NC-2009 MRc7: Certified Wood

  • NC Schools MRc7 Type3 Wood Diagram
  • Is it worth it?

    This credit can be easy and with little or no cost premium if your project only has a small amount of wood. A multifamily high-rise, for example, may have little wood on the project except for doors and cabinetry. In this case, it would be easy to reach the 50% Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) threshold.

    Projects with more wood might encounter a larger upfront cost, but have the potential to demonstrate their environmental values of sustainable forestry management. Projects can also go above the 50% threshold and earn an ID point for 95% FSC certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System.. For example, a commercial interior fit-out for an investment bank involved large amounts of wood veneers and millwork. The project purchased 97% FSC-certified wood, earning an additional exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point under IDc1.

    No minimum amount of wood

    This credit awards points for dedicating 50% or more of your total new wood budget to wood-based products or materials that are FSC certified. 

    You can use as much or as little total wood as you want—as long as 50% of it is FSC-certified. If you make it 95%, you earn an extra point for exemplary performance. 

    More wood = more challenging

    If wood is a big part of your project, with a lot of wood flooring, framing, or veneers, you’re unlikely to earn this credit unless you can find a source of FSC-certified wood for those items that’s within your budget. Projects without wood as a big-ticket item should focus instead on other wood materials, including blocking, millwork, and wood finish materials, as well as casework, and wood composites.

    All projects should get their subcontractor, vendor, or lumberyard on board to price available—and preferably regional, for MRc5—FSC-certified products early in the process. You can usually find an FSC-certified version of what you need, but it sometimes takes longer to arrive.

    Not all FSC-certified products are equal

    Architectural Millwork produces finished and unfinished FSC-certified stock and custom molding and paneling (including radius paneling and millwork) for commercial and residential projects.

    Pay attention to the different types of FSC certification. You can find these on product cut sheets: 

    • FSC 100%  (previously "FSC Pure"): Valued at 100% of product cost. 
    • FSC Mix Credit: Valued at 100% of product cost.
    • FSC Mix (XX)%: A percentage of FSC content is indicated and you can claim that percentage of the wood product’s cost. For example, FSC Mixed 50%, means that you can claim 50% of the wood product’s cost.
    • FSC Recycled and FSC Recycled Credit: These do not count towards this credit and can be left out of the baseline wood budget. FSC Recycled wood can count towards MRc4: Recycled Content. 

    Chain-of-custodyChain-of-custody (COC) is he path taken by raw materials, processed materials, and products from the forest to the consumer, including all successive stages of processing, transformation, manufacturing and distribution. A chain-of-custody certificate number on invoices for nonlabeled products indicates that the certifier’s guidelines for product accounting have been followed. A chain-of-custody certification is not required by distributors of a product that is individually labeled with the Forest Stewardship Council logo and manufacturer’s chain-of-custody number. Chain of Custody (CoC) certification requirements are determined by Forest Stewardship Council Chain of Custody Standard 40-004 v2-1. certification

    Wood is FSC-certified if it comes from the right forests. To ensure that the same FSC-certified wood that leaves the forest arrives at your building without being mixed up with conventional wood, FSC oversees another certification process—chain-of-custody certification, or CoC.

    The FSC-certified Collins Almanor Forest in Northern California has been logged five times in the last 50 years.

    CoC certification tracks FSC-certified wood as it moves through harvesting, production, manufacturing, and distributing chains. In order for your LEED project to make a claim about FSC wood you use, you need to make sure that the product is handled by operations carrying CoC certifications at every step. Those needing CoC certifications (see Checklists for more detail) should provide their certification number on their invoices. Certified operators can also be found on the FSC website.

    Why FSC?

    The Forest Stewardship Council is a nonprofit organization that was created to set an international standard for responsible forest management, and to track and certify wood products from well-managed forests. FSC certification ensures that your wood products have come from third-party-certified forests that comply with the FSC principles and criteria. 

    The "wood wars"

    FSC is only one of dozens of forest certification programs in the world. Others include the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) label. FSC currently remains the only program recognized for this credit. Following lengthy development of a more inclusive policy at USGBC, USGBC membership voted to reject the new policy. BuildingGreen.com, a sister publication to LEEDuser, chronicled the extensive debate over FSC and other certification schemes in a series of articles, including articles looking at the impact of certification on jobs, on climate change, and the future of forest certification in LEED.

    Although FSC provides the certification standard, other groups provide the audits that determine whether certification can actually be awarded to a forest. The two groups most commonly seen here are SmartWood and SCS Global Services.

    Rapidly renewable materials

    Woody rapidly renewable materials like bamboo and cork have not generally been covered by this credit, because they are not conventional lumber products, because they are already covered under MRc6: Rapidly Renewable Materials (except for LEED-CS), and because FSC certification had not been available for these products until recently. However, with the advent of FSC-certified bamboo products, teams may include bamboo and cork in MRc7, at their discretion. It would only be advantageous to do so if you are using FSC-certified products; otherwise, it would make credit compliance harder.

    FAQs for MRc7

    We are pursuing IEQc4.5 from LEED-CI as an ID credit. Are we then required to include the cost of furniture in MRc3–7?

    No, per LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #3901.

    What building components are typically purchased with FSC content to earn this credit?

    Big-ticket items commonly used for this credit include flooring and subflooring, framing, doors and door cores, wood finishes, and casework.

    We’re having trouble getting FSC wood within our budget. Can we use products with another forestry certification?

    No. Only forestry products certified by the FSC can contribute to earning MRc7. Wood products that are not FSC-certified, including those certified to SFI or PEFC, can still contribute to MRc5, though.

    Do I need to provide invoices for all of the new wood products purchased for the project, or just FSC wood products?

    GBCI had required invoices for all wood products, but has switched to requiring only invoices for FSC certified products, per the April 2008 FSC memo, which states that all invoices must be collected, but they do not need to be submitted. The reviewer does not need to see those to determine compliance.

    Certified wood invoices must contain the FSC Chain of Custody (CoC) tracking number, and indicate whether the product is “FSC 100%,” “FSC Mix Credit” or “FSC Mix [NN]%.”

    I have supporting manufacturer documentation for the FSC wood used on our project. Is this enough to document this credit, or do I need invoices as well?

    Per the previous question, you do not need to submit invoices for all wood products, but you must collect invoices in order to determine the cost of wood products on the project.

    Can products labeled “FSC Recycled” or “FSC Recycled Credit” contribute towards MRc7? What about "FSC Mix" percentages that refer to recycled content?

    Because this credit focuses on "new" wood, products that are 100% recycled content may not be counted as certified wood under MRc7, and should be excluded from the total cost of new wood materials. However, those purchases could qualify for credit under MRc4: Recycled Content.

    Some FSC Mix products combine recycled and "new" content, in which case project teams must decide how to classify the product. This is addressed in LEED Interpretation #10372, which states, "Products identified as FSC Mix Credit or FSC Mix [NN] % also have pre- or post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. recycled content, the latter of which is commonly reported separately by the product manufacturer. In these instances the project team must choose whether to classify the product (or some fraction of the assembly) as FSC certified or as recycled content; the material cannot contribute to both claims simultaneously."

    In other words, if a product is FSC Mix and also has recycled content, project teams have to choose which "environmental attribute" they will use to classify the product, and it (and its dollar value) will either go into an FSC "bucket" or into a recycled-content "bucket." 

    Does FSC-certified wood automatically contribute to IEQc4.4 as a low-emitting material?

    No, but it is common to find FSC composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard. products that meet IEQc4.4 requirements.

    We are using a lot of reclaimed wood. Should we include this in our MRc7 calculations? What about wood that is already installed on the project, in a renovation? What about wood products with recycled content?

    MRc7 only applies to "new" wood. Reclaimed, reused, or recycled wood should not be included in MRc7 calculations.

    Does FSC-certified bamboo products count towards this credit?

    Yes. Bamboo is considered a forest product by FSC even though it’s technically a grass, and it’s often as a forest product in materials like plywood, veneer, and flooring. It can contribute to both the Certified Wood and also the Rapidly Renewable Materials credits. See LEED Interpretation #2535, issued 4/22/2009, for more information.

