpose of the newly added Option 2? Can I pursue both options?

    Option 2, which originated as an Alternative Compliance Path for non-U.S. projects, but which is available to all projects, allows a material to come from a farther distance than 500 miles if it reaches the site by more fuel-efficient modes of transportation (ship and rail).

    LEEDuser previously advised, based on USGBC guidance, that the two options are available to be used on the basis of an individual product or material, allowing you to mix and match as needed. However, reference guide language and calculators don't appear to actually support this, and we have retracted this guidance. If you are looking to do this on a project, we recommed you contact GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). for advice—and post your results here on the forum.

    How do we account for materials using the new Option 2 equation?

    The new equation is embedded in the BD&C Materials and Resource Calculator. The calculator has a spot for materials that comply using the standard 500-mile radius (Option 1), and a spot for those that comply using the weighted average calculation (Option 2). See LEEDuser's Documentation Toolkit tab for a copy of the calculator.

    With steel and aluminum products, why do I often get review comments questioning why my extraction distance is the same as my manufacture distance?

    Unless the manufacture location (steel mill, steel coil producer, aluminum extrusion/fabrication facility, etc.) contains a recycling facility, scrap yard, depository, ore mine, or some kind of collection point on-site, it is very unlikely that the manufacture and extraction distances are the same.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Schematic Design

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  • Flooring from salvaged woodLook for unique regional resources to help earn this credit, like this wood flooring salvaged from beetle-killed pine, which would help earn this credit in the Colorado region.Early on, research the availability of materials harvested or extracted and manufactured within 500 miles of the project site. Consider resources such as stone quarries, timber resources, agricultural resources, and manufacturing centers. 


  • Denver area 500-mile radiusThe 500-mile radius around a site (Denver shown here), is measured as the crow flies—not the distance that products may actually travel.The 500-mile requirement is measured as a radius around the site “as the crow flies.” In other words, the actual miles and path traveled by the product or material is not as relevant for the calculation.

Design Development

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  • Begin by creating a baseline materials budget. This is the total amount of money that will be spent on building materials. Use the Materials Calculator from the Documentation Toolkit to compile the baseline material list in a way that facilitates adding information on environmental attributes.


  • Your material budget assumptions and material costs should be consistent across MRc3, MRc4, MRc5, MRc6, and MRc7. The LEED Online credit form helps ensure this automatically. 


  • Include in your new wood materials baseline budget the material cost (excluding labor) of all new wood items that apply under CSI Master Spec 2004 Format Divisions 3–10, 31.60 Foundations, 32.10 Paving, 32.30 Site Improvements, and 32.90 Planting. Division 12 Furniture is optional. Mechanical, electrical, plumbing and equipment costs are excluded. (See Resources for Master Spec information.) 


  • Adding Division 12 Furniture to your baseline materials budget for this credit is optional, but must be applied consistently across MRc3, MRc4, MRc5, MRc6, and MRc7. Analyze the baseline material budget to see if adding Division 12 furniture works to the project’s advantage. Generally, if the furniture helps contribute to the above MR credits it is in a project’s interest to take credit for it—however, it may help with some while making others more difficult.


  • Choose one of two options in creating a baseline budget—the default budget, or the actual budget (excluding labor). The default budget method gives you a baseline materials budget as 45% of your total budget, while the actual budget gives you a baseline based on what you actually spend.


  • A default budget is useful if you don’t want to break out the cost of materials and labor separately. You can take the total cost (material plus labor) of all items in the applicable CSI divisions and assume that cost of materials is 45% and labor cost is 55%.


  • The default budget is less time-consuming because the contractor does not have to break out the material and labor costs of items that are not being tracked for LEED credits, allowing the project to focus on tracking only the materials that contribute to LEED credits. You can take the total cost (material plus labor) of all items in the applicable CSI divisions and assume that cost of materials is 45% and labor cost is 55%. However, this option may put the project at a disadvantage in terms of getting full credit for the actual value of materials. 


  • You can alternatively use the actual materials budget (excluding labor) of all materials purchased in the applicable CSI categories.  


  • How do you decide whether to use the actual material budget or the default budget as your baseline? The lower you can get the baseline, the easier it is to purchase enough regional material to reach the credit threshold. For example, a project that is renovating an existing building will have low material costs and high labor costs. It might be better for this project to use the actual budget as the 45% default may bring the baseline too high.


  • How do you know how many regional materials you need to incorporate into your project? Look at the baseline material budget. Determine how much you want to spend on regional materials. Ten percent of the budget cost will give the project one point and 20% will give the project two points. Go through the project’s preliminary budget and identify specific items that are manufactured and harvested/extracted locally. Do these items add up to the amount needed to get one or two points?  


  • Include a cushion for this credit, in case of changes in design and purchasing. For example, if you are counting on points for using 20% regional materials, plan for 30% of your budget to be spent on regional materials to avoid coming up short.


  • Using the estimated budget to integrate regional materials into the design and specs early on can help prevent costly change orders during construction. 


  • Use your estimated budget as a guide throughout the project. Many projects fail to earn this credit because they wait until all the materials are purchased before doing the credit calculations.


  • Focus on “big ticket” items when seeking materials to meet regional purchasing requirements. If you can find regional materials like structural steel and concrete, these more expensive materials will go a long way toward meeting the required percentage of your materials budget. This approach allows you to Iimit the overall number of items you need to track and document, reducing contractor headaches. If these big-ticket items do not get you to the threshold you’re trying to meet, target medium-priced items next until you reach your goal.


  • A single product or material can contribute to multiple credits. For example, a chair made both locally and with recycled materials contributes to MRc5 as well as MRc4. Focusing on products and materials with multiple environmental attributes can also limit the overall number of items that must be tracked. 


  • Product manufacturers may not have extraction information readily available. Allow for time in your process to research this information.


  • The location of final assembly is considered the “manufacturing location.” Extraction locations are determined by the location from which the raw material was sourced. 


  • Products salvaged on site can count the site as the manufacturing and extraction location.


  • Look at product cut sheets and manufacturing data to determine whether a product contains regional materials.


  • Assemblies


  • When a product is made of multiple materials that are manufactured and extracted in different locations, or only part of the product can count as regional, use these special considerations.


  • The cost value for the LEED calculation is determined by weight as a percentage of the total. For example, a $100 piece of casework assembled locally contains 20% wood, and 80% marble, by weight, but only the wood was harvested and manufactured locally. Even though the piece of casework was manufactured and assembled locally, only $20 of the casework would contribute to this credit as being both manufactured and harvested locally.


  • Request that manufacturers provide assembly information broken down by weight. 


