NC-2009 SSc2: Development Density and Community Connectivity

  • NC_CS_SSc2_Type3_Density Diagram
  • Easier for dense urban sites

    This credit addresses two basic issues: density of the surrounding neighborhood and occupant access to everyday services. It encourages use of existing infrastructure and tries to reduce environmental impacts of transportation. It’s easier for projects located in a densely built area or with a host of community services nearby.

    This credit is not likely to drive the project location decision, but it does reward projects for locating in developed areas and for choosing infill instead of greenfield sites (you can’t earn the credit on a site that is not previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development."). In determining how easily your project can comply, site selection is one key factor, but so is the availability of property and building data.

    Two compliance options

    There are two compliance options for this credit. Unless you are in a dense urban neighborhood where either option is possible, your choice will probably be determined by the specifics of your project.

    • Option 1: Development Density requires the density of the community to be 60,000 square feet of floor area per acre or more. This is a typical density for a two-story downtown development.
    • Option 2: Community Connectivity requires connections to neighborhood services as well as to housing with at least 10 units per acre. This option could apply to a variety of settings, from urban areas to rural small towns with a density of services.

    Documentation is key

    Project teams should assess early in the planning stage which path is most suitable based on project location and the availability of density data. The owner, architect or civil engineer often take on the role of documenting this credit—either researching community services in the project’s vicinity, or documenting the density of the project and surrounding area.

    Community Connectivity is generally easier to document than Option 1. Image Courtesy YRG SustainabilityThe size of the area that has to be included in the Option 1 calculation depends on the size of your project site.

    Projects can earn an Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point through IDc1 if they meet Option 1’s requirements and are themselves twice as dense as the surrounding area, or can show that the surrounding area has double the required Option 1 density over twice the area.

    Eight of the ten services for Option 2 have to be existing and in operation at the time of the project opening. Two services can be anticipated within a year of opening. One service can be within the project itself.

    Differences between NC v2.2 and NC 2009

    The credit requirements for v2.2 and v2009 are exactly the same, However, the specifics of what can qualify as a basic service are further defined and outlined in v2009.

    For v2.2, basic services that are in construction by project completion can contribute to the credit requirements. For v2009, these basic services must be in operation. Additionally, for mixed-use projects, under v2.2 no basic services that are part of your project can contribute to the credit requirements. In v2009, one service can be within the project itself. 

  • FAQs for SSc2

    What exactly does LEED mean by residential neighborhood or area?

    LEED defines residential neighborhood or area as a minimum of 10 living units (i.e. an apartment unit or house) per acre. Apartment buildings, neighborhoods, or dormitories can all contribute to this.

    Only a portion of my complying residential development lies within the ½-mile radius. Will this suffice for credit compliance?

    It can be easier to earn this credit in a dense urban environment, but an average two story downtown can also comply. Photo – YRG SustainabilityIn LEEDuser's experience, if a residential development of 10 units/acre lies within a portion of the ½-mile radius, it likely will contribute to credit compliance. This is consistent with LEED Reference Guide guidance that states, "Mark all residential developments within the radius. For the project to earn this credit, a residential area with a minimum density of 10 units per acre must be present within the radius."

    Where do I draw the radius from?

    Use the center of the LEED project boundary.

    Is one building or residential area enough to satisfy the residential density requirement?

    Yes, LEED user’s experts have had success with documenting a single property that is at least 10 units/net acre density. Any discrete area that addresses the requirements is acceptable, and an existing residential area meeting the requirements may cross property lines between different properties. For projects with residential areas that are on the cusp (or perceived as being on the cusp) of meeting the required density, you may need to provide additional documentation or an explanation as to how the residential area meets at least 10 units/net acre. Finally, it is not sufficient for the area to be zoned to the correct density, if it is not built to it.

    My project has access to services that seem to be basic, but are not listed in the LEED Reference Guide—like insurance company, nail salon, auto repair shop. Will these count?

    Probably not. Project teams need to be careful when trying to pass off services not explicitly given in the LEED credit language. In most cases services not listed will not be approved. Review the credit intent and think about whether the additional services—in the absence of other basic services—are pedestrian-oriented and encourage walkable neighborhoods. However, some projects have had success in specific cases, such as a hotel being considered as a basic service for an office space with frequent contractors visiting. A CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide is probably needed to get approval for special cases like this.

    Also, to reduce confusion during a review while maintaining honesty, be careful to label your services to be consistent with the credit language list. For example, a "nail/hair salon/barber shop" should be categorized as a "beauty salon." If a gas station contains a full-service, stand-alone convenience grocery store (e.g. 7-Eleven) and credit is sought for grocery store use, label it as "convenience grocery" rather than a "gas station."

    My project is on a base or campus where some services are available to the population of the project, but not the general public. Do these count?

    Maybe. Language in the Reference Guide is not crystal clear on this point, and some comments from project teams indicate that campus projects should demonstrate that services are open to the public. For LEED documentation purposes, LEEDuser recommends avoiding relying on such services, or seeing a CIR to be sure of your approach.

    LEEDuser has seen reports of review comments questioning the inclusion of services on a military base or other installation that are not open to the general public, even if they are open to anyone within the radius. On the other hand, one project team reported success with a military base where access to the base was restricted to the public, and services on the base were open to anyone on the base.

    For Option 2, does the residential neighborhood with average density of 10 units per net acre have to be existing, or can planned neighborhoods count towards earning this option?

    The SSc2 Option 2 residential requirements for NCv2.2 and NC 2009 are for projects to locate in an area within one-half mile of an existing, not planned, residential district featuring a density of at least 10 units/acre. Projects should not depend upon planned residential areas for credit compliance, as this does not represent existing infrastructure in most cases. Projects not meeting these requirements but believing they meet the credit intent will be considered on a case-by-case basis and must submit a project-specific CIR to determine their compliance potential.

    What site area should be used for an interiors project when figuring out the density radius? The building site area, or building footprint?

    All projects use the building site area for the density radius calculation.