    A product has FSC-certified veneer, but a non-certified core. Can we prorate the MRc7 contribution of this product based on the cost of the veneer?

    No. If the product is built off-site then the entire assembly (the product which is shipped to site) must have an FSC label from the manufacturer of the assembly. Individual components, unless they are shipped to site and thereby complete the chain, may not contribute towards this credit. All entities that possess FSC materials until the product reaches the project site must have a chain-of-custody certification.

    Should wood used on site features such as benches or a gazebo be included here?

    Yes. If it is new wood and it is in your LEED project boundary, you should count it.

    Is there a minimum quantity of wood that must be used on the project to qualify for this credit?

    No, as long as some wood is used, no minimum threshold has been established.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Schematic Design

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  • Consider using FSC-certified wood on the project. Start by looking at the project’s applications for wood-based products. Wood blocking, framing, doors, millwork and wood finishes play a large role in obtaining this credit.   


  • Before identifying wood species and grades, check to see what FSC wood is readily available from local suppliers and try to design using those materials. 


  • FSC wood is becoming easier to find.  An increasing number of vendors and suppliers offer FSC wood as the consumer demand has increased.


  • There may be a price premium for FSC wood, depending on location, type of wood, and availability, but nationally the cost is becoming more competitive with conventional wood. This natural beaver pond in Lakeview, Oregon shows the potential for habitat protection in a working forest.For example, a project in New York City found a premium of 25% on high-end custom doors. A commercial interior fit-out project in New York found a 50% price premium on decorative hardwood veneers, while a core and shell project in New York found only a 5% price premium on wood blocking and plywood.  A school renovation project in Boulder, Colorado saw a 13% increase for FSC-certified wood flooring and 20% cost increase on ½” CDX FSC-certified new plywood.

     

Design Development

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  • Include in your new wood materials baseline budget the material cost (excluding labor) of all new wood items that apply under CSI Master Spec 2004 Format Divisions 3–10, 31.60 Foundations, 32.10 Paving, 32.30 Site Improvements, and 32.90 Planting. Division 12 Furniture is optional. Mechanical, electrical, plumbing and equipment costs are excluded. (See Resources for Master Spec information.) 


  • All new wood products must be listed in line-item fashion in the documentation, whether FSC-certified or not. There is no 45% default budget for this credit as there is in the other MR credits. 


  • Adding furniture to your baseline wood budget for MRc7 is optional, but must be done consistently across MRc3, MRc4, MRc5, MRc6, and MRc7. Analyze the baseline materials budget to see if adding division 12 furniture works to the project’s advantage. Generally, if the furniture helps contribute to the above MR credits it is in a project’s interest to take credit for it.


  • It is optional to add temporary wood structures such as sidewalk partitions, bracing, or concrete forms to the baseline wood budget. If added, however, the temporary wood structures can only count toward one project’s certification (that is, if reused on another LEED project, they cannot count toward MRc7 there). Also, if temporary wood structures are calculated towards the credit compliance, all temporary wood structures need to be counted in the baseline (essentially, you can’t just calculate FSC certified wood structures and not non-FSC certified wood structures). Unless the temporary structures are FSC-certified wood, it is not generally to your advantage to bring the baseline budget higher by adding them.


  • The baseline wood budget should be consistent across all wood products mentioned in MRc3–7. The LEED Online credit form helps ensure consistency.


  • To determine how much FSC wood you will need to incorporate into your project, look at the baseline wood budget. Determine how much you want to spend on certified wood. 50% of the wood budget cost will give the project one point and 95% will give the project one ID point for exemplary performance. Go through the project’s preliminary budget, identify what wood items could be purchased FSC-certified, and check to see whether these items add up to the amount needed to get the desired LEED points.


  • Include a cushion for this credit in case of changes in design and purchasing. For example, if you are counting on one point for using 50% certified wood, plan on using 60% of your wood budget for certified wood in order to avoid coming up short.


  • Using the estimated budget to integrate certified wood into the design and specs early in the process can help prevent costly change orders during construction.


  • Use your estimated budget as a guide throughout the project. Many projects fail to earn this credit because they wait until all the materials have been purchased before calculating whether they have purchased enough FSC-certified wood to gain the LEED credit. 


  • Focus on “big ticket” wood items first. Materials like flooring, custom millwork, and framing, if they meet the certified wood requirement, may represent enough value to earn the credit. This approach allows you to Iimit the number of certified wood items you need to track and document, reducing contractor headaches and keeping overall costs low. If big-ticket items are not enough, target medium-priced items next, until you reach your goal.


  • A single product or material can contribute to multiple credits. For example, cabinetry made both locally and with certified wood contributes to MRc5 as well as MRc7. Focusing on products and materials with multiple environmental attributes can also limit the overall number of items that must be tracked. 


  • There is no minimum amount of wood you need to earn this credit. If the project does not use a lot of wood, and your baseline wood budget is low, purchase 95% FSC wood to gain two points (for credit and exemplary performance) at very low cost.


  • Pay attention to the different types of FSC certification, which you can find on product cut sheets. You will need a letter, cut sheet, or statement from the vendor indicating the type of FSC certification.

    • FSC Pure: valued at 100% of product cost. 
    • FSC Mixed Credit: valued at 100% of product cost.
    • FSC Mixed (XX)%: A percentage of FSC content is indicated, and you can claim that percentage of the product’s cost. 
    • FSC Recycled and FSC Recycled Credit: do not count toward this credit at all and can be left out of the baseline wood budget. FSC Recycled can count towards MRc4 Recycled Content.

  • Assemblies


  • When a product is made of multiple materials that may or may not all be FSC certified, use the following special considerations.


  • The cost value for the LEED calculation is determined by weight or volume as a percentage of the total. See the example below, and a spreadsheet you can use in the Documentation Toolkit.


  • Request that manufacturers provide assembly information broken down by weight, volume, or cost. 


  • It is unwise to assume that 100% of an assembly is FSC-certified, just because the product literature says that it is. Double-check with the manufacturer on what percentage of the assembly (by weight or volume choosing one consistently) is FSC wood and allocate that percentage of the total assembly cost toward the credit calculations.


  • FSC Recycled and FSC Recycled Credit: do not count toward this credit at all and can be left out of the baseline wood budget. FSC Recycled can count towards MRc4 Recycled Content.


  • Include in your new wood materials baseline budget the material cost (excluding labor) of all new wood items that apply under CSI MasterFormat Divisions 03–10, 31 (31.60.00 Foundations), and 32 (32.10.00, Paving, 32.30.00 Site Improvements, and 32.90.00 Plantings). Division 12 Furniture is optional as long as it is consistently applied across all credits. Mechanical, electrical, plumbing and equipment costs are excluded. (See Resources for Master Spec information.)

Construction Documents

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  • For guidance and sample specification language for incorporating LEED specifications into construction documents, see MasterSpec, or the Whole Building Design Guide. (See Resources.)


  • Incorporating the LEED requirements directly into the drawings as well as into the specs is a good way to remind the contractor and subcontractors of the requirements. 


  • Include submittal requirements within each targeted construction spec section and add general requirements to the Division 1 bid package. Include a copy of any submittal documents that the contractor may need to fill out.


  • Revisit the baseline wood budget as the design evolves to make sure your numbers remain accurate and that you remain on track to achieve your goal for the credit.


  • Research specific products and incorporate FSC wood requirements into individual construction specifications. Require that vendors provide FSC Chain of Custody (CoC) tracking numbers on invoices, breakdown of wood costs and cut sheets.  See USGBC’s policy memo on CoC tracking for detail. (See Resources.)


  • Project contractors, subcontractors, and furniture installers are not required to be CoC certified, as long as they do not modify products beyond what is required for installation, according to the LEED Reference Guide.  However, vendors, suppliers, manufacturers are required to hold and provide CoC tracking numbers as the product moves throughout the supply chain.


  • You will need a letter, cut sheet, or statement from the vendor indicating what kind of FSC certification the wood has: FSC Pure or FSC mixed. FSC Recycled wood counts toward MRc4: Recycled Content, not this credit.


  • Whenever possible, designate in the construction specifications that contractors use specific product manufacturers that you have verified as suppliers of FSC-certified wood items. This will help save research time for the contractors.


