NC-2009 SSc2: Development Density and Community Connectivity

  • NC_CS_SSc2_Type3_Density Diagram
  • Easier for dense urban sites

    This credit addresses two basic issues: density of the surrounding neighborhood and occupant access to everyday services. It encourages use of existing infrastructure and tries to reduce environmental impacts of transportation. It’s easier for projects located in a densely built area or with a host of community services nearby.

    This credit is not likely to drive the project location decision, but it does reward projects for locating in developed areas and for choosing infill instead of greenfield sites (you can’t earn the credit on a site that is not previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development."). In determining how easily your project can comply, site selection is one key factor, but so is the availability of property and building data.

    Two compliance options

    There are two compliance options for this credit. Unless you are in a dense urban neighborhood where either option is possible, your choice will probably be determined by the specifics of your project.

    • Option 1: Development Density requires the density of the community to be 60,000 square feet of floor area per acre or more. This is a typical density for a two-story downtown development.
    • Option 2: Community Connectivity requires connections to neighborhood services as well as to housing with at least 10 units per acre. This option could apply to a variety of settings, from urban areas to rural small towns with a density of services.

    Documentation is key

    Project teams should assess early in the planning stage which path is most suitable based on project location and the availability of density data. The owner, architect or civil engineer often take on the role of documenting this credit—either researching community services in the project’s vicinity, or documenting the density of the project and surrounding area.

    Community Connectivity is generally easier to document than Option 1. Image Courtesy YRG SustainabilityThe size of the area that has to be included in the Option 1 calculation depends on the size of your project site.

    Projects can earn an Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point through IDc1 if they meet Option 1’s requirements and are themselves twice as dense as the surrounding area, or can show that the surrounding area has double the required Option 1 density over twice the area.

    Eight of the ten services for Option 2 have to be existing and in operation at the time of the project opening. Two services can be anticipated within a year of opening. One service can be within the project itself.

    Differences between NC v2.2 and NC 2009

    The credit requirements for v2.2 and v2009 are exactly the same, However, the specifics of what can qualify as a basic service are further defined and outlined in v2009.

    For v2.2, basic services that are in construction by project completion can contribute to the credit requirements. For v2009, these basic services must be in operation. Additionally, for mixed-use projects, under v2.2 no basic services that are part of your project can contribute to the credit requirements. In v2009, one service can be within the project itself. 

  • FAQs for SSc2

    What exactly does LEED mean by residential neighborhood or area?

    LEED defines residential neighborhood or area as a minimum of 10 living units (i.e. an apartment unit or house) per acre. Apartment buildings, neighborhoods, or dormitories can all contribute to this.

    Only a portion of my complying residential development lies within the ½-mile radius. Will this suffice for credit compliance?

    It can be easier to earn this credit in a dense urban environment, but an average two story downtown can also comply. Photo – YRG SustainabilityIn LEEDuser's experience, if a residential development of 10 units/acre lies within a portion of the ½-mile radius, it likely will contribute to credit compliance. This is consistent with LEED Reference Guide guidance that states, "Mark all residential developments within the radius. For the project to earn this credit, a residential area with a minimum density of 10 units per acre must be present within the radius."

    Where do I draw the radius from?

    Use the center of the LEED project boundary.

    Is one building or residential area enough to satisfy the residential density requirement?

    Yes, LEED user’s experts have had success with documenting a single property that is at least 10 units/net acre density. Any discrete area that addresses the requirements is acceptable, and an existing residential area meeting the requirements may cross property lines between different properties. For projects with residential areas that are on the cusp (or perceived as being on the cusp) of meeting the required density, you may need to provide additional documentation or an explanation as to how the residential area meets at least 10 units/net acre. Finally, it is not sufficient for the area to be zoned to the correct density, if it is not built to it.

    My project has access to services that seem to be basic, but are not listed in the LEED Reference Guide—like insurance company, nail salon, auto repair shop. Will these count?

    Probably not. Project teams need to be careful when trying to pass off services not explicitly given in the LEED credit language. In most cases services not listed will not be approved. Review the credit intent and think about whether the additional services—in the absence of other basic services—are pedestrian-oriented and encourage walkable neighborhoods. However, some projects have had success in specific cases, such as a hotel being considered as a basic service for an office space with frequent contractors visiting. A CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide is probably needed to get approval for special cases like this.

    Also, to reduce confusion during a review while maintaining honesty, be careful to label your services to be consistent with the credit language list. For example, a "nail/hair salon/barber shop" should be categorized as a "beauty salon." If a gas station contains a full-service, stand-alone convenience grocery store (e.g. 7-Eleven) and credit is sought for grocery store use, label it as "convenience grocery" rather than a "gas station."

    My project is on a base or campus where some services are available to the population of the project, but not the general public. Do these count?

    Maybe. Language in the Reference Guide is not crystal clear on this point, and some comments from project teams indicate that campus projects should demonstrate that services are open to the public. For LEED documentation purposes, LEEDuser recommends avoiding relying on such services, or seeing a CIR to be sure of your approach.

    LEEDuser has seen reports of review comments questioning the inclusion of services on a military base or other installation that are not open to the general public, even if they are open to anyone within the radius. On the other hand, one project team reported success with a military base where access to the base was restricted to the public, and services on the base were open to anyone on the base.

    For Option 2, does the residential neighborhood with average density of 10 units per net acre have to be existing, or can planned neighborhoods count towards earning this option?

    The SSc2 Option 2 residential requirements for NCv2.2 and NC 2009 are for projects to locate in an area within one-half mile of an existing, not planned, residential district featuring a density of at least 10 units/acre. Projects should not depend upon planned residential areas for credit compliance, as this does not represent existing infrastructure in most cases. Projects not meeting these requirements but believing they meet the credit intent will be considered on a case-by-case basis and must submit a project-specific CIR to determine their compliance potential.

