NC-2009 MRpc69: Construction and demolition waste management

  • Not just diverting waste, but preventing it

    This pilot credit takes a step that many in the LEED community have been pushing for years—recognition for projects that not only take steps to divert waste from the landfill, but that avoid generating it to begin with. To earn that credit option, projects will have to avoid generating more than 2.5 pounds of construction waste per square foot of the building's floor area. For more details, see the credit language.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    MR Pilot Credit 69: Construction and demolition waste management

    Intent

    Pilot Credit Closed

    This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

    To reduce construction and demolition waste disposed of in landfills and incineration facilities by recovering, reusing, and recycling materials.

    Requirements

    * This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

    Recycle and/or salvage nonhazardous construction and demolition materials. Calculations can be by weight or volume but must be consistent throughout.

    Exclude excavated soil, land-clearing debris from calculations. Include materials destined for alternative daily coverAlternative daily cover is material (other than earthen material) that is placed on the surface of the active face of a municipal solid waste landfill at the end of each operating day to control vectors, fires, odors, blowing litter, and scavenging. (ADC) in the calculations as waste (not diversion). Include wood waste converted to fuel (bio-fuel) in the calculations; other types of waste-to-energy are not considered diversion for this credit.

    However, for projects that cannot meet credit requirements using reuse and recycling methods, waste-to-energy systems may be considered waste diversion if the European Commission Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC and Waste Incineration Directive 2000/76/EC are followed and Waste to Energy facilities meet applicable European Committee for Standardization (CEN) EN 303 standards.

    Option 1. diversion (1-2 points)

    Path 1. divert 50% and three material streams (1 point)

    Divert at least 50% of the total construction and demolition material; diverted materials must include at least three material streams.

    OR

    Path 2. divert 75% and four material streams (2 points)

    Divert at least 75% of the total construction and demolition material; diverted materials must include at least four material streams.

    OR

    Option 2. reduction of total waste material (2 points)

    Do not generate more than 2.5 pounds of construction waste per square foot (12.2 kilograms of waste per square meter) of the building's floor area.

    General Pilot Documentation Requirements

    Register for the pilot credit

    Credits 1-14

    Credits 15-27

    Credits 28-42

    Credits 43-56

    Credits 57-67

    Credits 68-82

    Credits 83-103

    Credit specific
    Required Documentation BD&C Option 1 Option 2
    List of construction waste generated and diverted to landfill itemizing the waste, the material stream, waste total amount, and diverted amount per item and total for project. All units of measure must be consistent x  
    Evidence of average recycling rates for Commingled waste sorting Facilities (if applicable) x  
    Explanation why Waste-to-Energy Must be Used (if applicable) x  
    Proof of Certification for Waste-to-Energy Facilities (if applicable) x  
    Waste per Area for entire project   x
    Changes:
    • 4/1/2013: added documentation requirements
    • 6/19/2013: added CI to applicable rating systems

15 Comments

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Vanessa Cardona Senior Sustainability Consultant Steven Winter Associates, Inc.
Aug 03 2016
LEEDuser Member
30 Thumbs Up

MRpc69 Attainable in the New Construction Project

Project Location: United States

This credit was readily attainable for a new residential building located in Manhattan. Six streams were recycled by tracking waste throughout the construction phase of the project. It achieved over 75% diversion - which is typical for most NYC LEED buildings. Seems like the credit can certainly be achieved by most projects located in urban areas.

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Vibha Pai Student University of Cincinnati
Jun 19 2016
Guest
458 Thumbs Up

Master's Research Survey

Project Location: United States

I am conducting this survey in affiliation with University of Cincinnati in support of my hypothesis for my Master's thesis. It would just take 10-15 minutes of your time. By completing this survey you would help me in giving my research the required depth in understanding the achievability of the credit points in the Material and Resource category of LEED v2009 and v2013. I will send in the end results of this survey to you, which could potentially make your decision process easier on any future LEED registered projects you intend to work on.

The following is the link to my survey:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/XR3ZVZN
Every response is valuable to my research.Thank you in advance for your time.