  • Carefully review manufacturer data. Don’t pay attention to vague claims such as “Our product will give you a certified wood LEED point” (when it will only contribute to the credit). No matter what the manufacturer claims, you’ll still need to collect actual costs and FSC Chain-of-Custody numbers. 


  • Some projects require materials submittals from contractors as a stipulation of payment to ensure that contractors provide all the needed documentation.


  • There may be a longer lead time for ordering FSC wood. Make sure to order FSC wood early. Check with manufacturers early to learn about possible delays.

Construction

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  • Preparation Before Construction Begins


  • LEED documentation and materials tracking are usually the GC’s responsibility even though specific materials selection may have been already determined by the architect or designer.


  • The GC should hold an orientation meeting with the subcontractors to review the LEED responsibilities related specifically to their trades. This exercise helps to build trust and is crucial for obtaining buy-in from all participants in the process.


  • Give the GC and subcontractors the following tools to help them track materials data for all MR and IEQ credits. (See the Documentation Toolkit for access.)

    • Materials Calculator:  This is a master tracking spreadsheet that the GC can use internally to compile product information received from the subcontractors. The spreadsheet tracks LEED values across multiple LEED MR and IEQ credits.
    • Environmental Materials Reporting Form: This is a material tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values for products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing. 
    • Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form: This is a VOC tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing.
    • Low-Emitting Material Limits: These tables, found with each credit here on LEEDuser, summarize the maximum VOC limits for different types of adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, composite wood, and flooring products. When subcontractors search for low-emitting products, they should consult these charts.

  • Enabling coordination and communication among the GC, subcontractors and design team early in the process can minimize scheduling delays and pushback from subcontractors.


  • During Construction


  • The contractor starts gathering and environmental data and cut sheets from subcontractors for approval. 


  • Review subcontractor product suggestions ahead of time to avoid the purchase of inappropriate materials and eliminate the need for costly change orders.  


  • A master spreadsheet facilitates information collection for subcontractors, giving them a road map of exactly what types of information to collect for each product.  


  • Assign a responsible party to input the subcontractors’ tracking forms into the Materials Calculator (see Documentation Toolkit). A LEED consultant or an administrative assistant in the GC’s office may be the best choice for this role.


  • Breaking out specific materials costs (excluding labor) for construction materials that contribute to LEED credits is a requirement for LEED MR credits. Some subcontractors prefer not to do this because there are always hidden markups in the materials that subcontractors purchase at wholesale. However, you can simply include the product markup when breaking out a product’s material cost from installation and labor costs.


  • Transfer all the data collected in the Materials Calculator spreadsheet (see Documentation Toolkit) to the LEED Online form and upload the product cut sheets. 


  • Only a random 20% sampling of product cut sheets need to be uploaded to LEED Online to document this credit.


  • The general contractor (GC) is oriented to this credit and the need to track FSC-certified wood, along with being oriented to all of their responsibilities, including construction IAQ management, low-emitting materials, environmental materials tracking, and construction waste management. 


  • Do additional research on the availability of any FSC-certified wood that you did not already research during the design phase before construction begins to ensure that the project earns this credit. If product decisions are made after construction begins, there may be less time to carefully review data sheets and much greater risk of using a noncompliant product.


  • The GC functions as the overall quality assurance provider for this credit. Responsibilities include conducting weekly reviews of subcontractor product submittals and tracking forms including checking that CoC numbers have been provided for FSC wood.


  • Streamline documentation and research by taking data gathered from subcontractors via the Environmental Materials Reporting Form and transfer it into a master spreadsheet for all the items being tracked across MR and IEQ credits. (See Documentation Toolkit.) For example, you may need to ask the millwork contractor for certified wood information for this credit, and information on urea-formaldehyde-free products for IEQc4.4. If one spreadsheet collects all the data, it can streamline your documentation, associated research, and help with quality control. 

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Keep a list of FSC-certified wood products used on the project so that O&M staff can use these products for future renovations.


  • Develop FSC-certified wood procurement recommendations and incorporate them into a purchasing policy. If pursuing EBOM certification, this will contribute to MRp1: Sustainable Purchasing Policy.  

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    MR Credit 7: Certified wood

    1 Point

    Intent

    To encourage environmentally responsible forest management.

    Requirements

    Use a minimum of 50% (based on cost) of wood-based materials and products that are certified in accordance with the Forest Stewardship Council’s principles and criteria, for wood building components. These components include at a minimum, structural framing and general dimensional framing, flooring, sub-flooring, wood doors and finishes.

    Include only materials permanently installed in the project. Wood products purchased for temporary use on the project (e.g., formwork, bracing, scaffolding, sidewalk protection, and guard rails) may be included in the calculation at the project team’s discretion. If any such materials are included, all such materials must be included in the calculation. If such materials are purchased for use on multiple projects, the applicant may include these materials for only one project, at its discretion. Furniture may be included if it is included consistently in MR Credits 3. Materials Reuse, through MR Credit 7: Certified WoodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System..

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Establish a project goal for FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts.-certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. products and identify suppliers that can achieve this goal. During construction, ensure that the FSC-certified wood products are installed and quantify the total percentage of FSC- certified wood products installed.

Organizations

Revised Requirements for Documenting the Use of FSC Certified Wood in LEED

This is a memo from the USGBC clarifying how to address the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. calculation and detailing what documentation needs to be provided.


Forest Stewardship Council, United States

For information and practical tools such as databases of certified product suppliers, referral services, specification language, and the “Designing and Building with FSC” guide and forms.


Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG) — Federal Green Construction Guide for Specifiers

Support on incorporating LEED requirements into specifications. 


FSC Facts and Figures

This slide deck shows the global FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified forest area by region. In North America, FSC forests account for 40.74% of certified forests.

Assembly Calculator

If your project has furniture or assemblies such as built-in bookshelves that mix certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. with steel or other materials that are not certified wood, you'll need to calculate the portion of the certified-wood portion of the assembly. This calculator can help.

Chain-of-Custody Certificate

Manufacturers should provide their FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Chain of Custody (CoC) certification number on invoices. They may also provide their CoC certificate, like the sample shown here.

Product Cut Sheets

Look to product cut sheets like the sample shown here for information on how a wood product can contribute to credit for certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System.. Note the annotated LEEDuser tips on the attached PDF document.

Materials Calculator

Teams can use this tool to track all materials across various MR and IEQ credits. It helps teams develop a roadmap of what information needs to be tracked for different products. It can also be used early on to create the baseline budget and ensure the products that are being used will apply to the various credit thresholds.

Environmental Materials Reporting Form

This is a materials tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values of products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing.

Letter to Contractor for MR and IEQ Credits

Use a letter like this sample to orient the contractor to their responsibilities for all MR and IEQ credits. This letter is an introduction that can be customized for the credits your project is pursuing.

Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form

This is a VOC tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing. Use it specifically for earning low-emitting materials credits, but in conjunction with documentation for MR credits.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 MR

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 MR credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

388 Comments

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy
Aug 05 2014
LEEDuser Member
1316 Thumbs Up

Manufacturer and Vendor COC and Correct invoice format

Hello,

We are documenting this credit for a project where the only wood elements are the doors. These doors are all FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified. Our supplier bought these doors to the manufacturer.

The manufacturer provided us the FSC certificate which has the COC number and also gave us the invoice with the COC, but this invoice has not the FSC certificate number.

Then the vendor, who didn´t modify these doors provided his invoice (which has not the COC) with the number of the vendor´s invoice as a reference.

I have some questions here: should the vendor also has to provide the COC in his invoice? Is there a problem if the manufacturer didn´t put the FSC certificate number in his invoice?

Thank you in advance.

Regards,

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LEEDme STRATEGIE D'IMPRESA Aug 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 60 Thumbs Up

For MRc7 documentation invoice must indicate manufacturer COC number and type of FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certification (100%, mixed XX%) of each wood product, the number of FSC certificate is not required.
In a similar situation we uploaded on leedonline invoices of manufacturer (COC type of FSC certification, product cost), and both those of vendor (link between manufacturer and project).

Giorgia - LEEDme

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy Aug 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 1316 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your response Giorgia, in this case the invoice doesn´t mention the the type of FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts., but we were thinking, as this is a standarized product we would submit the technical data sheet of the doors for the FSC type, could this be acceptable?