    What site area should be used for an interiors project when figuring out the density radius? The building site area, or building footprint?

    All projects use the building site area for the density radius calculation.

    Is my site previously developed?

    Many projects have had questions about the definition of previously developed. Note that LEED 2009 projects have had the relevant definition updated by USGBC through a November 2011 addendum. Be sure to reference that definition, which is more specific, if it is applicable to your project.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Is your site “previously developed”? This credit is available only for projects on previously developed sites—those that have been graded or modified by human activity. 


  • Determine early on which of the two compliance paths is most feasible for your project. This will be determined by your project location. For projects that have the choice, Option 2 may be easier to document, although both options require developing a site plan and documenting the existing conditions of the surrounding area.

    • Option 1: Development Density is for project sites with a density of more than 60,000 square feet of built floor area per acre of land.
    • Option 2: Community Connectivity is for projects within a half-mile of a residential zone with an average density of 10 units per acre. 

  • It can be easier to earn this credit in a dense urban environment, but an average two-story downtown can also comply. Photo – YRG SustainabilityTypically, the requisite neighborhood density for Option 1 of 60,000 ft2 per acre can be met by two-story downtown development, or a denser area. The requirements for Option 2 can typically be met in a variety of settings, from dense urban areas to rural small towns with some density of services.


  • You can earn an Exemplary Performance point through this credit, but only through Option 1: Development Density. If you have some choice of which option to pursue, and the extra point is important, go for Option 1.


  • Weigh the pros and cons of locating a project in a dense urban area, as there may be trade-offs involved. For example, air quality and open space are two variables that could be compromised by locating a project in a dense urban area. However, LEED is generally oriented toward rewarding projects that locate in urban areas, particularly through SSc4.1 and other SS credits.


  • Careful site selection is crucial for obtaining this credit. Projects located in dense urban areas will qualify more easily, whereas projects located in rural or suburban areas, where densities are lower and development more spread out, may find this credit unattainable. 


  • Option 1: Development Density


  • Calculate the average neighborhood “built” density, with a target of 60,000 ft2 per acre, minimum, including your project building as well as surrounding buildings. Undeveloped public areas—including parks, water bodies, and public roadways—are not included in density calculations. 


  • All occupied buildings must be counted in the development density calculations. This would generally include conditioned spaces intended for occupancy, with an FTE above zero. Typical excluded spaces might be:

    • parking garages;
    • smoking pavilions;
    • and maintenance sheds not intended as workspaces. 

  • This approach is much easier to document if density information is accessible via a database of the built densities of all buildings in a neighborhood. Without such a resource, it can be hard to locate this information, and Option 2 may be preferable from a documentation standpoint. Obtaining this data can be a challenge if municipalities don’t provide a centralized database of building and property information for existing building stock—including lot area, building area, and number of residential units. Check with your local planning department or the regional, county, or state planning office GIS database. 


  • Locating your project next to a water body or park shouldn’t affect your density calculations, as undeveloped public areas, including parks and water bodies, are not factored into density calculations. 


  • Many urban sites are previously developed and may be brownfields. Investigate and address any contamination and remediation issues early in the planning process.  Doing so can contribute to earning SSc3


  • There may be a fee associated with obtaining data from a public agency’s GIS database. 


  • Option 2: Community Connectivity


  • Demonstrate that there is both:

    1. Pedestrian access to common services. Examples of basic services include: bank, church, school, grocery, laundry facilities, doctor’s office, and a post office. (See the list of common acceptable basic services in the credit language.)
    2. Proximity to a residential area within a one-half mile radius. The residential area must have an average density of 10 units per acre.

  • If a service is considered basic but not included in the list, attach a narrative explaining why you think this is acceptable or consult with GBCI. 


  • The one-half mile radius is drawn from the main building entrance. 


  • Documenting this option is easier than documenting Option 1, as there is little data collection involved, and usually no calculations to perform (unless there is no other documentation available and you have to calculate the housing density to make sure it is at least 10 units per acre). 


  • There may be costs associated with developing a site in an urban setting (due to aspects such as site constraints and brownfield remediation), although there can also be savings due to reduced need to install infrastructure.


  • Building within an existing urban fabric adds significant benefits for users, including lower transportation costs and healthier lifestyle. Employers may find that this helps attract and retain personnel.


  • To check your project’s eligibility to pursue this option, draw a circle with a one-half-mile radius centered on your project’s main entrance. If there is a qualifying residential development, and at least ten basic services, within the circle, your project is eligible to pursue this path. 


  • There must be pedestrian access to the basic services. Pedestrians cannot be blocked by walls, highways or other permanent barriers. 


  • To find the density of residential buildings near your project, check with sources like planning departments, or property management companies on a building by building basis. 


  • For mixed-use projects, one service located within the project boundary may be counted towards the credit calculation, and that service must be accessible to the general public. For example, if your project is an office complex with a coffee shop and dry cleaners—and they are accessible to the general public—one of these two can count as one of the ten required basic services.


  • At least eight of the ten required services must be operational at the time of project completion. For services that are nonexistent but proposed (up to two of the ten required services), the project team must demonstrate that they will be up and running within one year of occupancy. This can be documented by signed lease agreements or a letter from the developer or owner stating the scheduled opening of the service 


  • Access to services can attract more building occupants and improve occupant satisfaction with any project type—resulting in better financials and productivity. 

Schematic Design

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  • Complete density or community connectivity calculations relevant to Options 1 or 2 below.


  • These tasks could be completed in schematic design, design development or at 100% CDs. What is critical is to have the project square footage and site area set prior to performing final calculations. 


  • Option 1: Development Density


  • Your project area must be defined consistently throughout all LEED credits (per the project description). Make sure this is the case, especially if your project is part of a larger development, such as a campus. 