    Is my site previously developed?

    Many projects have had questions about the definition of previously developed. Note that LEED 2009 projects have had the relevant definition updated by USGBC through a November 2011 addendum. Be sure to reference that definition, which is more specific, if it is applicable to your project.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Is your site “previously developed”? This credit is available only for projects on previously developed sites—those that have been graded or modified by human activity. 


  • Determine early on which of the two compliance paths is most feasible for your project. This will be determined by your project location. For projects that have the choice, Option 2 may be easier to document, although both options require developing a site plan and documenting the existing conditions of the surrounding area.

    • Option 1: Development Density is for project sites with a density of more than 60,000 square feet of built floor area per acre of land.
    • Option 2: Community Connectivity is for projects within a half-mile of a residential zone with an average density of 10 units per acre. 

  • It can be easier to earn this credit in a dense urban environment, but an average two-story downtown can also comply. Photo – YRG SustainabilityTypically, the requisite neighborhood density for Option 1 of 60,000 ft2 per acre can be met by two-story downtown development, or a denser area. The requirements for Option 2 can typically be met in a variety of settings, from dense urban areas to rural small towns with some density of services.


  • You can earn an Exemplary Performance point through this credit, but only through Option 1: Development Density. If you have some choice of which option to pursue, and the extra point is important, go for Option 1.


  • Weigh the pros and cons of locating a project in a dense urban area, as there may be trade-offs involved. For example, air quality and open space are two variables that could be compromised by locating a project in a dense urban area. However, LEED is generally oriented toward rewarding projects that locate in urban areas, particularly through SSc4.1 and other SS credits.


  • Careful site selection is crucial for obtaining this credit. Projects located in dense urban areas will qualify more easily, whereas projects located in rural or suburban areas, where densities are lower and development more spread out, may find this credit unattainable. 


  • Option 1: Development Density


  • Calculate the average neighborhood “built” density, with a target of 60,000 ft2 per acre, minimum, including your project building as well as surrounding buildings. Undeveloped public areas—including parks, water bodies, and public roadways—are not included in density calculations. 


  • All occupied buildings must be counted in the development density calculations. This would generally include conditioned spaces intended for occupancy, with an FTE above zero. Typical excluded spaces might be:

    • parking garages;
    • smoking pavilions;
    • and maintenance sheds not intended as workspaces. 

  • This approach is much easier to document if density information is accessible via a database of the built densities of all buildings in a neighborhood. Without such a resource, it can be hard to locate this information, and Option 2 may be preferable from a documentation standpoint. Obtaining this data can be a challenge if municipalities don’t provide a centralized database of building and property information for existing building stock—including lot area, building area, and number of residential units. Check with your local planning department or the regional, county, or state planning office GIS database. 


  • Locating your project next to a water body or park shouldn’t affect your density calculations, as undeveloped public areas, including parks and water bodies, are not factored into density calculations. 


  • Many urban sites are previously developed and may be brownfields. Investigate and address any contamination and remediation issues early in the planning process.  Doing so can contribute to earning SSc3


  • There may be a fee associated with obtaining data from a public agency’s GIS database. 


  • Option 2: Community Connectivity


  • Demonstrate that there is both:

    1. Pedestrian access to common services. Examples of basic services include: bank, church, school, grocery, laundry facilities, doctor’s office, and a post office. (See the list of common acceptable basic services in the credit language.)
    2. Proximity to a residential area within a one-half mile radius. The residential area must have an average density of 10 units per acre.

  • If a service is considered basic but not included in the list, attach a narrative explaining why you think this is acceptable or consult with GBCI. 


  • The one-half mile radius is drawn from the main building entrance. 


  • Documenting this option is easier than documenting Option 1, as there is little data collection involved, and usually no calculations to perform (unless there is no other documentation available and you have to calculate the housing density to make sure it is at least 10 units per acre). 


  • There may be costs associated with developing a site in an urban setting (due to aspects such as site constraints and brownfield remediation), although there can also be savings due to reduced need to install infrastructure.


  • Building within an existing urban fabric adds significant benefits for users, including lower transportation costs and healthier lifestyle. Employers may find that this helps attract and retain personnel.


  • To check your project’s eligibility to pursue this option, draw a circle with a one-half-mile radius centered on your project’s main entrance. If there is a qualifying residential development, and at least ten basic services, within the circle, your project is eligible to pursue this path. 


  • There must be pedestrian access to the basic services. Pedestrians cannot be blocked by walls, highways or other permanent barriers. 


  • To find the density of residential buildings near your project, check with sources like planning departments, or property management companies on a building by building basis. 


  • For mixed-use projects, one service located within the project boundary may be counted towards the credit calculation, and that service must be accessible to the general public. For example, if your project is an office complex with a coffee shop and dry cleaners—and they are accessible to the general public—one of these two can count as one of the ten required basic services.


  • At least eight of the ten required services must be operational at the time of project completion. For services that are nonexistent but proposed (up to two of the ten required services), the project team must demonstrate that they will be up and running within one year of occupancy. This can be documented by signed lease agreements or a letter from the developer or owner stating the scheduled opening of the service 


  • Access to services can attract more building occupants and improve occupant satisfaction with any project type—resulting in better financials and productivity. 

Schematic Design

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  • Complete density or community connectivity calculations relevant to Options 1 or 2 below.


  • These tasks could be completed in schematic design, design development or at 100% CDs. What is critical is to have the project square footage and site area set prior to performing final calculations. 


  • Option 1: Development Density


  • Your project area must be defined consistently throughout all LEED credits (per the project description). Make sure this is the case, especially if your project is part of a larger development, such as a campus. 