And regarding the vendor´s invoice, have you had a similar situation like this, where the vendor has not the COC in his invoice (he is the supplier and he didn´t modify in any way the product) , can this affect the credit?

Regards!

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Jason Grant Principal, Jason Grant Consulting Aug 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1242 Thumbs Up

If the vendor doesn't have FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. CoC, then the chain is broken and the doors can't count toward MRc7 -- even if they are simply a distributor or trader and didn't modify the product in any way.

FSC rules require that all invoices for FSC-certified products include the certificate holder's CoC code as well as what Giorgia called "the type of FSC certification" (e.g. FSC 100%, FSC Mix 70%, FSC Mix Credit, etc.) In FSC lingo, this is known as an FSC claim. If the manufacturer's invoice doesn't include both of these key elements -- the CoC code and an FSC claim or claims for the certified products they are selling -- then they are out of compliance with the FSC CoC standard, and are likely to have problems during their next CoC audit. It would be best if they were proactive in addressing the non-conformance by updating their systems and issuing a corrected invoice.

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LEEDme STRATEGIE D'IMPRESA Aug 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 60 Thumbs Up

Thak you Jason for terminology clarification.

The vendor to which I have referred only made installation.
In USGBC addenda+ errata database I can find 10/01/2012: A chain-of-custodyChain-of-custody (COC) is he path taken by raw materials, processed materials, and products from the forest to the consumer, including all successive stages of processing, transformation, manufacturing and distribution. A chain-of-custody certificate number on invoices for nonlabeled products indicates that the certifier’s guidelines for product accounting have been followed. A chain-of-custody certification is not required by distributors of a product that is individually labeled with the Forest Stewardship Council logo and manufacturer’s chain-of-custody number. Chain of Custody (CoC) certification requirements are determined by Forest Stewardship Council Chain of Custody Standard 40-004 v2-1. certification is not required by distributors of a product that is individually labeled with the Forest Stewardship Council logo and manufacturer's chain-of-custody number.
In addition there is the addenda dated 07/19/2010.

Giorgia - LEEDme

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Jason Grant Principal, Jason Grant Consulting Aug 07 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1242 Thumbs Up

I couldn't find the addenda dated 07/19/2010. I did find the 10/12/2012 addenda that you referenced which reads:

Replace the definition of "chain-of-custodyChain-of-custody (COC) is he path taken by raw materials, processed materials, and products from the forest to the consumer, including all successive stages of processing, transformation, manufacturing and distribution. A chain-of-custody certificate number on invoices for nonlabeled products indicates that the certifier’s guidelines for product accounting have been followed. A chain-of-custody certification is not required by distributors of a product that is individually labeled with the Forest Stewardship Council logo and manufacturer’s chain-of-custody number. Chain of Custody (CoC) certification requirements are determined by Forest Stewardship Council Chain of Custody Standard 40-004 v2-1. (COC)" with "the path taken by raw materials, processed materials, and products from the forest to the consumer, including all successive stages of processing, transformation, manufacturing and distribution. A chain-of-custody certificate number on invoices for nonlabeled products indicates that the certifier's guidelines for product accounting have been followed. A chain-of-custody certification is not required by distributors of a product that is individually labeled with the Forest Stewardship Council logo and manufacturer's chain-of-custody number. Chain of Custody (CoC) certification requirements are determined by Forest Stewardship Council Chain of Custody Standard 40-004 v2-1."

Unfortunately, this definition contains an internal contradiction, because the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. CoC standard in question does not exempt all distributors of labeled products from CoC requirements; it only exempts retailers who sell to end consumers at the end of the distribution chain. Wholesale distributors who supply other companies down the chain still need FSC. In short, this is an error, and if this addenda is still applicable and hasn't been superseded by something more recent, then it needs to be corrected.

The LEED v4 Reference Guide which is the most recent attempt I know of to establish the rules for crediting FSC-certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. in LEED projects does not perpetuate this error. On pg. 533, in the section on FSC Chain of Custody, it reads:

"CoC certification requirements are established by the FSC CoC Standard 40-004 v2.1... Every entity that processes or trades FSC-certified material before it is shipped to the project site must have FSC CoC certification. On-site installers of FSC-certified products must have CoC certification only if they modify the projects off the project site."

and then in the section on Documenting FSC Claims, it reads:

"Project teams must document FSC certification for all wood products that contribute to credit achievement. FSC-certified products qualify for credit only when purchased from a vendor with an FSC CoC certificate that is current at the time of sale. The vendor is defined as the company that sells products to the project contractors and subcontractors who do not modify the products off site."

From your description, the vendor in question is a project subcontractor who installed the doors and didn't alter them off site, so they do not need to have FSC CoC.

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LEEDme STRATEGIE D'IMPRESA Aug 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 60 Thumbs Up

I fully agree. A project subcontractor who installed the doors and didn't alter them off site do not need to have FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. CoC.

Giorgia - LEEDme

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Aug 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Yes…If the “vendor” referred to in the original question is the installing contractor, the chain of custody is not broken. Nevertheless, FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. invoices are required as proof that certified goods were purchased & delivered.

On its own, the manufacturer’s CoC Certificate is not enough. Sometimes, a manufacturer that has a CoC Certificate makes both FSC-Certified and non-certified products. If Certified products were purchased, the invoices for those items should have included the FSC claim and the manufacturer’s CoC number, identifying the end-user (building owner or contractor) as the buyer.

If the installing contractor ordered FSC-Certified doors, and the manufacturer has erred by omitting the required information, the manufacturer must reissue a corrected invoice.

On the other hand, if the contractor ordered doors, but neglected to stipulate FSC-Certified doors, the manufacturer probably furnished ordinary, uncertified doors and their invoice would be missing the FSC & CoC information. If this is what happened, there is no chain of custody, and the doors count against MRc7.

Without proper FSC invoices from the manufacturer, you have no proof to show LEED reviewers that your project actually purchased FSC doors.

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy Aug 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 1316 Thumbs Up

Hello, Thank you all for your responses, you helped me to understand much better the documentation for this credit.
I just have one last question, if the invoices issued by the manufacturer and the vendor don´t mention the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. claim, can a letter be valid to justify the FSC claim? This letter can be issued by the manufacturer stating the FSC claim of the product and can be referenced to the project.

Regards!

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Aug 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

If the vendor invoices do not itemize FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. products, MRc7 requires a letter from the vendor to fill in the gaps. The letter & invoice must comply with the “Exception” described at the very end of the “Chain-of-Custody Requirements” section of the LEED-2009 BC+C Reference Guide:

“Exceptions: In some rare instances, it may not be practical for a vendor to invoice wood products on a line-item basis because the invoice would be dozens of pages long. In such cases, the invoice should indicate the aggregate value of wood products sold by the vendor. If the wood products are FSC certified, comply with the following requirements:
a. The vendor's COC number must be shown on the invoice.
b. The invoice must be supplemented by a letter from the vendor staring that the products invoiced are FSC certified.
c. The invoice or the letter must state whether the products are FSC Pure [FSC-100%], FSC Mixed Credit [FSC-Mix Credit], or FSC Mixed (NN)% [FSC-Mix-NN%].”

Therefore, even if you get a letter from the manufacture, they may also need to resubmit a revised invoice that reports their COC number (Item a, above)

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Esther Kohout Kohout Woodwork, Inc
Jul 30 2014
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16 Thumbs Up

MR4 -vs- MR7 credits

I have been told on a number of occasions, that the MR7c only applies to new wood. That if you purchase particle board that is FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. mixed, and you fabricate a cabinet with such particle board, the only credit that can be achieved is the MR4 c because the board is made up of 100% recycled material and the MR7 credit is for new wood. If such cabinet were faced with a veneer that is FSC certified, only the veneer portion would be eligible for the MR7c. Would appreciate some clarification.
Thank You

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jul 30 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts.-Certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. that has recycled content counts either to MRc4 or MRc7, but not to both. As noted above, in the LEEDuser “Bird Eye View” FAQ comments, LI #10372 (issued April 2014) stated:
“Products identified as FSC Mix Credit or FSC Mix [NN] % also have pre- or post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. recycled content, the latter of which is commonly reported separately by the product manufacturer. In these instances the project team must choose whether to classify the product (or some fraction of the assembly) as FSC certified or as recycled content; the material cannot contribute to both claims simultaneously. Specifically claims may be made under either MRc4: Recycled Content, or MRc7: Certified Wood. Note that for recycled content claims the material must meet the definition of ISO 14021 as required by LEED.”