  • Salvaged or Reused Material, and Recycled Content


  • Follow special considerations for products that are salvaged or reused or have recycled content.


  • Use the vendor or salvage location in place of the manufacturing location for salvaged, reused, or refurbished materials. Use the location from which the vendor salvaged the material in place of extraction location.


  • If a material is salvaged onsite and reused again onsite, you can count the site as both the manufacturing and extraction location. For example, parking lot concrete might be ground up and reused as infill on the same site.


  • Use replacement costs of salvaged materials (rather than actual costs) for all LEED materials calculations. For example, if you received free filing cabinets from a local office rehab you would use the cost of what you might spend on a filing cabinet if you had to replace the free one. This can work to your advantage, since the cost of used cabinets would probably be lower.


  • You can claim recycled content as a regional material, and you don't have to trace it back to its original extraction location. According to the LEED Reference Guide, the extraction point for recycled materials is the location of the raw material prior to the manufacturing of the final building product. That might be the recycling facility, scrapyard, depository, stockpile, or another location where the material was collected and packaged for market purchase before manufacturing. It is not necessary to track the raw material back to its original point of extraction.


  • The actual budget method can be more time-consuming for the contractor because it requires tracking the actual costs of all materials purchased, even those in the applicable CSI divisions that do not necessarily contribute to LEED credits.


  • Include in your new wood materials baseline budget the material cost (excluding labor) of all new wood items that apply under CSI MasterFormat Divisions 03–10, 31 (31.60.00 Foundations), and 32 (32.10.00, Paving, 32.30.00 Site Improvements, and 32.90.00 Plantings). Division 12 Furniture is optional as long as it is consistently applied across all credits. Mechanical, electrical, plumbing and equipment costs are excluded. (See Resources for Master Spec information.)

Construction Documents

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  • Revisit your baseline materials budget as the design evolves to make sure the numbers remain accurate and that you remain on track to achieve your goal for the credit.


  • Incorporate regional product requirements into individual construction specifications.


  • For guidance and sample specification language for incorporating LEED specifications into construction documents, see MasterSpec, or the Whole Building Design Guide. (See Resources.)


  • Incorporating the LEED requirements directly into the drawings as well as into the specs is a good way to remind the contractor and subcontractors of the requirements. 


  • Analyze the initial cost budget to know what materials the project can target and incorporate LEED requirement language accordingly into construction specs for the specific materials. The contractor will appreciate not having to fill out forms for materials that are not local, or that have so little cost value that it is a waste of time. 


  • Whenever possible, designate in the construction specifications that contractors use specific product manufacturers that you have verified as producers of locally manufactured and extracted items. This will help save research time for the contractors.


  • Include submittal requirements within each targeted construction spec section and add general requirements to the Division 1 bid package. Include a copy of any submittal documents that the contractor may need to fill out.


  • Carefully review manufacturer data. Don’t pay attention to vague claims such as “Our product will give you a regional LEED point” when in truth it will only contribute to the credit. No matter what the manufacturer claims, you’ll still need to ask for manufacturing and extraction locations.

Construction

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  • Preparation Before Construction Begins


  • The general contractor (GC) should be oriented to all LEED construction-related issues, such as IAQ management, low-emitting materials, environmental materials tracking tools, and construction waste management. 


  • LEED documentation and materials tracking are usually the GC’s responsibility even though specific materials selection may have been already determined by the architect or designer.


  • The GC should hold an orientation meeting with the subcontractors to review the LEED responsibilities related specifically to their trades. This exercise helps to build trust and is crucial for obtaining buy-in from all participants in the process.


  • Give the GC and subcontractors the following tools to help them track materials data for all MR and IEQ credits. (See the Documentation Toolkit for access.)

    • Materials Calculator:  This is a master tracking spreadsheet that the GC can use internally to compile product information received from the subcontractors. The spreadsheet tracks LEED values across multiple LEED MR and IEQ credits.
    • Environmental Materials Reporting Form: This is a material tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values for products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing. 
    • Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form: This is a VOC tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing.
    • Low-Emitting Material Limits: These tables, found with each credit here on LEEDuser, summarize the maximum VOC limits for different types of adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, composite wood, and flooring products. When subcontractors search for low-emitting products, they should consult these charts.

  • Enabling coordination and communication among the GC, subcontractors and design team early in the process can minimize scheduling delays and pushback from subcontractors.


  • For any materials not yet specified, research the availability of additional regional materials before construction begins to ensure that the project earns this credit. If product decisions are made after construction begins, there may be less time to review data sheets carefully and much greater risk of using a noncompliant product. 


  • During Construction


  • The contractor starts gathering and environmental data and cut sheets from subcontractors for approval. 


  • The GC functions as the overall quality assurance provider for this credit. Responsibilities include conducting weekly reviews of subcontractor product submittals and tracking forms.


  • Review subcontractor product suggestions ahead of time to avoid the purchase of inappropriate materials and eliminate the need for costly change orders.  


  • Streamline documentation and research by taking data gathered from subs via the Environmental Materials Reporting Form and transfer it into a master spreadsheet for all the items being tracked for each product across MR and IEQ credits. For example, you may need to ask the millworker for regional information for MRc5, certified wood information for MRc7, and information about adhesives installed on site for IEQc4.1. If one spreadsheet collects all the data, it can streamline your documentation, associated research, and help with quality control. Use the Materials Calculator spreadsheet in the Documentation Toolkit.


  • A master spreadsheet facilitates information collection for subcontractors, giving them a road map of exactly what types of information to collect for each product.  


  • Assign a responsible party to input the subcontractors’ tracking forms into the Materials Calculator (see Documentation Toolkit). A LEED consultant or an administrative assistant in the GC’s office may be the best choice for this role.


  • Breaking out specific materials costs (excluding labor) for construction materials that contribute to LEED credits is a requirement for LEED MR credits. Some subcontractors prefer not to do this because there are always hidden markups in the materials that subcontractors purchase at wholesale. However, you can simply include the product markup when breaking out a product’s material cost from installation and labor costs.


  • Even if you use the default budget method for your baseline material budget, you  have to break out the actual cost of materials you are tracking for LEED.  


  • Transfer all the data collected in the Materials Calculator spreadsheet (see Documentation Toolkit) to the LEED Online form and upload the product cut sheets. 


  • Only a random 20% sampling of product cut sheets need to be uploaded to LEED Online to document this credit.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Keep a list of sustainable materials used on the project so that operations staff can use these products for future renovations.


  • Develop regional procurement recommendations and incorporate the recommendations into a purchasing policy. This will contribute to EBOM MRp1: Sustainable Purchasing Policy.  

