NC-2009 MRp1: Storage and Collection of Recyclables

  • NC CS CI Schools MRp1 Recyclables Diagram
  • Easy prerequisite – provide space for recycling

    This prerequisite is very easy to meet. You only need to provide one space to store recycling. You are not even required to have a specific square footage, although the LEED Reference Guide does provide recommended square footage based on building size (see table below). To size this space properly, also consider the building’s needs and recommendations from your recycling hauler.

    Recycling plan not required

    Providing recycling bins for occupants in places like offices and kitchens is a good idea, but is not required for this prerequisite. Nor do you have to actually implement a recycling plan. You simply have to provide the area for centralized recycling collection. 

    LEED Reference Guide Recycling Area Recommendations

    Simple documentation

    When documenting this credit on LEED Online, you’ll simply write a narrative that details the size and accessibility of the recycling storage area, the expected volume of recycling and the frequency of pick-ups. Demonstrate that the area is located and sized properly.

    You’ll also need to check a few boxes confirming that you’ve provided recycling space for corrugated cardboard, metal, plastic, glass and paper, and upload a plan showing the location of the recycling storage area.

  • FAQs for MRp1

    Recyclables generated in the building are collected in dedicated bins and transferred to a collection area outside the LEED project boundary. Is that okay?

    Yes. The final collection point for the recycling can be outside your project boundary. With your documentation, show the location of the collection point, describe the process of how the recycling gets to that point including how access is provided for the required parties, and how you determined that it is large enough. You would still need receptacles inside the building at places like workstations and kitchen areas.

    If the collection point serves multiple buildings, then LEEDuser recommends discussing in your narrative how you have determined that the space is sufficient to serve all the buildings.

    There are limited or no recycling services in our project location. Should I still provide the required space?

    Yes. As reinforced by LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #1803 made on 07/02/2007, "space must be provided in the building in anticipation of recycling resources becoming available in the future."

    Are we required to collect and recycle food waste?

    No. It's a good idea to do so, but it is not one of the required waste types.

    Our project will have a different area for recycling than what is recommended in the LEED Reference Guide. Is that okay?

    Yes. The recommended figures are just that—recommendations. However, you should plan on being able to explain how the space is sufficient. The most common way to do this through a short narrative detailing the volume of recycling and trash per cycle based on how often it will be picked up or moved to a central storage location, such as larger dumpsters.

    Our municipality offers single-stream waste and recycling pickup; recyclables are separated from waste at an off-site processing facility. Even though the project needs only one type of bin, for single-stream waste, should we include space for recycling bins?

    No, you don't need to. With an adequate description and reference to the municipal policy, the project should not need additional space dedicated because the collection system is adequate and suited to the project needs.

    I'm confident we have enough space allotted for recycling, but how much detail should I go into in documenting expected volume?

    LEEDuser recommends providing a brief narrative that demonstrates you have estimated the volume following something like a Solid Waste Assessment. Resources such as those found at the California Integrated Waste Management Board can be useful. See case studies and approaches in the Establishing A Waste Reduction Program at Work participant's manual and in the waste disposal rates for Public Admin.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Plan to include an area for recycling storage. The architect needs to allocate this space and include it on project drawings. (See the Documentation Toolkit for a sample floorplan.)


  • Projects must provide enough space for the storage and collection of paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastic and metals. 


  • LEED Reference Guide Recycling Area RecommendationsYou don’t have to devote a specific square footage to recycling, but the LEED Reference Guide provides the following recommended areas based on building size. (See table.) However, you will have to provide a narrative describing how the area's dimensions were determined, and following the LEED recommendations provides a good basis for this.


  • The most common obstacle with this prerequisite is finding space to allocate for recycling storage. A basement, parking garage, or loading dock is ideal.


  • Recycling containersCollection should be offered in areas that are convenient for occupants throughout the building, but this is not required for prerequisite compliance.


  • Many large scale and multi-building projects design a centralized collection area near a loading dock or in a common basement or parking garage. 


  • This prerequisite usually is low- or no-added cost and is often standard practice. 

Schematic Design

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  • Actually implementing a recycling program is not required, but if you don’t have one, you’re not realizing the environmental benefits of this prerequisite. (See the Documentation Toolkit for a sample recycling plan.)


  • Identify local hauling services and determine which is best for the building and occupants, and what types of materials the hauler will handle.


  • Single-stream (or commingled) recycling is usually easiest from the occupants' perspective, but it is not available everywhere.


  • Determine the required square footage of the storage space based on the LEED Reference Guide recommendations (see above), and estimated volume of waste generation and frequency of hauler pick-ups. 


  • Generally, single-stream recycling will require less space for the storage of recycling because you will only need to provide one bin as opposed to five bins for sorted recycling. Also, if pickups are more frequent, you’ll need less space. Check with your hauler for recommendations.