  • Check that your project can comply, using these three steps:

    1. Divide the total project square footage by the total site area in acres. (The minimum density required by this credit is 60,000 ft2 per acre). 
    2. Convert the total site area in acres to square feet (acres X 43,560 square feet) and find the square root of this number. Then multiply the result by 3 to determine the appropriate density radius in feet. Density Radius = 3 x √ [site area in acres x 43,560 ft2/acre].
    3. Define a circle based on the density radius to serve as the density boundary. Add the square footage of all buildings within the boundary and divide by the total area of all sites in the density boundary in acres. Include both the entire floor area and entire site area for all properties within and intersected by the density boundary (i.e., where the radius boundary intersects a building, even if only partially). Be sure to include your project site as well. Parks and water bodies can be excluded from the density boundary area. 

  • The calculator within LEED Online computes the density radius as well as the average density by summing up the building square footages and the site areas in acres. 


  • Confirm that the average density of your project is at least 60,000 ft2 per acre.


  • Per CIR 9/22/06, you can document Exemplary Performance as part of IDc1 through Option 1: Development Density using one of the following methods: 

    1. Document that your project has twice the density of the average surrounding neighborhood within the established density boundary area. 
    2. Demonstrate that the average density in an area twice as large as the density boundary is at least 120,000 ft2 per acre. Establish the expanded density boundary by doubling the size of your site area and redoing the square root calculation. 

  • Option 2: Community Connectivity


  • Use online mapping resources such as Google Earth to draw a one-half mile radius from the project building entrance. Your project must be within one-half mile of a residential development with a density of at least ten units per acre, net, as well as within one-half mile of ten basic services. 


  • For projects with more than one main entrance or more than one building, you may draw a circle from more than one entrance. The area contained within the circles drawn from all these radii is then used as your project’s radius.


  • Identify at least one residential development that meets the requirement within the defined boundary. (This could be one apartment building containing ten units.)


  • If you determine that your project is eligible for this credit option, develop a list of all the services within that half-mile radius (or several half-mile radii), and their distance from the project site. 


  • All the services must be accessible by foot via an uninterrupted, safe path stretching from the designated entrance to the service location. The path cannot cross a highway, for example, unless there is a pedestrian pathway. 


  • For onsite services or those within a half-mile, you can count up to two restaurants in the list of ten community services, but no other service can be counted twice. For example, if there are three restaurants, two hair salons, and four dry cleaners within your radius, you can count two restaurants, one salon and one dry cleaner. 


  • If any of the ten services are nonexistent but planned, you must obtain written documentation that these services will be operational by the time the occupants move into your building. Appropriate documentation includes a lease agreement or a letter from the owner or other responsible party. Only two unbuilt but planned services can be counted in your credit documentation.


  • Websites like Walkscore and Google Maps can provide locations of services and walking access from a given address. (See Resources.) Note, however, that resources like these contain limitations that may not match up with LEED requirements (Walkscore, for example, assumes that you can walk across water, if that's the most direct route.) Use them as a starting point to identify services and approximate distances, but be sure to make adjustments as needed.

Design Development

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  • Check that no changes are made to the design that might hurt your chances of earning the credit.


  • If your project site is located in a dense urban area where pollution is a concern, design your building to minimize potential air quality problems. Place outdoor air intakes away from sources of pollution as much as possible. Consider acoustics and other issues that might be associated with urban environments.

Construction Documents

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  • Complete the LEED Online credit form and prepare the following documents to show credit compliance, according to your chosen option. The LEED Reference Guide also offers good process guidance and sample documentation for this credit. 


  • For both options, a licensed professional (PE, RA, or RLA) can sign off on the credit in lieu of entering all the calculations. The professional whose license is on the line will likely want to confirm all the calculations anyway, and the credit form offers a good way to do that.


  • Option 1: Development Density


  • Provide a site-vicinity map, to scale, showing the project site and the one-half mile boundary from the project’s main entrance. Highlight the residential development and ten services within the boundary. 




  • Compile a list of all buildings that are within or are intersected by your density boundary, with square footages and site areas for each property. Highlight the results of your calculations and confirm that your project meets the credit requirement. 


  • Option 2: Community Connectivity


  • Provide a site-vicinity map, to scale, showing the project site and the one-half mile boundary from the project’s main entrance. Highlight the residential development and ten services within the boundary. 




  • Demonstrate through an online tool, picture, or site plan that ten services are accessible by foot from the project site. 


  • Compile a list of services for easy review, and confirm that the credit requirement is met. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    SS Credit 2: Development density and community connectivity

    5 Points

    Intent

    To channel development to urban areas with existing infrastructure, protect greenfields and preserve habitat and natural resources.

    Requirements

    Option 1: Development density

    Construct or renovate a building on a previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development." site AND in a community with a minimum density of 60,000 square feet per acre net (13,800 square meters per hectare net). The density calculation is based on a typical two-story downtown development and must include the area of the project being built.

    OR

    Option 2: Community connectivity

    Construct or renovate a building on a site that meets the following criteria:

    • Is located on a previously developed site
    • Is within 1/2 mile of a residential area or neighborhood with an average density of 10 units per acre net
    • Is within 1/2 mile of at least 10 basic services
    • Has pedestrian access between the building and the services

    For mixed-use projects, no more than 1 service within the project boundary may be counted as 1 of the 10 basic services, provided it is open to the public. No more than 2 of the 10 services required may be anticipated (i.e. at least 8 must be existing and operational). In addition, the anticipated services must demonstrate that they will be operational in the locations indicated within 1 year of occupation of the applicant project. Examples of basic services include the following:

    • Bank
    • Place of Worship
    • Convenience Grocery
    • Day Care Center
    • Cleaners
    • Fire Station
    • Beauty Salon
    • Hardware
    • Laundry
    • Library
    • Medical or Dental Office
    • Senior Care Facility
    • Park
    • Pharmacy
    • Post Office
    • Restaurant
    • School
    • Supermarket
    • Theater
    • Community Center
    • Fitness Center
    • Museum

    Proximity is determined by drawing a 1/2-mile radius around a main building entrance on a site map and counting the services within that radius.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    During the site selection process, give preference to urban sites with pedestrian access to a variety of services.

     

Web Tools

Google Maps

For locating community services on a map in relation to project site.


NYC online map portal

For building information in the City of New York; useful for calculating density and identifying residential developments. 