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    MR Credit 5: Regional materials

    1–2 Points

    Intent

    To increase demand for building materials and products that are extracted and manufactured within the region, thereby supporting the use of indigenous resources and reducing the environmental impacts resulting from transportation.

    Requirements

    Use building materials or products that have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured, within a specified distance of the project site for a minimum of 10% or 20%, based on cost, of the total materials value. If only a fraction of a product or material is extracted, harvested, or recovered and manufactured locally, then only that percentage (by weight) must contribute to the regional value. The minimum percentage regional materials for each point threshold is as follows:

    Regional Materials Points
    10% 1
    20% 2



    Option 1

    All building materials or products have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) radius of the project site.

    OR

    Option 2

    Building materials or products shipped by rail or water have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) total travel distance of the project site using a weighted average determined through the following formula:

    (Distance by rail/3) + (Distance by inland waterway/2) + (Distance by sea/15) + (Distance by all other means) ≤ 500 miles [800 kilometers]

    Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components, and specialty items such as elevators and equipment cannot be included in all calculations. Include only materials permanently installed in the project. Furniture may be included if it is included consistently in MR Credit 3: Materials Reuse through MR Credit 7: Certified WoodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System..

    SITES-LEED Equivalency

    This LEED credit (or a component of this credit) has been established as equivalent to a SITES v2 credit or component. For more information on using the equivalency as a substitution in your LEED or SITES project, see this article and guidance document.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Establish a project goal for locally sourced materials, and identify materials and material suppliers that can achieve this goal. During construction, ensure that the specified local materials are installed, and quantify the total percentage of local materials installed. Consider a range of environmental, economic and performance attributes when selecting products and materials.

Web Tools

Free Map Tools- radius around a point

This free online tool allows you to draw a 500-mile radius around a point on a map, which can help visualize the Regional Materials boundaries for your  project location, and help you look for sources within those boundaries.


Reclaimed Material Consultant/Broker

PlanetReuse is a nationwide reclaimed construction material broker and consultant company. At no cost to the design team, they match materials with designers, builders and owners to serve LEED efforts, save money, and sustain the planet. They make it easier to use a wide variety of reclaimed materials in new projects as well as help find new projects for building materials being deconstructed, guiding clients through every step of the process.

Technical Guides

Master Spec

Architectural Computer Services, Inc. (ARCOM) offers a free downloadable PDF of the Master Spec divisions. Check this to verify which materials are included in this and other MR credits.


Specifying LEED Requirements Reference Book and CD ROM

This book and CD-ROM from Master Spec offers useful guidance and sample specification language for incorporating LEED specifications into construction documents. (Requires purchase.)

Organizations

Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG) — Federal Green Construction Guide for Specifiers

Support on incorporating LEED requirements into specifications. 

Assemblies Calculator

Many products contain materials with different extraction or harvest locations. Use this spreadsheet to determine how much of the assembly you can count toward the Regional Materials credit. Includes sample calculation.

Materials Calculator

Teams can use this tool to track all materials across various MR and IEQ credits. It helps teams develop a roadmap of what information needs to be tracked for different products. It can also be used early on to create the baseline budget and ensure the products that are being used will apply to the various credit thresholds.

Environmental Materials Reporting Form

This is a materials tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values of products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. for filing.

Product Cut Sheets

Manufacturers often highlight regional manufacturing and extraction information in cut sheets and letters, as shown here. In some cases information may be misleading or incomplete, and you'll need to follow up (see annotations on the PDF).

Letter to Contractor for MR and IEQ Credits

Use a letter like this sample to orient the contractor to their responsibilities for all MR and IEQ credits. This letter is an introduction that can be customized for the credits your project is pursuing.

Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form

This is a VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. for filing. Use it specifically for earning low-emitting materials credits, but in conjunction with documentation for MR credits.

Concrete Tracking

Use this form to track your concrete mixes and their recycled content and distance to the manufacturing and extraction sites.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 MR

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

384 Comments

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Rick Alfandre Principal Alfandre Architecture
Apr 05 2017
LEEDuser Member
652 Thumbs Up

Concrete Regional and Recyle Content

Project Location: United States

I'm trying to verify the appropriateness of our approach to concrete for MR 4 and 5.

Using the Materials Calculator and Tracker form; Concrete - total cost is the cost of concrete delivered to the site.

Using the LEED Concrete Tracking Form, I can determine the total $ value for the SCMs per Cubic Yard. This $ value can then be interpreted as a percentage of the overall concrete (not only the cementitious material). The % of SCM relative to the overall concrete is quite low.

For MR 5, I want to use the Concrete Mix information, to determine the percentage of material, fly ash, coarse, fine aggregate, cement, etc. was manufactuered/harvested within 500 miles. This percent (by weight) represents the amount of the concrete assembly that is manufactured/extracted locally. This percentage will be quite high.

Is this a proper approach to dealing with Concrete?

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Rick Alfandre Principal Alfandre Architecture
Mar 15 2017
LEEDuser Member
652 Thumbs Up

Extraction point for Recycled Content

I have steel products that a mfg is providing with certain quantities of post consumer/pre-industrial recycled content.

Can I use these percentages for the percent manufactured & extracted regionally if the Manufacturer is located within 500 miles?

Do I need to know where the recycled scrap comes from?

I know that variations of this question have been covered, I just need to verify.

Thanks.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Mar 16 2017 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

Rick—Reference Guide Correction #100000379, issued in 2010, states, “Recycled materials that satisfy the requirements of MR Credit 4 may also contribute to MR Credit 5. The extraction point for recycled materials is the location of the raw material prior to the manufacturing of the final building product. As such, the point of extraction could include a recycling facility, scrap yard, depository, stockpile, or any other location where the material was collected and packaged for market purchase before manufacturing. It is not necessary to track the origin of the raw material before it arrived at the point of extraction.”

Therefore, the extraction points are the scrap yards and other facilities from which the steel mill obtained the recycled steel. The steel mill is not the extraction point unless it sits in the middle of its own scrap yard (as some do).

You do NOT need to trace recycled content all the way back to the original consumer (for example, the homeowner that disposed of an old washing machine).

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant Mar 16 2017 LEEDuser Member 3171 Thumbs Up

Rick - Specifically for steel, if you claim the recycled content Defined in accordance with the International Organization of Standards document ISO 14021 D Environmental labels and declarations D Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labeling).% is also regional, the LEED Reviewers have been asking for documentation that the recycled content portion of the steel has been acquired within 500 miles of the project site. In my experience, a quick email or call to the designated "sustainability" or "LEED" contact at the various steel companies will get you what you need. These contacts are usually listed on the steel producers' websites. Just ask them for a project-specific regional content letter -- they almost all have them at this point. Then multiply the % regional x the % scrap to get your regional content for MRc5. This has been accepted for me every time. At a minimum, you will need to provide the project name, location, and date of completion (if applicable) to get the letter. You may also need the mill numbers, but not typically.