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Erica Suarino Sustainability Consultant Steven Winter Associates
Aug 06 2015
Guest
32 Thumbs Up

MRpc69 Attainable in Commercial Interior Project

Project Location: United States

This credit was easily attainable for an interior renovation in the New York metropolitan region. Haulers that divert and send waste to reclamation facilities for end use in a variety of applications were contracted early on. Waste was measured and tracked throughout the duration of the construction project with negligible added cost, and ultimately seven waste streams were diverted. This credit is beneficial in that it is applicable to a large variety of project types.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager Atkins North America
Jan 15 2015
LEEDuser Member
864 Thumbs Up

Complex projects benefit from turn-key waste mgmt services

Project Location: United States

The recently completed DrDemand response: a change in electricity use by demand-side resources from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity or to incentive payments designed to induce lower electricity use at times of high wholesale market prices or when system reliability is jeopardized.. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts facility, located in the active downtown district of Orlando FL, achieved an over 75% diversion rate for demolition and construction related waste. In part due to the complex job site staging and management required for the urban site spanning across 2 city blocks, the general contractor chose to engage a waste management company that provided turn-key services. The provider arranged for the various containers and orchestrated delivery to the various processing facilities. They also provided monthly reports that kept a running tally of all waste management activity and overall diversion rate as construction progressed. This helped to reduce the paperwork headaches and quality control time required from the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. 's very busy team. The one lesson to share is to be cautious of comingledA process of recycling materials that allows consumers to dispose of various materials (such as paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal) in one container that is separate from waste. The recyclable materials are not sorted until they are collected and brought to a sorting facility. collection of more conventional jobsite office waste, such as paper and plastic/glass beverage containers. Depending on the recycling center's sorting/ reporting procedures, this may not qualify as meeting the (2) LEED accepted comingled reporting methods (i.e., if they cannot break out reporting by material type or adequately document average facility diversion rate). If its incidental in amount, its certainly not an issue to include this as "waste" in project calcs. However, in a long-term project these materials may represent a greater share of total project waste than one might initially expect!

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager Atkins North America
Jun 19 2014
LEEDuser Member
864 Thumbs Up

Using a variety of waste recycling resources may be necessary

Just completed a renovation of an older Armory structure that resulted in demolished site paving along with a mix of demo'd interior materials along with the more typical construction debris. Fortunately both the demo contractor and the primary recycling provider supporting them (a local MRF) really leveraged their resources. As a result, the project was able to even recycle some demo'd ACT ceiling tile, carpet and old light fixture ballasts/lamps. In a couple cases it required a special trip to special receiving facilities, such as the mercury containing light fixtures. Likewise, the site contractor was also able to readily grind demo'd asphalt parking for regional reuse as RAP. It helps that the project is located on the outskirts of a metro area that has access to both ship and rail ports along with regional construction and manufacturing back on the rise again following the recession. Without that, there wouldn't be as much of a secondary market generating demand for these recycled materials in the surrounding locale. In all, the project was able to reach 95% diversion!

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Laura Charlier LEED Services Director Group14 Engineering
Jan 09 2014
LEEDuser Member
706 Thumbs Up

MRpc69 - easily achieved, but not always

We registered for this credit for one than one project under the thought that it would be easy to achieve. We were right...for one of the projects. However, because the credit follows the requirements as set forth in LEEDv4, we were not able to count drywall that was diverted, but used as daily landfill cover. Without the inclusion of the diverted drywall, one of our projects did not meet the requirement of three or more steams contributing to 50% diversion.

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Vince Briones Sustainable Design Manager, Atkins Mar 21 2014 Guest 307 Thumbs Up

Agreed Laura,

We have found this credit to be readily attainable in most urban settings as long as a project will have a variety of recyclable materials. You are also correct that access to recycling drywall makes a big difference in most projects given how common it is in most projects' waste streams. Just finished a relatively small tenant office renovation project in Orlando that benefited from a comingledA process of recycling materials that allows consumers to dispose of various materials (such as paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal) in one container that is separate from waste. The recyclable materials are not sorted until they are collected and brought to a sorting facility. service provider that fortunately does recycle numerous material types including clean/uncontaminated drywall (recycled for end-uses other than landfill ADC).

However, we have also had other projects struggle with this due to limited regional recycling services available, some in rural locations but some in surprisingly urban areas without access to recycling of materials like drywall or wood. In those cases, the team has had to consider whether its feasible or even "sustainable" to pay extreme freight costs to transport heavy waste materials significant distances to be processed for recycling.

