NC-2009 SSc4.3: Alternative Transportation—Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles

  • NC_SSc4-3_Type1_LowEmittingVehicles Diagram
  • Promote use of high-efficiency vehicles

    This credit is focused on limiting environmental impacts from automobile use. It targets commuting specifically, but also addresses company vehicle fleets, maintenance vehicles, and buses.

    If your project has substantial parking area, you may find the requirements of this credit to be low-hanging fruit, because you should easily be able to designate preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy., which is one option. There are other options for compliance, all of varying difficulty and requiring varying levels of commitment from the project owner.

    Pick a path and go with it

    It’s wise to choose your compliance path early in the process, especially since some of the options require infrastructure development such as alternative fueling stations. 

    LE/FE vehicle signageMake sure that you base your choice on the likelihood that building occupants will take advantage of the resources you provide. While this is not often done, surveying occupants or prospective occupants is a good way to determine which strategy is likely to have the highest impact.

    A range of options

    Option 1: Providing preferred parking for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles is by far the most cost-effective option for projects that have onsite parking managed by the building ownership. “Preferred” is defined as easy to access (such as close to building entrances), or available at a discounted price.

    Option 2: Providing onsite alternative fueling stations for 3% of total vehicle parking capacity is a bit more involved and potentially more expensive. The most readily accessible strategy here is providing plug outlets for electric cars. 

    Option 3: Providing low-emitting or fuel-efficient vehicles for 3% of FTE occupants along with preferred parking for these vehicles may be the most expensive approach to this credit. If a project already maintains a fleet of vehicles, however, then low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles can be substituted at no added cost—possibly even at a cost savings. 

    Parking signageOption 4: Implementing a vehicle-sharing program with provision for designated parking for shared vehicles may be best integrated into residential or campus project programming.   

    Parking is not a prerequisite

    Projects that do not provide onsite parking can still earn this credit by pursuing Option 4 and implementing a low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicle-sharing program (many residential projects prefer this option). Projects may also earn the credit by pursuing Option 2, providing alternative fueling stations onsite.

    Signage matters

    Parking signage for this credit must typically include the terms "Low-Emitting" and/or 'Fuel-Efficient," with the only exceptions being "Zero Emissions Vehicles" or "ACEEE 40+." Signage using solely terms like "Alternative Fuel Vehicles," "Hybrid Vehicles," or "Electric Vehicles" is not sufficient, because some hybrid vehicles, etc., do not meet the LE/FE definition, and vice versa.

  • Don't double-count parking spaces

    If your project is pursuing both SSc4.3 and SSc4.4, be careful not to double-count preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces allotted for those credits. The total number of preferred parking spaces must be equal to those required for SSc4.3, plus those required for SSc4.4. The same parking space cannot count for both credits (although they do not have to be distinguished through signage).

  • FAQs for SSc4.3

    Do all hybrid vehicles automatically qualify for this credit?

    No. The qualifying list rates vehicles for fuel efficiency as well as emissions. Most—but not all—hybrids meet the criteria. There are also non-hybrid cars that qualify for the credit. Always check the most up-to-date list for qualifying vehicles. The list is long and inclusive.

    Can a project pursue this credit via a combination of Option 1 (preferred parking) and Option 2 (alternative fueling stations)?

    This would probably be approved by LEED, depending on specifics, but you would need to get an official ruling—either a  CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide or LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org..

    How should the signage read for preferred parking spaces?

    Neither USGBC or GBCI has provided a mandatory signage design, but there has been consistent guidance indicating that one or more of the following terms must be on the sign:

    • Low-Emitting
    • Fuel-Efficient
    • Zero Emissions
    • ACEEE 40+

    Some project teams have struggled with this because they think it does not clearly convey the concept to occupants, but nonetheless, this has been the pattern of review comments from GBCI. For projects that want to use additional terms, they may use one of more of the above terms, in combination with any of the following terms.

    • Alternative Fuel Vehicles
    • Hybrid Vehicles
    • Electric Vehicles

    These terms are not sufficient on their own, however, as not all hybrid vehicles are low-emitting, for example.

    For electric vehicle charging stations, how are the parameters established for fueling capacity?

    Typically credit is given for each available preferred parking spot with a separate charging plug. If a charging station provides a fast charge and the project wants to have that reflected in its credit calculations, then the project team should provide evidence from both the charging system manufacturer and the building or parking management showing that the logistics of allowing multiple vehicles to share a single charging station will be managed accordingly.

    I am working on a project with no parking spaces allocated. Can I earn this credit?

    Yes, some projects have earned this credit with a regional car-sharing program that locates a publicly accessible car share vehicle adjacent to the project site.

    Our project is outside the U.S., and the LEED-approved ACEEE Green Score and CARB ratings and classifications don't apply to many vehicles. Is there another approach that is accepted?

    In Brazil projects can benefit from the approval of a regional program in LEED Interpretation #10230. Projects in Europe may use vehcicles meeting the Euro 6 limit values of Regulation (EC) No. 715/2007.

    For other locations, GBCI's policy is that until a global alternative compliance path (ACP) or LEED Interpretation comes out, proposals for non-standard approaches must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis by individual review teams. This means that some LEED projects may be able to create a successful approach, and some might have difficulty—a situation that is consistent with what LEEDuser has heard about LEED review comments.

    Should I consider motorbikes and parking spaces for them under this credit? What about fleet vehicles?

    Fleet vehicle and storage spaces—for example, spaces for school buses, military vehicles, rental cars, or tractor trailers—are not counted in the number of total parking spaces, but commuter spaces are counted, including those dedicated to atypical vehicles such as motorcycles.

    According to GBCI, an "atypical" vehicle used for commuting, such as a motorcycle, should be counted the same as a "standard" passenger car parking space.  The amount of preferred parking provided should be distributed evenly among the various parking space types.

    For example, if 40% of the project’s parking is for motorcycles, 60% of the total parking is for standard passenger vehicles, and 10 preferred spaces are required to earn the credit, the preferred spaces should be distributed such that four preferred spaces (40%) are provided for motorcycles and six preferred spaces (60%) are provided for passenger vehicles.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Pick the best of the four compliance path options for attaining this credit:

    • Option 1: Provide either preferred parking for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles for 5% of total parking capacity or a discounted parking rate (at least 20%) for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles. 
    • Option 2: Install alternative fueling stations for 3% of parking capacity.
    • Option 3: Provide low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles for 3% of FTE building occupants with designated preferred parking for these vehicles. 
    • Option 4: Institute a low-emitting or fuel-efficient vehicle-sharing program.

  • Costs for each option are very different, and occur at different times. Don't forget to factor in infrastructure development, administration costs, procurement costs, and maintenance and upkeep costs. For example, installing fueling stations is much more expensive than providing preferred parking spaces with signage.


  • Simply providing preferred parking for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles is the easiest way to comply with this credit. It is also a low-cost option.   