  • If recycling haulers in your area don’t recycle all of the required materials, design a collection area that can accommodate all items. You’ll meet the prerequisite this way, and be prepared for more comprehensive recycling if and when the service becomes locally available. 


  • Although recycling is required by law in some cities, this does not exempt your project from providing the appropriate documentation for LEED. 


  • Avoid problems by early planning to allow sufficient space for recycling storage areas. 

Design Development

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  • It’s ideal to specify the inclusion of small recycling bins at every trash receptacle location, and larger bins to collect and store building-wide recycling. However, this prerequisite only calls for the centralized collection area. Small recycling bins scattered throughout the building are not strictly necessary for compliance. 


  • Locate the recycling storage facility in an area that is easily accessed by building occupants, maintenance personnel, and recycling haulers. Many projects choose to include a collection area on each floor of the building, and have the maintenance staff bring all recycling to a main storage area. 


  • Locate multiple, small collection areas throughout the building. For example, locate a paper recycling bin near fax and copy machines or by workstations, and glass, plastic, and paper recycling bins in kitchen areas. 


  • You can choose to locate the recycling storage area away from the building or outside the LEED site boundary. You will need to provide a detailed narrative describing how recyclables from the building will be taken to this main storage area. 


  • For residential buildings, consider including a space in each unit for individual recycling collection as well as a chute or collection area on each floor. 


  • Consider including cardboard balers and other waste management tools that will help to reduce the volume of recycling. 


  • Projects have the chance to earn IDc1: Innovation in Design either through a comprehensive recycling plan including electronics and other hard to recycle items, and showing an actual reduction in waste; or through a comprehensive composting program (either onsite or hauled away) that shows reduction in waste.


  • Consider stacking the recycling bins if floor area is limited.

Construction Documents

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  • Verify that the recycling storage area is included on project drawings. 


  • Write a narrative that describes the recycling storage area, accessibility, frequency of pickup, and volume of the space. You will also need to describe how the area’s dimensions were determined. See the Documentation Toolkit for a sample narrative.


  • Upload documents to LEED Online. This may include a project drawing showing the location of recycling areas if it is not clear on the images that are uploaded as part of the overall LEED submittal. See the Documentation Toolkit for an example.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • If you decide to implement a recycling plan, ensure that regular recycling pickup is included as part of the janitorial contract.


  • Ensure that recycling bins have been installed.


  • Get the most value out of your recycling program by offering employee environmental awareness training and discussing ways to reduce trash and recycling. 


  • If pursuing EBOM certification, consider pursuing the following credits:

    • MRc6: Solid Waste Management—Waste Stream Audit to help increase recycling rates.  
    • MRp2: Solid Waste Management Policy, to put in place a plan to reduce waste.
    • To follow through on the solid waste policy, implement, MRc7: Solid Waste Management—Ongoing Consumables, MRc8: Solid Waste Management—Durable Goods, and MRc9: Solid Waste Management—Facility Alterations and Additions.

  • Train maintenance personnel on proper recycling methods, such as what materials need to be separated or commingled, and in what bins.

     

     

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    MR Prerequisite 1: Storage and collection of recyclables

    Required

    Intent

    To facilitate the reduction of waste generated by building occupants that is hauled to and disposed of in landfills.

    Requirements

    Provide an easily-accessible dedicated area for the collection and storage materials for recycling for the entire building. Materials must include at a minimum paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics and metals.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Designate an area for recyclable collection and storage that is appropriately sized and located in a convenient area. Identify local waste handlers and buyers for glass, plastic, metals, office paper, newspaper, cardboard and organic wastes. Instruct occupants on recycling procedures. Consider employing cardboard balers, aluminum can crushers, recycling chutes and other waste management strategies to further enhance the recycling program.

Organizations

California Integrated Waste Management Board

The California Integrated Waste Management Board (CIWMB) offers information about waste reduction, recycling and solid waste characterization, as well as generation rates for offices, schools, and residences. 

Web Tools

Earth 911

Earth 911 offers information and education programs on recycling as well as links to local recyclers.

Floor Plan Showing Recycling Locations

You will be required to upload to LEED Online a project floorplan, like the approved sample shown here, showing recycling storage and collection areas.

Recycling Area Narrative

To document this credit, you'll be required to write a narrative like this sample describing the recycling storage area, accessibility, frequency of pickup, and volume of the space. You will also need to describe how the area’s dimensions were determined.