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Rick Alfandre Principal, Alfandre Architecture Mar 16 2017 LEEDuser Member 652 Thumbs Up

Thank you. I appreciate the verification.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Mar 16 2017 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

As an example, I have received documentation from various major steel manufacturers that several of their mills are immediately adjacent to scrap yards from which each of those mills obtains all of its recycled steel. In these cases, I count the combined pre- and post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. recycled percentage toward MRc5.

Other mills have reported that they purchase recycled steel from various sources, but that an annual average of X% comes from scrap yards and recycling facilities that are within 500 miles of my project. X% of this steel’s recycled content percentage counts toward MRc5.

Finally, some steel makers tell me that they purchase from too many different recyclers to track how much is regional. Since they can’t pin down a percentage, I can’t count any of this toward MRc5.

Just remember that, if the mill or the steel fabricator is more than 500 miles away, the steel is not regional regardless of where it buys its scrap.

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Denise Domino DivisionOne Construction, LLC
Mar 14 2017
LEEDuser Member
9 Thumbs Up

Material & Recycled Calculator - v2009

Project Location: United States

Can a reviewer tell me how they would like to see this spreadsheet set up?

I started with entering as I got the information and then quickly realized when I needed to add another Vendor to the project, I would insert a row and it throws the row at the bottom so now my spreadsheet is no longer in alphabetical order. Should I go back and download a new calculator?

Also if a vendor has zero recycled content and does not qualify for Regional material points do they need to be listed on the calculator?

It gets messy and a little confusing with all the "extra" information.

There are formatting issue and the spreadsheet is locked.Due to the fact that there are many form

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant Mar 14 2017 LEEDuser Member 3171 Thumbs Up

The formatting drives me crazy too..... So I copied and pasted into a new file -- exactly the same except it allows formatting changes. It took some time, but has been totally worth it. If you want a copy, let me know -- I will share.

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Denise Domino DivisionOne Construction, LLC Mar 15 2017 LEEDuser Member 9 Thumbs Up

That would be great. Do you have my email??

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Denise Domino DivisionOne Construction, LLC
Mar 14 2017
LEEDuser Member
9 Thumbs Up

20% Cut Sheet Upload

Project Location: United States

It is my understanding that you need to upload cut sheets for 20% of the cost. Is the 20% of the total project cost, 20% of the default cost or 20% of the material cost (which is the total listed in Column G in the Material and Resource Calculator?

Thank you-

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant Mar 14 2017 LEEDuser Member 3171 Thumbs Up

Hi Denise -
It is 20% of the sutstainable materials cost. So 20% of the cost contributing to your MRc4, or MRc5 tally. The LEED Materials Calculator spreadsheet calculates this for you under each credit section (at least the older version did). In the documentation provided column, if you select "yes" or "no" for each contributing material, the total % documented will be calculated at the bottom.

Since the newer version of the spreadsheet does not ask about documentation, and neither does the v5 LEED Online Form, I'm not sure what you're supposed to do -- other than manually calculate the % of contributing materials cost that you are uploading.

On a side note, that 20% is pretty arbitrary. I routinely have Reviewers ask me for additional supporting documentation about specific materials -- it does not seem to matter if I originally submit 20% or 90% of the documentation.

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Denise Domino DivisionOne Construction, LLC Mar 14 2017 LEEDuser Member 9 Thumbs Up

Thank you Erica:

This is my first time to upload and wanted to be concise.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Mar 14 2017 LEEDuser Expert 13244 Thumbs Up

Check out the January and June 2016 updates on the LEEDuser forum - LEED Online Status Updates - http://www.leeduser.com/strategy/leed-online-status-updates. Among other things, those posts discuss the changes to the MR and IEQ documentation uploads that USGBC included as part of the January 2016 LEED Online Upgrade and v06 forms for LEED 2009 projects. These USGBC articles are additional references - http://www.usgbc.org/articles/new-forms-online-leed-2009-and-leed-v4-pro... and http://www.usgbc.org/articles/leed-online-2016-updates.

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant Mar 16 2017 LEEDuser Member 3171 Thumbs Up

Michelle - thanks for the link. That is helpful.
One question -- do you know if the Reviewers are still asking for supporting documentation during review, even if the Forms do not require the uploads? Thanks!

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Mar 16 2017 LEEDuser Expert 13244 Thumbs Up

Erica - My understanding is that the reviewers will only ask for backup if they have a question on items or something looks problematic in the MR Calculator. From a Proven Provider call, I learned that going forward MR backup that is uploaded is really not even reviewed by the reviewers.

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant Mar 16 2017 LEEDuser Member 3171 Thumbs Up

Great - thanks Michelle. So, keep collecting the documentation just in case, but don't bother uploading with the new forms. Got it!

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Mar 16 2017 LEEDuser Expert 13244 Thumbs Up

Erica - I just wanted to add something to your last comment.

There's no way for the team's project manager for LEED to verify the information in the MR Calculator without the manufacturer documentation on the materials from the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. . So, it's not really the case of collecting it "just in case." In order for a full QC review to be done BEFORE the project is submitted to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)., the project manager for LEED needs the backup documentation. Then if there is a concern from the review team, the project manager for LEED has the backup readily available to provide.

So, the only change in the process is that GBCI is no longer requiring the team to upload the 20% by cost of the backup documentation.

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant Mar 16 2017 LEEDuser Member 3171 Thumbs Up

Yes, of course! Did not mean to diminish the importance of verification!

As a LEED Admin, I spend a lot of time prepping documentation for upload with highlights, circles, flashing arrows if possible, and editing down the contractor's submittals to only the necessary pages. If I only need to spend time on this all prep work if asked for it during review could be a big time saver.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Mar 29 2017 Guest 219 Thumbs Up

I'm in my leedonline nc v2009 cert project and the MRc4 form itself says: "provide cutsheets for 20% of materials by cost" and the line above that also says "with cutsheets provided."
So naturally I'm confused by your comments above wheres my leedonline form seems to require uploading cutsheets. The bottom right of this form indicates v4. so my bigger question is why is the latest version of this form 06 as mentioned above not automatically showing up in my leedonlikne rather the version 04 form seems to be the default?
Thank you!
Debra

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Mar 29 2017 LEEDuser Expert 13244 Thumbs Up

Debra - You have the pre-v06 form for your project (v04 in this case) - meaning your project was registered prior to 1/1/16.