Google Earth

Great resource for creating site maps and measuring distances.


Walk score

This online tools provides “as-the-crow-flies” distance to typical standard services from a given address, so it is most helpful to identify the location of basic services that are in close proximity, but shouldn’t be used to document walking distances. 

Community Services

Option 2: Community Connectivity

Compile a list of qualifying community services and residential neighborhoods, and their proximity to your project using a template like this one (with example shown).

Community Connectivity Narrative

Option 2: Community Connectivity

Use a narrative like the one illustrated in this example to demonstrate compliance with this option. This sample narrative provides sample language for planned community services, in addition to existing ones.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

Development Density Calculations

Option 1: Development Density

Calculations like these are needed to demonstrate the required development density for your site.

Planned Community Services

Option 2: Community Connectivity

Use a narrative like this to discuss use of services that are planned but not built to meet Option 2. As many as two of 10 services may be planned.

Development Density Calculator and Map Tool

Option 1: Development Density

Use this spreadsheet to check your compiance with this credit, including Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. compliance, and generate a map for documenting compliance in LEED Online.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms: (newest)

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

220 Comments

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Alicia Silva CEO Revitaliza consultores
Oct 21 2014
LEEDuser Member
1514 Thumbs Up

Veterinary hospital

Does a veterinary hospital count towards this credit?

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E H Sustainability Architect
Aug 22 2014
LEEDuser Member
3101 Thumbs Up

Pool?

Does a community pool count as a basic serivce? If yes, can it count as it's own category, or would it fall under "community center" or "fitness center"? (Our project already has community center and fitness center covered.)

Thanks!

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Michelle Robinson Re:Vision Architecture Aug 23 2014 LEEDuser Member 704 Thumbs Up

Unless you could justify putting it under the "park" category, I don't think you could count it as a basic service in addition to the community center and the fitness center. (You could still list it to show the LEED Reviewer you really have a lot of items, but I would number it with something higher than 10 so it doesn't get mixed in and call attention in a sentence or two that you have more than the required number of basic services.)

Alternatively, have you looked at pursuing the v4 version of the credit? LT Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses is listed on the "approved credit substitutions" (http://www.usgbc.org/articles/use-v4-credits-your-v2009-project).

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patricia vasconcellos creato consultoria e projetos ltda
Aug 11 2014
LEEDuser Member

government administrative center.

My project is a government building, which is being built in an exclusively governmental area. only government buildings are constructed in this area. is a government administrative center.
there are no residential buildings around. still, I can get the credit?

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Trey Akers Aug 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 7 Thumbs Up

Hi Patricia,

Your project would be eligible to pursue this credit via Option 1 Development Density, which does not require a certain residential density. The Option 2 pathway, Community Connectivity, requires at least one neighborhood with at least 10 dwelling units per acre to be within a one-half mile radius of the project's main entrance.

Trey

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Stacey Olson Associate, LEED AP, ID+C, CID Gensler
Jul 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
155 Thumbs Up

Walkability - Services AND housing, or Services only?

We have a project campus that is a quarter of a mile from a residential community, however a freeway prevents direct walkable access between the two.

We have access to over 10 basic services. Can we still qualify for this credit?

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Jul 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

If there is some sort of pedestrian access either over or under the freeway, then yes. Otherwise, no.

What kind of campus is this? If it is a university, I believe you can count dormitories as residential.

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Trey Akers Jul 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 7 Thumbs Up

Hi Stacey,

The pedestrian access stipulation applies only to the basic services component of the credit. Pedestrian access to the residential area is not required to meet the SSc2 Option 2 requirements; the residential area must only be within a 0.5 mi. radius. As Ellen notes, if this a campus that features student housing, then the dormitories may be utilized to demonstrate compliance (assuming they are 10 du/ac).

Lastly, your comment mentions that the project features access to at least 10 basic services. Given that this is a campus setting, please note that in order to meet the Option 2 intent the basic services must be open to the public - the services cannot be restricted to campus occupants only.

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Stacey Olson Associate, LEED AP, ID+C, CID, Gensler Jul 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 155 Thumbs Up

It is a technology business headquarters, not related to a university campus. Thanks for your response!

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JASON BONE SENIOR PROJECT DESIGNER GKKWORKS
Jun 02 2014
LEEDuser Member
32 Thumbs Up

Alternative approach to SS credits than the campus approach

Our new construction project is a new fitness center on the periphery of a community college campus, which is adjacent to a landscape valley (with no density). We are attempting credits SS credit 2 and SS credit4.1, by defining the “entrance” of this project as center of campus, which represents an overall campus perspective and not the individual project site. It is known that the pedestrian network (students/visitors) uses the campus as a whole, instead of getting dropped off at the entrance of specific buildings. Student and visitor parking and drop off zones are designated and adjacent to campus entrances. Considering all students and visitors will be coming from and entrance point and navigate through the campus, when using the new fitness center. We are going to move the center of the radius for SS credit 2 “Development Density and Community Connectivity” and SS credit 4.1 “Public Transportation Access” to the center of the campus. The client will not support the documentation effort for a campus approach within the “master site”, so I am asking for the validity of the above mentioned approach.

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Jun 02 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

I'm not sure I entirely understand your situation, but I think in general you are going to have a hard time getting the reviewers to accept a scenario where you are not using the LEED project building as the center of the radius. If you had a multiple building scenario, LEED will let you draw radii around multiple entrances and use the aggregate area as your boundary but it does not sound like that is the case here. It is also important to note that the community connectivity option is not available for the master site if you are using the campus approach.