Note that the ruling leaves the classification up to the project team. If you are a fabricator/supplier, work with the project team to determine how best to count wood that contains recycled content. (This may require breaking it down both ways.)

Also see Tristan & Jason’s April 7 comment thread below.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC Jul 30 2014 LEEDuser Expert 5125 Thumbs Up

Esther - As a guest, you can't see the Bird's Eye View above that Jon refers to. Here is a link to the LI - http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=10372.

Here's some of the relevant verbiage from the FAQ above: "Some FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Mix products combine recycled and "new" content, in which case project teams must decide how to classify the product...In other words, if a product is FSC Mix and also has recycled content, project teams have to choose which "environmental attribute" they will use to classify the product, and it (and its dollar value) will either go into an FSC "bucket" or into a recycled-content "bucket.""

I recently had some FSC Mix Credit products on a job and thought I might use recycled instead of FSC due to the invoice requirement. Yet the supplier did not have a recycled content percentage noted. So since I didn't know what the percentage was in order to include it in the BDC Materials and Resources calculator, I had to count it under MRc7.

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Esther Kohout Kohout Woodwork, Inc Jul 30 2014 Guest 16 Thumbs Up

So for clarification, I am aware that you cannot do both. If we make a cabinet out of particle board that is 100% recycled, and FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Certified, we can count that cost 100% of it toward the MR7c if the LEED admin wanted to attempt the MR7c instead of the MR4c. My confusion comes from completing spreadsheets that require the recycled content, and other data pertaining to inputs, then at the end of the sheet it asks Under the MR7 how much is new wood, and only the % of new gets calculated in the MR7c column. Which in my example would be 0 because there isn't any new wood in the product.
And thank You! I really appreciate the help.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC Jul 30 2014 LEEDuser Expert 5125 Thumbs Up

The FAQ above states: "Because this credit focuses on "new" wood, products that are 100% recycled content may not be counted as certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. under MRc7, and should be excluded from the total cost of new wood materials. However, those purchases could qualify for credit under MRc4: Recycled Content." I don't see that in the LI but LEEDuser staff may have another resource for this information.

It seems to make sense in your situation. If I were you, I would just put it under MRc4 and save myself the MRc7 invoice hassle.

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Esther Kohout Kohout Woodwork, Inc Jul 30 2014 Guest 16 Thumbs Up

Part of my dilemma is we use various materials to fabricate 1 finished piece of Architectural Millwork, and the forms we receive are never the same.
But your last post made things clearer as far as MR7c goes.
Thank You again.

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Jason Grant Principal, Jason Grant Consulting Jul 30 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1242 Thumbs Up

I think that both this particular FAQ and the MRc7 spreadsheet are out of date in light on the LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. that Michelle references above.

If a wood product bears an FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Mix (X% or Credit) claim, then under the new Interpretation it can count toward MRc7 even if it is 100% recycled content, or it can count toward MRc4, but not both, at the option of the project team. If it bears an FSC Recycled (X% or Credit) claim, then it can only count toward MRc4.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Jul 31 2014 LEEDuser Member 5058 Thumbs Up

FYI not all FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Recycled products can apparently count for MR4. I just had an FSC Recycled product rejected from MR4 because it was reclaimed lumber that had gone through a process to convert it from whatever it previously was to wall paneling. The reviewer interpreted the product as refurbished rather than remanufactured and cited the ISO definition. Though I would have said the product was "consumer waste" from "construction debris" or "discarded" material and of course it was FSC Recycled, the reviewer stood firm based on the difference between remanufactured and refurbished.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jul 31 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Jason – Your reading of LI#10372 matches mine. When I cited the LI above, I emphasized the need to consult the project team. If they specified, purchased, & paid for FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts., there is a high probability that they would prefer to count it toward MRc7. On the other hand, if the project’s registration predates the April 2014 Ruling, and if their MRc7 tallies to-date have ignored recycled wood, they may choose not to apply the newer Interpretation.

M Rosenberger – Was your review before or after LI#10372 was issued in April 2014? If your project was registered before April, reviewers may not have applied the LI to your project.

MRc7 is a challenging credit to document already, but the frequent revisions to MRc7 requirements through new addenda & interpretations have compounded the confusion among project teams, woodworkers, & LEED reviewers.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Jul 31 2014 LEEDuser Member 5058 Thumbs Up

Hi Jon,
My review was returned 6/3/14, however the project was registered in 2012. I didn't read the recent LI referenced above as making any statement about FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Recycled or it being impacted by remanufacturing vs. refurbishing definitions. I'm operating under previous understandings about FSC Recycled.

You're right it's brutally difficult to keep up with the nuances, and we unfortunately are at the stage of not encouraging this credit for most our client's projects even here in the Pacific Northwest where it is theoretically available due to the difficulties of documentation and frankly the issues surrounding the need for small millwork and casework subs to be chain of custody holders.

Part of LEED's appeal for us is that it has always been about intent. So it is particularly troublesome when we are forced to elevate the letter of the law over the spirit. Somehow that seems unbecoming when it comes to sustainability.

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Jason Grant Principal, Jason Grant Consulting Jul 31 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1242 Thumbs Up

"MRc7 is a challenging credit to document already, but the frequent revisions to MRc7 requirements through new addenda & interpretations have compounded the confusion among project teams, woodworkers, & LEED reviewers."

Agreed, Jon, but as someone who supported the development of the latest round of MRc7 addenda/interpretations, the hope and intent is that these policy changes resolve some longstanding problems and sources of confusion and that further changes won't be needed for a good long while.

"You're right it's brutally difficult to keep up with the nuances, and we unfortunately are at the stage of not encouraging this credit for most our client's projects even here in the Pacific Northwest where it is theoretically available due to the difficulties of documentation and frankly the issues surrounding the need for small millwork and casework subs to be chain of custody holders."

I sympathize, Michelle. Now that the policy has settled out, at least there is a clear and do-able compliance pathway for those millwork/casework subs that opt for FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. CoC certification. For what it's worth, small shops in the PNW can get a price break on CoC certification as well as technical guidance and support through Sustainable Northwest:

http://www.sustainablenorthwest.org/what-we-do/programs/FSC-group-certif...

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Jul 31 2014 LEEDuser Member 5058 Thumbs Up

Hi Jason,
Thanks for the response. You're right Sustainable Northwest is a great approach to trying to address this issue. I hope that more of our local guys are able to take advantage of it. We'll keep trying.

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Esther Kohout Kohout Woodwork, Inc Jul 31 2014 Guest 16 Thumbs Up

We are in fact a very small shop, and the amount of time and $ to be COC certified is not worth it. The most discouraging part is the lack of support and guidance. We now have over zealous LEED admin's writing in the spec that, there will be a $100 charge for every improper LEED submittal. Our previous COC certifying body never once answered the questions we had when it came to calculations and documentation. The only response we received was refer to the standards. All emails I have sent directly to the USGBC have been ignored, as have the email our current COC certifying body has sent . However this forum is quite helpful all of your comments confirmed for me that we should just submit what we know to the best of our ability and see it the LEED admin excepts it. LEED v4 may smooth out some bumps, but it will probable be a year or more before we see LEEDv4 spec out. Thank you all for the interpretations.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jul 31 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Esther – Forgive us for hijacking this thread. Obviously, you hit a chord.

Jason & Michelle – This latest ruling DOES significantly resolve & simplify the longstanding MRc4/MRc7 conflict. It’s just hard to keep everybody on track as the sawdust shifts under our feet. Now, LEEDv4 folds Recycled Content, Certified WoodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System., & other criteria into a single credit, which, I hope, will simplify things further. However, since all these critera will count for only one point, the challenge for USGBC, LEEDuser, & LEED Project Teams will be to develop tools & consistent policies that will streamline credit documentation.

Now, Jason – Any good advice for Esther?