  • Check that your project can comply, using these three steps:

    1. Divide the total project square footage by the total site area in acres. (The minimum density required by this credit is 60,000 ft2 per acre). 
    2. Convert the total site area in acres to square feet (acres X 43,560 square feet) and find the square root of this number. Then multiply the result by 3 to determine the appropriate density radius in feet. Density Radius = 3 x √ [site area in acres x 43,560 ft2/acre].
    3. Define a circle based on the density radius to serve as the density boundary. Add the square footage of all buildings within the boundary and divide by the total area of all sites in the density boundary in acres. Include both the entire floor area and entire site area for all properties within and intersected by the density boundary (i.e., where the radius boundary intersects a building, even if only partially). Be sure to include your project site as well. Parks and water bodies can be excluded from the density boundary area. 

  • The calculator within LEED Online computes the density radius as well as the average density by summing up the building square footages and the site areas in acres. 


  • Confirm that the average density of your project is at least 60,000 ft2 per acre.


  • Per CIR 9/22/06, you can document Exemplary Performance as part of IDc1 through Option 1: Development Density using one of the following methods: 

    1. Document that your project has twice the density of the average surrounding neighborhood within the established density boundary area. 
    2. Demonstrate that the average density in an area twice as large as the density boundary is at least 120,000 ft2 per acre. Establish the expanded density boundary by doubling the size of your site area and redoing the square root calculation. 

  • Option 2: Community Connectivity


  • Use online mapping resources such as Google Earth to draw a one-half mile radius from the project building entrance. Your project must be within one-half mile of a residential development with a density of at least ten units per acre, net, as well as within one-half mile of ten basic services. 


  • For projects with more than one main entrance or more than one building, you may draw a circle from more than one entrance. The area contained within the circles drawn from all these radii is then used as your project’s radius.


  • Identify at least one residential development that meets the requirement within the defined boundary. (This could be one apartment building containing ten units.)


  • If you determine that your project is eligible for this credit option, develop a list of all the services within that half-mile radius (or several half-mile radii), and their distance from the project site. 


  • All the services must be accessible by foot via an uninterrupted, safe path stretching from the designated entrance to the service location. The path cannot cross a highway, for example, unless there is a pedestrian pathway. 


  • For onsite services or those within a half-mile, you can count up to two restaurants in the list of ten community services, but no other service can be counted twice. For example, if there are three restaurants, two hair salons, and four dry cleaners within your radius, you can count two restaurants, one salon and one dry cleaner. 


  • If any of the ten services are nonexistent but planned, you must obtain written documentation that these services will be operational by the time the occupants move into your building. Appropriate documentation includes a lease agreement or a letter from the owner or other responsible party. Only two unbuilt but planned services can be counted in your credit documentation.


  • Websites like Walkscore and Google Maps can provide locations of services and walking access from a given address. (See Resources.) Note, however, that resources like these contain limitations that may not match up with LEED requirements (Walkscore, for example, assumes that you can walk across water, if that's the most direct route.) Use them as a starting point to identify services and approximate distances, but be sure to make adjustments as needed.

Design Development

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  • Check that no changes are made to the design that might hurt your chances of earning the credit.


  • If your project site is located in a dense urban area where pollution is a concern, design your building to minimize potential air quality problems. Place outdoor air intakes away from sources of pollution as much as possible. Consider acoustics and other issues that might be associated with urban environments.

Construction Documents

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  • Complete the LEED Online credit form and prepare the following documents to show credit compliance, according to your chosen option. The LEED Reference Guide also offers good process guidance and sample documentation for this credit. 


  • For both options, a licensed professional (PE, RA, or RLA) can sign off on the credit in lieu of entering all the calculations. The professional whose license is on the line will likely want to confirm all the calculations anyway, and the credit form offers a good way to do that.


  • Option 1: Development Density


  • Provide a site-vicinity map, to scale, showing the project site and the one-half mile boundary from the project’s main entrance. Highlight the residential development and ten services within the boundary. 




  • Compile a list of all buildings that are within or are intersected by your density boundary, with square footages and site areas for each property. Highlight the results of your calculations and confirm that your project meets the credit requirement. 


  • Option 2: Community Connectivity


  • Provide a site-vicinity map, to scale, showing the project site and the one-half mile boundary from the project’s main entrance. Highlight the residential development and ten services within the boundary. 




  • Demonstrate through an online tool, picture, or site plan that ten services are accessible by foot from the project site. 


  • Compile a list of services for easy review, and confirm that the credit requirement is met. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    SS Credit 2: Development density and community connectivity

    5 Points

    Intent

    To channel development to urban areas with existing infrastructure, protect greenfields and preserve habitat and natural resources.

    Requirements

    Option 1: Development density

    Construct or renovate a building on a previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development." site AND in a community with a minimum density of 60,000 square feet per acre net (13,800 square meters per hectare net). The density calculation is based on a typical two-story downtown development and must include the area of the project being built.

    OR

    Option 2: Community connectivity

    Construct or renovate a building on a site that meets the following criteria:

    • Is located on a previously developed site
    • Is within 1/2 mile of a residential area or neighborhood with an average density of 10 units per acre net
    • Is within 1/2 mile of at least 10 basic services
    • Has pedestrian access between the building and the services

    For mixed-use projects, no more than 1 service within the project boundary may be counted as 1 of the 10 basic services, provided it is open to the public. No more than 2 of the 10 services required may be anticipated (i.e. at least 8 must be existing and operational). In addition, the anticipated services must demonstrate that they will be operational in the locations indicated within 1 year of occupation of the applicant project. Examples of basic services include the following:

    • Bank
    • Place of Worship
    • Convenience Grocery
    • Day Care Center
    • Cleaners
    • Fire Station
    • Beauty Salon
    • Hardware
    • Laundry
    • Library
    • Medical or Dental Office
    • Senior Care Facility
    • Park
    • Pharmacy
    • Post Office
    • Restaurant
    • School
    • Supermarket
    • Theater
    • Community Center
    • Fitness Center
    • Museum

    Proximity is determined by drawing a 1/2-mile radius around a main building entrance on a site map and counting the services within that radius.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Streamlined path available

    Achievement of this credit can be documented via a LEED ND v2009 submittal. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    During the site selection process, give preference to urban sites with pedestrian access to a variety of services.