You must request an upgrade to the v06 forms within LEED Online via Feedback button. Only projects registered after 1/1/16 have the v06 forms automatically. You can try to request to upgrade to this one v06 form but I heard recently from another LEEDuser that USGBC is no longer doing single form upgrades and instead only upgrades the entire project.

The problem is that many of us were used to the linkages that are in the pre-v06 forms, which is why the subject line of this post says beware of consequences. The v06 forms break all linkages and data sharing between credits because they can be worked on offline in addition to online.

Please review my March 14, 2017 post in this thread (http://www.leeduser.com/comment/redirect/71068) that discusses the changes to the LEED Online that occurred with the v06 forms in the LEEDuser LEED Online Status Update forum.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Mar 29 2017 Guest 219 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much Michelle! I will read the three webpages you linked. Your assistance is greatly appreciated. It's too bad that GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). makes it so difficult for those trying to make LEED cost effective for the project Owners. It's never been easy for LEED users and seems to be more complicated than ever. I'm not working on any LEED v4 certification projects yet and am almost hesitant to even go there as much as I want to assist with sustainable design projects. GBCI needs to realize that when obtaining info for LEED and uploading/using LEEDonline gets complicated it add costs to projects that will likely prohibit projects from finishing or even starting LEED certification projects. It'd be interesting to find out from those that are working within LEEDonline how much of one's time (%) is actually spent on having to read through LI's, CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide's, LEED addenda, LEED webpages, and trying to figure out what to do when, etc.

Cheers!
Debra

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Zu-Ning Chang
Mar 13 2017
Guest
4 Thumbs Up

construction management

Hello, I am curious about that how do LEED determine the regional distance of material is 500 miles? Thank you in advance for the answer.

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant Mar 13 2017 LEEDuser Member 3171 Thumbs Up

Hi Zu-Ning -

For NC Option 1, use a 500-mile radius from the project site, measured "as the crow flies". You can use an online tool like the Geobytes Distance Calculator http://geobytes.com/citydistancetool/ to find the staight-line distance between 2 cities. Both the manufacturing location AND the raw material extraction point must be within that radius.

For Option 2, add the actual distance traveled (road miles -- use google maps, etc.) from the extraction point to the manufacturing point, then the manufacturing point to the project site. Hope that helps.

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Zu-Ning Chang Mar 14 2017 Guest 4 Thumbs Up

Thank you for answering. But my question is why LEED uses 500 miles as a baseline for regional materials? How do LEED delineate this figure?

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant Mar 14 2017 LEEDuser Member 3171 Thumbs Up

Sorry Zu-Ning. I have no idea why they chose 500 miles. My guess is it was somewhat arbitrary, but a reasonable radius from which to actually source products.

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Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 14 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Hi--having been there since (almost) the beginning, I can say with some confidence that there was no science behind the 500-mile figure. It was selected based on what seemed achievable for most major cities; while still encouraging a regional approach to the procurement of resources.

One consideration was the energy/carbon impact of transportation. There was along the way a proposal to allow the travel distance to vary based on mode of transport. LEED Canada actually adopted that approach. But it was deemd too complicated by those managing the US/international version.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Mar 14 2017 LEEDuser Expert 13244 Thumbs Up

Hi Nadav - Thanks for the history. I wanted to note that the 7/6/2012 correction (http://www.usgbc.org/leedaddenda/100001265) added the new Option 2 for this credit that allows teams to use total travel distance using a weighted average.

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Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 14 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Right! I had forgotten that. Thanks, Michelle.

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Zu-Ning Chang Mar 28 2017 Guest 4 Thumbs Up

Hello Nadav and Michelle,

Thank you for your answer. Because I am a graduate student researching sustainability, I need some information on LEED. May I quote your answers in my study to explain this credit? Or you can give me some reference describing the meaning of the distance of 500 miles?
Thanks a lot!

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Mar 28 2017 LEEDuser Expert 13244 Thumbs Up

Zu-Ning - You're welcome to quote my answer. I didn't participate in the development of LEED so I'll defer to Nadav about his information. The only thing I could suggest to potentially get a resource for the 500-mile radius would be to contact USGBC and ask to connect with the Materials and Resources Subject Matter Expert. I'd use leedinfo@usgbc.org.

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant
Feb 23 2017
LEEDuser Member
3171 Thumbs Up

How to use combination of Option 1 and Option 2?

Project Location: United States

In the FAQ section above, it says "The two options are available to be used on the basis of an individual product or material, so you can mix and match as needed."
Does anyone know how to do this? Because the LEED Materials Spreadsheet will only one or the other, definitely not both. It treats Op 1 and Op 2 on a project scale.

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant Mar 14 2017 LEEDuser Member 3171 Thumbs Up

Anyone have success with this??
Or is the LEEDuser FAQ section just sadly mistaken?

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Mar 23 2017 LEEDuser Expert 13244 Thumbs Up

Erica - I'm sorry that I didn't post this sooner. I wanted to let you know we are looking into this situation. I'll be back in touch as soon as I can share more.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 07 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

I've edited the LEEDuser FAQ to remove this guidance, because as you have noticed it doesn't appear to be supported by USGBC.

However, I would recommend you contact GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). or USGBC directly to request clarification and to see if they will allow it. I think that request would have to come from a project to be successful.

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Guillermo Brunzini
Feb 15 2017
Guest
9 Thumbs Up

New materials and resources calculator since 12/01/16

Hello Everybody,
Two questions: 1- a project registered in 2012 can use the new materials and resources calculator? 2- What happens with the cutsheets required in previous versions,?
I would appreciate any help on this one.
Thanks.

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant Mar 13 2017 LEEDuser Member 3171 Thumbs Up

Hi Guillermo -
I don't think it matters which version you use. If you have already started using the older version and it's easier to continue using it, I would not bother switching over.

Good question about the documentation -- it is odd that they no longer ask for it. However, this does match the new LEED Online Form v5, which no longer appears to request the former 20%-by-cost documentation upload. I can't believe the Reviewers would not ask for anything. If you are using the new forms and/or calculator, probably a good bet to collect all the documentation anyway and have it handy in case they ask.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Mar 14 2017 LEEDuser Expert 13244 Thumbs Up

Check out the January and June 2016 updates on the LEEDuser forum - LEED Online Status Updates - http://www.leeduser.com/strategy/leed-online-status-updates. Among other things, those posts discuss the changes to the MR and IEQ documentation uploads that USGBC included as part of the January 2016 LEED Online Upgrade and v06 forms for LEED 2009 projects. These USGBC articles are additional references - http://www.usgbc.org/articles/new-forms-online-leed-2009-and-leed-v4-pro... and http://www.usgbc.org/articles/leed-online-2016-updates.