Recycling Plan

You are not required to follow through with a recycling program to earn this prerequisite, so it is not necessary to document one for LEED as shown in this sample recycling plan. However, implementing a recycling program is only logical, once you have done the work of allocating space for it.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 MR

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 MR credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

62 Comments

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Omar ElRawy Building Engineer, LEED AP BD+C EA Building Consultants
Aug 18 2014
Guest
484 Thumbs Up

"Access to Occupants"

Dear All,
I have a 6 story office building with one garbage shoot linked to a garbage sorting room outside the building but within the LEED project boundary. I was intending to let the while garbage be sorted on this room until I got the following reviewer comment:

"recycling collection points should be established within common areas to allow access to occupants. The recycling program should teach occupants and other building users about recycling"

Now my question is that: Can I place only two bins for each office/workstation; one for (paper) and one for (other), where the paper will be shoot to the garbage room separately, then the (other) will be shoot on a different time to the sorting room, and sorted inside, OR should I place the whole five categories in a place accessible to all occupants?

knowing that the second option isn't very applicable since that every occupant will have to leave his office to discard anything!

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Aug 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Option 1 (double bins at each workstation) should be acceptable, since paper is the most common recyclable in office areas. We have used this approach in the past.

You should also provide centralized receptacles for the other categories at each floor. The key is to locate collection points near waste sources. For example, put bins for glass, plastic, and metals in common areas and lunchrooms where people use bottles & cans. Gather cardboard in shipping & receiving areas, and collect paper at copy rooms, mailrooms, & offices.

Besides teaching “building users about recycling,” using separate receptacles allows users to “self-sort” at the source and eliminates the need to sort later. However, since you only have one garbage chute, your challenge is to avoid “remixing” recyclables or contaminating recyclables with non-recyclable wastes. You have suggested timing separate drops for each type of waste. You could also use marked bags or other strategies.

In any case, match your strategies to the capabilities of your building operator and your waste hauler’s needs. Many recyclers will allow intermingling of some commodities (for example, plastic & metals).

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Caroline Hedin Architect studio point253
Aug 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
1035 Thumbs Up

Calculating Waste

Approximately a year ago, we documented this credit for a small 3,000 sf (give or take) bank branch. The reviewer required we collect the waste from an average 24 hour period, sort the waste, photograph it, weight it, break it down in to a table, and submit it for approval of the prereq.
I am now documenting a student center at a community college which is approximately 65,000 sf. I don't have the option of collecting, sorting and weighing each of the streams. I will contact the waste management company but in case they don't have the information I need - can I get some ideas on how others have approached this in the last year (they keep changing the requirements it seems - the documentation has gotten significantly more strict each time I've documented this prereq).
Thank you for your help.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Aug 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Caroline – The reviewers of your former project appear to have forgotten that, in LEED-NC, MRp1 is a Design Phase submittal documented prior to construction. Your review team appears to have imposed EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. Waste Stream Audit Credit documentation requirements on your project. The post-occupancy waste stream audit that they required is beyond the normal, pre-occupancy scope of LEED-NC.

LEED-NC requires only a narrative “describing the size, accessibility and dedication and the collection frequency” of recycling provisions. Ideally, the design of recycling facilities should be based on volume estimates from a Solid Waste Assessment or similar study performed during early design & programming. For the two MRp1 submittals that I have been involved with in the past year, such a narrative was all that reviewers required.

On your branch bank, my guess is that your narrative did not convince the reviewers that the sizing of your facilities had been studied sufficiently during design. For your student center, find out if the design team did such a study. If not, work with your Owner & their waste service to evaluate your project’s anticipated needs (and justify its design) based on volumes at similar, existing facilities. Citing recommendations from the LEED Reference Guide (based solely on building SF) is not enough anymore.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Aug 12 2014 LEEDuser Expert 14118 Thumbs Up

You may not need a study if your owner has an established waste hauling contract that includes that includes recycling (which is likely in a university setting). You will need to provide information on the how their contract works, that the owner is committed to the recycling effort and what happens when things are 'full'. See my response below on 10/2013 for additional information.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Aug 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Susan – Excellent suggestion! The important point is to demonstrate that the recycling provisions are not arbitrary, but that they come from kind of quantification based on building use and waste contractor capabilities. If you don’t show the methodology used to size the facilities, you risk tempting reviewers to prescribe their own.

The audit that reviewers required for the branch bank must have been a challenge. Institutions that handle cash &/or confidential documents typically follow stringent policies to secure, manage, shred, & remove trash. An initial narrative describing these procedures and projecting waste/recycle volumes might have satisfied the reviewers.

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FABIO VIERO Head of Sustainability Manens-Tifs s.p.a.
Apr 22 2014
LEEDuser Member
452 Thumbs Up

Storage area for Group Certification

Hi,
I'm now working on a Group Project certification under LEED 2009 NC.
The Group is made of 3 separate buildings with a common basement dedicated to parking use.
We're planning to locate the recyclables storage area in the basement, one space that serves the 3 buildings.
Recyclables shall be delivered from each building by means an electrical vehicle (the moving operations will take place exclusively in the basement)
Vehicles of Public Authority, in charge to pick up recyclables and not recyclables, (separated) may access to the basement (through a dedicated and protected lane).

From your point of view, assuming an adequate sizing of the collection area, might this solution be compliant with the requirement?

