NC-2009 SSc4.4: Alternative Transportation—Parking Capacity

  • NC_SS4-4_Type1_Parking Final Diagram
  • Plenty of options

    This credit offers a variety of strategies for residential, non-residential and mixed use projects. These strategies help to reduce the number of cars on the road, cut down on the sprawl of parking facilities, and decrease the negative environmental impacts of parking infrastructure, including stormwater runoff and the urban heat islandA densely populated area in which pavement and buildings absorb, store, and release solar energy, making the vicinity warmer than it would be if the pavement and buildings were not present. effect. 

    Getting mileage out of your efforts

    Assess the location and context of your project to make sure that carpooling, public transportation (see SSc4.1), walking and bicycle commuting (see SSc4.2) are viable strategies for reducing single-occupancy vehicle use.

    If all you do is limit parking capacity in an area where options other than driving aren’t viable, your efforts could prove frustrating to drivers rather than truly beneficial. You may also want to consider implementing a program to incentivize public transit and carpooling. 

    Consider no new parking

    This credit is fairly straightforward for most projects. Projects that either have no parking or are not providing additional parking automatically qualify. To make this work from a practical perspective, it’s a good idea to locate in an area with good public transit, pedestrian, and bicycle access.

    You can also provide parking, with some caveats

    Non-residential projects that will be providing new parking will need to reduce parking capacity to not exceed minimum zoning requirements and, for LEED-CS projects For projects providing parking for less than 3% of full-time equivalentFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 40 hours per week in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per week divided by 40. Multiple shifts are included or excluded depending on the intent and requirements of the credit. (FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.) building occupants, provide preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for carpools.

    Sign for reserved parking for carpoolResidential projects that will be providing new parking will need to reduce parking capacity to not exceed minimum zoning requirements and facilitate programs to encourage carpooling among residents. 

    Mixed-use projects have to meet both requirements, on a proportional basis.

    Follow these basic steps when approaching this credit

    • Identify the appropriate strategy based on your project type and the context of the individual project. If providing no new parking, go ahead and document the credit. If providing parking, follow the remaining steps.
    • Confirm the FTE for the project.
    • Confirm local minimum zoning requirements for parking capacity.
    • Determine the number of preferred parking spaces required or develop a ride-sharing program for your project.
    • Include parking locations in the construction documents to ensure that signage and additional markings are included in the construction budget.
    • Consider earning an exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point for a comprehensive transportation management plan.
    • Document the credit and upload the documentation to LEED Online.
  • Don't double-count parking spaces

    If your project is pursuing both SSc4.3 and SSc4.4, be careful not to double-count preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces allotted for those credits. The total number of preferred parking spaces must be equal to those required for SSc4.3, plus those required for SSc4.4. The same parking space cannot count for both credits (although they do not have to be distinguished through signage).

  • FAQs for SSc4.4

    How does one account for off-site parking. Should the LEED boundary encompass this parking? Or alternatively may the project pursue the "no new parking" option?

    The Minimum Program Requirements supplemental guidance document covers these situations in some detail. The boundary needs to include "contiguous land that is associated with and supports normal building operations."

    The intent of the credit is to reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use. New parking provided off-site does not meet the credit intent. Although its applicability to LEED 2009 has not been considered (it was issued for NC-v2.2, LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #2120 issued 5/23/08 states, “if there will be additional parking built as a result of the construction of the [project], even if this parking is off site, then the No New Parking option cannot be used.”

    If a project does not provide parking onsite but provides a shuttle service to new parking offsite, is that considered “no new parking” since the new parking is not onsite?

    See the previous question.

    Does rebuilding an existing parking area with fewer spaces mean “no new parking”?

    Yes. Rebuilding a current parking lot with fewer spaces will meet the credit intent.

    If a non-residential project wants to use Option 4, which references the  ITE Parking Generation Study, where does one upload and submit required documentation? There is no Option 4 choice in the credit form.

    Since the LEED Online form doesn't have an Option 4 choice, you'll need to indicate with the checkbox under "Additional Details" that you're using an alternative compliance path. For more information, see LEEDuser's analysis of the ITE study.

    How do you designate preferred parking if the parking facility is not under the owner's control?

    You would need to work with the parking authority or management to designate the preferred parking.

    How does one apply minimum zoning requirements to a project when it is part of a larger complex or campus?

    The LEED MPRs require you to allocate parking between multiple buildings. Allocation may be determined by an "appropriate percentage" of use.

    Are there standards regarding how to document the spaces that will be dedicated as reserved?

    There aren't specific standards, but projects are expected to adequately communicate to occupants about the location and purpose of preferred parking spaces, typically by use of pole, wall-mounted, and/or pavement markings.

    How does a carpool/vanpool relate to a shared car service/company when it comes to the preferred parking requirements of this credit?

    If a proper contract agreement of two years and designated space are provided through an alternative compliance method, then a shared car service may be accepted as a “carpool or vanpool” substitute. See LEED Interpretation ID#3138, 1/26/2005, in which Reviewers define car share services, and LEED Interpretation ID#3137, 5/24/2004, in which Zipcar is discussed as a carpool substitute for residential projects.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Determine if your project will be providing new or additional parking. 


  • Providing no new parking is the easiest compliance option. This is a great option for projects that already have adequate parking spaces or that are in close proximity to public transit (also earning SSc4.1: Alternative Transportation—Public Transportation Access). However, this is not possible for all projects. 


  • If your project is an existing site with parking, you can revamp the parking spaces (and even rearrange the layout) and still earn this credit as long as the number of new parking spaces does not exceed the number of previously existing parking spaces. Consider reducing the parking area, however, if it’s more than the project needs. This will help you comply with credits such as SSc6.1: Stormwater Management.


  • Research local and state tax incentives for carpooling programs. In order to qualify for state or local programs the carpooling program must typically be verifiable and meet specific requirements. 


  • Reserved for carpool signThis is generally a low-cost credit. Reducing built parking capacity can even reduce construction and maintenance costs. The only added cost might be signage for preferred parking spaces, if applicable. 

Schematic Design

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  • Identify whether your project is non-residential, residential or mixed-use. Depending on your building type, assess each of the compliance paths separately to see which best suits your project’s scope.


  • Some projects find it helpful to assess the demand for parking. You may find that many occupants will walk or bike to the building. If the demand is actually less than called for by minimum zoning requirements, consider seeking permission from local authorities to provide less than the minimum number of parking spaces. A traffic study performed by transportation planners or engineers can be helpful here. 