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Kris Phillips Architect Arcadis
May 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
589 Thumbs Up

How LEED credits are awarded

As it turns out, LEED v4 has changed SSc2 a bit (now called LT Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses - if the USGBC is reading this, the omission of credit numbers in v4 is not helpful, please bring the numbers back), focusing in one option on previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development." industrial sites and/or proximity to "transportation resources". You can submit your LEED v3 (2009) project attempting SSc2 as a special circumstance using the intent and requirements from v4. We were able to successfully earn the credit on a recent project using this strategy. Be sure to understand the new requirements and clearly explain how your facility meets those requirements. This won't work for all project types, but it's worth checking out. You may have to be crafty in how you develop your explanation to be sure you are adequately addressing the overall intents and requirements. You may have to pick and chose which requirements you are meeting - the more the better. Good luck!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Kris, this is a great comment. I'd love to have you post it on our... I'll say it... LTc4 forum!

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GOVINDACHARI SUNDARARAJAN
May 12 2014
Guest
24 Thumbs Up

Alternate Transportaion

Which of the following transportation methods does not count as public transportation for LEED purposes?
A. Bus
B. Subway System
C. Elevated Rail System
D. Taxi
E. Campus Shuttle or School Bus System

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace May 13 2014 Guest 3328 Thumbs Up

Taxi

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GOVINDACHARI SUNDARARAJAN
May 12 2014
Guest
24 Thumbs Up

Density Development

I have a queries as below in Density Development, in the credit it is specified as both project and surroudng shall have minimum density of 60,000 Sqft/Acre. kindly clarify as below.

Example for a Project density:
For ex a project is planned for LEED Certification is located in 0.44 Acre area with a sqft of 30,000, Density will then be 68181.

Example for surrounding density,
The site is located in 15 Acre area where there are already 15 buildings, each of the building area in the site area is summed up and total average density of more than 60,000 Sqft/Acre are arrived for all the 15 buidings.

In the above cases i think both project and sorrounding has met 60,000 Sqft/Acre density requirement, please confirm me if my understanding is correct on proejct and surrounding

but if the project alone has not met the density with a density of say less than 60,000, is there any minimum density requirement to qualify for LEED certifciation for the project or still it can quality.

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Trey Akers May 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 7 Thumbs Up

Hi Govindachari,

No, the project building itself does not need to meet the density requirements:

Project Building DensityBuilding density is the floor area of the building divided by the total area of the site (square feet per acre)., Reference Guide, Option 1: Under the Calculations section of the Reference Guide (pg. 28), Step 1. indicates that the project building development density must be 60,000 square feet or more per acre, which is not true. Per the rating system, it’s the minimum density of the surrounding community, not the certifying project building, that must be 60,000 sf. Note that the density of the certifying project building must be included in the calculations; if the certifying project building's density causes the overall density of the surrounding community to average less than 60,000 sf per acre, then the project would not meet the Option 1 requirements.

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Michelle Robinson Re:Vision Architecture
May 08 2014
LEEDuser Member
704 Thumbs Up

Development Density - Minimum Density of Project?

For Option 1. Development Density, does the LEED project itself still need to meet the 60,000 SF/acre requirement?

Per the addenda from 10/01/2013 for the section 6. Calculations, Option 1 (http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?&keys=100001789):
Delete a sentence in Step 1 so it reads: “Calculate the development density for the project by dividing the total square footage of the building by the total site area in acres (Equation 1).”

It appears as though the sentence that should be deleted is the one in the reference guide that states "The development density must be 60,000 square feet or more per acre." But that is not actually specified in the addenda. The LEEDuser guidance also still states that the LEED project itself must meet the minimum development density.

There is an old LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #5861, which confirms that the project itself does NOT have to meet a minimum density, however it currently only lists being applicable to v2.1 and no other versions.
http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=5861

Does anyone have any insight as to what is now required for the LEED project's own density?

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. May 28 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

I admit my experience with submitting the development density credit is limited, but I always assumed that the LEED building/site itself had to be included in the calculations. All of the buildings within the density radius in aggregate had to meet the 60,000 sf/acre requirement.

I'm not sure I am addressing your question or not - if not, let me know and I'll try again.

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Michelle Robinson Re:Vision Architecture May 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 704 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Ellen, for responding. I agree that in aggregate, they all have to meet it. What is unclear is if the LEED Reviewers are enforcing the original requirement that the LEED project itself had to meet the 60,000 sf/acre requirement.

Can anyone confirm successfully submitting a v2009 project where the LEED project itself was less than the 60,000 sf/acre but located in a denser community so the overall density was met and the credit was approved?

(With the wording of the credit requirements for the building to be "on a previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development." site AND in a community with a minimum density of 60,000 square feet per acre" it's not totally clear if it has to be "on a previously developed site .. with a minimum density of 60,000 sf/acre AND in a community with a minimum density of 60,000 sf/acre" or if the portion of the sentence "with a minimum density of 60,000 sf/acre" is only applying to the community.

Since:
* Section 6. Calculations, Option 1 of the Ref. Guide originally spelled out that the LEED property itself had to meet the density,
* this section of the reg. guide was unclearly addended, and
* the LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. that says it does not have to is marked as applying to NCv2.1, but it not listed with v2009
the credit requirements remain unclear.

Perhaps someone from USGBC & GBCI can chime in and clarify the addenda and also append the applicability of the LEED interpretation...)

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Trey Akers May 29 2014 LEEDuser Member 7 Thumbs Up

Hi Michelle & Ellen,

Please see the 5/16/14 response to the 5/12/14 Density Development inquiry. Per the Addenda you mention, the project building does not have to be at least 60,000 sf/ac. The Addenda removed that sentence from the Calculations section of the reference guide. The project building's density must be included in the development density calculations, but the project itself does not need to be at least 60,000 sf/ac. The surrounding area including the project building must average at least 60,000 sf/ac. Concerning the LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. you cite, since the Addenda refers to the v2009 rating system, this guidance is applicable beyond NCv2.1.

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Michelle Robinson Re:Vision Architecture May 29 2014 LEEDuser Member 704 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Trey! It's great to have USGBC on here to chime in! :)

(Any chance the addenda will be clarified any more for future documentation purposes and/or the LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #5861 will be clarified to also be applicable to v2009?)