Thanks.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

See my answer below to Christina.

In terms of this specific situation, I would ask how recyclables are being collected prior to being moved to the central storage location? I would consider emphasizing that in your documentation.

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Christina Nguyen
Feb 19 2014
Guest
32 Thumbs Up

How strictly is the "accessible location" interpreted?

We have a 3-story classroom building for a community college. We originally designated a portion of the main mechanical room on the ground floor as the building recycling collection and storage area. The mechanical engineers are now claiming the entire mechanical room and are offering a trade for a mechanical space on the 3rd floor. The travel distance from the proposed recycling collection to the elevator is 62 feet (door to door). Once on the ground floor, the travel distance from the elevator to the exterior door is 60 feet. Is this option worth exploring, or will the reviewers flag us for "accessible location"? Thanks in advance.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Christina, there are no hard and fast rules around this. The key thing is what will really be workable for your specific project. Is this a usable space in terms of how recycling will be collected on this project?

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Magda Aghababyan CEO Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
Dec 09 2013
LEEDuser Member
480 Thumbs Up

Calculation of the required area

Dear all,

We are doing a project with an IT office complex. The largest possible waste stream is E-Waste, food and paper. We do not see much potential for glass and metal waste streams. So we are thinking of eliminating those insignificant waste streams in our calculation to estimate the required waste storage area and add E-Waste and Food waste streams in to the equation.

In doing so we calculated a worst case scenario of about 5 tons of waste per month. And now we have a challenge of converting this waste amount in to floor area requirement.

Q1: Please give your comments on our approach that I have described above. Do you think we are thinking correctly on this matter?

Q2: Please give your advise on converting the waste quantities to required storage space (area). Is there any rules of thumbs or standards for this?

Thank you!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Magda, you do need to provide space adequate for the designated waste types stated in the LEED requirements, even if you don't think you will be producing them.

However, you do have discretion in allocating space. For guidance, I would recommend reading LEEDuser's guidance above, and reviewing the forum here.

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Michael Johnson Architect Chenevert Architects
Nov 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
698 Thumbs Up

recycle storage room exhausted?

not sure which credit to put this question under. but not sure if the recycle room needs to be exhausted to the exterior - per IEQc5?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, please post this question under our IEQc5 forum.

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Julia Ellrod
Oct 29 2013
Guest
46 Thumbs Up

Designated Storage Area(s)

Could someone please clarify the following for me? Am I interpreting the language correctly to require:

- (1) designated recycling storage area, sized appropriately based on the recommended sf in the reference guide in addition to other smaller collection and storage areas through the building; so in effect, I need (1) designated space at a certain sf, rather than designing for that same sf in aggregate for the project

- Our project is a small new building/addition that physically connects to another existing building that already has a large space designated and used for collection and storage. Can I claim this space as the designated recycling storage, or am I required to provide a storage location within our LEED project boundary?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Oct 29 2013 LEEDuser Expert 14118 Thumbs Up

I believe you can use this central area as part of your recycling plan. However, you'll need to prove that this existing area meets the requirements for all areas served. In other words, your project plus the existing building plus any other building that uses it to collect recycling. I've done this in our hospital projects and we have to address the capacity at the loading dock frequently as well as collection from the project site to the loading dock.

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Jesus Deras Energy Analyst The Wall Consulting Group
May 05 2013
LEEDuser Member
263 Thumbs Up

Separate Buildings, Same Cellar

I have two hotel projects(190K & 98K) which will be filed as two separate LEED projects that have a combined cellar. As per reference guide sizing guideline, do I have to provide two individual centralized locations (275 SF minimum each) to meet credit intent, or can I provide one (500 SF) room to meet the prerequisite requirement for both projects?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Jesus, the first FAQ above relates to this. The collection point for recycling does not have to be within your LEED project boundary, as long as it is an accessible and sensible location for the project. And, the sizing recommendations are just recommendations—again, see the FAQs. So I would make the right choice for the buildings first, and then explain it in a LEED narrative.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager Google
Apr 15 2013
LEEDuser Expert
15234 Thumbs Up

Guidelines for large projects that are greater than 500,000 sf

Hello,

I am working on a large development that has several buildings that are greater than 500,000 sf. Is there a good recommendation out there, in addition to the City of Seattle document, that clarifies how much recycling area I should set aside? For instance, I was hoping to be more specific than just 500 sf (as noted in the City of Seattle recommendation for projects over 200,001 sf). Also, the Reference Guide mentions that the City of Seattle has recommendations for commercial and residential spaces but the Table in the Reference Guide seems to just be for Commercial. Can someone help to point me in the direction of Residential guidelines for recycling?

Thanks so much!