  • Consider the feasibility of each option based on your site location. Is your project located in a dense urban environment where most people commute to work via mass transit, or are you in a suburban or rural area where most people drive to work, and may appreciate a vehicle-sharing program? Also consider things like whether there are alternative-fuel vehicles used by occupants or whether occupants tend to use low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles. Are HOV (high-occupancy vehicle) lanes available? These types of questions will help to determine an appropriate approach to this credit.  


  • Consider the preference of building occupants so as not to dedicate resources to programs or infrastructure that will remain idle and not serve their intended audience. Is the organizational culture such that employees would appreciate such amenities? Depending on the building type, building occupants can be surveyed to assess the demand for amenities relating to low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles. If you are planning on providing alternative-fuel refueling stations, assess what kind of fuel is preferred.


  • If the project team is committed to creating a comprehensive transportation management plan to qualify for an Exemplary Performance point through IDc1, dedicating the resources upfront to develop and implement a vehicle-sharing program makes sense, as it will be folded into the broader transportation plan.


  • A residential building in a dense urban area that does not have parking facilities may favor a vehicle-sharing program as a way of attracting new tenants and earning the credit at the same time. 


  • The same parking space cannot contribute to both SSc4.3 and SSc4.4 by being designated for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles (SSc4.3) and carpools or vanpools (SSc4.4).   

Schematic Design

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  • Refer to the California Air Resources Board Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEV) list and to the American Council for an Energy Efficiency Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide to determine which vehicles are classified as low-emitting and fuel-efficient. (See Resources.)


  • Hybrid and electric vehicles are not the only ones considered low-emitting and fuel-efficient. Many common gasoline vehicles with mileage efficiency of 21 mpg and above also meet that description depending on their make, model, fuel efficiency and emissions. 


  • “Preferred parking” refers to parking spaces near the building entrance or to discounted parking rates (minimum 20% discount), which must be offered to all eligible parking customers. Preferred parking is separate from, and should not be confused with disabled parking. Preferred spaces should be broken out evenly for the various types of parking spaces that are provided in the project—automobiles, trailers, compact cars, etc. Spaces for vehicles integal to the facilities process such as fleet or "inventory" vehicles can be excluded from calculations.


  • In a parking-garage, look to the location of disabled parking spaces for guidance on what is “preferred.” This may be on the lowest floor, or it may be closest to stairwells or elevators spread out over multiple floors.   


  • If it is not possible to reserve designated parking spaces close to the main entrance for LE and FE vehicles, comply by offering discounted rates for parking through coupons, vouchers, or other similar incentive programs. 


  • Some past projects have been able to designate preferred parking spaces in off-site parking areas attributed to the project that were not within the LEED scope or boundary, as long as they were within one-quarter mile of the project's main entrance or serviced by a shuttle. These preferred spaces had to be reserved for LEED project building occupants only. Project teams with similar circumstances need to consult with GBCI to see if taking a similar approach is allowed.


  • Since there are no “LEED police” to check compliance with parking rules after a project’s completion, it is the project owner’s responsibility to meet the intent of the credit throughout the operations phase using the honor system. Some owners choose to screen occupants’ cars and distribute stickers to those that are allowed to park in designated preferred-parking spaces.


  •  Option 1: Provide Preferred Parking


  • Calculate the total vehicle parking capacity of the site and allocate 5% of it for preferred parking spaces for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles.  


  • Calculations should be based on the parking spaces associated with the building pursuing LEED certification plus any additional parking included in the LEED boundary. Options 1 and 2 relate to total parking spaces included onsite within the LEED boundary while Options 3 and 4 relate to vehicles for project occupants. If parking for the building is offsite, it must be included in credit calculations. If some of the parking is onsite and some offsite, confirm the appropriate approach to the situation with GBCI.


  • Alternatively, if the LEED boundary includes a multi-story garage that serves multiple buildings in addition to the LEED project, all the parking spaces within the LEED boundary must be included for calculations even if only a portion of the parking area is expected to be for the project building’s use. 


  • If designating parking spaces is not desirable, the credit can be achieved by providing a discounted parking rate of at least 20% for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles.  


  • Option 2: Refueling Stations


  • Incorporate alternative fueling stations into your plan early in the design stage. 


  • Calculate the total vehicle parking capacity of the site and install alternative fuel stations for at least 3% of that capacity. 


  • Fueling stations can be as simple as an electric-car charging outlet in a parking garage, but they must be designed to support street-legal, long-range vehicles (not electric golf carts, for example).


  • If installing a electric car-charger, install a 240V conductive power supply (or inductive charger). The emerging market for electric vehicles is expected to require J-1772-compliant outlets, which need a 240V power supply.


  • To assess the demand (potential or future) for alternative fueling stations, conduct surveys to determine the alternative fuel most likely to be used by future building occupants. Consider polling future building occupants via email or a paper survey.


  • Research local code requirements and standards that may apply to installing fueling stations on your project site, including building, fire and electrical codes. Also look into relevant equipment, upkeep, and maintenance of refueling stations.  


  • Project teams should carefully consider available technologies and different fuel sources before installing fueling stations. There are also legal, technical, and safety issues to take into account and deal with early in the process: 

    • Look at the kind of liability that is associated with installing these fueling stations on your project site. 
    • Look at fuel availability and compare the price and requirements of installing fueling stations for different kinds of fuels. Cost will vary depending on the type of fuel and the complexity of installation. 
    • Consider the fueling and charging characteristics of each type of fuel that you are considering. Natural gas fueling facilities, for example, consist of one or more gas compressors, a compressed gas storage tank, and gas dispensing equipment. If you are using another kind of alternative fuel, the equipment requirements may be different, affecting cost and feasibility. 
    • Consider health and safety aspects that may be linked to each alternative fuel option. For example, electric vehicles with batteries should generally be charged in a well-ventilated area.  
    • Consider how easy or difficult it will be for operations personnel to maintain the stations.

  • For liquid fuels like biodiesel and ethanol, provide storage and safe handling procedures for fueling stations. Research a variety of fuels that may be made available to the project occupants. 


  • Providing alternative fueling stations may have significant cost implications, though the popularity of alternative-fuel vehicles is slowly working to make them more cost-competitive. 


  • The project owner may choose to sell the alternative fuel to the public in addition to providing it to building occupants.


  • The costs of installing and maintaining alternative fueling stations should be weighed against the anticipated use of the facilities and the environmental benefits that can accrue from it. 


  • Option 3: Provide Low-Emitting Vehicles and Preferred Parking for Occupants


  • Calculate the total number of FTE occupants in the building to determine the number of low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles to purchase as well as the number of preferred parking spaces to provide. 


  • To calculate FTE occupants, use a standard eight-hour occupancy period. An FTE, therefore, has a value of one (8 ÷ 8). Each part-time staff occupant has a value of the number of hours of occupancy divided by eight (e.g., 4 ÷ 8 = ½ FTE). It follows that the total number of staff FTEs equals the total number of staff hours divided by eight.


  • Maintain consistency in the number of FTEs across all LEED credits.


  • Refer to the ACEEE list for eligible vehicles. (See Resources.)