  • Case 1: Non-Residential Projects 


  • Consider the four options  for non-residential projects to earn this credit:

    • Option 1: Do not exceed minimum zoning requirements for parking capacity and provide preferred parking for carpools and vanpools for 5% of the total parking spaces.
    • Option 2: Projects that provide parking for less than 5% of the building FTE occupancy need to provide preferred parking spaces for carpools and vanpools for 5% of total parking spaces or provide discounted parking rates for carpools and vanpools. 
    • Option 3: Provide no new parking.
    • Option 4: For projects that have no minimum local zoning requirements, provide 25% fewer parking spaces than the applicable standard listed in the 2003 Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) “Parking Generation” study. (This option was not included in the original edition of the LEED 2009 Reference Guide, but was added through the April 2010 addenda.)

  • “Preferred parking” refers to designated spaces located nearest the building entrance, covered, or at a discount price, but not providing preference over handicapped parking. Preferred parking spaces must be clearly designated, for example, with a sign that states “Carpool and vanpool parking only.”


  • There are no “LEED Police.” Use of preferred parking spaces required for non-residential buildings are largely based on the honor system and the integrity of building management and occupants. Consider incorporating an enforcement mechanism that will ensure carpool parking spaces are not abused. To ensure that preferred parking polices are respected, consider the following strategies:

    • Use signage in conjunction with parking permits.
    • A sticker program can be implemented to identify the carpool vehicles, which have access to preferred parking spaces. 
    • Clearly communicate to building occupants the steps required to acquire a parking permit or sticker from building management.

     


  • Minor costs may also be associated with enforcing preferred parking spaces.


  • If you’re not careful, limiting parking capacity could be frustrating for occupants, and not behavior-changing. Consider strategies that go above and beyond the credit requirements such as carpooling incentives and providing information on public transit options. This could also help projects earn an Exemplary Performance point for a Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan. 


  • Case 2: Residential


  • Determine which of the two options for residential projects is most appropriate:

    • Option 1: Do not exceed minimum zoning requirements for parking capacity, and provide infrastructure and programs to encourage carpooling and vanpooling.
    • Option 2: Provide no new parking.

  • Case 3: Mixed-Use


  • Mixed-use projects such as apartments over street-level retail, have two options to earn this credit, determine which option is best appropriate for your project:

    • Option 1: If the project is less than 10% commercial, follow the options for residential projects. If the project has more than 10% commercial space, the commercial space should follow the options for non-residential compliance and the residential portion should follow the options for residential compliance. 
    • Option 2: Provide no new parking.

Design Development

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  • Case 1: Non-Residential projects 


  • Depending on your compliance path option:

    • Option 1: Check local codes and make sure your planned parking capacity meets but does not exceed minimum parking requirements. Identify preferred parking spaces for carpools and vanpools for 5% of total parking capacity.
    • Option 2: Calculate the total number of parking spaces and the project FTE. Make sure the FTE number is consistent across all LEED credits. If your project provides parking for less than 5% of FTE occupants, identify the preferred parking for carpool and vanpools for 5% of the total parking spaces. 
    • Option 3: Verify that the project is not providing any new parking spaces.
    • Option 4: Review the applicable ITE study to determine the proper number of parking spaces for credit compliance.

  • If providing new parking for the project, begin developing literature or flyers that communicate to building occupants the programs and infrastructure to support the reduced use of single-occupancy vehicles.  


  • If new parking is provided within the LEED boundary, the owner must sign off on the LEED Online credit form stating that preferred spaces will be indicated with signage and will be communicated to building occupants (via flyers, bulletin boards, or handbooks, for example) or that discounted parking will be provided with at least a 20% discount rate to all customers and available for at least two years, and  communicated to building occupants. 


  • All parking spaces in the LEED boundary are affected, so 5% of the total parking spaces within the LEED boundary must be marked as “preferred,” even if only a portion of the parking area is for the project building’s use.


  • You may want to assess the likelihood that building occupants will carpool to work and use the reserved carpooling parking spaces; you may find that it is best to provide carpooling incentives to motivate people to minimize single-occupancy vehicles. 


  • Case 2: Residential Projects


  • Ride boardProceed based on your chosen compliance path:

    • Option 1: Check local zoning laws and make sure your project’s parking capacity meets but does not exceed minimum zoning requirements, and develop the infrastructure and support programs for minimizing single-occupancy vehicles. Consider incorporating programs for car-share, ride boards (or website), carpool drop off locations, designated parking for carpools, and shuttle services to mass transit. 
    • Option 2: Verify that the project is not providing any new parking spaces.

  • If providing new parking, determine infrastructure and programs that will be most effective at reducing single-occupancy vehicles at your project. This can include developing a carpooling policy, defining procedures and eligibility requirements for participating in a carpooling incentive program, creating and distributing tags for vehicle identification, creating communication materials about the carpool program, providing a rideshare board, and designated preferred parking and drop off areas for carpool. Begin developing materials to communicate these programs to occupants—this will be required for your LEED Online submittal.


  • Residential projects can include preferred parking spaces for carpools as part of their program to reduce single-occupancy vehicles. “Preferred parking” refers to designated spaces located nearest the building entrance, covered, or at a discount price, but not providing preference over disabled parking. 


  • Assess whether programs to minimize single-occupancy vehicles might be successful given the nature and location of the project. Consider surveying future building occupants about their interest in a commercial vehicle-sharing program or shuttle buses. Providing access to a vehicle-share program or to promote carpooling may help to attract occupants to a multi-tenant building.


  • Consider whether there are existing vehicle-share programs in the area that you can utilize. If not, research vendors that can help develop a program.


  • When choosing among options to reduce single-occupancy vehicles, consider the time that will be spent by building personnel in administering a car-sharing plan, keeping a ride-board updated, or organizing shuttle services. Also consider the type of infrastructure that may be needed for specific programs, like a carpool drop-off area with signage, or preferred parking spaces for carpools, car-share preferred parking space, website for ride-board, etc. Procedures and policies may need to be developed and maintained over time. 