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Caroline Hedin Architect, studio point253 Apr 17 2013 LEEDuser Member 1035 Thumbs Up

Hi Lauren,
I am usually able to find this information out by contacting the company that is responsible for picking up recycling in the area. They spend a bit of time with me discussing the size of the project, the use, the projected number of occupants and any unique aspects. Once they have this information, they then run some calculations and give me a count of bins or size of a larger bin and ideas for storage within the building. From what I've seen through my certifications and research, the USGBC doesn't seem to have a requirement for per person (if someone has seen a requirement somewhere, I'd love the link!), they just want to know that the Owner understands their waste stream and makes it easy to recycle/reuse.

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Michael Johnson Architect Chenevert Architects
Jan 30 2013
LEEDuser Member
698 Thumbs Up

Enclosed Room?

Can the "dedicated space" be a space set aside in part of a bigger "back of house" service room (near loading dock)? Or does it actually have to be its own room with nothing else but collecting bins?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 30 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, it does not have to be a dedicated room with four walls. It can be a dedicated space within a larger space. Something that you can show on your floor plan, and demarcate somehow.

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SUNG SU KIM Engineer HanmiGlobal
Jan 23 2013
LEEDuser Member
179 Thumbs Up

Minimum Recycling Area for residential building

Hi guys.
We are pursuing LEED v2.2.

Our project have five separate residential building.

We will provide recycling area where each building entrance. But we don't know how much area is needed.

For LEED reference guide, it mention about commercial case only.
So, should I follow commercial case?

Please help me~~

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Lisa Fabula Sustainable Project Manager, KEMA Services Jan 31 2013 LEEDuser Expert 654 Thumbs Up

Here's a California source that discusses residential generation rates...
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/wastechar/WasteGenRates/Residential.htm
You do not need to follow the LEED Reference Guide, but rather describe and defend your volume.

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Jatuwat Varodompun Dr Green Building Soultion
Jan 20 2013
LEEDuser Member
1163 Thumbs Up

Recycling of the factory

We planned to apply LEED for a factory which has a recycle yard. The yard is openned and will be used to sort the wast for recycling without any clear boundary of waste types. Will this comply with this credit.

If not, can we used the metal wire fence to create the 5-type waste zone which can be locked and secured. Will this help to comply?

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Lisa Fabula Sustainable Project Manager, KEMA Services Jan 31 2013 LEEDuser Expert 654 Thumbs Up

It may be important to make recycling easier, and clearer, for building user's too. You should be able to identify on a floor plan where recyclables are collected on the interior, and then stored on the exterior. If the plan is for comingledA process of recycling materials that allows consumers to dispose of various materials (such as paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal) in one container that is separate from waste. The recyclable materials are not sorted until they are collected and brought to a sorting facility. recycling, there may be no need for fencing separating the types.

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SmithGroupJJR IP
Oct 16 2012
LEEDuser Member
228 Thumbs Up

Amount of recycling generated

Has anyone found baseline data for amount of recycling generated in an office? To fill out the sample narrative provided in the Documentation Toolkit I have been looking for baseline numbers for recycling generated in an office (specifically a call center), such as pounds per employee per day. The CalRecycle website only seems to have data from the 1990's (http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/wastechar/WasteGenRates/Commercial.htm) and I am having a hard time finding another measured data on the amount of recycling or waste produced.

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Karen Joslin principal, Joslin Consulting Nov 05 2012 LEEDuser Member 1646 Thumbs Up

Yes the CalREcycle and other sources all use weight now - I remember in LEED v2 systems we had info on volumes broken down by all kinds of users like 1.1 cu ft paper/person/week. But I cannot locate my old reference materials ARGH! And the reviewer doesn't seem to see all the empty space in my hoteling office location available for future recyclable storage. The reviewer requests have become pretty frustrating on this subject given that we don't even have to provide the service...

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Luis Miguel Diazgranados Green Factory
Sep 18 2012
LEEDuser Member
1144 Thumbs Up

MRP1 FOR HEALTHCARE

Is there any reference about recycling area recommendation for general healthcare facilities in relation to square foot?, # of pacient?, health departments? or anyone has ever conduct calculations for waste stream for LEED HC (waste generation ratio). Thank you .

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Nadia Ayala Architect / LEED AP BD+C, KILTIK Consultoría Sep 18 2012 Guest 1162 Thumbs Up
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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Sep 19 2012 LEEDuser Expert 14118 Thumbs Up

The healthcare industry is all over this! First, look at the 2010 Facility Guideline Institute which is the healthcare guideline book. If you're doing a Hospital in the US, you already have this book. Second, check out Practice Greenhealth and the old Green Guide for Healthcare may also have something (LEED HC pilot). The best thing is to work with the materials management people at the hospital and understand what their waste is currently, what their waste streams are and then ask about their red bag waste as a percentage of their total waste stream. (If this is high, then reducing this can produce the savings to implement something else waste related.) Instead of applying a generality, work with the hospital on where they are at now.