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FABIO VIERO Head of Sustainability Manens-Tifs s.p.a.
Dec 13 2016
LEEDuser Member
1375 Thumbs Up

Scrap as regional material

Hi everyone.
Could a scrap of a production process be claimed as regional material, assuming that it is generated and harvested in the same plant (which is, of course less the 160 km from project site) where the material is produced?
Thanks.

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Chris Klehm President, Energy & Environmental Solutions Dec 13 2016 LEEDuser Member 68 Thumbs Up

Scrap production is a great example of material "recovered", so it can be claimed as regional.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Dec 14 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

Fabio—What is the process that produces this “scrap,” and what is the product into which the scrap is being incorporated before being sold to the project?

I ask because LEED calculates regional material the same as it does recycled content. The recycled content calculation is set by ISO 14021, which excludes “reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” Because using the scrap introduces no new material into the process, such scrap content would be ignored completely when calculating recycled and regional content.

However, if the scrap materials from producing one product are used in a second process to manufacture a product different than the first, the scrap would be considered recycled and regional.

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Karolina Izdebska Ove Arup & Partners Int. Ltd Sp. z o.o. Oddzial w Polsce
Sep 19 2016
LEEDuser Member
253 Thumbs Up

manufacturer statement - lack of exact numbers

Hi,
We have a manufacturer's statement and it says: "materials used to manufacture above mentioned products are approximately in 90% extracted/produced within 500mile radious from the construction site".
Do you think such statement is acceptable? In our calculations for MRc5 credit, can we safely use 90% of material as regional? I have doubts because of the word "approximately"...
many thanks in advance.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Sep 20 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

Karolina—You are right to question the statement for using the word “approximately.” The manufacturer should report the MINIMUM percentage of regional extraction. For example: “At least 90% of the materials are extracted within 500 miles.”

I would also question the use of the expression “extracted/produced.” For example, a window may contain aluminum, and the aluminum may be extruded (produced) within 500 miles, but the sources of the ore and the recycled material used to make the aluminum may be unknown of located outside the 500-mile radius. The extraction site is the source of the recycled or raw material, not the location where the intermediate, man-made component was produced.

I would expect the statement to state clearly the minimum percentage of regionally extracted RAW MATERIALS, preferably identifying the materials (at least generally). Any statement should specifically include the address of the project site and the address of the manufacturer.

Finally, I would only be concerned about the statement’s validity if the manufacturer’s product were a major part of the project. If this is a low-cost item, it may make little difference whether the regional percentage is 90% or 0%. The project’s big-budget items will earn the credit.

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Paul Deinhofer MSc Schöberl & Pöll GmbH
Aug 17 2016
Guest
65 Thumbs Up

CSI MasterFormat necessary in Europe

Project Location: Austria

Hello
Is it also necessary for projects in Europe to evaluate the material costs using the CSI MasterFormat?
Or is there another possibility...?
Thanks

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Aug 17 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

Paul—LEED Interpretation, LI#10287 (http://www.usgbc.org/content/li-10287), advises Project Teams using Specification formats other than CSI-MasterFormat-2004 to verify that the Spec divisions used for LEED correlate to those in MasterFormat-2004.

Compare your Spec format side-by-side to MasterFormat to ensure that you include the appropriate material in MR Credits 3-7. You should probably include that comparison in "Special Circumstances" narratives in the LEED-Online MR Credit forms.

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Matthew Martin Assistant Site Superintendent QBS, Inc.
Aug 05 2016
Guest
141 Thumbs Up

Are Base/Subbase Aggregate Materials part of Materials Cost?

Project Location: United States

I have not seen this question about base/subbase addressed here yet.

I have read the comment fill materials are part of 31 2000 Div. and not counted as materials but what about base courses, subbase for asphalt and concrete paving? CSI MasterFormat puts Bases within section 32 1000 Paving, which is an included section for materials. Can we assume soil preparations like aggregate, stone, subbases or bases for asphalt and concrete should be considered Earth Moving classification "excavation and fill" instead of the included "Base" classification? What about for 32 9000-is topsoil for seeding considered "fill/earthmoving" or is it considered a "base, subbase"? And if it's considered "fill/earthmoving" what does the classification mean when it says Bases for Div. 32 1000?

Is this example correct?
For example, a project with asphalt paving and turf grass installation should include the material costs of the asphalt, asphalt paint, grass seed, straw-mulch or netting but should not include all the special base aggregate that goes beneath asphalts and the topsoils that are for the turfgrass because those aggregate mat's are considered "earth moving" or "fill" Is this correct thinking?
Thank you, -Matt

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Aug 07 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

Matthew—No. The LEED Reference Guide requires MR credit tallies to include all materials specified in Divisions 03-10 and in Sections 31.60.00, 32.10.00, 32.30.00, 32.90.00 of CSI MasterFormat. If fill materials have been specified in these locations, include them in the MR Credit Tallies.

CSI MasterFormat is a system for organizing Construction Specification, a standard “table of contents” for the “Project Manual” that becomes part of the contract documents for most architectural projects in the US and Canada. This system is flexible and includes several overlapping designations for seemingly similar materials. Ultimately, the specification writers on an individual design team choose which locations are the most appropriate to specify the particular materials used on their project.

For example, many specifiers put general soil and fill materials under 31.23.00 Excavation and Fill—using 32.10.00 Bases Ballasts, and Paving only for the base courses that are installed as part of paving systems and using 32.91.00 Planting Preparation only to specify soils for planting beds. I have also seen fills used as part of drainage systems specified under 33.00.00 Utilities and those used in foundation systems specified under 31.60.00 Special Foundations and Load-Bearing Elements.

Typically, the materials used in these various applications require very different characteristics, they are often specified by different designers, and they are often installed by different contractors during different phases of construction. I usually follow the specifiers’ lead and tally my MR credits based on how the Spec writers organized their Specifications.

Outside of North America, design teams may not use CSI MasterFormat. In such cases, I would work with the design team and with the project’s LEED coordinator to determine which materials are relevant to the MR Credits

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Matthew Martin Assistant Site Superintendent, QBS, Inc. Aug 08 2016 Guest 141 Thumbs Up

Thank you, I understand. Follow the specifier (the one organizing the specifications) as to which spec. division they place the materials-the specs. take precedence. In this case, the specs. refer to the subbase, and base for asphalt/concrete paving and topsoil for turfgrass as "earth moving".