  • Case 3: Mixed-Use Projects


  • Proceed depending on your chosen compliance path:

    • Option 1: Verify the proportions of residential and commercial areas in your project. If less than 10% of the development is commercial in nature, follow the requirements for Case 2 for residential spaces—see details above. If more than 10% of the development is commercial space, follow the requirements of Case 2 for the residential spaces, and Case 1 for the commercial portions—see details above.
    • Option 2: Verify that the project is not providing any new parking spaces.

  • If more than 10% of the total project area is non-residential space, you will need to follow two paths for the different portions (residential vs. non-residential) of the project. This may seem complicated but is really quite simple. Typically mixed-use buildings have separate parking for the commercial and residential portions of the building. In this case you would designate 5% of the commercial parking spaces as preferred parking. The portion for residents, is exempt from the preferred parking spaces but you will need to implement programs and infrastructure to reduce single-occupancy vehicles. If your parking area is shared between the commercial and residential portions of your building, you will determine the preferred parking spaces based on commercial FTE occupants, and provide 5% preferred parking for that portion of spaces. 

Construction Documents

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  • If pursuing an option that makes provisions for carpools, design your facility to include transportation amenities for a carpooling program such as appropriate drop-off areas, preferred parking for carpools and vanpools, and space to post ride-share program and other relevant information. 


  • Ensure that preferred parking spaces are included in your total parking count and on construction documents. 


  • Mark your parking areas, and any carpool drop-off areas, in the parking layout drawings. Preferred parking spaces must be clearly designated, for example with a sign that states, “Carpool and vanpool parking only.”


  • Finalize the carpooling program details and infrastructure, including any literature, employee brochures, newsletters and other materials that inform building occupants about the carpooling program and its benefits (either access to preferred parking or discounted parking rates). 

Construction

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  • When preferred parking is provided for carpooling or vanpooling, provide appropriate signage for the parking spaces. 


  • Complete the LEED Online credit form according to the following instructions, based on the approach taken.


  • Case 1: Non-Residential Projects


  • Confirm whether the project will be providing new parking within the LEED project boundary. 


  • Option 1: Provide minimum parking spaces required by local zoning code and total onsite vehicle parking capacity. Confirm if preferred parking will be in the form of designated parking spaces or discount parking rate. 


  • If designated parking spaces are being implemented provide the total onsite vehicle parking capacity, the number of preferred parking spaces for carpools or vanpools, and the owner must sign the LEED Online credit form stating that spaces will be reserved and indicated with signage and occupants will be made aware of these designated spaces. Projects will also need to upload a site plan showing parking areas with the preferred parking spaces highlighted. 


  • If discounted parking is being implemented the owner must sign the LEED Online credit form stating that the parking rate will be discounted at least 20%, it will be available to all customers and publicly posted at the parking entrance, that it will be available for at least two years, and that the discount will be communicated to building occupants. Projects will need to upload a document showing that building occupants have been made aware of the discounted rates (for example, with an excerpt from the employee handbook, or a brochure).


  • Option 2: Provide the non-residential FTE occupancy and total onsite parking capacity. Confirm if preferred parking will be in the form of designated parking spaces or discount parking rate. 


  • If designated parking spaces are being implemented, provide the total on-site vehicle parking capacity, the number of preferred parking spaces for carpools or vanpools, and the owner must sign the LEED Online credit form stating that spaces will be reserved and indicated with signage and occupants will made aware of these designated spaces. Projects will also need to upload a site plan showing parking areas with the preferred parking spaces highlighted. 


  • If discounted parking is being implemented the owner must sign the LEED Online credit form stating that the parking rate will be discounted at least 20%, it will be available to all customers and publicly posted at the parking entrance, that it will be available for at least two years, and that the discount will be communicated to building occupants. Upload a document showing that building occupants have been made aware of the discounted rates.


  • Option 3: The owner must sign the LEED Online credit form verifying that no new parking was incorporated within the LEED boundary. 


  • Option 4: Since this option was added in April 2010, after the LEED Online credit form was finalized, it is not currently mentioned on the form. Document this option using the alternative compliance path instead of one of the standard paths.


  • Case 2: Residential Projects


  • Confirm whether the project will be providing new parking within the LEED boundary. 


  • Option 1: Provide minimum parking required by local zoning and total onsite parking capacity. Upload literature showing the communications between building owner and residents as to the infrastructure and support programs that have been implemented to minimize single-occupancy vehicles usage. Upload a site plan showing any infrastructure related to this credit such as preferred parking spots or carpool drop-off areas.


  • Option 2: The owner must sign the LEED Online credit form verifying that no new parking was incorporated within the LEED boundary. 


  • Case 3: Mixed-Use Projects


  • Confirm whether the project will be providing new parking within the LEED boundary. 


  • Confirm whether the project is primarily residential (10% or less of the building is commercial) or mixed use.


  • If primarily residential, follow the Case 2 residential requirements above.


  • If mixed use, follow a combination of the Case 2 residential and Case 1 non-residential requirements above. 

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Communicate with building occupants about the infrastructure or programs in place to minimize single-occupancy vehicles. Take this opportunity to develop an educational program for occupants. Develop literature and post signs in public areas and on the company’s intranet. Make it as easy as possible for people to find out about and use the program. 


  • Using clear signage to designate areas for carpooling and sharing information about rides is a first step in facilitating communication about such programs. These areas should be easily accessible to all building occupants. 


  • Building personnel are responsible for establishing procedures relating to carpooling or vanpooling and for administering any programs, as applicable. 


  • Building staff must administer the parking plan: preferred or discounted parking, or vehicle sharing. Procedures and policies must be developed. Consider implementing enforcement mechanisms as well. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    SS Credit 4.4: Alternative transportation - parking capacity

    2 Points

    Intent

    To reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use.

    Requirements

    Case 1 - Non-residential projects

    Option 1

    Size parking capacity to meet, but not exceed, minimum local zoning requirements.

    Provide preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system.1 for carpools or vanpools for 5% of the total parking spaces.

    OR

    Option 2

    For projects that provide parking for less than 5% of full-time equivalentFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 40 hours per week in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per week divided by 40. Multiple shifts are included or excluded depending on the intent and requirements of the credit. (FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.) building occupants:

    Provide preferred parking for carpools or vanpools, marked as such, for 5% of total parking spaces. Providing a discounted parking rate is an acceptable substitute for preferred parking for carpool or vanpool vehicles. To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all customers (i.e. not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area, and available for a minimum of 2 years.

    OR

    Option 3

    Provide no new parking.