  • Simple electrical outlets do not constitute vehicle-charging stations. Electrical charging stations have distinct hardware for vehicle charging. If providing electrical vehicles for the fleet, these charging stations should be available to those vehicles. 


  • Allowing adequate lead time is important in this option, as alternate-fuel vehicles may take longer to order and purchase. Communicate with procurement officers as early as possible in the planning process. 


  • For companies that provide vehicles for employee use, consider “greening your fleet” by purchasing vehicles qualified as low-emitting and fuel-efficient. Project teams should carefully consider available technologies and different fuel sources before purchasing vehicles. 


  • The setup costs for this option may be considerable. 


  • Research tax incentives offered by federal, state, or local governments for purchasing alternative-fuel vehicles. This could help offset some of the initial costs. 


  • Option 4: Vehicle-Sharing Program


  • Implement a vehicle-sharing program in which one low-emitting or fuel-efficient vehicle is provided per 3% of FTE occupants. This works out to one vehicle for every 267 FTE occupants, assuming that one shared vehicle can serve eight people. (The number of vehicles required equals the total number of FTEs divided by 267—see the Documentation Toolkit for a calculator.) At a minimum, one vehicle must be provided, regardless of the number of occupants in the building.  


  • All cars included in the vehicle-sharing program must be qualified as low-emitting or fuel-efficient by ACEEE. 


  • The program also must have a minimum two-year contract and designated preferred parking for the shared vehicles. 


  • Try negotiating a special contract with a vehicle-sharing company for low-emitting or fuel-efficient vehicles.

Design Development

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  • Design your building to include transportation amenities such as preferred parking for low-emitting vehicles or alternative fueling stations, depending on your chosen option. 


  • Option 4: LE or FE vehicle-sharing program


  • Look at existing vehicle-sharing programs in your area.


  • If none are available, locate vendors that can develop a program to manage a low-emitting or fuel-efficient vehicle fleet.

Construction Documents

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  • Indicate the locations of all preferred parking spaces on site plans, along with requirements for signage. 


  • If providing alternative-fueling stations, make sure the construction documents include all required specs.  

Construction

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  • Install markings on preferred parking spaces. These can include a sign, striping or both.  


  • Complete the LEED Online credit form, and provide the following supporting documentation, as applicable:

    • Drawings or a site plan that indicates the location and number of preferred parking spaces or alternative-fueling stations. 
    • If discounted parking is offered, provide information about the program and explain how the information is disseminated to building occupants. 
    • Sample signage for preferred parking.
    • Equipment cut sheets and product information for alternative-fueling stations. 
    • Vehicle product information for low-emitting and fuel-efficient cars provided to employees. Include make, model number, and fuel type. 
    • If a vehicle-sharing program is put in place, prepare information about the program, including statistics about users, contracts, and other relevant information.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Continued compliance with the spirit of this credit is largely based on the honor system and the integrity of building management and users. To ensure that preferred parking policies are respected, consider the following strategies:

    • Wherever preferred parking is provided, post signage that identifies preferred parking or alternative-fuel stations.
    • Signage can be as noticeable or discreet as desired, but must clearly demarcate preferred spaces as such. 
    • A sticker program can be implemented to identify cars that qualify to park in preferred parking spaces. 
    • Provide information about the parking program via appropriate channels for your project.
    • Post information about the parking program in entryways and in public areas. 

  • Make sure that operations and maintenance personnel (or a vendor, if involved) are set up to maintain the alternative fueling stations. Provide them with all required information about safety and maintenance procedures.


  • Building staff will also spend time administering the various parking programs: preferred parking, discounted parking, or vehicle-sharing. Procedures and policies for their use must be developed, along with enforcement mechanisms. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    SS Credit 4.3: Alternative transportation - low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles

    3 Points

    Intent

    To reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use.

    Requirements

    Option 1: Preferred or discounted parking

    Provide preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system.1 for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy.2 for 5% of the total vehicle parking capacity of the site. Providing a discounted parking rate is an acceptable substitute for preferred parking for low-emitting/fuel-efficient vehicles. To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all customers (i.e., not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area and available for a minimum of 2 years.

    OR

    Option 2: Alternative fuel

    Install alternative-fuel fueling stations for 3% of the total vehicle parking capacity of the site. Liquid or gaseous fueling facilities must be separately ventilated or located outdoors.

    OR

    Option 3: Provide vehicles

    Provide low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles for 3% of full-time equivalentFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 40 hours per week in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per week divided by 40. Multiple shifts are included or excluded depending on the intent and requirements of the credit. (FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.) occupants.

    Provide preferred parking for these vehicles.

    OR

    Option 4: Vehicle sharing program

    Provide building occupants access to a low-emitting or fuel-efficient vehicle-sharing program. The following requirements must be met:

    • One low-emitting or fuel-efficient vehicle must be provided per 3% of FTE occupants, assuming that 1 shared vehicle can carry eight persons (i.e., 1 vehicle per 267 FTE occupants). For buildings with fewer than 267 FTE occupants, at least 1 low emitting or fuel-efficient vehicle must be provided.
    • A vehicle-sharing contract must be provided that has an agreement of at least two years.
    • The estimated number of customers served per vehicle must be supported by documentation.
    • A narrative explaining the vehicle-sharing program and its administration must be submitted.
    • Parking for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles must be located in the nearest available spaces in the nearest available parking area. Provide a site plan or area map clearly highlighting the walking path from the parking area to the project site and noting the distance.
    • 1For the purposes of this credit “preferred parking” refers to the parking spots that are closest to the main entrance of the project (exclusive of spaces designated for handicapped persons) or parking passes provided at a discounted price. To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all eligible customers (i.e. not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area, and available for a minimum of 2 years.

      2For the purposes of this credit, low-emitting vehiclesLow-emitting vehicles are classified as zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) by the California Air Resources Board. are defined as vehicles that are classified as Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVZero-emission vehicles.) by the California Air Resources Board. Fuel-efficient vehicles are defined as vehicles that have achieved a minimum green score of 40 on the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide [Europe ACP: Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles] [South America ACP: Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles].

      Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

      Europe ACP: Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles

      Projects in Europe may use vehicles meeting the Euro 6 limit values of Regulation (EC) No. 715/2007.

      South America ACP: Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles

      Vehicles in South America may qualify as low-emitting and fuel-efficient by meeting both of the following conditions:

    1. A score of Four Stars or above from IBAMA (Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Naturais Renováveis - Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources) Nota Verde Program.
    2. An A from INMETRO (Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia - National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology) Brazilian Labeling Program for Vehicles.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Provide transportation amenities such as alternative-fuel refueling stations. Consider sharing the costs and benefits of refueling stations with neighbors.

    FOOTNOTES

    1 For the purposes of this credit “preferred parking” refers to the parking spots that are closest to the main entrance of the project (exclusive of spaces designated for handicapped persons) or parking passes provided at a discounted price. To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all eligible customers (i.e. not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area, and available for a minimum of 2 years.