     

Web Tools

Google Maps

For locating community services on a map in relation to project site.


NYC online map portal

For building information in the City of New York; useful for calculating density and identifying residential developments. 


Google Earth

Great resource for creating site maps and measuring distances.


Walk score

This online tools provides “as-the-crow-flies” distance to typical standard services from a given address, so it is most helpful to identify the location of basic services that are in close proximity, but shouldn’t be used to document walking distances. 

Community Services

Option 2: Community Connectivity

Compile a list of qualifying community services and residential neighborhoods, and their proximity to your project using a template like this one (with example shown).

Community Connectivity Narrative

Option 2: Community Connectivity

Use a narrative like the one illustrated in this example to demonstrate compliance with this option. This sample narrative provides sample language for planned community services, in addition to existing ones.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

Development Density Calculations

Option 1: Development Density

Calculations like these are needed to demonstrate the required development density for your site.

Planned Community Services

Option 2: Community Connectivity

Use a narrative like this to discuss use of services that are planned but not built to meet Option 2. As many as two of 10 services may be planned.

Development Density Calculator and Map Tool

Option 1: Development Density

Use this spreadsheet to check your compiance with this credit, including Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. compliance, and generate a map for documenting compliance in LEED Online.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 SS

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

281 Comments

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Susan Di Giulio Project Manager Zinner Consultants
Jan 22 2016
LEEDuser Member
1641 Thumbs Up

Very high density in a rapidly developing area

Project Location: United States

Hi,

Our project is a campus filling a city block across the street from the premier sports stadium, a huge entertainment complex and a convention center in major US city. Not surprisingly, everything in the neighborhood is being developed to a similar density (over 300,000 SF/Acre).

However, at the moment, none of the new projects are completed, and Google Earth shows a lot of mud and surface parking.

We would like to earn SSc2 as a campus credit and go for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. as well.

2 Questions:

For projects that are approximately on our time line, it seems legitimate to use the density of the projects as they will be when completed, not as vacant. Correct?

2. Due to the size of the project, the density radius for the basic credit itself is 1340 ft; for EP it's over 1900 ft. This means we have literally several hundred individual properties to account for, and it is really burning hours (without making our planet any healthier). Is it possible to go by block, where there is pretty much a uniform number of stories; perhaps subtracting 20% for alleys? There is an average of 8-12 buildings per bock on the already-developed tracts, so that would make our work much faster.

Thanks! .

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Consultant, Integral Group Jan 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70 Thumbs Up

Susan, I replied earlier but somehow it didn't go through. For your first question, I would assume this is reasonable. How far apart do you think the completion dates will be? Is it all one phase or one contract - perhaps that could help support your case. Regarding your second question, this seems reasonable to me but I don't have direct experience with this approach. I would recommend clearly guiding the reviewers through your thought process to support your compliance path. Since it is a very dense area, I'd imagine it'll be pretty obvious you meet.

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Dave L
Jan 22 2016
Guest
7 Thumbs Up

Size of map

Project Location: United States

I have a project in which I need to “provide a revised map that highlights the existing residential area and density. The residential area must be existing and feature a net density of at least ten dwelling units per acre.” If you have had this comment before, what size must this map be — how many acres, square miles, what radius, etc.?

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Consultant, Integral Group Jan 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70 Thumbs Up

Hi Dave, do you have any apartment complexes nearby? This is a sure-fire compliant path. If not, I've had luck using Google maps to calculate out an acre, then count out the 10 residential units within that space for my documentation. It's a quick and easy way to show compliance.

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Dave L Jan 26 2016 Guest 7 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Marilyn. There are many apartment complexes nearby and will definitely point at least one out this time around.

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Annalise Reichert Project Manager stok
Jan 22 2016
LEEDuser Member
296 Thumbs Up

Basic Services within Hotel Project

I am working on a Hotel that has a laundry facility on-site for guest use, and also offers valet dry-cleaning services and grocery shopping services for guests. Am I able to count any of these towards the basic services for the hotel?

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Consultant, Integral Group Jan 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70 Thumbs Up

Hi Annalise! You can count one basic service within your project as long as it is open to the public, which it sounds like these may not comply.

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Lucas Bizelli Civil Engineer Sustentech
Jan 22 2016
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

Beach as a basic service

Project Location: Brazil

We have a project in Rio de Janeiro that is near to the beach (between 1/2 mile). Can I count the beach as a basic service?

There are lots of futball, volleyball court and also fitness equipment in this beach.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 22 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Lucas, if the fitness equipment is permanently installed I think you could claim this. My recommendation is to call it a "fitness center" on your LEED Online form, and then note somewhere that it is equipment installed open-air on the beach.

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Susan Di Giulio Project Manager, Zinner Consultants Jan 22 2016 LEEDuser Member 1641 Thumbs Up

Or call it a park. And a restaurant. Viva a cidade maravilhosa!

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater: EDGE Auditor Revitaliza Consultores
Jan 18 2016
Guest
1196 Thumbs Up

Exchange Office

Does anyone have experience documenting an exchange office as a bank for the purposes of this credit?
Thanks in advance!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 22 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Gustavo, I don't have experience but I am doubtful this would work as an exchange doesn't offer the same degree of services as even a brank branch office.