Are you at the planning stage or trying to prove that the current conditions meet the capacity of the expansion? Most facilities have a limited loading dock situation that is not being impacted by the expansion project. They also have more flexible haul contracts with their waste haulers. We've successfully used this to earn the pre-req in hospital projects.

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Luis Miguel Diazgranados Green Factory Sep 20 2012 LEEDuser Member 1144 Thumbs Up

Thank Susan , and thank you Nadia as whell , currently we are at the planning stage of the project trying to give a real projection of what magnitude of waste will be , and i have already check de FGI guidelines and the other webpages you recommend, but i have not work yet with the tips you gave me about fieldwork and haulers, that is going to be my next step.
I would like to know if you agree with me about using the following references for waste generation calculations i've found (Nadia links ) from www.calrecycle.ca.gov and other hospital studies:
hospitals produce 0.0108 tons/sq ft /year
or
33.8 pounds /bed/day
I hope this is a correct aproach.

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Nicolas MOLLE ETAMINE
Sep 12 2012
Guest
304 Thumbs Up

Plastic waste

Hello,
I would like if it's possible to sort plastic waste with other banal (common? I don't know the english word) industrial waste ? Or do we need a specific garbage ?
Thank you in advance for your answer,
Best regards
Héloïse COUVERT - ETAMINE

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Lisa Fabula Sustainable Project Manager, KEMA Services Sep 12 2012 LEEDuser Expert 654 Thumbs Up

The more recyclables collection the better; you just have to affirm the minimum 5 types (paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics, metals) are able to be collected. Comingling of recyclables is fine.

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Nadia Ayala Architect / LEED AP BD+C KILTIK Consultoría
Jul 23 2012
Guest
1162 Thumbs Up

Post Industrial Waste

Hi,
I was wondering if post industrial waste is included by default in the recycling plan required by the MR prerequisite. If it didn't, adding this waste to a comprehensive plan may be an option for an innovation in design credit, would you agree?
Thanks.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 30 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Nadia, a recycling plan is not required for MRp1 so any kind of plan already goes beyond the prereq.

Your best bet would be to use one of the LEED-EBOM solid waste management credits as a model, and either stick with the scope of one or more of those credits, or expand on it, using similar methodology.

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Kenneth Van Riper Associate Principal Commonwealth Architects
Apr 30 2012
Guest
213 Thumbs Up

Recycling in Multi-family housing project

Based on review of CIRs and the comments on this forum I think our approach to this prerequisite would be acceptable, but I thought I'd see if anyone else out there wanted to weigh in. The project is a multi-story adaptive reuseAdapted reuse is the renovation of a space for a purpose different from the original. apartment project with a very long footprint composed of a 6-story tower with two-story wings on either side. We plan to provide a centrally located recycling dumpster outside the building behind the tower (in the vicinity of one of the general waste dumpsters), with adjacent access from the building for all occupants. A collection bin would be provided for each apartment unit for collection of comingledA process of recycling materials that allows consumers to dispose of various materials (such as paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal) in one container that is separate from waste. The recyclable materials are not sorted until they are collected and brought to a sorting facility. recyclables, and the residents would take their bin when full to the central exterior dumpster, which would be picked up on a weekly basis. Does this approach meet the intent of the prerequsite? Any input is appreciated; thanks!

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Apr 30 2012 LEEDuser Member 5058 Thumbs Up

Hi Kenneth,
Sounds good to me. Our multifamily strategies are similar. Keep in mind for documentation that reviewers now are most interested in metrics and the collection process inside the building, not just the dumpster enclosure SF and location on site. They'll want to know how much volume of recycling is expected and how big the containers are, along with the process and frequency you've described above. We have been getting our volume estimates from the future waste vendor.

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Erin Cowan Sustainability Coordinator The McKinney Partnership Architects
Mar 28 2012
Guest
97 Thumbs Up

Form Template Compliance

We are working with a University that collects everything but Glass however that is detailed out in the special circumstances. Without checking the box marked for "Glass" in the form, it is not recognizing compliance. Does anyone know if we need to just mark it and rely on the explanation in the dialog box for reviewer documentation? Otherwise, it doesn't appear that we can check the status as "complete" in order to submit.....

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Lisa Fabula Sustainable Project Manager, KEMA Services Mar 30 2012 LEEDuser Expert 654 Thumbs Up

I think you have identified the correct process and necessary steps. Be sure your narrative is clear and mentions if co-mingled collection is occurring.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Mar 08 2013 Guest 2782 Thumbs Up

There was LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. about this- #1803 "Given the location and infrastructure of your project,you will not be required to collect these materials that you cannot recycle. However, it should be noted that even if recycling does not exist [...] in the geographical area, space must be provided in the building in anticipation of recycling resources becoming available in the future. Please be sure to include a narrative with your submittal describing your recycling efforts[...]"