    2 For the purposes of this credit, low-emitting vehiclesLow-emitting vehicles are classified as zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) by the California Air Resources Board. are defined as vehicles that are classified as Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVZero-emission vehicles.) by the California Air Resources Board. Fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. are defined as vehicles that have achieved a minimum green score of 40 on the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide.

Web Tools

American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy

ACEEE is an online, searchable green car guide based on an evaluation of fuel efficiency and tailpipe emissions. It also offers hardcopies of Green Guide to Cars and Trucks, an annual publication of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.

Publications

California Air Resources Board, Cleaner Car Guide

CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it. has developed a comprehensive, searchable buyer’s guide to finding the cleanest cars on the market. The guide also lists advantages clean vehicles offer.


Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology

The Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology offers a useful guide to fuel cells and hydrogen in vehicles. 


Rocky Mountain Institute Transportation Page

This website offers information on the environmental impact of transportation and extensive information about Hypercar vehicles.


Union of Concerned Scientists, Clean Vehicle Program

This site provides information about the latest developments in alternative vehicles, the environmental impact of conventional vehicles, and documents such as the guide Buying a Greener Vehicle: Electric, Hybrids, and Fuel Cells.


U.S. Department of Energy, Fuel Economy

This website offers comparisons of new and used cars and trucks based on gas mileage (mpg), greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution ratings, and safety information.


American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide

A comprehensive list of vehicles that score 40 and above in the rankings. These vehicles are considered LE/FE vehicles. 


List of alternative fuels

A summary of common available alternative fuels in production. 

Technical Guides

Clean Cities Vehicle Buyer’s Guide For Fleets

The Vehicle Buyer’s Guide for Fleets is designed to educate fleet managers and policymakers about alternative fuels and vehicles to help them determine whether the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992 affects them. Use the site to determine whether your fleet is covered under EPAct; obtain pricing and technical specifications for light and heavy-duty AFVs; find an alternative fueling station in your area; or research information about state AFV purchasing incentives and laws.

Organizations

Electric Auto Association

This nonprofit education organization promotes the advancement and widespread adoption of electric vehicles.


Electric Drive Transportation Association

Through policy, information, and market development initiatives, this industry association promotes the use of electric vehicles.


National Biodiesel Board

This trade association, representing the biodiesel industry, serves as the coordinating body for biodiesel research and development in the United States. The website provides information on the purchasing, handling, and use of biodiesel fuels.


Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition

The Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition consists of natural gas companies, vehicle and equipment manufacturers, service providers, environmental groups, and government organizations.


U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Alternative Fuels Data Center

This center provides information on alternative fuels and alternatively fueled vehicles, a locator for alternative fueling stations, and more. Their Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Advanced Technology Vehicle Listing for 2007 can be found online here.

 


City Car Share

Car Share program in the BayA bay is a component of a standard, rectilinear building design. It is the open area defined by a building element such as columns or a window. Typically, there are multiple identical bays in succession. Area – partnering with a program like Car Share may help meet the requirements of a vehicle sharing program. 


Zip Car

Car SharingA system under which multiple households share a pool of automobiles, either through cooperative ownership or through some other mechanism. Service – partnering with a company like Zipcar may help meet the requirements of a vehicle sharing program.

Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan

A comprehensive transportation management plan is one way to earn an Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point under SSc4. 

Site Plan with Preferred Parking

Document preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. with a site plan like this example.

Vehicle Calculator

Option 4

Use this spreadsheet to help calculate the number of low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. you need to provide based on the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. occupancy.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 SS

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

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Pamela Mendez WSP
Jan 11 2016
LEEDuser Member
111 Thumbs Up

No Parking Provided - Option 4 Vehicle Sharing

Our project is a Residential Building with No Parking provided. A LE/FE Vehicle Contract will be implemented for (2) Years.

Can this project earn both SSC4.3 & SSC4.4

SSC4.4 - 2 Points No Parking
&
SSC4.3 - 3 Points for Vehicle Sharing via Contract with Zip Car

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Specialist, Integral Group Jan 12 2016 Guest 2 Thumbs Up

Hi Pamela, my experience has been that if you do not provide parking you can meet SSc4.4. Regarding SSc4.3, have you reviewed the requirements for the vehicle sharing compliance path? There are several and I'd recommend that you will want to make compliance with each clear. I'd also encourage you to review related LEED interpretations to see if there are additional information that might be useful for your specific case.

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Pamela Mendez WSP Jan 13 2016 LEEDuser Member 111 Thumbs Up

Yes we would like to use Option 4 -

-Provide One low-emitting or fuel-efficient vehicle must be provided per 3% of FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. occupants
-A vehicle-sharing contract must be provided that has an agreement of at least two years. (Via Zip-Car)
-Parking for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. must be located in the nearby parking lot.

Questions are can this be earned via Zip-Car Contract and having the zip-car at a nearby parking lot. Since we are earning SSc4.4 No Parking Onsite.

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Specialist, Integral Group Jan 14 2016 Guest 2 Thumbs Up

Pamela, if you read above you can see this is an acceptable compliance path. "Some projects have earned this credit with a regional car-sharing program that locates a publicly accessible car share vehicle adjacent to the project site."

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Joann Lee Heitman Architects Inc.
Nov 18 2015
LEEDuser Member
602 Thumbs Up

Interchangeability of LE/FE vehicles and HOV parking spaces

Project Location: United States

We are pursuing both SS4.3 and SS4.4. As long as we provide the total parking spaces required for both 4.3 AND 4.4, can those spaces be used interchangeably for either LE/FE and HOV? Can the sign read the space is for either Low Emitting/Fuel Efficient Vehicle or High Occupancy vehicle?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Joann, I would not be confident in this approach. While there is a lot of sense in your approach, the LEED requirements stipulate that the spaces are for LE/FE. You could be limiting access to LE/FE vechicles for these spaces in favor of HOV. Which may be justifiable from a policy perspective, but is outside of what LEED requires. If this is important I would look for a LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. or other official communication from GBCI.

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Joann Lee Heitman Architects Inc. Nov 30 2015 LEEDuser Member 602 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Tristan.

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Joann Lee Heitman Architects Inc. Nov 30 2015 LEEDuser Member 602 Thumbs Up

Tristan, one more question.
Can a Fuel Efficient parking space be used as charging station for electric cars while charging? We are not pursuing the credit through charging station (the client just opted to install them); we are trying to comply the credit only through LE/FE reserved parking spaces.

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Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores
Nov 12 2015
LEEDuser Member
1094 Thumbs Up

Preferred parking spaces definition interpretation

The definition of preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. refers "designated spaces close to the building (...), designated covered spaces (...)". Does this mean that parking spaces designated for low-emitting that are covered but not the ones closest to the building would qualify? Or do they have to comply with both conditions.

In the particular case I'm working on, the designated parking spaces are covered and are the closest to the building besides an area of uncovered parking spaces.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M, Revitaliza Consultores Nov 12 2015 Guest 882 Thumbs Up

I think you can choose either covered spaces or those close to the building entrance. You don't have to meet both requirements.