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Robert Hink Principal, LEED Faculty The Spinnaker Group
Jan 11 2016
LEEDuser Member
756 Thumbs Up

can hotels be included as 10 unit per acre requirement

I'm working on a very suburban site and was wondering if I can include a hotel as part of the minimum 10 unit per acre requirement?

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Consultant, Integral Group Jan 12 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70 Thumbs Up

Hi Robert, I don't know for sure but my gut says hotels cannot count. If you reference the definition of "residential area" at the end of the SSc2 section in the reference guide, it mentions single family, multifamily homes, townhomes, apartments, duplexes, condos, or mobile homes. The interpretation of the credit is also to encourage development in urban areas so it sounds like your project might not meet this credit.

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Rachel Weber
Nov 11 2015
Guest
3 Thumbs Up

Future Pedestrian Access

Project Location: United States

We have a project that will meet SS2 once pedestrian access is available. Do you know if it is adequate to show the sidewalk is in the county's budget? If it needs to be constructed, we may miss the 2 year window after substantial completion. Thanks for your help.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Rachel, where are you seeing a 2-year window? Off the top of my head I am only thinking of the one-year window for adding a service.

This sounds iffy to me overall.

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Greg Snow Gibbons Snow Architects Inc.
Sep 29 2015
LEEDuser Member
35 Thumbs Up

SSc2 Development Density and Community Connectivity

Project Location: Grenada

My project is located in a hospital campus and I am targeting this credit for 5 points; 3 for community connectivity and 2 for development density. The project gross area is 5600 m2 on the campus site and there is no parking within LEED boundary.
My questions is that how can I determine the development density for the surrounding buildings if there is no exact site boundary?
As for my project, I will use the LEED boundary as project site to find the development density to achieve the density 2 points .

I wonder if doing the right thing? I kindly ask for your advise in this regard.

Thanks

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Saurabh Shrestha HKS Inc. Oct 09 2015 LEEDuser Member 62 Thumbs Up

Hi Greg,

I am afraid you are not allowed to pursue partial points under this credit. You will have to choose one of the two options for 5 points. Does your project meet the requirements for Options 2: Community Connectivity? If so, you wouldn't have to worry about the site areas and the development density.

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Greg Snow Gibbons Snow Architects Inc. Oct 09 2015 LEEDuser Member 35 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the comment.
Yes- The project meets the criteria of option 2 Community Connectivity but I wanted to pursue additional 2 points by pursuing option 3 Community Connectivity with density. (CANDA LEED). How can I calculate the density for the campus building. Will the same density rules apply for the campus? Is a letter from Campus planning department sufficient to say that the density of the LEED building is 13800 m2 /hectare?

Please advise

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Saurabh Shrestha HKS Inc. Oct 12 2015 LEEDuser Member 62 Thumbs Up

Hi Greg,

Thanks for clarifying that you are pursuing LEED Canada. I'd imagine the same rules will apply. But I will not be able to advise you because I do not have any experience with LEED Canada. Maybe someone else can chime in.

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Michael Wahjudi ESD Consultant Kaer Pte Ltd
Sep 24 2015
Guest
84 Thumbs Up

ATM and Driving School

Project Location: Singapore

Hi all, need to get some guidance here. Can ATM considered as "bank"? Since the ATM is having full capability of banking services, except opening bank account. Additionally, can driving school considered as "school"? The driving school also having standard services like canteen, etc that can be used by pedestrian.

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Michelle Schwarting Robinson Re:Vision Architecture Sep 25 2015 LEEDuser Member 1236 Thumbs Up

In LEED v4 ATMs are specifically excluded ("It does not include automated facilities such as ATMs, vending machines, and touchscreens.") so I wouldn't count on it, but it doesn't hurt to try...

I would expect a driving school would NOT be accepted since it's a car-related service, and I think they're trying to discourage car usage...

So all in all I'd say both will unlikely be accepted, but you might as well try submitting it anyway and see what happens! Just don't count on definitely achieving the credit...

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Michael Wahjudi ESD Consultant, Kaer Pte Ltd Sep 28 2015 Guest 84 Thumbs Up

Thanks Michelle for sharing your view..
Any opinion whether Western Union can be considered as "bank"? Since we can make account on the Western Union.
How about training center? Can we considered as "school"?

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Michelle Schwarting Robinson Re:Vision Architecture Sep 28 2015 LEEDuser Member 1236 Thumbs Up

I think your chances are definitely a lot higher with those two options, but still no guarantee. Definitely submit it, though, and see what happens!

Just beware, though. Is the Western Union inside another location (ex. in the grocery store)? If so, you'll have to choose which one you want to count because you can't count that one location for both items.

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Michael Wahjudi ESD Consultant Kaer Pte Ltd
Aug 14 2015
Guest
84 Thumbs Up

Site Surrounding that Partially Developed

Project Location: Singapore

Our project is located at site that the surrounding site partially already developed and able to meet the development density requirement. There are some part of surrounding site that will be developed in future (only graded site for now and will not be developed for public areas). Can I exclude the part of surrounding site that will be developed in future? Since the floor area for the buildings are unknown for this moment.

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Consultant, Integral Group Jan 12 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70 Thumbs Up

Hi Michael, I'm not exactly sure what you're asking. Are you trying to exclude the surrounding site from Option 1 calculations? If you don't know the floor areas of the building, I would either wait until you know or try to comply via Option 2.

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Michael Wahjudi ESD Consultant, Kaer Pte Ltd Jan 12 2016 Guest 84 Thumbs Up

Hi Marylin, Yes, we are planning to exclude some part of the surrounding that unknown for the building floor area. Since the development will be completed for the next 5 or 10 years, hence our submittal timeline will not be able to wait until the floor areas will be know. We will try to pursue under Option 2.