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Jason Grant Principal, Jason Grant Consulting Jul 31 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1242 Thumbs Up

The only additional advice I can think to offer Esther is to contact FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. US (I would try to get ahold of Lori Knosolla) and see if there are any FSC CoC Groups similar to Sustainable NW that serve companies in her region that she might join to reduce the costs of FSC CoC and get more support than she is receiving from her current FSC certifying body. It would also be good for FSC US to hear from Esther that there is a need for FSC US to develop a definitive guidance document for custom woodworkers who want to obtain FSC CoC and comply with LEED requirements.

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Esther Kohout Kohout Woodwork, Inc Jul 31 2014 Guest 16 Thumbs Up

Thank You Jason, I will definitely keep the name for future use. I feel the previous COC certifying body, didn't answer my questions because they didn't have the knowledge. to do so. I have gone with a Group certifying body who mainly certifies woodworkers, we will see how things go.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jul 31 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Esther – The fine for improper LEED submittals is problematic. You may wish to submit a Request for Interpretation/Information (RFI) through the Prime Contractor or Construction Manager asking how to proceed. If answers to the following questions are not spelled out clearly in the Contract Document (Drawings & Specs), ask the LEED Administrator to clarify:

1. On what date was the LEED Project registered?
2. Does the LEED Administrator anticipate applying any Addenda or LEED Interpretations issued by USGBC after the project’s registration that would affect MRc7 requirements?
3. If so, which ones?
Emphasize that you are trying to save the Administrator’s time and ensure that your submittal aligns with the project’s LEED goals and documentation requirements.

This puts the ball in the Administrator’s court and (if he/she is not overwrought) maybe win you an ally. It will also provide clear instruction on how to treat recycled content.

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Esther Kohout Kohout Woodwork, Inc Jul 31 2014 Guest 16 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much I will do just that.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Jul 31 2014 Guest 2782 Thumbs Up

I had an email exchange about this with GBCI in March 2014. Not sure if the April information changes anything?

My question to GBCI: Is pre-consumer recycled content that goes into an FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Mix (not FSC MIX-NN% but FSC MIX) MDFMedium-density fiberboard (MDF): Panel product used in cabinets and furniture; generally made from wood fiber glued together with binder; similar to particleboard, but with finer texture, offering more precise finishing. Most MDF is made with formaldehyde-emitting urea-formaldehyde binder. product considered “new wood”? I have heard some rumors that this is supposed to be included but I have also heard that only virgin wood is supposed to be counted. Let’s assume that we are not using this product for any recycle content claims. Page 272 of the LEED CI reference guide adds to my confusion because it has a table that excludes postconsumer wood from a product’s new wood value. It doesn’t mention excluding pre-consumer recycled wood or all recycled wood.

GBCI response: Correct, only virgin inputs are included in the scope of MRc7. Sometimes there are virgin wood materials that are from a manufacturing process that could be considered pre-consumer content. The product manufacturer will know how to document the wood components (as new wood which will not be counted as recycled content) based on the FSC rules. However, because of the FSC definition of the “Mixed” label it is possible for the same wood product to contain virgin and recycled content inputs. Project teams may make recycled content and certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. claims on a product as long as the percentage by weight allocated to each claim does not add up to more than 100%. See LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #1702. "

I also asked if there was a webinar on this and was told "there is a separate webinar on FSC and Chain of custody in the “tough credits” series that covers MR credits 6 and 7"

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Jason Grant Principal, Jason Grant Consulting Jul 31 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1242 Thumbs Up

GBCI's response conflicts with LI#10372. The statement that "only virgin inputs are included in the scope of MRc7" is no longer correct in light of this new interpretation. Hopefully GBCI is getting their arms around their own policy changes.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Jul 31 2014 Guest 2782 Thumbs Up

wow. yeah. I will just follow #10372 and upload the LI with my credit to make sure my LEED reviewer is aware of this clarification.

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Jordan Sager UCSB
Jul 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
3 Thumbs Up

Chain of Custody Certification

For a project, we have specified FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. wood for the casework. The casework subcontractor/installer is planning on buying FSC wood, building the casework offsite, and then installing the finished casework on the project. We are confused as to whether the casework subcontractor/installer needs to be CoC certified, since technically he is "modifying the product beyond what is required for installing," but he is also not selling us a final FSC-certified product, only installing it. Can we get some guidance here?

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jul 30 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Installing contractors do not require a COC, but the subcontractor who fabricates the casework offsite DOES. If a non-FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts.-Certified sub builds the cabinets offsite, the chain of custody is broken and the FSC Certificate is invalid.

See the July 2010 Reference Guide Correction ID#100000383 on the USGBC Addenda Database:
“Entities that install an FSC-certified product on the project building/site (typically project contractors or subcontractors, but also furniture installers and the like), do not require CoC certification as long as they do not modify the product’s packaging or form except as is required for installation.”

See: https://us.fsc.org/download.coc-basics.129.pdf.

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Jordan Sager UCSB Jul 30 2014 LEEDuser Member 3 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your quick response! We were thinking the same thing, and you have confirmed it for us.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jul 30 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

When specifying casework for LEED MRc7, it is wise to include FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts.-CoC among the “Fabricator Qualifications” listed in the Spec Section’s “Quality Assurance” Article. Requiring the fabricator to submit their FSC qualifications up front ensures that you get what you are asking for BEFORE the subcontract is awarded.
Boilerplate woodwork Specs frequently require that the wood be FSC-Certified for LEED, but they often omit the fabricator qualification.

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Jordan Sager UCSB Jul 30 2014 LEEDuser Member 3 Thumbs Up

That's exactly the issue we came up against, thanks for the advice!

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Michelle Reott LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC Jul 30 2014 LEEDuser Expert 5125 Thumbs Up

Jordan - This link might also help explain FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. in LEED - https://us.fsc.org/frequently-asked-questions.296.htm. It doesn't address some of the new issues though.

Like this LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. - http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=10296 - that explains an alternative documentation process for architectural woodworkers who also install product. It helps to avoid having to have them produce every single invoice for a large job.

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Susan Di Giulio Project Manager Zinner Consultants
Jul 22 2014
LEEDuser Member
1023 Thumbs Up

Correct invoice structure for millwork

Hi there,
I have been having a heck of a time getting correct and complete millwork invoices even from FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified shops, who really ought to know. When I ask for a complete breakdown with FSC % and cost per item, they send me the invoices from their suppliers to them, which would be fine if we were buying plywood, but of course the millwork value is much greater. Can LEED User please post a "good" millwork invoice showing a variety of materials and products so I can give more certain guidance to the team? This is such an expensive credit and I don;t want to lose it due to format.
Thanks!

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Kevin Flynn President, AIA, LEED FELLOW (LEED AP BD&C) EcoDEEP
Jul 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
203 Thumbs Up

Who includes taxes in their cost calculations?

Just curious - how many of you include taxes in the cost calculation for your materials credits?
I typically only include the cost of the wood (or other material) products themselves. There may, however be times when including other line item costs such as taxes, shipping, etc in the cost of the material could mean the difference between achieving Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. or not.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Jul 03 2014 Guest 2782 Thumbs Up

The Materials and Resources calculator has a note that states the Material Costs "include all expenses to deliver the material to the project site INCLUDING taxes and delivery costs incurred by the contractor. Excludes labor and equipment costs once the material is delivered to the site."

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jul 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

The same language appears in the LEED-2009 BD+C Reference Guide in the “Calculation” paragraphs of the MRc4, MRc5, & MRc6 chapters:

“Material costs include all expenses to deliver the materials to the project site. Material costs should account for all taxes and transportation costs incurred by the contractor but exclude any cost for labor and equipment once the material has been delivered to the site.”

I have always assumed that the same definition applies to material costs for MRc3 & MRc7. However, I have always wondered how to figure taxes & shipping into MRc7 FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. calculations, which require wood costs to be itemized separately on invoices. In these cases, tax & shipping charges are typically added as a separate line item at the bottom of the invoice. Therefore, they are not usually included in the invoiced wood price.

How do we account for this discrepancy when entering MRc7 wood costs into the M&R Calculator?