    OR

    Option 4

    For projects that have no minimum local zoning requirements, provide 25% fewer parking spaces than the applicable standard listed in the 2003 Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) “Parking Generation” study at http://www.ite.org.

    Case 2 - Residential Projects

    Option 1

    Size parking capacity to meet, but not exceed, minimum local zoning requirements

    Provide infrastructure and support programs to facilitate shared vehicle use such as carpool drop-off areas, designated parking for vanpools, car-share services, ride boards and shuttle services to mass transit.

    OR

    Option 2

    Provide no new parking.

    Case 3 - Mixed use (residential with commercial/residential) projects

    Option 1 - Commercial and non-commercial requirements

    Mixed-use buildings with less than 10% commercial area must be considered residential and adhere to the residential requirements in Case 2. For mixed-use buildings with more than 10% commercial area, the commercial space must adhere to non-residential requirements in Case 1 and the residential component must adhere to residential requirements in Case 2.

    OR

    Option 2

    Provide no new parking.

    OR
    Option 3

    For projects that have no minimum local zoning requirements, provide 25% fewer parking spaces than the applicable standard listed in the 2003 Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) "Parking Generation" study at www.ite.org.

    1For the purposes of this credit “preferred parking” refers to the parking spots that are closest to the main entrance of the project (exclusive of spaces designated for handicapped persons) or parking passes provided at a discounted price. To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all eligible customers (i.e. not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area, and available for a minimum of 2 years.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Minimize parking lot/garage size. Consider sharing parking facilities with adjacent buildings. Consider alternatives that will limit the use of single occupancy vehicles.

    FOOTNOTES

    1 To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all customers (i.e., not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area, and available for a minimum of 2 years. (For the purposes of this credit “preferred parking” refers to the parking spots that are closest to the main entrance of the project (exclusive of spaces designated for handicapped persons) or parking passes provided at a discounted price.)

Web Tools

Ride sharing site

This website helps to organize carpooling trips and rewards members for reduced single-occupancy vehicles. 


Tips for Vanpooling

Provides general tips for setting up a vanpool program, and provides a template for writing a program for vanpooling. 


eRideshare.com

Website set up to organize carpooling.

Articles

Benefits of Carpooling

Article on the benefits and tips for carpooling. 

Software Tools

Carpooling network

For Short and Long Distance Carpooling: Through the Carpooling Network’s integrated software, you can find carpool mates for your single or long distance trips, whether in Canada or the United States.

Publications

Commuting Guide for Employers

This website outlines strategies employers can use to encourage employees to commute by bicycle. 


U.S. EPA and Department of Transportation, Best Workplaces for Commuters

This program publicly recognizes employers who have exemplary commuter benefits programs. It provides tools, guidance, and promotions to help employers give commuter benefits, reap the financial gains, and achieve national recognition.


U.S. EPA, Transportation and Air Quality

This site provides information on the types and effects of air pollution associated with automobile use  and links to resources for organizations interested in promoting commuter choice programs.

Organizations

Smart Commute

Smart Commute is a program of Research Triangle Park that has valuable information about telecommuting and carpool programs useful for any organization. 

Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan

A comprehensive transportation management plan is one way to earn an Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point under SSc4. 

No New Parking

Pursuing the option to provide no new parking is straightforward to document, as with this sample narrative.

Site Plan – Parking Meeting Local Zoning Requirements

Option 1

Document Option 1 with a site plan like this one, showing parking meeting but not exceeding local zoning requirements.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms: (newest)

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

292 Comments

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John Covello LEED AP BD+C, EBOM, LEED and Sustainability Manager Development Management Group
Oct 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
389 Thumbs Up

Parking for Electric Buggies (golf carts)

I am with an eco-resort project in Thailand. We are using electric buggies as the primary means of transportation around the resort. We were planning on applying for Option 1 and not exceed the local minimum capacity. Would parking for these buggies count towards the parking capacity? They are commuter vehicles and stay only on site. Thanks for your feedback.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Sep 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
1791 Thumbs Up

Parking spaces for transients only

Our project is located central area of metropolitan city. The facility is university campus building. Some public transportation systems are available, so workers and students are banned to use parking spaces for commuting by the university rule. There are several parking spaces planned within the project boundary, but these are for transients visitors only. In this case, it is unpractical for our project to provide car pool or van pool, because no one uses these spaces. Is it impossible for our project to achieve this credit points, even if the number of parking spaces don't exceed the local minimum zoning requirement for parking spaces?

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0
Hieu Huynh Environmental Engineer
Aug 27 2014
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

Designated vanpool parking space for Case 2

Hi, My project is a mixed use building with apartments and Im confused with vanpool parking spaces for residential portion. Firstly Does only design vanpool parking comply with LEED requirement? do I have to provide drop off area, car share at the same time, etc.. Secondly, how many parking spaces are required for vanpool and is there any requirement on location of vanpool parking for residential? it must be on basement 1 near the entrance (like LEFE car) or it can be anywhere in the parking?

Many thanks for your advice

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0
Eric Thompson Architect NBBJ
Jul 02 2014
LEEDuser Member
331 Thumbs Up

"Preferred" Parking = reserved, cannot be used by others?

I have a project where we only have 3 parking spaces provided, resulting in a substantial reduction from the baseline.

However, the client is reluctant to reserve these exclusively for carpools/vanpools, since there are so few spaces. The language in the LEED credit / Reference Guide does not specifically say that these have to be reserved for only carpools / vanpools, just that they should be "preferred" or prioritized, and that they need to be the nearest one, etc. However, examples of signage I've found, including the one in the description at the top of this page, seem to say that they are reserved only for carpool/vanpool.

Can someone confirm either way, and if it does have to be reserved for only these vehicles, can you show me the citation where it says that?

Thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 03 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Eric, the parking should be reserved for carpools/vanpools. If it is not, then the signage and credit requirements really have no meaning. The credit language states this, I believe.

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Sadie Martin
Jun 02 2014
Guest
108 Thumbs Up

Parking Capacity includes capacity for Future Development

We are working on a project that is trying to jumpstart development in the city center. Our project is providing more parking then needed by the building so that future buildings nearby can tie into the parking garage instead of creating new surface lots. Has anyone had success with arguing for a case like this? If we receive a signed letter of intent from these future devopements saying that they will be tieing into this parking garage, could we only count the spaces that will be reserved for our building within our LEED documentation even though the entire garage is within our boundary?