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Consultant, Integral Group Jan 12 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70 Thumbs Up

Yes, I would look at Option 2 and see if that's an option for your project.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional JLL
Jul 20 2015
Guest
6038 Thumbs Up

Laundromat vs. Central laundry in a building

Have you ever taken credit for laundry facilities in a condo or dormitory? Isn't this essentially a Laundromat/ more convenient than a Laundromat?

I am not talking about a condo with a laundry machine in every unit but the central laundry facilities with coin operated machines.

Any insight would be appreciated. I might be overthinking it. :)

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Paul Desmond OPN Architects, Inc. Sep 09 2015 Guest 4 Thumbs Up

Within the credit, the service may be located within the building, however, the service within the building MUST be open to the public.

Hope this helps :)

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C GREENSQUARE
Jul 18 2015
LEEDuser Expert
4115 Thumbs Up

Where is the center of the ½-mile radius?

Under the “Bird’s Eye View” tab above, in response to the FAQ, “Where do I draw the radius from?” it says, “Use the center of the LEED project boundary.” This same advice is in the LEEDuser “Missing Manual” and on the LEEDuser Tipsheet “How to Document SSc2 with Map Data” for both SSc2 Options 1 & 2 (see http://www.leeduser.com/strategy/how-document-ssc2-map-data). However, this response appears to be at odds with the LEED Reference Guide and other LEED guidance publications.

The LEEDv2009-BD+C Reference Guide does say that the Density radius for Option 1 should originate “from the center of the LEED project site.” However, for the ½-mile Connectivity radius for Option 2, the Guide says to draw the radius “around the main building entrance.” It goes on to say, “Radii may be drawn around multiple entrances for projects with multiple buildings or more than 1 main entrance. The combination of the areas in these radii would then be considered the project radius.”

I have not found any LEED Interpretations or Addenda that revise the Reference Guide’s instructions. (LEEDv4’s version of this credit even sets the center point at the building entrance.) Has there been a change that I have missed?

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Whysal Haddad
Apr 27 2015
Guest
25 Thumbs Up

Exemplary performance for SSc2 in LEED v.2

I have a project with a Project Development Density = 298,419 Sf/acre and after the calculations the Average Neighborhood Development Density = 249,458 Sf/acres.
I want to pursue the exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. ID credit however I am confused by the calculations needed, do I have to double the area and use equation 2 then use the new radius to locate all building within the new radius and after use equation 3 to calculate the new Average Neighborhood Development Density for option 2 ?

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deborah lucking associate, fentress architects May 13 2015 LEEDuser Member 2108 Thumbs Up

Whysal, which version of LEED are you referring to - LEED v2.2. or LEED 2009?

For LEED 2009, (from the LEEDuser Bird's Eye View above) Projects can earn an Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point through IDc1 if they meet Option 1’s requirements and are themselves twice as dense as the surrounding area, or can show that the surrounding area has double the required Option 1 density over twice the area.

It appears that your project alone is more than twice the 60,000 SF/acre, so that should suffice for the Exemplary Point.

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Whysal Haddad May 14 2015 Guest 25 Thumbs Up

Hello Deborah
We are using LEED V2.2, I have pursued the ID credit but the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). needs the calculation showing the compliance, I have referred the credit to SSc2 but they still request to show compliance by calculation.
I would like to have a sample calculation of the exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. for the ID SSc2 .

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Michelle Schwarting Robinson Re:Vision Architecture May 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 1236 Thumbs Up

Yes, Whysal, your explanation of what you have to do for calculations as described in your original question is correct. (Double your project's site area to calculate the new revised Density Radius as you described.)

The requirements are explained in these two LEED Interpretations for reference:
http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=1536
http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=5004

In terms of documentation we typically show a neighborhood plan with two radii -- one for the original SSc2 calculations and a second radius for the Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. level's Density Radius. (And we typically show the math as to how both of those distances were calculated.) Then we have a spreadsheet with each property address, building space, and site area -- highlighting the ones that only contribute to the Exemplary Performance calculations and not to the original SSc2 calculations. Basically this does the same thing as the sample area plan and sample area properties table that are shown in the LEED Ref. Guide.
(There are actual examples in LEED User, but you have to be a paid Member to access them under the Documentation Toolkit tab.)

Does that answer your question?

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Bouygues Sustainability Sustainability Manager Bouygues Bâtiment International
Apr 07 2015
LEEDuser Member
6 Thumbs Up

NC-2009 SSc2: Development Density and Community Connectivity

Project Location: Cuba

Hi everyone,
We are certifying a Hotel. I want to know if we can count in this credit Option 2 the services offered by the hotel.
Txs

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Michelle Schwarting Robinson Re:Vision Architecture Apr 08 2015 LEEDuser Member 1236 Thumbs Up

There's a limit of how many of the services can be within the LEED project itself, namely only 1 service can be counted.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, JLL Jul 20 2015 Guest 6038 Thumbs Up

I had a library project and attempted to claim it under this credit and received this comment:

the library "which is the same building that is being certified, is listed on the form and should not be counted as one of the ten basic services"

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Michelle DiPenti Project Coordinator HDR, Inc.
Mar 16 2015
LEEDuser Member
121 Thumbs Up

Residential Units - Retirement Community

Has anyone used a retirement community (condos) to meet the 10 units/acre requirement? It's not a nursing home and there are no age requirements to buy a condo. I haven't (yet) looked into the age requirements to reside there...
Thank you!

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Ellen Mitchell Director of Sustainability, HKS, Inc. Mar 16 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4851 Thumbs Up

I don't see why it would not count toward your residential density requirements.

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KC Rat ESG
Mar 11 2015
Guest
551 Thumbs Up

Basic Services Provided by the Client

Project Location: Pakistan

We have purchased an old factory and currently renovating the buildings to accommodate 2,000 workers. This was an abandoned place and no basic services available.
The developer agrees to construct and provide 10 basic services close to the main entrance and these services would be available to outsiders as well.
Would this be accepted by LEED?