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Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability, Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores Nov 16 2015 LEEDuser Member 1094 Thumbs Up

So, your interpretation is that if the parking is covered any of its parking spaces would comply with credit requirements even if it isn't the closest one regarding building entrance?

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Helen Kessler President, HJKessler Associates Nov 16 2015 LEEDuser Member 467 Thumbs Up

Covered parking has no bearing on this credit for preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy.. The preferred parking needs to be adjacent to the ADA (handicap) spaces, i.e. close to the building entrance.

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Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability, Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores Nov 17 2015 LEEDuser Member 1094 Thumbs Up

Hi Helen,

are you sure on this one? The definition states that «preferred parking (...) includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, (...)». My take on this is that covered spaces by itself can be considered preferred parking. Don't you agree?

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Helen Kessler President, HJKessler Associates Nov 17 2015 LEEDuser Member 467 Thumbs Up

Hi Pedro,
I recommend searching for a credit interpretation on this. If there is no credit interpretation, you may want to submit one. The reason I think that covered parking is not part of the definition for preferred is because that would mean that all covered parking is preferred. In a parking garage where all of the parking is covered, the only spaces that are preferred are adjacent to the ADA spaces.

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Annalise Reichert LEED Project Coordinator Environmental Building Strategies
Oct 26 2015
LEEDuser Member
230 Thumbs Up

Low-Emitting Signage Wording Requirements

I am working on a project that reserved 10 parking spots for "fuel-efficient" vehicles, this is noted by spray-painted signage on each parking stall. Half of these stalls have the following verbiage: "Reserved for Fuel-Efficient Clean Air Vehicles". The other half of these stalls have the following verbiage:
Reserved for Fuel-Efficient Hybrid Vehicles".

We received a preliminary review comment that the stalls with "Hybrid" verbiage do not meet signage requirements. Isn't the inclusion of the term "fuel-efficient" sufficient to meet the intent of this requirement? All stalls are in preferred locations.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M, Revitaliza Consultores Oct 26 2015 Guest 882 Thumbs Up

I think the reviewers (and the credit intent) want ALL the parking spaces reserved for fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy.. The 5 spaces you are reserving ONLY for hybrid cars prevents electric and other fuel-efficient vehicles from using them.

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Saud Abdul Rasheed Mechanical/Sustainability Engineer, PMP, LEED AP BD+C, LEED AP O+M, Estidama PQP
Oct 21 2015
LEEDuser Member
664 Thumbs Up

Preferred Parking and LEED Interpretation 10202

Project Location: Saudi Arabia

Hi all,
We have received our Final Design Review and the credit has been denied. Now we want to appeal for the credit as the client is willing to provide Low Emitting and Fuel Efficient Vehicles. The LEED review we received is as follows:
"The additional documentation indicates that preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. for 5% of the total
parking capacity. However, the locations of the designated spaces do not appear to meet the LEED definition of preferred, as required. It
appears that there are 13 spaces located on the ground level that are more preferred than the spaces located in the parking garage.
Note that preferred spaces are those spaces located closest to the main entrance of the project (exclusive of spaces designed for
handicapped). Additionally, note that according to LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 10202, preferred parking spaces in a garage are those that are
the shortest combined driving distance from the parking garage entrance and walking distance to the project building's main
entrance(s). Therefore, it appears that the spaces within the parking garage located on the First Basement floor are more preferrable
than the designated spaces on the Second Basement floor. The documentation does not demonstrate compliance."
We had actually distributed the preferred parking in 3 basements and on ground floor. We have a total of 320 parking slots out of which 16 slots are on ground floor and the remaining are in basement 1, basement 2 and basement 3. Now I want to understand as per the LEED Interpretation 10202 should we allocate 13 slots on the ground floor as preferred parking? Because 3 of the 16 slots are handicapped parking. So we provide 13 slots on ground floor and 3 slots on basement 1 to make it a total of 16 slots which is 5% of the total parking slots? Is this the correct approach? I don't want to apply for appeal and get rejected again because of not understanding the real approach.

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deborah lucking associate, fentress architects Oct 21 2015 LEEDuser Member 1924 Thumbs Up

It's not immediately clear without seeing how the parking is laid out, but here's a suggestion -
First of all, DO NOT count the handicap stalls as preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system.. If you can accommodate all 16 preferred parking spaces on the ground floor, immediately adjacent to the handicap spaces, that would be the way to go. If not, locate the remainder (3 spaces?) in the first basement level.
The concept of "preferred" is that there is the least amount of driving and walking to get to the parking space, and from there to the building entrance.
Good luck!

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Saud Abdul Rasheed Mechanical/Sustainability Engineer, PMP, LEED AP BD+C, LEED AP O+M, Estidama PQP Oct 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 664 Thumbs Up

Thank you Deborah. I am also thinking the same. We will not include the 3 parking slots for handicapped but we will accommodate 13 out of 16 parking slots on the ground floor as preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for Low Emitting and Fuel Efficient Vehicles. We will also reserve 3 slots on First Basement and hence the total will be 16 which is the requirement to achieve the credit. I hope it works this way.

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Greg Snow Gibbons Snow Architects Inc.
Sep 18 2015
LEEDuser Member
21 Thumbs Up

Alternate Transportation: SSc4.3 and SSc4.4

Project Location: Canada

Hi Everyone,

I am filling out the LEED letter template for SSc4.3 and SSc4.4 and don't know which path/option I should check. The project is in Canada in a Campus; there are no parking allocated within the LEED boundary and no new parking added to the existing parking. I am using Campus path tpo meet the requirements of above credits i.e 3% of FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. for SSc4.3 and 5% of FTE for SSc4.4. In the LEED letter template, I am using the special circumstances path and will provide a narrative to explain the compliance.

Please advise if this procedure is correct?

I appreciate your feedback.

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Helen Kessler President, HJKessler Associates Sep 18 2015 LEEDuser Member 467 Thumbs Up

As long as you make it clear that you're using the campus approach, it sounds like what you're doing for SSc4.3 should work. Have you checked to see which option is preferable - Option 1 - preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. designated for 5% of parking spaces or Option 3 - preferred parking for 3% of FTEs? Also, if no new parking is being added, you should be able to achieve SSc4.4 without designating carpool spaces - unless the client wants to, of course. Option 3 for SSc4.4 - no new parking.

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Greg Snow Gibbons Snow Architects Inc. Sep 18 2015 LEEDuser Member 21 Thumbs Up

Hi Helen- Thanks for the feedback. I would like to elaborate more:
For SSc4.3 I am pursuing 3% of total FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. for charging station to be provided in the existing campus parking within 500m to the LEED building( campus option). Is that acceptable?

Thanks

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Helen Kessler President, HJKessler Associates Sep 20 2015 LEEDuser Member 467 Thumbs Up

I believe that the requirement is that charging stations be provided for 3% of the total parking spaces. The LEED 2009 BD+C Reference Guide doesn't say anything about 3% of FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. for charging stations.