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Sunayana Jain Energy Engineering Specialist FTC&H
Feb 14 2012
Guest
143 Thumbs Up

Recycling Areas Designation

In the floor plan, is it required to document the recycling areas as paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics and metals specifically or just designating as recycled areas in floor plan will be suffice for submission for this credit. Please let me know.
Thanks!

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Feb 17 2012 Guest 7510 Thumbs Up

It's in your best interest to be as specific as possible with your documentation. That being said, if you're using co-mingled recycling, then you wouldn't need separate collection areas anyway.

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Rebekah Burke Director of Sustainable Design Clark Nexsen
Dec 07 2011
LEEDuser Member
433 Thumbs Up

'Expected Volume for the Building' Question

How do we address the expected volume of recycling for the building question? This is a question we received recently on a design review, and I'm not certain how to address. Are there any good references? Or should it be a general statement that 'recycling receptacles have been provided to meet the expected needs of the occupant, collection frequency or the size of bins may be addressed for any additional or reduced needs'...

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Kate Kelly Sustainability Coordinator, YR&G Dec 07 2011 LEEDuser Member 149 Thumbs Up

We have come across this same issue lately and it seems some reviewers/cases do want specific volume/capacity approximations.
If the hauler can't give a volume approximation, a way you might be able to do it (not sure if easiest or best at all) is a combination of resources from California Integrated Waste Management Board (Diversion % by Industry Groups http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/Publications/Disposal/34106006.pdf and Disposal Rates by Biz http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/wastechar/DispRate.htm ) along with a Volume-to-Weight Conversion http://www.recyclemaniacs.org/doc/measurement-tracking/conversions.pdf
It seems there should be a better resource out there?... would like to know as well if anyone has used!

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Sofia Kesidou Ms
Sep 08 2011
LEEDuser Member
431 Thumbs Up

Which Waste Streams Should Be Included?

Hi All.

Is this credit specifically for office waste or all waste streams?

I’m working on a large industrial factory building, and whilst the operator has a policy of recycling materials from the manufacturing process this is a very different process to the occupant-led recycling facilities and plan.

Would in internal layout drawing need to show the recycling areas on the factory floor?

Many thanks.

Kit

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Lisa Fabula Sustainable Project Manager, KEMA Services Sep 09 2011 LEEDuser Expert 654 Thumbs Up

The prerequisite requires a description and drawing that shows the "dedicated recycling storage areas" that are used to collect "paper; corrugated cardboard; glass; plastics; metals"; this may be quite different than the manufacturing process that reclaims pre-consumer material for reuse/recycling.

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Kenneth Bailey Owner Bativert
Feb 26 2011
LEEDuser Member
214 Thumbs Up

Centralized Storage Area

Our project is a campus of buildings in a remote, isolated hotel resort. Employees live within the LEED boundary. We will have a centralized storage area within the LEED boundary. We will document this with the plan and volume calcs based on occupancy of resort and employees. According to your synopsis above, this shoudl be sufficient. I want to make sure that we do not also have to supply designated storage areas within each individual building.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Mar 01 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17399 Thumbs Up

Depending on the size of the individual buildings, the reviewers may require you to provide designated storage areas with individual buildings that generate a large volume of waste. A main guest lodge with kitchen and dining facilities, for example, would probably need to have its own designated storage area. For other buildings the most important thing is to provide a narrative describing the waste management plan that explains how recyclables are being separated from other waste, collected on site, stored, and then where they go.

Since guest rooms or small outbuildings are probably maintained by housekeeping staff, it might be acceptable to have two labeled waste bins in a room - one for all recyclables, and one for other landfill trash. The narrative will need to describe who collects these, how often, where they are taken, how they are sorted and stored, etc.

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Marcio Alberto Casado Pereira Aug 31 2012 LEEDuser Member 3207 Thumbs Up

Hi David,

Which size would be this? We have a similar situation as Kenneth's - 8 residential towers on a campus, a central restaurant buildings that serves these towers, and a central gym also. I'm wondering now if our resturant will need oits own designated storage area...

Thanks

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Joanna Yaghooti Director of Sustainable Design PageSoutherlandPage
May 25 2010
LEEDuser Member
414 Thumbs Up

Yard and lawn clippings

LEED for Schools requires a project to divert yard clippings from landfills. Is the same true for LEED BD+C 2009?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 25 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Joanna, that was true in earlier versions of LEED for Schools but is no longer the case in LEED for Schools 2009 MRp1, or in other BD+C systems.

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Jean Ascoli
May 06 2010
Guest
322 Thumbs Up

Storage / Collection of Recyclables In Apartment

Can we count space for collection of recyclables inside the dwelling units towards the SF for recyclable storage; reducing the overall size of the central storage?