Regards,
KC

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Michelle Schwarting Robinson Re:Vision Architecture Mar 11 2015 LEEDuser Member 1236 Thumbs Up

Are these 10 services within the project itself or would they be separate facilities not part of this project? There' a limit of how many of the services can be within the project itself (only 1).

Otherwise, when would the developer have these services up and running, because at least eight have to be up and running by the time the LEED project is competed. (The other two are allowed to be anticipated within a year of the LEED Project's opening.)

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KC Rat ESG Mar 12 2015 Guest 551 Thumbs Up

Hi Michelle,
These 10 services would be located within the owners property; but outside the LEED Boundary of this LEED-NC building. These services would be ready by the completion of the project.

KC

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Michelle Schwarting Robinson Re:Vision Architecture Mar 12 2015 LEEDuser Member 1236 Thumbs Up

If all 10 services are outside your LEED project and will be up and running by the time your LEED project is completed, then they should be fine! (Assuming of course they are within the distance requirement and you can walk to get there...)

Just don't forget about the residential requirement (min. equivalent of 10 units per acre).

Good luck!

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patricia vasconcellos creato consultoria e projetos ltda
Feb 26 2015
Guest
26 Thumbs Up

government areas

Project Location: Brazil

I have a project that is in a government area. A region of the city that has been set aside to house all the public departments. This area has different urban characteristics and for this reason, all buildings are low and we focused on the gap between the buildings for coexistence of users. We are trying Ssc2-Density Development credit but did not get the density of the community of 60,000 square feet of floor area per acre or more. It is possible to apply for credit claiming this differentiated feature region?

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Ellen Mitchell Director of Sustainability, HKS, Inc. Feb 27 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4851 Thumbs Up

I am not aware of any allowances or deviations for this credit. Typically, the USGBC response is that not all credits are appropriate for all project types.

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Marcio Alberto Casado Pereira
Feb 12 2015
Guest
4429 Thumbs Up

Services inside a mall would do?

Project Location: Brazil

We have a project built right next to a shopping center. The shoppping center has more than the 10 basic services inside. WoIuld those 10 sevices qualify? Or is the fact that they are all inside of the shopping center is a problem?
There are probably 3 basics services outside of the mall too.

Thanks for any help!

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Feb 26 2015 LEEDuser Member 1429 Thumbs Up

Hi Marcio,
There is no requirement for the services to be distributed or spread out in a certain way within the radius. I don't see any reason to worry as long as the services are available to the public and represent the required number of categories. Also, as long as the hours of operation are reasonable.

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E H Sustainability Architect Feb 26 2015 Guest 3903 Thumbs Up

Marcio - all the services can be in one location. Your mall would qualify.

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Michelle Schwarting Robinson Re:Vision Architecture Mar 02 2015 LEEDuser Member 1236 Thumbs Up

FYI - the Preliminary Review Comment (from July 2013) for an addition (to be certified) to a large existing hospital (not certified) said:
"[Some] of the basic services noted on the Community Connectivity Plan are within the existing, adjacent hospital. In buildings that offer multiple services, only one service may contribute to credit compliance. Multiple services may contribute if they are a different service type, have a party wall and are distinctly different business enterprises."

So if your services in the shopping center have
1) "different service types" AND
2) "party walls" AND
3) are "distinctly different business enterprises"
then you should be fine.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner ArchEcology, LLC
Feb 03 2015
LEEDuser Member
7412 Thumbs Up

Density Calc which includes Marinas

Our high rise apartment building is located in a fairly dense urban area. The project team felt pretty confident that we could make ID level density. However, our site is proximate to coastline such that several marina moorage properties fall within the density radius. These properties are large SF with obviously no buildings on them. No building could ever actually occur, but they are parcels with SF that are identified in the County Assessor maps. Are we obliged to treat these parcels like parking lots and include them?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Michelle, are the properties over water? I think you could make a case for excluding them. I would check with GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)., or minimally, include a short narrative describing your approach.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Member 7412 Thumbs Up

I'll give it a shot. Thanks, Tristan.

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Qiongwen Kong Intern Architect, COOPER CARRY Apr 12 2016 LEEDuser Member 3 Thumbs Up

Michelle, undeveloped public areas, such as parks and water bodies can be excluded from this calculation; public roads and right-of-way areas are excluded as well.

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R W
Dec 17 2014
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

Auto Service/Repair

Would an auto service/repair business count as a basic service?
What about a place that sells landscaping materials?
Insurance Brokers?
Skatepark?

Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 18 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

R W, this question has been asked a lot about various specific "services." I would recommend referencing the FAQs above.

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Michelle Schwarting Robinson Re:Vision Architecture Dec 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 1236 Thumbs Up

Whatever you're submitting pretty much has to fit in one of the categories listed in the credit. So which category could you put any of those in to?

You might have a chance with the Skatepark, which you might be able to categorize as a "Park" -- unless it's indoors, in which case you might be able to try it as a "Fitness Center" or maybe as a "Community Center" although it's probably a stretch...

Does the Landscaping Materials place sell shovels, hoses, tools and things like that too or is it just plants? There is the "Hardware" category, but it's likely be a stretch...

You can always try submitting -- being sure the actual name is clear (i.e. "Skatepark (Service: Park)" and "Joe's Landscaping Supply (Service: Hardware)") so you're not lying to the LEED Reviewer and see what they think. If you need to you could also include a sentence or two (or a photo!) describing the amenity (Ex. The Skatepark includes multiple benches and paths to walk around outside of the skating area allowing people a place to walk or sit with interesting things to look at while out of harms way...) You might get lucky...

But I wouldn't even bother trying with the Insurance or Auto Repair.