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Rezkar Abdulmajeed Architect/LEED AP, SANA Associates LTD Sep 21 2015 Guest 176 Thumbs Up

There is zero parking in LEED project boundary and no new parking will be added. How can I figure out how many parking spaces will be utilized from the existing shared parking structure for this project? If I use the formula below;
total parking for LEED Building= Gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) of the LEED Building/total gross area for the campus X total existing parking space in the campus.
the results may come up more than the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. number in the LEED Building.

Can the campus authority provide a letter and state that a total number of XX spaces will be assigned within the existing infrastructure for LEED building, which we can use it as a baseline of our parking calculation SSc4.3 and SSc4.4 .

Your feedback is appreciated

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Rezkar Abdulmajeed Architect/LEED AP SANA Associates LTD
Aug 20 2015
Guest
176 Thumbs Up

Alternative Transportation: Alternative refueling stations 3%

Project Location: Grenada

I am working on the first LEED project in campus. There is zero parking provided within the LEED project boundary staff. The campus parking structure will be used foe the staff and the visitors of this building.

LEED 2009-campus will allow us to provide 3% of FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. of all LEED buildings.Since this is the first LEED Building in the campus 3% will be for the FTE of this building only.

Please let me know if I am doing the right thing for documenting this Credit?

Thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Rezkar, this sounds right to me.

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Greg Snow Gibbons Snow Architects Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Member 21 Thumbs Up

Tristan,
Thanks a lot for your feedback.

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Anya Fiechtl ARCHITECT, LEED AP BD+C High Plains Architects
Aug 17 2015
Guest
828 Thumbs Up

EV charging stations VS energy model

Have others on this forum documented electric vehicle charging stations in the energy model for EAp2 and EAc1? Any advice?

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Mark Zoeteman Sr. Mech Engr, FTC&H, Inc. Aug 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 93 Thumbs Up

We were able to obtain actual energy consumption data from our client from one of their existing buildings that had charging stations. We input this data into baseline and proposed energy models as a process load.

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Asa Posner Senior Sustainability Consultant Sustainable Investment Group (SIG)
Aug 03 2015
LEEDuser Member
1154 Thumbs Up

FYI... CIR has been posted re: combination of Option 1 and 2

Project Location: United States

Lots of comments and threads have occurred here regarding combining FE/LE spaces and Electric Fueling Charging stations.

FYI: A CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide has been posted (as of April 1, 2015) and it offers a prescription for how to do this. See CIR ID#10410

Ruling:
"Projects may achieve this credit using a combination of Option 1 and Option 2. Preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. must be provided for 5% of the total parking capacity, as required in Option 1. Fueling stations may be substituted for preferred parking spaces to meet this threshold such that one fueling station is equivalent to 1.67 preferred parking spaces. All other credit requirements (such as the location of the preferred parking spaces and the capacity of fueling stations) apply. The special circumstances section should be used for additional documentation."

The "preferred" location still seems to be tricky per the conversations / threads on this here in LEEDuser, but.... at least the combination question is finally spelled out.

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Dan Barton via Greengrade LEED Management Software
Jul 06 2015
Guest
500 Thumbs Up

SSc4.3: "publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area"

Project Location: United States

Our project is a classroom and faculty office building with an occupancy calculated at 89 FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. and 707 peak transients located on an urban college campus . There are no zoning requirements for parking and only 59 parking spaces are provided within our LEED boundary. Unmet parking demand for parking by occupants of our project will be satisfied by the many existing parking lots scattered around the campus outside of our LEED boundary.

Instead of publicly posting the discounted parking for LE/LF vehicles at the entrance to the lot within our LEED boundary we would like to propose posting the discount on the parking webpage of the campus website and at the parking services office where all campus parking permits are purchased. Can anyone share their experience with this approach to meeting "publicly posted" requirement for parking discount? Any helpful suggestions are appreciated.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Dan, this seems reasonable. Could you post a sign at your LEED lot, in addition to the other locations you noted?

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LEEDme STRATEGIE SRL STRATEGIE SRL
Jul 03 2015
Guest
222 Thumbs Up

Reserved parking on existingcampus parking area outside building

Project Location: Italy

We have a new office project inside a campus, there is an existing big parking area serving the campus not adiacent to the building, no parking are allocated inside our LEED boundary and not new parking will be added to the existing parking area. We do not want to include any parking into the LEED boundary and we want to attempt SSc4.3 and SSc4.4 reserving parking lots as much as required by credits. Is signage related to minimim standard for the building under certification sufficient or must we extend to all parking spaces reserved parking % and minimum standard verification? Are there other requirements in addition to signs to define and reserve parking?
Thank you
LEEDme

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Judhajit Chakraborty Building Performance Specialist, WSP Built Ecology Jul 07 2015 LEEDuser Member 15 Thumbs Up

Hello,

First of all, even though you LEED boundary does not include any parking, for SSc4.3 and SSc4.4, you should assign some parking through applicable codes and standards and put that number in PIf2. I have succesfully used the Portland Parking and Zoning code - Page 6 which states that for campuses, if there are no parking codes, then provide 1 parking spot per 600 sf of the total gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. of the project. Also there are similar standards put forward by the Institute of Transport Engineers (ITE) Parking generation 4th Ed which has been approved as well. For SSc4.4, its simple you just click on "No new parking is provided" option and explain that you are using the existing campus parking for the project.

For SSc4.3, you need to then need to choose which option you are pursuing and calculate the number of parking spots required to meet the credit requirements for that option and then provide signage details for them.

Also you must take note that if there are existing signage in the parking lot, then find out if any adjacent LEED certified building has already used those for their documentation. If yes, then you cannot double count it for your project. Provide documentation in that respect as well.

Hopefully this answers your questions.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Jul 07 2015 LEEDuser Member 1302 Thumbs Up

Another option for campus parking is to determine the percentage of building area for your project compared to the total building area for all projects on the campus that use the parking. Then allocate the number of parking spots from the total parking spots based on the same percentage. Example: all buildings on campus equals 100,000sf, and your building is 10,000sf. Your building area is 10% of whole. Parking lot has 300 spots. Allocate 30 spots to your building for LEED calculations. The signs used for your preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. will have to specifically reference your project "Reserved for Low-Emitting/Fuel-Efficient VehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. for Building XXX"

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deborah lucking associate fentress architects
Jul 01 2015
LEEDuser Member
1924 Thumbs Up

Preferred parking on surface lot or in garage structure

Project Location: United States

First of all, thanks to all for the lively discussion on LI 10202 (April through Sep 2013). And if anyone is curious, yes, LI 10202 is still being cited in Review comments.

Ours is a campus project, with surface parking close to building entrances, and garages further away. My question - what is the more "preferred" parking location - closest to building entries, or under shade (and yes, closest to the garage entries and/or elevator)?

I might add we are in a state that has high summer temps and lots of snow in winter, so shade is a very desirable thing. (Oh, and hail, too.)

Has anyone any experience of this?

Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Deborah, I would probably go with the garage, but include a short narrative in case a reviewer questions it.