Cheers

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Matthew Martin Assistant Site Superintendent QBS, Inc.
Aug 04 2016
Guest
141 Thumbs Up

Material Cost Aggregate, Base, Topsoil (Div. 32 1000, 32 3000)

Project Location: United States

A Contradiction? (my project is under LEED NC 2009)
The LEED 2009 ref. guide is unclear with the inclusions for Div. 31, and 32. Are base, subbase, subgrade preparations; stone, aggregate and topsoil included in the material costs for Divisions 32 1000 and 32 3000-Asphalt/Concrete Paving and Plantings/Turf? Or do material costs only include asphalt/concrete mixes, associated Joint sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid., asphalt paints, and turf seed, fertilizers? It merely states. "include these Divisions (also 31 6000) in material costs".

The incongruity: our Specification for Asphalt/concrete paving calls "Earth Moving" for subgrade preparation a related requirement under Div. 31 2000 (not an included Div. as stated in Ref. guide) Conversely, the CSI classifications group Bases-base courses within Div. 32 1000 (an included Div. for const. materials)

If helpful, CSI classifications available here:
http://web.stanford.edu/group/narratives/classes/08-09/CEE215/ReferenceLibrary/Construction%20Specification%20Institute%20(CSI)/CSI_MASTERFORMAT/MF2004ETM-Oct2005.xls

Can anyone offer insight or direction? Thank you

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Aug 08 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

Matt—You appear to be describing a common specifying practice. Your Spec writer appears to have specified soil and fill materials for various applications under Materials (Part 2) in Section 31.20.00 Earth Moving, while specifying specialized requirements for the installation (labor) of some of those materials under Execution (Part 3) in 32.10.00 Paving and 32.90.00 Planting. Part 1 of each of these Sections appears to have included a cross-reference to 31.20.00 in the Article entitled “Related Requirements.”

As recommended in the discussion immediately above this one, follow the specifier’s lead and base your materials tallies upon where he or she specified the material. If Part 2 of 32.10.00 or 32.90.00 includes additional, special requirements for soils or fills related to paving and planting, it may be appropriate to include these materials.

In any case, coordinate with the project’s LEED administrator to be sure of the intent.

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Matthew Martin Assistant Site Superintendent, QBS, Inc. Aug 08 2016 Guest 141 Thumbs Up

I see. So there is coherency and order to the specs! To identify the materials included in the division, locating Part 2; Products is very helpful and essential. It will define what is included for the division. In Part 2; Products, one should be prudent not to confuse actual asphalt or concrete components listed with, as you explained, Jon, potential special soils or fills related to paving and planting.

In this case, for this project, the Part 2; Products does not include any special requirements for aggregate fills or soils. It only includes products associated with the actual concrete or asphalt components, like cementitious material, potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems., and aggregate.

Thank you for the explanation.

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer Lile Engineering LLC
Jun 28 2016
LEEDuser Member
3167 Thumbs Up

deleted

Project Location: United States

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Vibha Pai Student University of Cincinnati
Jun 19 2016
Guest
467 Thumbs Up

Master's Research Survey

Project Location: United States

I am conducting this survey in affiliation with University of Cincinnati in support of my hypothesis for my Master's thesis. It would just take 10-15 minutes of your time. By completing this survey you would help me in giving my research the required depth in understanding the achievability of the credit points in the Material and Resource category of LEED v2009 and v2013. I will send in the end results of this survey to you, which could potentially make your decision process easier on any future LEED registered projects you intend to work on.

The following is the link to my survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/XR3ZVZN
Thank you in advance for taking the time!

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sriram tetali Manager -Sustainability Services M W Group
May 05 2016
Guest
76 Thumbs Up

Regional Material for Reinforcement Steel

Hi ,
As MRc5 credit Requirment says Raw material extraction and Manufacturing Plant of steel should be below 500 miles (800kms).
But in our case the raw materials and manufacturing plant are located at a distance of 1200 kms from the project Site. Further these Rebar steel is cut and bend to required sizes at a place which is at a distance of 600 kms from Project site.
So Can any one suggest, what distance should be considered in the Regional material criteria
Thanks & regards
sriram tetali

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE May 05 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

Sriram—If you are using NC-MRc5 Option 1, the distance is 1200 km and the Percent Regional is 0%. Because all your rebar steel is extracted outside the 800-km (500-mile) radius, none of it counts toward MRc5 under Option 1. On the other hand, if only 60% of the rebar came from the 1200-km mill, and 40% came from a mill/extraction site that was only 400 km away, your distance would be 600 km and your percentage would be 40%.

If it’s any consolation, in my area, I have rarely been able to find much locally extracted steel, but locally sourced concrete, gypsum, and paving materials are plentiful. I have earned MRc5 based almost solely on these materials. You may find a different set of materials extracted near your project that will help you to earn the credit.

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sriram tetali Manager -Sustainability Services, M W Group May 06 2016 Guest 76 Thumbs Up

Thanks Jon for the suggestions

Best Regards
Sriram Tetali

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Brooke Robbins
Feb 10 2016
Guest
55 Thumbs Up

MR C5 Regional Materials Multiple components

How do you calculate the regional materials value for a product that has multiple components, for example concrete? the components come from different locations & have different % values which we've entered in tot eh materials table. How does this work in relation to the materials cost? We have an overall materials cost for the concrete, but it is not broken down by individual component.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Feb 10 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

Brooke—In the MRc5 chapter of the LEED 2009 BD+C Reference Guide, Table 2 shows a “Sample Assembly Percentage Regionally Extracted Calculation for Concrete” as an example of how to calculate regional content in a product with multiple components.

To make this calculation, you do need a breakdown (by weight) of the product’s components and data indentifying the extraction sites for as many of the components as possible. For concrete, you may not even realize that you have access to the required information.

Structural engineers usually require concrete suppliers to submit “mix design” reports for each type of concrete used on a project. These “recipes” show the proportions of each component in each mix, usually in pounds per cubic yard. These reports should also identify the quarries that produced the aggregates, the plants that produced the fly ash, and the manufacturers that made the cement and admixtures. I usually calculate material percentages for both MRC4 & MRc5 using these reports.

Be aware, though, that a single project typically uses many different types of concrete, each one with a different “recipe” comprising different proportions of ingredients. I would expect suppliers to submit a different “mix design” and report a separate cost for each type delivered to the jobsite.

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Brooke Robbins Feb 11 2016 Guest 55 Thumbs Up

Thank you. Yes I saw this chart and do have this info. Once you calculate the % of regionally extracted materials how do you input it in the Materials & resource calculator spreadsheet? Going off this example chart - I would input the 92.6%, but in the excel calculator spreadsheet you also have to enter the extraction & manufacturer distance - do you just do an average of the components or input the info for the items that is the farthest distance?

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Feb 11 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

The answer depends on which version of the MR calculator you are using. A new version just came out on January 4, 2016, but you may be using an older version.