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Vince Briones Sustainable Design Manager, Atkins Mar 21 2014 Guest 307 Thumbs Up

I will further note that there are sometime logistics involved that create barriers to accomplishing this even by a capable construction team. In one of our more rural projects that needed to transport waste a great distance for any chance of an overall 50% project waste diversion rate, the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. was advised that the waste provider (company) managing the MRF recycling center in the nearest city would not accept dumpsters from another hauler due to "liability" issues.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Apr 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 864 Thumbs Up

Agreed,

Was recently surprised to have a tenant (LEED-CI) project reach only 65% diversion in spite of being in the greater Miami urban area with robust comingledA process of recycling materials that allows consumers to dispose of various materials (such as paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal) in one container that is separate from waste. The recyclable materials are not sorted until they are collected and brought to a sorting facility. / off-site separation resources used. In this case a lack of drywall recycling options, along with other misc non-recyclable waste material types, was an obstacle to achieving 75%+ diversion.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Apr 09 2015 LEEDuser Member 864 Thumbs Up

Alternately, we just completed another project outside the Miami metro area that achieved a nearly 95% diversion rate. The primary difference is this project is a LEED-Core and shell with only limited interior improvements. Likewise, there was no notable demolition required. Both of these factors minimized the miscellaneous non-recyclable materials resulting from the project work. Coupling that with robust comingledA process of recycling materials that allows consumers to dispose of various materials (such as paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal) in one container that is separate from waste. The recyclable materials are not sorted until they are collected and brought to a sorting facility. recycling resources available in the region ultimately resulted in a very high diversion rate.

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Joseph Haupt
Dec 17 2013
Guest
61 Thumbs Up

MRpc69 was easy to achive with a little planning up front.

The current thresholds were easy to achive as long as you clearly identify what material streams the project is planning to recycle and you have someone in charge or monitoring the construction debris that is being placed in the containers on a daily basis. With a little planning up front this credit is easy to achive. If you wanted to make this credit more challenging, I recommend the % of waste diverted is 90% with an exeperlary performace for 95% diverted.

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Vince Briones Sustainable Design Manager Atkins
Nov 02 2013
Guest
307 Thumbs Up

MRc69 easily achieved with a comprehensive comingled service

We have had great success with use of a comingledA process of recycling materials that allows consumers to dispose of various materials (such as paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal) in one container that is separate from waste. The recyclable materials are not sorted until they are collected and brought to a sorting facility. service on our project in the Austin, TX region. It especially helped that there was a recycling option for clean (new) drywall scraps and lumber/pallets. That detail enabled us to divert 5 material types in all. The project CWMConstruction Waste Management (CWM) diverts construction debris from landfills through the processes of recycling, salvaging and reusing. efforts ultimately exceeded the 75% threshold on a tonnage basis, which was predominately associated with the heavier concrete and wood based recycled materials.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager Atkins North America
Jul 15 2013
LEEDuser Member
864 Thumbs Up

MRc69 readily attainable in most regions

In MOST cases, I have found this credit's requirements to be attainable. In the case of a SE regional military installation I am working on, the established recycling collection service used for C&D projects is already able to recycle 6+ materials and achieved over 75% total diversion. This would be the typical range of diversion results for most project types in this region. However, greater transportation costs may be associated with rural projects if they are more remote from the recycling facilities, as the recycling facilities are fewer in number than the various local landfills.

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist, HGA Architects and Engineers Aug 02 2013 LEEDuser Member 2590 Thumbs Up

I agree - the current thresholds seem quite low/easy to achieve for the majority of our projects. As part of our standard MRc2 tracking, we've demonstrated achievement of the diversion of over 5 different material streams and well over the 75% mark as well. If this really wanted to push the envelope, it would probably be better if projects were required to have more material streams or if each material stream had to hit the minimum diversion rate individually (to help prevent one single stream being really good and carrying the others).

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Francis Chua AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Architect at NK Architects Sep 26 2016 Guest 271 Thumbs Up

I agree, as well. I was able to get over 95% diversion for 6 streams not including gypsum. Mainly because we recycled a massive amount of masonry on the job, as the project had masonry veneer, and exterior and interior CMU.

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