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Joann Lee Heitman Architects Inc.
Jun 18 2015
LEEDuser Member
602 Thumbs Up

FEV/LEV Signs

Project Location: United States

Does the sign have to be a post type? Could it be letters painted on the ground? If it has to be a post type, can the sign have arrows pointing at either direction of the parking spaces to allow 1 sign per 2 spaces? Our project requires over 40 designated preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces and we are trying to minimize obstruction of views.
Thanks.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M, Revitaliza Consultores Jun 18 2015 Guest 882 Thumbs Up

I have participated in projects where we earned the credit by painting the signs on the ground.

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Judhajit Chakraborty Building Performance Specialist WSP Built Ecology
Jun 10 2015
LEEDuser Member
15 Thumbs Up

Using LEED version 2.2 approval as a precedent

Project Location: United States

Hello,

I am working on a campus project where there is common parking for the project I am working on and another project which is LEED platinum certified under the 2.2 version. Now I am documenting for the SSc4.3 by showing that 3% of the parking have EV charging stations. The parking capacity has been calculated using the Portland Parking and Zoning code (This method was used by the LEED certified neighboring building as well) and GBCI didn't seem to have any problems with that. There are 7 EV Charging stations on site and the LEED Platinum bldg has assigned 2 of them during their documentation. However there are no exclusive signage that restricts the use of the EV stations to only the users of that building and GBCI didn't have any issues with that. Now for the project I am working on, we have assigned two of the remaining five to our project (3% of parking) and GBCI during the first review came up with a comment about the use of assigned EV stations by other parties and that how can we show that these two will be exclusive for our facility. Now, the campus does have a policy of permit parking which is required for all the EV stations. Also there aren't enough EV stations in the campus to go by the LEED for campus route.

So, the question is, can I use the approved documentation for the LEED certified building as a precedent to approve my case? Although there is a difference in the versions, but looking at only the language for EV stations, they are same. Any advice would be highly appreciated. Thanks.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Judhajit, I would cite the v2.2 point in your communication with GBCI, but do not expect that they will approve this now just because of that. Past reviews are not precedent-setting.

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Marisa Picard
Jun 10 2015
LEEDuser Member
43 Thumbs Up

LEVs and Electric Charging Stations to share a spot

Project Location: United States

We are doing a combined approach, with both LEVs and charging stations. Since there are not location requirements on the charging station, can it be located at an LEV parking space?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Marisa, see LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 10410 for how to calculate this.

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C Michael Ross Principal HBA Architecture
Apr 27 2015
LEEDuser Member
5 Thumbs Up

School staff spaces closer to entrance than LE/FEV spaces

Our project is a high school building with parking separated into different areas for visitors, staff, and students. We have allocated 5% preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for each user group, however, many of the staff spaces are reserved for specific people (Principal, Teacher of the Year, etc.). Would it be allowable to locate these specific reserved staff spaces closer to the building entrance than the reserved staff spaces for Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. since they are integral to the function of the building and serve the operational needs of the end user? If this has been covered in a previous thread, I apologize. I have been unable to find anything on this issue that is specific to schools. I appreciate your feedback!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Hmm, how many spaces are involved? I am reluctant to say that this would be okay. Why shouldn't the school give a higher preference to people using LE vehicles? And I think it's hard to argue that these preferential spaces are integral to the operation of the building.

If this is important to the project I would request clarification from GBCI.

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Garrett Ferguson ARCH I, LEED Green Associate Perkins+Will
Apr 16 2015
LEEDuser Member
45 Thumbs Up

Fueling Capacity - multiple stations

Project Location: United States

In regards to the number of fueling stations, we have a charger that can charge 2 cars simultaneously (one plug on either side), and can reach 2 spots in either direction with a long cord. When applying for this credit, would the fueling capacity be 2 or 4?

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Ellen Mitchell Director of Sustainability, HKS, Inc. Apr 22 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4622 Thumbs Up

The credit form asks for the vehicle fueling capacity per station over an 8 hour period, so the amount of vehicles your charger can serve depends on what type of charger it is. If it is a fast charger capable of providing a full charge in 30 minutes, then it can service 16 vehicles in an 8 hour period (x2 for two plugs). If it is a Level II charger, the capacity will depend on the make and model but will be much less - if it takes 8 hours for a full charge, then your charger will only serve 1 vehicles per plug in an 8 hour period.

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GTF CPRE University of Oregon, Campus Planning & Real Estate
Apr 02 2015
Guest
30 Thumbs Up

Existing Biofuel Station on Campus

Project Location: United States

Our project is on a university campus that has an existing biofuel station for fleet vehicles. The biofuel station services the entire campus and is not located with our LEED boundary for this project. Could we receive credit for Option 2, if the existing station can supply fuel for 3% of the total vehicle capacity of the site? Would there be any additional documentation to upload besides the required information on the number of stations, alternative fuel type, manufacturer, model number, and fueling capacity per station?

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Helen Kessler President, HJKessler Associates Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Member 467 Thumbs Up

When you say site, do you mean the entire campus or do you mean just your one project. The biofuel stations would likely need to serve 3% of the total vehicle capacity of the campus.

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Mary Kay Project Coordinator Gray Construction
Apr 01 2015
LEEDuser Member
328 Thumbs Up

Fuel Stations for Shared Parking Lot Outside of LEED Boundary

Project Location: United States

Our project has no new parking. We are on a campus where there is an existing parking lot adjacent to our building, but not within our LEED project boundary. There are 420 parking spaces in this lot shared by other buildings on the campus. None of these other buildings is attempting LEED cert. This parking lot has 2 electric fuel stations. We have 41 peak employees on our project, so these 2 fuel stations would cover the 3% required for our employees. The owner tells us there are sufficient available spaces in this lot for our 41 employees. Would this meet the intent of Option 2 of SSc4.3? Would we need to provide signage reserving the fuel stations for employees of our building only? Thank you.

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Helen Kessler President, HJKessler Associates Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Member 467 Thumbs Up

Signage would be required to reserve the fuel stations for employees of your building only, although you may need more than signage to ensure that those spaces are only used by your building's employees. I'm thinking of other projects that I've worked on where we've needed more than signage for bike racks - such as a locked enclosure. (We have never done that, but that appeared to be what was required.)

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LEEDme STRATEGIE SRL STRATEGIE SRL Jul 03 2015 Guest 222 Thumbs Up

We have a similar situation but our campus existing parking lot is not adjacent to our building. Can we attempt SSc4.3 and SSc4.4?

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Robert Shields R.S. Mowery & Sons, Inc.
Apr 01 2015
LEEDuser Member
25 Thumbs Up

Car Dealership

Project Location: United States

We are working on a project to build a Toyota Dealership in Pennsylvania and the owner is seeking LEED Certification (LEED 2009). The dilemma is this; for counting parking spaces do we include those spaces dedicated to car inventory or just include dealership employee and customer parking? Would appreciate a response.