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Jul 03 2014 Guest 2782 Thumbs Up

I just put it in a separate excel file and figure out what the tax rate was, and add a column for the individual line items + tax. So for instance if I have some MDFMedium-density fiberboard (MDF): Panel product used in cabinets and furniture; generally made from wood fiber glued together with binder; similar to particleboard, but with finer texture, offering more precise finishing. Most MDF is made with formaldehyde-emitting urea-formaldehyde binder. that is $100 and some Door cores that are $500 and my tax rate is 7% the invoice will total all the items at the bottom of the invoice and add the tax for a total of $642.That's not good for my LEED documentation. I'll figure out what the tax was (7%) and add it for each individual line item. My excel sheet will have MDF $100 x 1.07 = $107, Door Cores $500 x 1.07 = $535. Then I enter those numbers ($107 & $535) into the Materials and Resources Calculator. It's a pain but it's the only way I can make sure I'm accounting for everything properly.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Jul 03 2014 Guest 2782 Thumbs Up

Not sure about shipping, I guess you could divide it evenly among the products? Sometimes I'll have a bulk freight charge on an invoice for several products.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jul 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

I have only pursued this credit on tax-exempt projects, so I have not had to address taxes. Shipping costs are usually based on weight & distance.

Rather than to try divvying up shipping costs among separate items, I have included all shipping costs in the "Total Wood Cost", but not in the compliant, FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. value. This assumes the "worst case." It would be great if there were an official ruling.

MRc7 reporting requirements have been modeled after FSC rules. I wonder, does the FSC or USGBC have a policy for how to treat tax & shipping costs?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 03 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Material costs for MRc3-7 are to include all costs to deliver the product to site, as has been quoted already in the thread.

The invoice requirement for itemizing is for the manufacturer to meet FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. invoicing requirements, but the LEED calculation should not have the costs broken down. LEED just needs to see the end product as shipped to site. Enter the cost for the product shipped to site, the percentage of new wood, and the percentage FSC as per the FSC label. The invoice submitted should be the invoice for this product which is shipped to site.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jul 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

What if an invoice includes multiple items? To illustrate the dilemma, here is an example taken from an invoice that shows $4,192 in FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. end-products (before tax & freight). It also separately itemizes $122 in non-wood products that do not apply toward MRc7:

Casework - FSC Mixed 70% - COC-#......$ 3,739.00
Loose Millwork - FSC Pure - COC-#..........$ 453.00
SS Cabinet Hardware...............................$ 122.00
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Subtotal 1............................................$ 4,314.00
Freight....................................................$ 444.00
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Subtotal 2............................................$ 4,758.00
Tax.........................................................$ 333.06
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total....................................................$ 5,091.06

Finally, the invoice includes about $777 in freight & taxes applicable to all three items on the invoice.
Does this invoice comply with FSC requirements?
If USGBC requires us to include taxes & shipping in our MRc7 calculation, how do we figure how much of the $777 to apply toward each of the two FSC items?
What values do we enter into the BDC-MR Calculator for “Material Cost,” “Percent New Wood,” & “Percent New Wood that is FSC Certified” for the items on this invoice?

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Jason Grant Principal, Jason Grant Consulting Jul 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1242 Thumbs Up

This invoice complies with FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. requirements for invoicing except that the "FSC claims" are out of date ("FSC Pure" is now "FSC 100%" and "FSC Mixed 70%" is now "FSC Mix 70%"). FSC requirements for invoicing are only that FSC-certified products carry the appropriate FSC claim and that the companies CoC # is included somewhere on the invoice.

Given the evident confusion, it seems like maybe we need a definitive ruling from USGBC on how this works.

For whatever it's worth, if it were me, in your example, I'd get a total for the FSC products ($3739 + $453 = $4192) and then calculate this as a percentage of all items on the invoice ($4192 / $4314 = 97% or .97). Then I'd apply the percentage to both the freight and the tax and add that to the FSC total (($444+ $333.06) * .97 = $753.75; $4192 + $753.75 = $4945.75). I would put $4945.75 into the MRc7 calculator as the "Material Cost" and put in 100% for both the "Percent New Wood" and the "Percent New Wood that is FSC Certified."

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jul 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Thanks Jason.

Admittedly, the example that I gave is an oddity. Most FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. invoices that I have received have been much cleaner, addressing only one FSC Type, with no non-wood items and no interpretation issues. This one threw me.

On the other hand, non-FSC wood invoices frequently include a jumble of unrelated materials.

Now that you mention it, I had noticed the recent change in claim terminology. I had modified the claims in my example to match the language in the LEED Reference Guide.

One more question: If the FSC Claim is “FSC Mix 70%”, does that mean the “Percent New Wood” is 70%, and the “Percent New Wood that is FSC Certified” is 100%? If it is the other way round, it makes a big difference.

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John Covello LEED AP BD+C, EBOM, LEED and Sustainability Manager Development Management Group
Jun 23 2014
LEEDuser Member
358 Thumbs Up

Packing List with Chain of Custody information only.

Hello,

Our supplier has sent packing lists with Chain of Custody numbers and have been identified as FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. mixed. Their invoice however does not have this information. Is the packing slip sufficient for the credit submission or does the supplier need to modify the invoice as well?

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Jason Grant Principal, Jason Grant Consulting Jun 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1242 Thumbs Up

The invoice is the key document

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Renee Shirey Jun 24 2014 LEEDuser Member 2870 Thumbs Up

I am in a similar situation. I assume I will need to supply both documents, since my packing slips have the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. COC#, but the Invoice has the pricing.

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Renee Shirey
Jun 16 2014
LEEDuser Member
2870 Thumbs Up

Freight and tax on wood invoices

The wood invoices that I have show a separate line item for tax/fuel charge/freight charges, etc. and I was unclear how to include this in the documentation.
Do I take the total of the entire invoice as the cost, then calculate out the amount of wood (separate from the extra fees) as the % of new wood, and then calculate the % of FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. from all the wood?
OR do I add up the line items of wood and use that as the total cost, list that it as 100% wood, and then calculate the amount of FSC wood from all the wood?

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Jason Grant Principal, Jason Grant Consulting Jun 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1242 Thumbs Up

I would do the latter

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Jennifer Ratts P.E. LEED AP AMEC Earth and Enviornemntal
May 28 2014
LEEDuser Member
151 Thumbs Up

Chain of custod?

i am working on a project where a fabricator (who has a CoC) has used another company to assemble a wood cabimet. The other company is a small shop and went to the warehouse of the fabricator to do all of the labor. The labor company does not have a CoC. Does this still count as certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System.?

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Jim Park Project Manager, EAN Technology May 29 2014 Guest 402 Thumbs Up

I think it is important to verify who purchased the raw wood material. If the small shop only provides the labor the fabricator does all of purchases and sales, and then i think it's OK to skip documenting about the fabricator.

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Jason Grant Principal, Jason Grant Consulting May 29 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1242 Thumbs Up

Jim is right. If the fabricator with FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. CoC maintains physical and legal possession of the certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. and brings in contract labor to do some or all of the work, it's not an issue. There is even something called an outsourcing agreement where a CoC company that maintains legal possession of the material can send it to another company that doesn't have CoC to have specific services done (e.g. kiln drying, custom milling, pressure treating) without breaking the chain of custody.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications May 29 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Jason – Questions like the one above seem to come up a lot.
Am I right to say, when in doubt, check the invoice?
When a supplier or fabricator receives a COC Certification, they sign on to abide by FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. rules for handling, tracking, selling, & invoicing FSC products. They are subject to annual audits to ensure that their practices are in line with FSC policies. Their invoices should be reliable, or they risk their standing with the FSC.
An FSC-Certified vendor will be versed in the special circumstances, like the ones that you & Jennifer mention, that allow flexibility while maintaining the COC.
Therefore, if the invoice for FSC products is issued by a COC-holder directly to the end consumer (building owner or contractor), the COC should still be intact. If the invoice comes through a non-Certified intermediary, COC is broken.
Is it as simple as that?

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Jason Grant Principal, Jason Grant Consulting May 29 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1242 Thumbs Up

Yes, that's right!

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Renee Shirey
May 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
2870 Thumbs Up

Alternate to invoice?