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William Weaver Sustainability Practice Lead, JLL Jun 02 2014 LEEDuser Member 1312 Thumbs Up

Sadie,

I think what you are arguing is feasible. To do so, you would need to provide a parking plan that clearly defines which parking spots are dedicated to which development. In addition to the letter, you may also need to provide signage details showing how the parking restrictions will be communicated to visitors. If you're not providing this signage, you likely won't achieve the credit as someone visiting one building could easily park in a section dedicated to another development.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jun 02 2014 LEEDuser Expert 14852 Thumbs Up

How sure are these future developments? It seems to me that the only way this will be acceptable is if they are under construction and agreements are in place between your project and other projects. If those projects go for LEED certification, how will those projects dedicate parking in your project? Who is maintaining the garage?

The intent of the credit is to minimize the impacts of automotive traffic and it sounds like your project doesn't fit that intent. Not all credits fit all projects.

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager HKS, Inc.
May 29 2014
LEEDuser Expert
3420 Thumbs Up

ITE Analysis

Hi Tristan,
I am looking for information on the ITE study for a project in Mexico. When I click on the "LEEDuser's analysis of the ITE study" link located in FAQs, nothing happens. Can you check to make sure that it is working properly on your end?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Ellen, I'm sorry for the slow response. I have fixed the link above, and here it is as well: http://www.leeduser.com/topic/money-guesswork-ite-parking-generation-study-2003-SSc4.4-LEED-NC-certification

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Francis Porter
Mar 31 2014
Guest
347 Thumbs Up

Mixed-Use vs. Non-residential Classification for a Hotel

Hi,

I am working on a hotel which has several buildings, one main building, two different groups of clusters, 2 suite buildings, and a seperate back of house and a seperate employee residences. The hotel is far away from any town so there is a residential facility for the employees. My question is if we should treat this project as a mixed-use (hotel + residential) or if we should treat this project as a non-residential (hotel only excluding the employee residences treating them as part of the hotel)?

Cheers!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Francis, it sounds mixed use to me, relative to this credit. Relative to LEED as a whole, I would check MPR2 and whether it's a good idea to lump all those buildings together under one LEED certification.

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Eddie Cuevas
Mar 25 2014
Guest
43 Thumbs Up

Exemplary Performance Compliance

I am currently working on a nonresidential project on a college campus that is seeking to obtain an EP point by implementing parking for high-occupancy vehicles. The project building is providing no new parking. In order to meet the exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. requirements, we would like to convert several parking spots located on the site of an adjacent building (that the project building is serving as an expansion for) to reserved spots for carpools. Would this be an acceptable way to obtain an exemplary performance point?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Eddie, I don't think so, as that is not an established way to earn and EP point under this credit. You would need to complete an comprehensive transportation management plan like the example shown in the Documentation Toolkit above.

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Keith Steurer Structural Engineer Shive-Hattery, Inc.
Mar 14 2014
LEEDuser Member
396 Thumbs Up

Stall count: Vehicles vs. Mopeds

For a project at a University, we are providing 102 parking spaces for cars and 50 spaces for mopeds. Any advice on weather we would enter the total number of parking spaces as 102 or 152, or something different? Thanks.

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E H Sustainability Architect Mar 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 3101 Thumbs Up

Hi Keith. You would exclude the moped parking from the overall parking count for SSc4.3 & 4.4. However, when looking at SSc7.1, you need to include all the parking areas. (This is what we have been instructed to do by GBCI on past projects, still waiting for the addenda to clarify this offically.)

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Keith Steurer Structural Engineer, Shive-Hattery, Inc. Mar 31 2014 LEEDuser Member 396 Thumbs Up

We are going to give that a try. Thank you for the advice~

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William Weaver Sustainability Practice Lead JLL
Mar 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
1312 Thumbs Up

HOV vs. Carpool/Vanpool

This feels like a question in semantics, but I'm going to throw it out there anyway. I'm working on a project for the Department of Transportation, and they are planning on providing signage for preferred spots for High Occupancy Vehicles (HOV). The signage will specifically read 'Reserved HOV Parking Only.' In the particular state where this project is located, HOV is generically defined as a vehicle containing two or more passengers. Similarly, a carpool vehicle is effectively two or more passengers sharing a ride in a single vehicle. In essence, they are effectively the same. However, I have in the past experienced reviewers who are excruciatingly particular about the wording on signage. In this particular scenario, do you think HOV preferred signage meets the credit criteria and will suffice as carpool preferred signage?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 10 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

William, this seems reasonable to me. However, as you note, reviewers can be very particular. I think that before you commit to the signage it would be safest to contact GBCI to check. Let us know what you find out.

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Tim Gaidis Sustainable Design Leader, HOK May 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 5 Thumbs Up

Extending this chain a bit further, I understand that you can combine wording on signage for LEV + Carpool spaces as long as the sum total of both SSc4.3 + SSc4.4 spaces are allocated - thus 5% LEV spaces + 5% Carpool spaces = 10% LEV + Carpool spaces. Given William's question, is it possible the combined signs could read, "Reserved LEV and/or HOV Parking Only" ? Pending the reviewer of course...

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William Weaver Sustainability Practice Lead, JLL May 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 1312 Thumbs Up

I just submitted the project a couple of weeks ago, using the 'Reserved HOV Parking Only' signage. I'll post here if it is accepted or not.

Given that we only needed 5 signs, I figure that it's easy enough to replace 5 signs at $20+/- per sign without too much fan-fair if the preliminary review comments come back negative.

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Nena Elise May 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 3505 Thumbs Up

William did you hear back yet? I have a project that wants to use the same verbiage on signs because they are a hotel and the term "carpooling" doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

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William Weaver Sustainability Practice Lead, JLL May 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 1312 Thumbs Up

Not yet. The estimated return date is June 16. I'll keep you posted as I hear back.

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Jonathan Weiss May 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 2183 Thumbs Up

@tim - can you clarify about combining LEV/FEV with Carpool spaces? I was under the impression that you could not - did that change?

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Tim Gaidis Sustainable Design Leader, HOK May 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 5 Thumbs Up

Hi Jonathan - the only specific/formal reference to this I have been able to find is LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #10369 made on 4/2/14 that indicates you can meet the signage requirements under the CalGreen CleanAir/Vanpool/EV requirements - in California - by providing the appropriate combined signage for 10% of the parking spaces. I have not (yet) found evidence of this being acceptable elsewhere however.