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Maria Glädt White Arkitekter AB
Nov 20 2014
LEEDuser Member
70 Thumbs Up

Definition of greenfield site

Project Location: Sweden

Hi!

We have a site in Nairobi which we try to define as a greenfield or previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development." site. The site is 2km south from the City Center, on the Campus Area,between two residential areas, bordering the national park. There is no hard surfaces on the site, no roads, buildings or parking. The habitat is that of open grassland predominant with natural vegetation of grassland community with scattered saplings of bushes and small trees.
The area is not directly used by people, like a park or a urban forest, but seems not like "natural land" that never been affected by human activity at all.

We used the definitions of greenfield site and previously developed as:
- "Greenfield sites" are those that are not previously developed or graded and remain in a natural state. For projects outside the U.S. only: For the compliance path described by Case 1, rural landscapes are considered the same as greenfield sites. A rural landscape is a natural area modified by agro-forestry-pastoral activities, with environmental, aesthetic, cultural and historical values resulting from the interrelationship between its physical and biological aspects and traditional human activities.

- "Previously developed areas" are those that previously contained buildings, roadways, parking lots or were graded or altered by direct human activities.

The ecologist define the area as "greenfield site" and the local landscape architects define it as "previously developed".

What to do?

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Dec 26 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4115 Thumbs Up

Ulrika—I would ask your ecologist and your landscape architect both why each of them classified the site differently. Are they using the same definitions and criteria? Does either of them know something about the site’s history or ecology that has led them to opposite conclusions? If they work from the same definitions and information, their conclusions should agree.

Also, make sure that you are using the correct definitions for the version of LEED that you are using. The current “Global ACP” supplement for LEED-NC 2009 says to use the definitions from the LEED-2009 BD+C Reference Guide:
.. Greenfield sites are not previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development." or graded that could support open space, habitat, or agriculture.
.. Previously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprintThe development footprint is the total area of the building footprint and area affected by development or by project site activity. Hardscape, access roads, parking lots, nonbuilding facilities, and the building itself are all included in the development footprint. and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development. (http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?clearsmartf=true&keys=100001040)

The definitions that you cite appear to come from another version of LEED.

Finally, these same definitions apply to various LEED Credits. Make sure that you classify your site consistently across all credits.

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Jason Hercules Manager, LEED Department, U.S. Green Building Council Jan 15 2015 LEEDuser Member 26 Thumbs Up

Ulrika, from the description you've provided, it sounds as though the site would be considered a greenfield. Given the credit intent, the site description more closely aligns with that of a greenfield, since there doesn't seem to be any evidence of the site being altered to the extent that it would be considered previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development.".

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Alicia Silva CEO Revitaliza consultores
Oct 21 2014
LEEDuser Member
2055 Thumbs Up

Veterinary hospital

Does a veterinary hospital count towards this credit?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 11 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Alicia, I wouldn't think so. 

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E H Sustainability Architect
Aug 22 2014
Guest
3903 Thumbs Up

Pool?

Does a community pool count as a basic serivce? If yes, can it count as it's own category, or would it fall under "community center" or "fitness center"? (Our project already has community center and fitness center covered.)

Thanks!

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Michelle Schwarting Robinson Re:Vision Architecture Aug 23 2014 LEEDuser Member 1236 Thumbs Up

Unless you could justify putting it under the "park" category, I don't think you could count it as a basic service in addition to the community center and the fitness center. (You could still list it to show the LEED Reviewer you really have a lot of items, but I would number it with something higher than 10 so it doesn't get mixed in and call attention in a sentence or two that you have more than the required number of basic services.)

Alternatively, have you looked at pursuing the v4 version of the credit? LT Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses is listed on the "approved credit substitutions" (http://www.usgbc.org/articles/use-v4-credits-your-v2009-project).

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patricia vasconcellos creato consultoria e projetos ltda
Aug 11 2014
Guest
26 Thumbs Up

government administrative center.

My project is a government building, which is being built in an exclusively governmental area. only government buildings are constructed in this area. is a government administrative center.
there are no residential buildings around. still, I can get the credit?

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Trey Akers Aug 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 36 Thumbs Up

Hi Patricia,

Your project would be eligible to pursue this credit via Option 1 Development Density, which does not require a certain residential density. The Option 2 pathway, Community Connectivity, requires at least one neighborhood with at least 10 dwelling units per acre to be within a one-half mile radius of the project's main entrance.

Trey

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Stacey Olson Associate, LEED AP, ID+C, BD+C, CID Gensler
Jul 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
277 Thumbs Up

Walkability - Services AND housing, or Services only?

We have a project campus that is a quarter of a mile from a residential community, however a freeway prevents direct walkable access between the two.

We have access to over 10 basic services. Can we still qualify for this credit?

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Ellen Mitchell Director of Sustainability, HKS, Inc. Jul 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4851 Thumbs Up

If there is some sort of pedestrian access either over or under the freeway, then yes. Otherwise, no.

What kind of campus is this? If it is a university, I believe you can count dormitories as residential.

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Trey Akers Jul 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 36 Thumbs Up

Hi Stacey,

The pedestrian access stipulation applies only to the basic services component of the credit. Pedestrian access to the residential area is not required to meet the SSc2 Option 2 requirements; the residential area must only be within a 0.5 mi. radius. As Ellen notes, if this a campus that features student housing, then the dormitories may be utilized to demonstrate compliance (assuming they are 10 du/ac).

Lastly, your comment mentions that the project features access to at least 10 basic services. Given that this is a campus setting, please note that in order to meet the Option 2 intent the basic services must be open to the public - the services cannot be restricted to campus occupants only.

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Stacey Olson Associate, LEED AP, ID+C, BD+C, CID, Gensler Jul 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 277 Thumbs Up

It is a technology business headquarters, not related to a university campus. Thanks for your response!

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