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Ali Kassid Sr. Architect Hill International
Mar 31 2014
Guest
17 Thumbs Up

LEED-NC Building Within New Complex

We are working on the design of a new Campus comprises 5 faculties along with 14 buildings including residential, public, and ancillary facilities. RFP requested to get the presidency building certified as new construction (registered under v2009) with, as minimum, silver rating; the rest of project's components shall simply follow the sustainable design standards. My question is: could we consider SSc2 as applicable to this case as a new building within NEW complex, as opposite to an infill within existing context?
If yes; is there any example in this regard?
Appreciate your inputs..

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 31 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Ali, is your question about whether the project qualifies as previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development.", per LEED definitions? It doesn't sound previously developed to me.

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Ali Kassid Sr. Architect, Hill International Apr 01 2014 Guest 17 Thumbs Up

The project is on a suburban land includes an old abandoned brick factory that will be demolished, so the site has bee selected as a previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development." and already identified as brownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination (may include hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants). They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. (EPA) /contaminated zone. The case is that we have new multiple buildings to be sited there, and LEED certification to be pursued for one building in the complex; the question is that could SSc2-option1 be consider as applicable to this building although there are no existing surroundings at the time being but will be realized simultaneously as a campus in the near future any way?; we can customize the urban design to achieve the credit's requirements, further to the requirements of SSc5.2.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 02 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

According to the LEED requirements, this would not suffice. LEED-NC typically looks at the project as built, not as it is planned.

That being said, if the complex is planned and permitted, I could see the potential for a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide or LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. affirming your compliance. If this is important to the project I would probably submit a CIR.

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Ali Kassid Sr. Architect, Hill International Apr 03 2014 Guest 17 Thumbs Up

Many Thanks Tristan,

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Robert Celio
Mar 27 2014
Guest
2 Thumbs Up

Development Radius for EP

We have a project in the city and can easily meet the EP requirements for Option 1. Our project does not meet path 1 for EP but the surrounding properties are dense enough to comply with EP path 2. With path 2, the density radius changes to include a larger area but the LEED form does not allow for a different radius for the base credit and for the EP credit. In other words, how does the form allow us to show we comply with the density at both density radii? Anyone had experience with this?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 31 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Robert, I would first check that you have the most up-to-date version of the LEED Online form. Assuming it is up to date, I would probably include a short narrative to indicate that you are documenting EP.

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Neetika Parmar
Mar 23 2014
Guest
111 Thumbs Up

Hi ! Are 10 basic services

Hi !

Are 10 basic services limited to only those mentioned in LEED NC 2009 or can we include other services to target credit for community connectivity ?? Our project is located near garment store and tyre repair which are considered as retail, so will this qualify for this credit ?? Also the project should be located within 1/2 mile to a residential unit with avg density of 10 units per acre net. Will just showing location of the residential units along with photos do ? What is required as proof for the density of the residential unit??

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Mar 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

They are not likely to accept any basic services that are not identified in the reference guide, in my experience. For the residential, I usually try to be as descriptive as possible by saying "3-story multi-family apartment complex" or something to that effect so that it is pretty obvious that it meets the density requirements. I don't often see them question multi-family apartments but if you are trying to use a single-family home neighborhood, you should probably take the added step of drawing out an acre and counting how many homes are within it just to be on the safe side.

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Neetika Parmar Sep 23 2014 Guest 111 Thumbs Up

Thankyou Ellen :)

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Jennifer Rennick Principal In Balance Green Consulting
Mar 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
3 Thumbs Up

Community Connectivity travel distance

I am documenting basic services within a 1/2 mile radius of a project, however within the radius is a large body of water (river port). There are only 9 services close to the project on the near side of the water channel. Other services exist across the water and are within the 1/2 miles radius. The basic services on the other side of this channel can be accessed by travelling outside the 1/2 mile radius or via boat. Does this situation comply with the credit or does the credit specify that the 1/2 mile radius needs to be accessed on foot.

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Shannon Deeb Consultant Mac Company
Mar 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
381 Thumbs Up

Pedestrian Access

Pedestrian access is defined in the reference guide as "Allows people to walk to services without being blocked by walls, freeways or other barriers." Are sidewalks and crosswalks required? If yes, do they need to be documented on submittals?

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Mar 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

Check out the comments section of CIv2009 - there is some guidance on this topic from GBCI.

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Faith Wilbert Pathfinder Engineers & Architects
Mar 05 2014
LEEDuser Member
39 Thumbs Up

SSc2 - Property Building data

I'm struggling finding the building information for the surrounding areas. I have checked the zoning maps, and property tax doc but can't find all the information. Any other suggestions?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Hmmm... Google maps and some back of the envelope calcs, going door to door, contacting owners, etc.

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Faith Wilbert Pathfinder Engineers & Architects
Mar 05 2014
LEEDuser Member
39 Thumbs Up

SSc2 Option 1 - parking garages

Do I include parking garages as part of the density calculations?

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GTF CPRE University of Oregon, Campus Planning & Real Estate
Mar 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
11 Thumbs Up

Pilot credit "Walkable Project Sites" double-dips with SSc2?

Our campus student union is considering an Innovation Credit using v4 pilot credit 14: Walkable Project Sites. Would this pilot credit be double dipping if we also achieve SSc2 option 2?
Are there any considerations of the type of street that requires street trees on Walkable Project Sites? We may not be able to achieve an average of 40' spacing between, but the street is not a heavy traffic street, but an internal university street, mainly pedestrian.
Thanks.

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Mar 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

I have been able to successfully achieve both SSc2 option 2 as well as the Walkable Sites Pilot Credit. I don't know for sure about the definition of "street" but I would think that trees would be even more useful/ advantageous on a pedestrian street.

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Farah A.
Feb 17 2014
Guest
417 Thumbs Up

Calculation Issue

A building pursuing the Development Density and Community Connectivity credit is located within a 2 acres community (8,093,m²), in which existing buildings total 90,000 sq. ft (8,361 m²). How large does the building need to be in order to comply with Option 1 of the credit?