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William Weaver Sustainability Practice Lead, JLL Aug 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 1312 Thumbs Up

I apologize, as I thought I had previously followed up on this thread. We unfortunatley had to redefine our LEED boundary to exclude parking due to the building to site ratio for the MPR. However, with that said, the reviewer did not provide any negative commentary regarding the HOV wording. That isn't to say other reviewers won't be sticklers, but this particular reviewer at least did not seem to have any qualms with the HOV wording on the signage.

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Mike Stopka Director of Sustainability Solomon Cordwell Buenz
Feb 18 2014
LEEDuser Member
204 Thumbs Up

Does Car-Sharing add to the total car parking capacity count?

Hello

We have a project with minimum parking requirements set to 238. We have agreed to provide 13 additional car-sharing stations, bringing the total parking effectively up to 251. Does this make us ineligible for the credit or is it okay since the additional spots are for Low Emitting/Fuel Efficient ZipCars?

Thanks

Mike

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 18 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Mike, there are a lot of options to this credit so without more background I won't say that it makes you ineligible, but the car-sharing stations would be a part of your total parking capacity. I don't really see a logic to exclude them, although if you have a case, by all means...

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 1181 Thumbs Up

Mike,

I wanted to add to Tristan's comments. If you're asking whether the car-sharing spaces that are reserved for Zip cars can also count as the low-emitting and fuel-efficient parking spaces for the project building in order to earn SSc4.3, then the answer is "probably not," in my opinion. I assume that GBCI would want to see parking spaces reserved for the building occupants. Since these spaces would be reserved only for Zip cars, it is assumed that the parking spaces are not also available to the building occupants. And last, but not least, make sure that the parking spaces are in a preferred location. To Tristan's point, I agree that including these spaces does not make the project ineligible for the credit.

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Mike Stopka Director of Sustainability, Solomon Cordwell Buenz Feb 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 204 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the responses. I will try and clarify a bit more.

This is a High-Rise Residential building. Planing code allows for 238 parking spaces. We have provided 238 parking spaces for the building to accommodate for all the occupants, not exceeding the minimum parking requirements.

The client also WANTS to provide car-sharing stations on the project. 13 ZipCars will be added on top of the 238 parking spaces, bringing the total of parking spaces on-site effectively up to 251. LEED requires you to provide infrastructure for Car SharingA system under which multiple households share a pool of automobiles, either through cooperative ownership or through some other mechanism.. In this case, the infrastructure is additional parking spots to support Car Sharing.

My question is, because of the additional parking added for ZipCars, does that increase our total vehicle parking capacity to 251, thus exceeding the minimum parking requirements specified by zoning and making this project ineligible for the credit?

Seems like Tristan thinks that the ZipCar parking gets added to total capacity. Lauren, the ZipCar are reserved only for the ZipCar and they are in preferred locations. You said you agree with Tristan that including these spaces does not make the project ineligible, however it sounded like he was saying the opposite.

Thanks

Mike

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 1181 Thumbs Up

Mike,

In regards to SSc4.4 for residential projects (Case 2), adding more parking than is required of the local code does not meet the credit requirements. Tristan was saying that, without additional information, he couldn't say you were ineligible for the credit. I agree with Tristan in saying that, if you think you have a case for excluding the Zip car spaces, then you could try your argument and see what GBCI thinks.

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Lewis Hewton Cundall Feb 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Another way to look at this is would planning allow for you to provide 225 general parking spots and 13 zip car spots? If the answer is NO then you should certainly be able to achieve the points.

If the answer is YES and you are still looking at a way to exclude the 13 zipcar spaces from the parking capacity I suggest to look at them as not car parking but rather "infrastructure provided to support programmes which facilitate shared vehicle use". This would be looking at them in the same way as car-pool drop off areas or shuttle services to mass transit.

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Ashley Love
Feb 17 2014
Guest
7 Thumbs Up

Signage location requirements for Carpool/Vanpool and LEV

If this question has been asked previously, I apologize I didn't see it. Is there a requirment as to the location of the signage for the spaces for CP/VP and LEV - either on a stand-alone signs OR using pavement markings? I've used stand-alone signs on one project and both for another, but for our current project the GC is asking if we can do the pavement markings only without doing the stand-alone signs.

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 1181 Thumbs Up

Ashely,

You can use any type of signage that you feel is appropriate. The requirement just states that the spaces must be marked as reserved for both low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. (or car/vanpool vehicles), and that there is signage in place designating the spaces as reserved. If the contractor wants to designate the spaces by painting signage within each space, that should be fine. Just make sure that the wording is appropriate. Hope that helps.

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Jennifer Sutherby NBBJ
Feb 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
7 Thumbs Up

Stand Alone Building or Campus?

Hi All,

I am attempting the ITE study for a research building with below ground parking located on a hospital campus. I am wondering if the the building can be considered stand-alone or if the other buildings on campus must somehow be factored in. I would check The Minimum Program Requirements supplemental guidance document but the link herein appears broken or no longer valid.

Thanks in advance for any guidance on this topic!

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 1181 Thumbs Up

Jennifer,

If the parking being included in the study is reserved solely for the research building, then there is no need to include other building types on the campus in the ITE study calculations. If the parking serves multiple buildings, then all of those building types must be represented in your calculations. For example, if I was building a new K-12 school next to an existing office building, and there was existing parking that would now be serving the school and the office building, then both building types would need to be incorporated into the calculations. Hope that helps!

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American University Sustainability American University
Jan 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
885 Thumbs Up

Building on a parking lot

We're constructing a multi-building project on a parking lot on our campus Though there will be a 150 spot parking garage under one of the buildings, this is a reduction from the surface parking that was there before. Would this be considered no new parking?

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 1181 Thumbs Up

Emily,

Yes. If there is no additional parking being added to the previous parking count, then it would be considered "no new parking" under SSc4.4.

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James MacMillan VP - Director of Sustainability Karpinski Engineering
Jan 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
126 Thumbs Up

no new parking

My understanding of this credit's intent is to reduce the impact of automobiles for commuters. Our project, a commerical office building, has a parking garage off site for commuters, but is adding 6 parking spaces on the buildings lower floor for vehicles owned by the county. Does anyone have any experience or insight as to whether or not we can still use the "no new parking" option seeing as these spots are not for employee or visitor vehicles?