I am unfortunately dealing with documentation that others gathered, and I am now trying to make it work. I have an invoice for FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. wood that was used for our doors. Although the invoice shows line items, there is no cost per line item nor FSC identification per line. There is an FSC Mix stamp and a total cost at the bottom. This obviously doesn't meet the standard format that LEED requires. The invoice is a year old (and paid) and the company is saying that they aren't able to alter and/or reprint the invoice. Any alternative? Could I get a letter from the company to suppliment the invoice, breaking down the info on the invoice the way LEED requires? Has anybody tried this, and what success have you had? Help!

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace May 13 2014 Guest 2782 Thumbs Up

if they break it down to the line-item level with the % FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Mix in an email you may be able to submit that as documentation. It's not ideal but it's better than nothing. I had an invoice that had some errors and instead of fixing it so it was 100% correct I submitted it with an explanation and screenshots of the email exchange. (this was after about the 4th revision on the invoices.) This is something that's more likely to get approved on a final review than a preliminary review. On the preliminary review the reviewer will probably ask for proper invoices.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace May 13 2014 Guest 2782 Thumbs Up

a signed letter would be just as good/ better than an email

It's too bad they won't help you out by printing an invoice that conforms to the LEED rules.

On my future projects pursuing this credit I'll likely send folks a sample invoice of how things need to be broken down so they can get it right the 1st time.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications May 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

MRc7 requires a letter from the vendor if their invoice do not itemize FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. products. The letter & invoice must comply with the “Exception” described at the very end of the “Chain-of-Custody Requirements” section of the LEED-2009 BC+C Reference Guide:

“Exceptions: In some rare instances, it may not be practical for a vendor to invoice wood products on a line-item basis because the invoice would be dozens of pages long. In such cases, the invoice should indicate the aggregate value of wood products sold by the vendor. If the wood products are FSC certified, comply with the following requirements:
a. The vendor's COC number must be shown on the invoice.
b. The invoice must be supplemented by a letter from the vendor staring that the products invoiced are FSC certified.
c. The invoice or the letter must state whether the products are FSC Pure, FSC Mixed Credit, or FSC Mixed (NN)%.”

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Renee Shirey Jun 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 2870 Thumbs Up

Follow up: The signed letter from the vendor was accepted! The project was quite some time ago, and the software that they used at the time did not allow for the addition of the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. info on the itemized lines. They explained this in their letter, and clarified that their FSC consultant had directed them that this letter was acceptable for projects completed with their old software program. They have since updated their software and are now able to include the required FSC info on their invoices.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Jun 16 2014 Guest 2782 Thumbs Up

Congrats, Renee! I'm glad you were able to work this out and kudos to the LEED reviewers for accepting this alternative documentation. Now that you've tackled this credit you can tackle any of them :)

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Renee Shirey Jun 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 2870 Thumbs Up

I would also like to say to the LEED people out there - be presistant. The contact person from the company gave me a hard time, acting like I was asking for something unheard of. I continued to be polite but to the point - I need this info and this is why. When he clearly wasn't going to provide a reprinted and revised invoice (it had long been paid and was in their old software system) I requested the letter, and was specific about what should be in it. He balked, didn't think they could do that, and then said that he would talk to there FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. person. Fast forward, I get a call back and suddenly "poof" the letter isn't a problem and guess what? Their new system actually has that info built in for their invoices. Um, yeah - because it's a REQUIREMENT for documenting FSC wood. I smile, thank them for their time and cooperation, and move on to the next LEED challenge...

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jun 17 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Bingo!
Recently, I spent weeks trying to explain to a contractor what documentation we required from their casework fabricator. The contractor made several incomplete, unsatisfactory attempts. Finally, I said, “Contact your fabricator. Tell them that you need invoices & FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. documentation for LEED. They are FSC-Certified, so they should already know exactly what we need.”
Voila! Three days later, we had it!

Lesson: Establish contact with your vendor’s FSC manager early.

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jack larson
May 13 2014
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

FSC concept

Two questions

1) The LEED reference guide states that “ Each vendor invoice must conform to the following requirements

a) Each wood product must be identified on a line item basis
b) FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. products must be identified as such on a line item basis”

Can someone please expound on the "line item basis" phrase as it is unclear to me, and what is the difference between a and b.

2) a) Can someone explain to me in very simple terms the concept that revolves around COC as I can’t seem to fully comprehend it .

b) It mentions that all vendors must have a COC, and they must also be certified by an FSC accreditor. How do I know for a fact that this vendor is certified by a legitimate FSC accreditor? And who certifies an FSC accreditor, and how do I know my vendor’s COC is valid? And what exactly does COC mean? I know it stands for chain of custody, but what exactly does that mean ?

c) Can two different vendors have the same COC? Can the manufacturer of a certain product that supplies his product to VENDOR A have the same COC as VENDOR A?

d) It says in the LEED reference guide that “Forest management certification is awarded to responsible forest managers after their operations successfully complete audits of forestry practices and plans” so if I’m understanding this correctly - there is no such thing as certified forests. Am I right? Only managers get certified? How do I assure when my vendor submits his FSC product coupled with his COC that his product came from a forest where it’s manager is certified? Shouldn’t forests be certified? And what exactly does it mean when a manager is certified? And why is FSC more expensive than your regular wood? What’s so special about FSC? What’s so unique about FSC ? Can someone please explain this whole FSC concept to me as I can’t seem to wrap my head around it.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications May 21 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Response to Question 1: Imagine that a Contractor places an order at a lumberyard for the following materials:
a) a few sheets of non-FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. NAUF plywood,
b) a truckload of FSC-Certified lumber, &
c) a crate of nails [non-wood].
Items a & b match a & b from your question. Item c doesn't match either, so it is a separate line item. As long as the invoice for this order includes a bill-of-materials that itemizes costs for each material (like a grocery receipt), it’s good.

An invoice that omits the bill-of-materials or fails to itemize costs is unacceptable.

Since one can only purchase FSC-Certified products from an FSC-Certified vendor, the invoice would also include the lumberyard’s COC Certificate number. Item b would also indicate whether the product is “FSC-Pure”, “FSC-Mixed Credit”, or “FSC-Mixed ##%”. An FSC-Certified vendor should already know these invoicing requirements, and their invoices should automatically conform.

For question 2, see
https://us.fsc.org/download.coc-basics.129.pdf.

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jack larson
May 06 2014
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

FSC WOOD

Three questions

1) The LEED reference guide states that both FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. pure and FSC mixed credit can both be claimed as FSC 100 %. It does not specify the type of system that ought to be used. The FSC website lists three systems

a) Transfer system, where you can claim FSC 100% or FSC mix %
b) Percentage system, where you can claim FSC mix %
c) Credit system, where you can claim FSC mix credit

My supplier is using the transfer system and claiming his product as FSC mix credit ( without a percentage), is this possible? In other words can I claim his product as FSC 100 percent? Because under the transfer system according to the FSC website, there is no such thing... it's either FSC 100% or FSC mix credit .

2) My second question is because the LEED reference guide does not specify the type of system one ought to used, I think it is only right to claim my product as FSC 100% provided that's it's FSC mixed credit regardless of which system is being used, Do you agree?

3) My third and final question: to achieve a point for mr-7, does your wood have to contained within the building (foot print), or does it have apply to throughout the site (Leed boundary). For example if I have new wooden benches outside of my building, do I have to include this in my calculation.?

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Ronnie OLeary Sales Manager LEED AP BD&C, DIXIE PLYWOOD & LUMBER, INC May 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 41 Thumbs Up

I can help with the first two questions.
1. FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. mix credit counts 100%. How it is worded above is a little confusing, but if he invoices you as FSC mix credit, you can contribute 100% of the value no matter which system your supplier uses.
2. Don't get confused by the type of system your supplier is using. (transfer, percentage system, and credit system). There are reasons a manufacturer, distributor, retailer etc.. would use one of those, but you are only responsible for what they invoice you for.
If they invoice you as a mixed credit, you can claim the total amount. If it is mix %, you can claim the percentage, whether its 100% or 70% for example. To clarify, FSC mix credit and FSC 100% count exactly the same, its just the terminology FSC is strict on.
3. I only work on interior products, so I am not sure about the benches. Sorry, I hope the rest helped!

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