The answer is: 30,000 sq. ft. (2,787 m²)

I'm assuming this is so because the minimum density is 60,000, and the building densityBuilding density is the floor area of the building divided by the total area of the site (square feet per acre). times the acres would meet this requirement- however, I see no such calculation formula in the reference guide. If someone could explain the concept behind this, I'd be grateful!

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C, ThemaVerde, France Feb 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 685 Thumbs Up

Farah,
If I understand this correctly you are pursuing option 1 and you calculated your density radius, the overall average property density within the radius equals 45 000 SF/Acre (=90 000 SF/ 2Acres). So well below the required 60 000SF/Acre.

But the credit requirements require you to account for your own project gross area in this calculations, which you did not.
And you are now wondering how many SF the gross area of your project should come up to in order to reach the minimum density.

Then you are correct: 30 000 SF is the gross area for your project that will be required. leading your average community density to 120 000 SF/2Acres =60 000 SF/Acre

Also, you need to ensure that your project has a density of 60 000 SF/Acre as well.

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Farah A. Feb 26 2014 Guest 417 Thumbs Up

Hello Charline,

Thanks for your explanation.

Why is 30,000 the gross area required?

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C, ThemaVerde, France Feb 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 685 Thumbs Up

Ok, you are targeting an Average property density within the density boundary of 60,000 SF/Acre, right?
You can See the following equation in the reference guide page 29, option 1 STEP 3:
Average property density = (Sum of all property SF) / (Sum of all sites area in acre)

In this equation you need to account for your own project Square footage, this means: (Sum of all property SF) = Existing buildings SF + your project SF

Using the two equations above, this leads to:
Your project SF = [Average property density x (Sum of all sites area in acre)] - Existing buildings SF
Your project SF = [ 60000(SF/acre) x 2 (Acres)] -90000 (SF) = 30000 SF

Hope that helps!!

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Rosemary Muller Architect Muller & Caulfield Architects
Feb 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
2 Thumbs Up

Definition of supermarket for SS C2 option2 credit

Is there a definition of what can be counted as a "supermarket" instead of just a "convenience grocery"? What features is a "supermarket" required to have? I have a site which is near several small (non-chain) markets, but don't know if any could be counted as a "supermarket".

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Feb 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

I don't think there is any kind of technical guidance on this, but I usually count convenience grocery as a 7Eleven or mart associated with a gas station.

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Farah A.
Feb 09 2014
Guest
417 Thumbs Up

LEED BD+C Help

Hi everyone,

Currently racking my brains over the BD+C reference guide and can't seem to locate the answers to a few questions I have regarding BD+C rating system, if anyone can help with ANY of these inquiries, it would be much appreciated!

--For Credit SS 5.1 and SS 5.2 may only one exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. credit be earned between these credits? How about for SS 7.1 and SS 7.2? (Since Credit 4 has a 1 EP limit between SS 4.1-4.4)

--Not understanding Development Density Exemplary performance requirement- if a project's density is 120,000 sq ft does it automatically receive +1 EP?

--To determine average weighted roof compliant area, are you adding or multiplying [(Area meeting min SRI/.75)+ (vegetated roof areaRoof area is the area of the uppermost surface of the building which covers enclosed Gross Floor Area, as measured when projected onto a flat, horizontal surface (i.e. as seen in Roof Plan view). ‘Roofs’, or portions of roofs, covering unenclosed areas (e.g. roofs over porches and open covered parking structures) are not included in the areas used to evaluate compliance with SSc7.2, though they may be applicable to SSc7.1./.5)] The reference guide clearly states you must multiply, however I came across a solution for a GBES question which adds both values!

--Lets say you are calculating the amount of open space needed to qualify for the Maximize Open Space credit. You are given 20 acres with a local zoning requirement of 4 acres of open space. The project has restored 2 acres of land with native and adaptive plants. The project also has a vegetated pond that takes up .5 acres.
The BD+C rule states I must exceed local zoning requirement by 25%, making it 5 acres total of open space that I need. Must I subtract 2 AND .5 Acres from 5 acres to determine how many MORE acres of open space are needed for this credit?

THANK YOU for any help!

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Feb 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

I think you will be better served if you break up your questions and post them in their respective forums - it gets confusing when a discussion about open space begins under the development density credit. But in regards to your question about the EP point, you are automatically eligible to earn it if your density is double that of the requirement - 120,000 sf per acre net.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Coordinator Opsis Architecture
Feb 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
689 Thumbs Up

Definition of fitness center?

Would a studio dedicated to a particular activity/sport count as a fitness center? Martial arts, yoga, dance, etc? I would think the answer is yes but want to confirm since we don't have a basic service to spare!

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Feb 04 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

I have had success using a yoga center in the past but it was an older version of LEED so I can't say with 100% certainty that it will work again. But I think you have a good shot at getting it accepted.

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C, ThemaVerde, France Feb 25 2014 LEEDuser Member 685 Thumbs Up

I had a question on the same topic: Would a center with multiple indoor and outdoor sport courts qualify?
We're not sure there's a fitness room though but I would think it could be filed as a "fitness center".

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C, ThemaVerde, France Feb 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 685 Thumbs Up

Anyone has tried submitting this in the past? I would think a sport facility could qualify for a fitness center...

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C, ThemaVerde, France Feb 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 685 Thumbs Up

Someone mentioned to me today we may be able to file the outdoor sport courts as a park instead, Tristan any idea?

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Magda Aghababyan CEO Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
Jan 24 2014
LEEDuser Member
540 Thumbs Up

Banking facility

For one of our projects we are thinking of negotiating with a local bank to set up an ATM machine that is open to public. The bank it self is not close by but we can make a deal with them to set up the ATM machine within the 1/2 mile radius. Will it be acceptable as a banking facility under the credit intent? Of course it doesn't provide the full scale of banking services, but with an ATM you can withdraw cash, deposit checks, pay bills etc. So I think it is fair to consider as a banking facility.