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Lewis Hewton Cundall Jan 30 2014 LEEDuser Member 370 Thumbs Up

Hi James, the intent of the credit is "to reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use". As such, it doesn't sound like you would be eligible for the points under "no new parking" (option 3). I suggest checking to see if your project is eligible under options 1 or 2.

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Sara Greenwood Green Building Consultant, Cadmus Group Aug 27 2014 Guest 84 Thumbs Up

I have a related question. My project is an addition to an existing building. It will add a few parking spaces for buses, not cars. Building users will access the parking structure in the existing building. Does this qualify for No New Parking?

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William Weaver Sustainability Practice Lead, JLL Aug 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 1312 Thumbs Up

Hi Sara,

This is just my interpretation, but I would venture to say that your project would not be eligible for no new parking. The intent is to reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use. I would say that applies regardless of whether the automobile is a car or bus - either way, it has a negative land impact by increasing parking surface area, and increases the vehicular emissions on site.

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E H Sustainability Architect Aug 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 3101 Thumbs Up

Sara - If you are only adding bus parking spaces, then you should qualify for the credit via "no new parking." This credit is for personal vehicle parking used for commuting. So, you can also exclude parking for fleet vehicles, etc.

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Camill Marciniak Intep
Jan 16 2014
LEEDuser Member
267 Thumbs Up

Parking under the building but not belonging to the same owner

Hi,
We are working on a new construction of an office building located on a site where 3 other buildings will be also constructed. The buildings belong to different owners and the boundaries between the buildings above ground are clearly defined. However the 4 buildings share underfloor parking spaces. The parking spaces belong to another owner and are connected to all buildings but specific parking spaces are dedicated to each building users. In addition in these 3 underfloors of parking spaces under the building to be certified there are storage spaces as well as the central technical room for ventilation belonging to the owner of the building to be certified.
My question is: do we have to exclude the parking spaces from the LEED project boundary? In this case can we still use the parking spaces to earn the credit under SSc4.3 and SSc4.4 and how? or is it possible to include the parking spaces even if it belongs to another owner? In this case, we should maybe make sure that if the other buildings decide to get certified they cannot certify our parking areas with them and the parking floors must be clearly separated. is that right?
What does LEED say about multiple ownership? What does LEED say about using areas to earn credits that will not be certified with the project?

We are welcome to any comment, previous experience or advices.

Thank you!

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 1181 Thumbs Up

Severin,

I suggest that you read through the Supplemental Guidance to the Minimum Program Requirements (http://www.usgbc.org/Docs/Archive/General/Docs6473.pdf) to see what constitutes an appropriate LEED project boundary. If the underground parking is not within the scope of the project building undergoing certification, then these spaces (as well as any ancillary spaces) do not need to be included in the LEED project boundary. Even if the parking that is allocated for the project building undergoing certification is not within the LEED project boundary, the spaces can be used to attempt SSc4.3 and SSc4.4. Just ensure that you provide narratives that clearly explain the situation, how the spaces are allocated for the project building, and why the spaces are not included in the project boundary. Hope this helps.

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Michael Johnson Architect Chenevert Architects
Jan 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
855 Thumbs Up

some of existing parking is limestone....

renovation and repurpose of an old school into an office facility. parking capacity will remain the same, but some existing spots (9 spots out of about 85) are limestone. These are now to be converted into paved spots.

Can these be counted as existing parking? technically, local ordinances do not allow these to count since the ordinance does not allow gravel/stone parking - but they are well documented (google earth, photos, etc) as being regularly used as parking spots.

any one have experience with such a situation w/ this credit?

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 1181 Thumbs Up

Michael,

For SSc4.4, if no additional spaces are added to the existing parking count, regardless as to whether the spaces are repaved or newly paved, then the project is considered to have "no new parking." Hope this helps.

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Edgar Rodriguez Arq. LEED AP BD+C CEMEX
Dec 17 2013
Guest
98 Thumbs Up

Use of existing facilities - Cement Distribution Plant, Colombia

We are working in Colombia on a new 4,840sqft "dinning room facility" that will serve all users 24/7 of already existing administrative offices and truck drivers (this existing facilities are not certified).

The existing buildings within the property and part of the same company, already have parking lot, distributed in the area.

The question is, can we use those existing parking spaces to comply with LEED requirements?

Hope you can help me.

Best regards!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 17 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Edgar, it's helpful with this credit to think about which compliance path you are pursuing and how your situation matches up with that. I'd suggest reviewing the various options provided in the credit language (see above) and checking how they match with your situation. Which path do you want to pursue?

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Edgar Rodriguez Arq. LEED AP BD+C, CEMEX Dec 18 2013 Guest 98 Thumbs Up

Hi Tistan, we are pursuing Option 1.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 18 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Are you adding any parking, or will any parking be in your LEED project boundary?

If not, why not go with Option 3?

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Edgar Rodriguez Arq. LEED AP BD+C, CEMEX Dec 20 2013 Guest 98 Thumbs Up

We can pursue Option 3, no problem, but what will happen if we want to comply with SScr4.3 - Option 1? Can we use the existin parking lots?

Those existing parking spaces are providing service to the existent facilities... and will be the same for the new LEED building.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 23 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

If you want to go down this path (Option 1), where I think you're going is to designate 5% of all parking on the plant as preferred for vanpools and carpools. That's how I understand your question of complying with Option 1 for parking that is not in your LEED project boundary. Let me know if I am misunderstanding.

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Edgar Rodriguez Arq. LEED AP BD+C, CEMEX Dec 23 2013 Guest 98 Thumbs Up

You are correc Tristn.

No new parking for SScr4.4 (option 3 ). Check.
And for SScr4.3 complying with Option 1 for parking that is not in our LEED project boundary.

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Tom Warner Senior Architect Leidos
Dec 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
20 Thumbs Up

No new parking

Our project site currently has three existing buildings and over 300 parking stalls. All of these buildings and parking areas will be demolished under separate contract. The new building will have approximately 100 new parking spaces, significantly less than the current amount. The question that I have is would we still be able to achieve the No New Parking option even though the site is cleared under separate contract and not included in LEED calculations for waste management?