If you are using the previous spreadsheet (which I think was dated Aug 2012), and if you are using Option 1, go to Cell P7, and select “Option 1.” Now, in Column O of the line where you have entered the cost of the concrete mix, enter the Regional Percentage (in your case, 92.6%). In Column Q, enter the distance to the farthest regional extraction point (less than 500 miles). Do not average. In Column R, enter the “Manufacture Distance” (the concrete mix plant).

This approach works unless you are using the SCM Alternative approach for MRc4. In this case, you should have separate costs for cementitious and non-cementitious materials, so you enter the values for each mix on two separate lines and calculate the regional content separately for each.

If you are using the new MR calculator (labeled “v06”), see the instructions in the discussion just below this one: http://www.leeduser.com/comment/redirect/62554.

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Brooke Robbins Feb 12 2016 Guest 55 Thumbs Up

Thank you. We were thinking we would input the distance for the item that was furthest away, but didn't see any clarification to do so.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Nov 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13244 Thumbs Up

Brooke - You were correct! See http://www.leeduser.com/comment/redirect/67712 below.

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Tiffany Moore LEED Documentation Consultant Built Kansas City LLC
Jan 07 2016
Guest
1276 Thumbs Up

New Materials & Resources Calculator

Project Location: United States

Has anyone taken a look at the new calculator (v06, Jan 4, 2016)? This version combines the BD+C and ID+C calculators and changes the way the data for Option 1 and Option 2 are entered.

The instructions confirm that you still need to enter manufacturing and extraction distances for Option 1, but there doesn't appear to be a place for those numbers to be entered.

Anyone???????

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Meghan Ward Architectural Technologist, Sustainable Design Consultant, Aurecon South Africa Jan 19 2016 Guest 226 Thumbs Up

Hi Tiffany,

I have also realized this with the material calculator, which we need to complete.

Have you managed to figure out how we include the extracted and manufactured distance?

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Tiffany Moore LEED Documentation Consultant, Built Kansas City LLC Jan 19 2016 Guest 1276 Thumbs Up

GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). replied and indicated they would develop a set of instructions for the new calculator, which does require the information be documented in a different way. (No, I haven't figured out how to document extraction and manufacturing distances OR the percentage of back-up documents provided.)

I responded and explained that wholesale changes in the documentation process for existing projects and existing rating systems was unfair to project team members for many reasons. They acquiesced and confirmed I could continue using the old version on a project-specific basis.

My suggestion to you is to send a feedback/contact question regarding this issue. If they receive feedback on the implications of a new v2009 calculator from several people, perhaps they will re-evaluate the need to make this type of change retroactively on v2009 projects.

Honestly, I'm at a loss as to the purpose of this change in v2009.

Tiffany

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Feb 11 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

Well, I have finally had a chance to take the new MR calculator (2009_Materials and Resources Calculator_v06.xlsm) for a test drive, and I have a few observations:
. . 1. I think that the new spreadsheet should only be used in conjunction with the new MRc5 form v06 from LEEDonline v3.
. . 2. The new LEEDonline form appears not to require the upload of cutsheets, so the new spreadsheet does not calculate the percentage uploaded either.
. . 3. Only use Column S for ID+C projects.
. . 4. For assemblies, enter the percentage of regional extraction into Column Y.
. . 5. On B+D projects, if you are using the Option 2 weighted average travel distance, enter manufacture & extraction distances into Columns T, U, V, & W.
. . 6. On B+D projects, if you are using the Option 1 500-mile radius, the instruction to enter both the manufacture & extraction distances is just plain wrong. Until GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). issues definitive instructions, I would just enter the Manufacture distance into Column W.

Following this approach appears to tally up the proper percentages on the BD+C, CS, & HC Summary tabs, but GBCI might choose another approach.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE May 17 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

Just as an update: On April 8, 2016, USGBC issued a revised version of the Materials and Resources Calculator (v07). For now, at least, you can download this spreadsheet from http://www.usgbc.org/resources/materials-and-resources-calculator-v2009. There appear to have been some modifications to the instructions (including a contradiction to my guess in Item 6 above). However, I suspect that v07 does not resolve all the issues raised concerning v06.

LEEDuser has a new forum, “LEED Online Status Updates” (http://www.leeduser.com/strategy/leed-online-status-updates) to address issues with the latest LEED Online forms and calculators. There, Michelle Reott is working with USGBC to answer or resolve issues with the new tools. Check in to the new forum for the latest news.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Nov 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 13244 Thumbs Up

Tiffany, Meghan, and Jon - I was asked to review the latest Materials and Resources Calculator v08. It should be released with (or before) the 1/1/2017 quarterly LEED Addenda Update. It will be cataloged as a Form Update (under Entry Type) in the Addenda Database - http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations.

Keep an eye on http://www.usgbc.org/resources/materials-and-resources-calculator-v2009 for the new version.

One of the fixes was to rename the dropdowns in Column S to differentiate between BD+C and the further clarify the two options in ID+C. Column S was also renamed to make things clearer. “BD+C” was added to cell T7 to make it clearer this is the Distance for BD+C and ID+C project. And the embedded comment in cell T7 has been updated to reflect that for BD+C only the furthest of the compliant manufacturing/extraction distances is to be entered. At least this method of entering the further compliant distance can be used and you’ll be on the same page when the updated version is released.

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Allen Cornett Sustainable Consultant INSPEC Sustainability Group LLC
Dec 22 2015
LEEDuser Member
315 Thumbs Up

Select Fill

Project Location: United States

Can select fill mined within the LEED boundary be counted as a regional material? I have not been able to determine if the soil preparation below items included in specification sections 31.60.00 Foundations, 32.10.00 Paving, 32.30.00 Site Improvements, and 32.90.00 Planting can be counted for MRc5.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Dec 22 2015 LEEDuser Expert 6931 Thumbs Up

CSI MasterFormat puts soils & fill materials under Earth Moving in Section 31.23.00 “Excavation and Fill.” Since this is not one of the designated Spec Sections, fill should not figure into material tallies for Credits MRc3 through MRc7.

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Matthew Martin Assistant Site Superintendent, QBS, Inc. Aug 04 2016 Guest 141 Thumbs Up

O'kay for fill materials. What about base courses, subbase for asphalt and concrete paving? CSI MasterFormat puts Bases within section 32 1000 Paving, which is an included section for materials.. Can we assume soil preparations, subbases or bases should be within Earth Moving "excavation and fill" instead? What about for 32 9000-is topsoil for seeding considered "fill/earthmoving" or is it considered, "base, subbase"?

Thank you, -Matt

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Apr 26 2017
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