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Jean Ascoli May 06 2010 Guest 322 Thumbs Up

Follow-up - If the answer is yes to part one of this question:
Is one cabinet or “bin” within the units enough?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 06 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Jean, there is no specific requirement for square footage to meet the MRp1 requirements. The recommendations shown above are recommendations, but not binding.

The proper course is to allot enough square footage so that your building's recycling program will be effective. That will be your own judgement call. If all the recycling from the individual units winds up in the central location, I would hesitate to reduce its size, though, since the in-unit bin space is not performing the same function as the central space.

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Jean Ascoli May 06 2010 Guest 322 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan,

Presumably the actual collection point will be a recycling dumpster (or dumpsters) outside the building - so a central collection point inside the building would not make sense unless there were one for trash as well - which there is not (this is a four story 16-unit mixed-use building). So I guess the ultimate question is whether or not the collection must be in a centralized location inside the building irregardless of building type to meet the preRequisite?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 12 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Jean, when documenting this credit on LEED Online the first thing you'll be asked for is this following narrative:

"Describe the dedicated recycling storage areas in the project building. Include the size of the area, accessibility, and expected volume for the building, as well as collection frequency. Demonstrate that recycling storage areas are appropriately sized and located. Please refer to corresponding reference guide for guidelines on size of recycling storage areas."

To answer your question, I would say no, a centralized interior location is not required by the credit, but you will have to justify your system and reasoning in this narrative.

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Pete Larsen May 27 2010 Guest 121 Thumbs Up

Tristan - so a separate dumpster outside the building for recycling would qualify, as long as it is appropriately sized?

I am working on a project in a city with no recycling pick-up service, and the LEED Reference guide says that the project should still provide adequate space for future recycling efforts.

Therefore, if I put those two things together, will it be sufficient to provide an empty paved spot next to the garbage dumpster for the future recycling dumpster? All we would need is a site plan showing the potential location of the recycling dumpster (and won't need an interior recycling room). Of course, we would still have the narrative to justify the sizing. Do I understand this correctly? Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 27 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Pete, this approach sounds reasonable to me. Note that the documentation asks not only about size but also location. I think you would want to show (probably in a narrative) that a recycling program in the building would work with the outside dumpster, i.e. that occupants could reasonable access it. If there is some indoor collection point(s), all the better.

Also note that the MRp1 credit language calls for space supporting the collection and storage of several types of materials. A single dumpster seems to assume that the future recycling pickup service would be comingledA process of recycling materials that allows consumers to dispose of various materials (such as paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal) in one container that is separate from waste. The recyclable materials are not sorted until they are collected and brought to a sorting facility., which may not be the case.

So, your approach does sound reasonable, as I said, but I would make sure to really think through all the credit requirements.

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Tarek Dalati Sustainbility manager CRHI
May 06 2010
Guest
1070 Thumbs Up

high rise residential building collect of recyclables

i m working on a 50 floor residential high rise building i im finding a problem in finding a way to allow for the segregation of teh recyclables so.i m thinking of providing a garbage room on each floor with a garbage chute and a central collection areas in the ground floor.my questions are:
1-do i need to provide garbage chute for each recyclable like for paper one garbage chute,for metals one garbage chute throwing to the related bin in the central room.
2- or shall we contract with a company who will collect the garbage from one central garbage chute where they will segregate the garbage in the bins.
3- or is there any other ideas to segregate the recyclables by the occupants in acceptable way
please note we are talking about high rise building and if it snot practical for the occupant to throw his segregate bags in the central room
can anyone help me

regards,
tarek

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert May 06 2010 LEEDuser Member 8263 Thumbs Up

I would suggest:
1) One main garbage room, with space to store, sort recyclables and normal garbage - groundfloor or basement depending on access.
2) Per Floor, assuming each floor has a tee kitchen...
2.1) Bin for normal rubbish - in teekitchen
2.2) Bin for co-mingled plastics, packaging, glass, metals - in tee kitchen
3) In office spaces, paper bins

4) Either dedicated garbage elevator terminating in / next to main garbage room

OR

x1 garbage shoot for co-mingled recyclables and Paper (using plastic bin liners should keep these seperate); x1 for normal rubbish; for glass ...bring glass down by hand (simply because I imagine a 50 floor fall for anything glass will result in SMASHING).

5) Contract company to pick up a) co-mingled recyclables for off-site processing b) pick up paper waste c) pick up glass waste (maybe with a)) and d) pick up normal rubbish.

...I'm no Architect. I would get some proper reading on how to plan these.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 06 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Is there a hauler you can contract with who will take single-stream or comingledA process of recycling materials that allows consumers to dispose of various materials (such as paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal) in one container that is separate from waste. The recyclable materials are not sorted until they are collected and brought to a sorting facility. garbage from the building, and sort it in an off-site facility? If so, you would simply use a single chute for all waste, including space in the basement to collect it, and haul it off-site.

LEED does not require you to segregate recyclables, as long as they can be collected and later recycled.

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