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Dec 04 2013 LEEDuser Member 1181 Thumbs Up

Tom,

I have seen this strategy approved, as you are not adding to the total number of parking spaces, even if the actual parking lot is new. The intent of the credit is to reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use by reducing the parking capacity period. Just make sure your documentation very clearly outlines the parking capacity that was existing versus the new parking lot. Adding the existing asphalt, etc., to MRc2: Construction Waste Management will not have any affect on whether or not you achieve SSc4.4. Hope this helps!

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Todd Bundren Director of Sustainabilty - Architectural Project Manager Lawrence Group
Nov 26 2013
LEEDuser Member
1137 Thumbs Up

Temporary Parking Question

My project is a group project on a college campus with 2 phases. We are going to be certifying each phase separately. The Phase 1 scope includes a temporary parking lot being created in the location where phase 2 will occur. This parking lot (gravel), will be removed when phase 2 begins. Besides this temporary lot (for construction purposes), no new permanent parking is being added to the site for either phase. Can this lot be omitted from the parking count and therefore qualify my project for the "no new parking" requirement in this credit? Thanks...

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Todd, I would say so, but the devil is in the details as to document this in a credible way.

It seems that a clean approach would be to put the lot into the LEED boundary for the phase 2 project, as it sounds like the lot will be affected by both projects.

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Michael Johnson Architect Chenevert Architects
Nov 20 2013
LEEDuser Member
855 Thumbs Up

signage verbage...

I see the example in this website states "reserved carpool and vanpool parking only"

The project I am working on has approved submittal/shop drawing in which it states "high occupancy vehicle parking only"

is this going to be a problem?

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Nov 20 2013 LEEDuser Member 1181 Thumbs Up

Michael,

I don't see where that should be an issue. There is more issue in the way in which you label LE/FE parking spaces, though most often the signage verbiage is just noted as an educational note when GBCI feels that there is some concern with the language.

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Kelly Duepner LEED BD+C Christner Inc.
Nov 08 2013
LEEDuser Member
175 Thumbs Up

can partial credit be earned?

Our project is an expansion to a facility that hosts events/conferences in addition to its normal use as a lab facility, and while daily use would not require all the parking necessary by code, the events would overload parking if designed to code. The jurisdiction that the project is in does not allow parking on unpaved surfaces, so parking on grass for the events would not be allowed. Also the owner already has agreements with neighboring lots to use their parking for big events but these lots are saturated as well when they have the large events. As such the owner would like more spaces than code requires so they have enough parking when large events occur. Is partial credit (just one point instead of 2) achievable for providing the required carpool/vanpool spaces, or is the credit all-or-nothing? Or, if more than 5% of spaces are designated as preferred, would this help compensate for not having less parking? Are there any other ways to meet the intent and achieve the credit? Thanks

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Nov 20 2013 LEEDuser Member 1181 Thumbs Up

Kelly,

This is an all or nothing credit. Have you looked into attempting the credit using the ITE Parking Generation Study? My assumption, though, is that this credit is just not going to be applicable to your project. Designating more than the 5% minimum would not help overcome providing more parking spaces than is allowed by the local code. Sorry!

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Rezkar Abdulmajeed Architect/LEED AP 7D ASSOCIATES
Nov 01 2013
Guest
52 Thumbs Up

SS 4.4 No New Parking.

I have the first LEED project in a campus. The project will be built on an existing parking lot and no new parking will be added within the LEED project boundary. There is an existing parking adjacent to the building site. My questions is if I can use 5 spaces in the existing parking for carpooling and van-pooling for this project.?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 01 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Rezkar, yes, you can. You should be clear how much of the existing parking lot is included in your LEED project boundary, and be sure that those spaces serve the project building and not other buildings on the campus.

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Rezkar Abdulmajeed Architect/LEED AP, 7D ASSOCIATES Nov 03 2013 Guest 52 Thumbs Up

Hi Tristan,
Thank you very much for your feedback.
However, I should explain more a bout the project and would like to obtain your advice in the following:

1- We are building a new project on the existing parking. We will nod add any new parking (0 new parking) . and there is no parking allocated inside our LEED boundary, and I do not want to include any parking adjacent to our building into the LEED boundary (0 New and 0 Existing), all required parking will be off site, Can I still be eligible to this Credit? Is the %5 Carpooling and Van polling still required for this Credit.

2- Also, I have question with regard to the Credit SS.4.3 to provide stations for 3% parking capacity , how can I implement this if my boundary does not include any parking spaces? Can I use the parking spaces that are adjacent to my LEED boundary for this Credit without adding them into. the boundary. Your feedback is appreciated

Thanks

Rezkar

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Nov 20 2013 LEEDuser Member 1181 Thumbs Up

Rezkar,

Because you are not providing new parking, and the existing parking lot is not within your project scope, it is permissible to not include the parking within your LEED project boundary, though still attempt SSc4.3 and SSc4.4. When attempting SSc4.4, adding no new parking is an option that does not include the requirement to provide designated, preferred 5% car/van pool spaces.

My suggestion to you would be to include a narrative indicating that the parking is existing and not within the current project scope, and therefore, it has been excluded from the LEED project boundary. However, "x" number of parking spaces from the existing, adjacent parking has been allocated for the building users. Hope this helps!

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Rezkar Abdulmajeed Architect/LEED AP, 7D ASSOCIATES Nov 26 2013 Guest 52 Thumbs Up

Lauren,
Thanks for your feedback.
Yes, I believe I can pursue both Credits SS 4.3 (providing x number electric station) and SS 4,4 (no new parking and no spaces for carpooling/Vanpooling) without including the parking spaces into LEED Project Boundary. .
Thanks again .
.

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Kendall E Design Partners Inc.
Oct 31 2013
LEEDuser Member
381 Thumbs Up

Preferred Parking Exceeds 5% of FTE

I have a building with 21 FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.. Since 5% of FTE translates to 2 (1.05 rounded up)parking stalls, can they both be preferred (1 for carpool and 1 for LEV)? If I provide an additional 2 preferred, then I will exceed the 5% parking requirement, which is one part of this point.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 01 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Kendall, I'm a little confused about what you're asking, especially since it sounds like you are trying to combine compliance with SSc4.3 and SSc4.4. Can you give a little more detail about what you want to do, and which options for each credit you're pursuing? Also, is there an obstacle to exceeding 5%?

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Kendall E Design Partners Inc. Nov 01 2013 LEEDuser Member 381 Thumbs Up

Tristan, sorry for the confusion, I think I found a way to make option 1 work instead of option 2.

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