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Jan 27 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

This question has been asked before further down the thread. The opinion seems to be that it doesn't count but no one ever tried it and posted back so it is hard to know for sure.

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Magda Aghababyan CEO, Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd. Jan 29 2014 LEEDuser Member 540 Thumbs Up

Thank you. If any one has ever tried it and got feedback, can you please share your experience here?

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Jan 29 2014 LEEDuser Member 976 Thumbs Up

I have never personally submitted it on one of my projects, but I have heard of others consistently getting ATMs denied as not qualifying as "banks" in the v2009 systems (not sure about the older v2 systems).

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Eric Anderson Technical Customer Service Specialist, GBCI Jan 29 2014 Guest 1383 Thumbs Up

Yes, Kristina is correct. An ATM would not be accepted as a qualify service in LEED v2009. This is stated more explicitly in the LEED v4 documentation, but even for v2 & v3/2009 rating systems the same principle applies. ATMs do not share the same characteristics as the examples listed in the rating system or reference guide. Namely, they are not distinctly operated enterprises, and the credit intent aims to reward projects for locating in places with a variety of amenities – generally characterized as full business establishments open to the public.

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Jiri Dobias
Nov 05 2013
LEEDuser Member
1231 Thumbs Up

Exemplary performance calculation

Dear all LEEDusers,

I got a clarification question regarding our project but I am not sure that the review team is correct.
My density radius for the base credit is 406 feet (project site is 18,296 sf), therefore the buildable landThe portion of the site where construction can occur. When used in density calculations, the calculation for buildable land excludes: public streets and other public rights of way, and land excluded from development by law or other prerequisites of LEED for Neighborhood Development. is 11.88 acres. Am I correct that the radius for the EP would be = 3 x (2 x 18,296 x 43,560)^(1/2) = 574 ft?

Thanks for any suggestions!

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Nov 13 2013 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

Hi Jiri - it may be helpful if you could post the exact comment from the reviewer.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Oct 09 2013
LEEDuser Member
1794 Thumbs Up

a site with no building

Hi,
Our project will use option 1. The project site is located on industry development area nea bayside. There are some sites which have no building whithin the density radius of our project. Should these sites with no building be included to credit calculation?
That means that the density of that kind of site is 0 sf/acre. Is my understanding correct?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 02 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, that is correct.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Member 1794 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Tristan.

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Bill Holub
Sep 04 2013
Guest
16 Thumbs Up

Public Access for Community Services - Attn Eric Anderson

Eric,
I was hoping you could provide follow-up resources concerning your response (of August 13th) to Lauren's inquiry about campus service's. In the response it specifically indicates Military Bases as an example of where general public access would not be required for this credit. Can you direct me to any resources that detail the public access requirements for community services on a militray base?

Thank you in advance.

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Eric Anderson Technical Customer Service Specialist, GBCI Sep 05 2013 Guest 1383 Thumbs Up

Hi Bill, Our in-house experts on this credit provided some feedback on your question that I'm happy to pass along here: While’s there’s no published guidance on this circumstance, to meet the credit in intent services on military bases must be open to all base occupants (military personnel and/or their families, visitors to the base, staff/contractors working on the base, etc.). This is because military bases are typically “secure islands” or “gated communities” all unto themselves and are not typically accessible by the surrounding community for security reasons. Nonetheless, featuring walkable services within these settings can have significant environmental benefits. It can be argued that military projects should not be able to attain SSc2 as the credit was meant for well-located, non-gated projects with excellent community access to diverse public services, which many military bases are not. However, given the unique security requirements of these installations this long-standing compromise ensures services on the base used to obtain SSc2 are open to all base occupants, thereby meeting the credit intent for Option 2.

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Sahar Abi-Ziki
Aug 16 2013
Guest
57 Thumbs Up

Calculation clarification-

Our building has a large atrium on 3 floors. We are trying to achieve credit SSc2, option 1 development density. Can we count the atrium area in the project floor area calculation or the atrium area should be deducted on each floor for total building floor area. As per the definition of Project area in the Addendum, shaft spaces and elevators can be included in the calculations, which are also voids…
The project has 3 floors parking areas, as I understood from previous discussions the parking should be excluded from the building floor area. Can we include a section from the basement which has services, mechanical rooms or storage areas in the floor area calculations?
If the project is already registered in CAGBC under a certain floor area, I assume it will still be possible to change this area after if needed?
Thank you

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Aug 19 2013 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

I would say that yes, you can count the atria space and any basement areas that are not parking.

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Jay DeVilbiss Mechanical Engineer PAE Consulting Engineers
Aug 13 2013
Guest
56 Thumbs Up

Option 2 - portion of residential street meets 10 units per acre

Hello,

I have a question regarding the requirement for a residential neighbourhood meeting a min density of 10 units per acre for Option 2 - Community Connectivity. The FAQ above states that "any discrete area that addresses the requirements is acceptable." If the site has several streets within a half mile that contain single family homes, is it sufficient to demonstrate that a portion of one street block meets the requirement, or would that whole street block have to be considered? For example, if one nearby street block has a total of 15 homes on it, and 10 adjacent homes/properties on that street make up less than an acre (thus meeting the requirement), can just that subset of 10 homes be used in the calculation or would all 15 on the street have to be considered?

Thanks in advance for any help.

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Aug 16 2013 LEEDuser Expert 3427 Thumbs Up

Hi Jay - I believe you can count a residential area even if it is only partially inside your radius as long as you can substantiate that it meets the density requirements.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager Google
Aug 12 2013
LEEDuser Expert
15717 Thumbs Up

Services on campus

We recently received a review comment that said that we could not count the services located on our university campus and freely available to all of our project's FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.. I see that there is some dialogue above about this topic but I was wondering if there was any additional insight that I should be aware of. I have achieved it with this path plenty of times in the past. It is very unlikely that we will achieve the point if we cannot count these campus services. If it is not allowed I would love to see the official guidance clarifying how this is the case (either from a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide, addendum, or of course the Reference Guide itself).

Thank you.

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Oct 23 2014
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