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Helen Kessler President, HJKessler Associates Apr 01 2015 LEEDuser Member 467 Thumbs Up

Just include employee and customer parking for SSc4.3. I've had projects with fleet vehicles and we have not included the fleet vehicle parking spaces in the count of parking spaces for SSc4.3.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Apr 01 2015 LEEDuser Member 7136 Thumbs Up

Hi Robert,
Yes, Helen is correct. I've had a few dealerships, and we don't include the car inventory. Just make sure that your site plan is very clear about labeling the different types of spaces.

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ELIZABETH REITER Architect 1 WORKSBUREAU
Mar 26 2015
Guest
4 Thumbs Up

LEFEV Parking spots in shared garage w/ no dedicated spaces

Project Location: Saudi Arabia

Regarding Option 1 of providing preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for LEFEV for 5% of the total vehicle parking capacity of the site. Here is our issue/question. We have two buildings being submitted as a 'campus' thru LEED. We are providing no new parking for our specific project as there is a dedicated parking garage with several thousand parking spots for the adjacent building's use. The garage does not specify an allowable # of spots for any of the adjacent buildings. We would like to apply for this credit by creating parking spots for LEFEV specifically for our two buildings. Using the total vehicle parking capacity of the garage will not work as it is not all for our project and would require a HUGE amount of LEFEV spots. How can we approach this credit? Can we calculate the spots based on the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. of our two buildings? Thanks in advance.

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Tak Louie, AIA Dir. of LEED Services, Antunovich Associates Aug 10 2015 LEEDuser Member 75 Thumbs Up

We've encountered a similar situation, although it's not a campus, where we were sharing a large parking complex with the other users. Our project signed a contract with the Owner/ Operator, as you will read, but the balance of the GBCI comment might help you to see the viewpoint of a shared garage. Your situation may result in having a lot of LEV/FEV parking spaces but it would certainly be a benefit to all users beyond your LEED certified project.

"The LEED project parking is located in a portion of a parking area that is shared with other occupants of the neighboring building and the provided parking contract states that the 50 dedicated parking spaces are provided in the form of parking passes and the spaces themselves are unreserved. If parking is to be shared with neighboring building occupants, provide a narrative or signage samples indicating how sufficient preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. will be reserved for occupants of the LEED project building. Alternatively, the project may demonstrate that preferred parking is provided for at least 5% of the total parking capacity of the shared parking area. In this case, provide revised site plans, calculations, and a narrative to demonstrate compliance at the whole-parking area level."

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M Revitaliza Consultores
Mar 25 2015
Guest
882 Thumbs Up

Parking spaces owned

I see this credit mainly oriented to shopping malls and office buildings, but how should I address a project where all parking spaces are going to be SOLD to individual buyers? Are we still eligible for this credit?

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Roberto Meza Sustainable Building Consultant SPHERA Sustainable Building Consultants
Jan 27 2015
LEEDuser Member
613 Thumbs Up

Parking spaces

In one of our projects (a bank branch) we have 4 parking spaces out of parking lot, only for employees, these 4 spaces are separated of the parking lot by a gate and they are not available for the public.

These 4 parking spaces count for the total number of parking spaces?

Thanks for the collaboration

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Ellen Mitchell Director of Sustainability, HKS, Inc. Jan 29 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4622 Thumbs Up

I would say yes. Typically, when I have a parking lot that has divided uses, I try to allocate preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for 5% of each usage type. So in this case, it might be a good idea to have one of those 4 spaces identified as preferred parking.

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Roberto Meza Sustainable Building Consultant, SPHERA Sustainable Building Consultants Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Member 613 Thumbs Up

But, if these 4 spaces are reserved for 4 specific workers; they count in parking capacity calculations?

Thanks

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S. Macgregor
Dec 30 2014
Guest
6 Thumbs Up

Empty parking spots

Project Location: Canada

We are installing alternative-fuel refueling stations, with preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system.. We are also creating preferred parking for carpools.

An announcement has been made company-wide that these spots are available and must be reserved. If no one reserves them, must they remain empty to comply?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 08 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Sandi, I don't think the reservation policy is really in the spirit of the LEED credit. Making people jump through that hoop to have a parking space that is already supposedly designated for them doesn't seem necessary. Also, do you have the signage? This should communicate clearly whom the spaces are for.

Ultimately if you don't have any takers, will other people figure out that these spaces are empty and use them? Probably. If this happens, it will have transitioned to a facilities maintenance question, which is in the scope of LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. or the LEED Dynamic Plaque, should you use one of those tools, and not your LEED-NC certification.

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Tim Gaidis Sustainable Design Leader HOK
Nov 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
39 Thumbs Up

Can FEV/LEV Spaces In Existing Parking Areas Count?

Project Location: United States

Hi all - I'm working on a v3 NC major renovation project. There is no new parking being added to the project, but some of the building users have access to a limited number of underground parking spaces at an adjacent building that is outside of the LEED boundary. It has been offered to convert an appropriate (or potentially greater) number of the spaces in this adjacent area to FEV/LEV spaces to meet this credit. Would this be a valid approach?
Thanks so much for your input...
Tim

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Helen Kessler President, HJKessler Associates Nov 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 467 Thumbs Up

We are doing essentially the same thing on a project - designating 5% of existing parking spaces for LEV/FEV cars. This worked on another project a few years ago and I am anticipating that it will work again. Make sure the spaces are adjacent to the ADA spaces. In other words, they need to be preferred spaces.

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Tim Gaidis Sustainable Design Leader, HOK Nov 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 39 Thumbs Up

Thanks so much for the info and advice Helen! I think this gives us room to proceed with an attempt at this approach. Any other comments/input welcome!
Tim

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, JLL Dec 11 2014 Guest 5633 Thumbs Up

according to the existing published guidance you will need to either 1) mark the spots as usable by only the LEED project occupants or 2) provide preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for 5% of the total vehicle parking capacity- not just the subsection of spaces expected to be used by the LEED building occupants.

Source: LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #2076

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Marisa Picard
Oct 20 2014
LEEDuser Member
43 Thumbs Up

Updated ACEE list of qualifying cars score >40

Tbe resources available through LEED User is outdated, it only shows the qualifying vehicles up through 2012. Here is the list through 2014.

http://greenercars.org/news.htm

One this link, file is under "documents" titled "model year 1998–2014 low emission vehicles"

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Kimberlyn Caoagas
Sep 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
84 Thumbs Up

SSc4.3 Option 2: How long must charge stations be installed ?

Project Location: United States

How long must charge stations be installed in order to be credit compliant? How is the project affected if clients remove charge stations if they are not being used?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Kimberlyn, this question is similar to many other issues that might come up on a LEED-NC project.

The LEED certification is for the project as built. There are just a few specific requirements that carry into operation, such as MPR6 for energy reporting. While it would not be in the spirit of LEED or in good faith to rip out a charging station just after it is installed, there is no specific requirement in LEED for longevity. The assumption is that it would be there for the life of the building, pretty much, but there is no specific LEED-NC consequence if that does not turn out.

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