NC-2009 SSc4.4: Alternative Transportation—Parking Capacity

  • NC_SS4-4_Type1_Parking Final Diagram
  • Plenty of options

    This credit offers a variety of strategies for residential, non-residential and mixed use projects. These strategies help to reduce the number of cars on the road, cut down on the sprawl of parking facilities, and decrease the negative environmental impacts of parking infrastructure, including stormwater runoff and the urban heat islandA densely populated area in which pavement and buildings absorb, store, and release solar energy, making the vicinity warmer than it would be if the pavement and buildings were not present. effect. 

    Getting mileage out of your efforts

    Assess the location and context of your project to make sure that carpooling, public transportation (see SSc4.1), walking and bicycle commuting (see SSc4.2) are viable strategies for reducing single-occupancy vehicle use.

    If all you do is limit parking capacity in an area where options other than driving aren’t viable, your efforts could prove frustrating to drivers rather than truly beneficial. You may also want to consider implementing a program to incentivize public transit and carpooling. 

    Consider no new parking

    This credit is fairly straightforward for most projects. Projects that either have no parking or are not providing additional parking automatically qualify. To make this work from a practical perspective, it’s a good idea to locate in an area with good public transit, pedestrian, and bicycle access.

    You can also provide parking, with some caveats

    Non-residential projects that will be providing new parking will need to reduce parking capacity to not exceed minimum zoning requirements, and LEED-NC projects must also provide preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for carpools (Option 1).  

    Sign for reserved parking for carpoolResidential projects that will be providing new parking will need to reduce parking capacity to not exceed minimum zoning requirements and facilitate programs to encourage carpooling among residents. 

    Mixed-use projects have to meet both requirements, on a proportional basis.

    Follow these basic steps when approaching this credit

    • Identify the appropriate strategy based on your project type and the context of the individual project. If providing no new parking, go ahead and document the credit. If providing parking, follow the remaining steps.
    • Confirm the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. for the project.
    • Confirm local minimum zoning requirements for parking capacity.
    • Determine the number of preferred parking spaces required or develop a ride-sharing program for your project.
    • Include parking locations in the construction documents to ensure that signage and additional markings are included in the construction budget.
    • Consider earning an exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point for a comprehensive transportation management plan.
    • Document the credit and upload the documentation to LEED Online.
  • Don't double-count parking spaces

    If your project is pursuing both SSc4.3 and SSc4.4, be careful not to double-count preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces allotted for those credits. The total number of preferred parking spaces must be equal to those required for SSc4.3, plus those required for SSc4.4. The same parking space cannot count for both credits (although they do not have to be distinguished through signage).

  • FAQs for SSc4.4

    How does one account for off-site parking. Should the LEED boundary encompass this parking? Or alternatively may the project pursue the "no new parking" option?

    The Minimum Program Requirements supplemental guidance document covers these situations in some detail. The boundary needs to include "contiguous land that is associated with and supports normal building operations."

    The intent of the credit is to reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use. New parking provided off-site does not meet the credit intent. Although its applicability to LEED 2009 has not been considered (it was issued for NC-v2.2, LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #2120 issued 5/23/08 states, “if there will be additional parking built as a result of the construction of the [project], even if this parking is off site, then the No New Parking option cannot be used.”

    If a project does not provide parking onsite but provides a shuttle service to new parking offsite, is that considered “no new parking” since the new parking is not onsite?

    See the previous question.

    Does rebuilding an existing parking area with fewer spaces mean “no new parking”?

    Yes. Rebuilding a current parking lot with fewer spaces will meet the credit intent.

    If a non-residential project wants to use Option 4, which references the  ITE Parking Generation Study, where does one upload and submit required documentation? There is no Option 4 choice in the credit form.

    Since the LEED Online form doesn't have an Option 4 choice, you'll need to indicate with the checkbox under "Additional Details" that you're using an alternative compliance path. For more information, see LEEDuser's analysis of the ITE study.

    How do you designate preferred parking if the parking facility is not under the owner's control?

    You would need to work with the parking authority or management to designate the preferred parking.

    How does one apply minimum zoning requirements to a project when it is part of a larger complex or campus?

    The LEED MPRs require you to allocate parking between multiple buildings. Allocation may be determined by an "appropriate percentage" of use.

    Are there standards regarding how to document the spaces that will be dedicated as reserved?

    There aren't specific standards, but projects are expected to adequately communicate to occupants about the location and purpose of preferred parking spaces, typically by use of pole, wall-mounted, and/or pavement markings.

    How does a carpool/vanpool relate to a shared car service/company when it comes to the preferred parking requirements of this credit?

    If a proper contract agreement of two years and designated space are provided through an alternative compliance method, then a shared car service may be accepted as a “carpool or vanpool” substitute. See LEED Interpretation ID#3138, 1/26/2005, in which Reviewers define car share services, and LEED Interpretation ID#3137, 5/24/2004, in which Zipcar is discussed as a carpool substitute for residential projects.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Determine if your project will be providing new or additional parking. 


  • Providing no new parking is the easiest compliance option. This is a great option for projects that already have adequate parking spaces or that are in close proximity to public transit (also earning SSc4.1: Alternative Transportation—Public Transportation Access). However, this is not possible for all projects. 


  • If your project is an existing site with parking, you can revamp the parking spaces (and even rearrange the layout) and still earn this credit as long as the number of new parking spaces does not exceed the number of previously existing parking spaces. Consider reducing the parking area, however, if it’s more than the project needs. This will help you comply with credits such as SSc6.1: Stormwater Management.


  • Research local and state tax incentives for carpooling programs. In order to qualify for state or local programs the carpooling program must typically be verifiable and meet specific requirements. 


  • Reserved for carpool signThis is generally a low-cost credit. Reducing built parking capacity can even reduce construction and maintenance costs. The only added cost might be signage for preferred parking spaces, if applicable. 

Schematic Design

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  • Identify whether your project is non-residential, residential or mixed-use. Depending on your building type, assess each of the compliance paths separately to see which best suits your project’s scope.


  • Some projects find it helpful to assess the demand for parking. You may find that many occupants will walk or bike to the building. If the demand is actually less than called for by minimum zoning requirements, consider seeking permission from local authorities to provide less than the minimum number of parking spaces. A traffic study performed by transportation planners or engineers can be helpful here. 


  • Case 1: Non-Residential Projects 


  • Consider the four options  for non-residential projects to earn this credit:

    • Option 1: Do not exceed minimum zoning requirements for parking capacity and provide preferred parking for carpools and vanpools for 5% of the total parking spaces.
    • Option 2: Projects that provide parking for less than 5% of the building FTE occupancy need to provide preferred parking spaces for carpools and vanpools for 5% of total parking spaces or provide discounted parking rates for carpools and vanpools. 
    • Option 3: Provide no new parking.
    • Option 4: For projects that have no minimum local zoning requirements, provide 25% fewer parking spaces than the applicable standard listed in the 2003 Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) “Parking Generation” study. (This option was not included in the original edition of the LEED 2009 Reference Guide, but was added through the April 2010 addenda.)

  • “Preferred parking” refers to designated spaces located nearest the building entrance, covered, or at a discount price, but not providing preference over handicapped parking. Preferred parking spaces must be clearly designated, for example, with a sign that states “Carpool and vanpool parking only.”


  • There are no “LEED Police.” Use of preferred parking spaces required for non-residential buildings are largely based on the honor system and the integrity of building management and occupants. Consider incorporating an enforcement mechanism that will ensure carpool parking spaces are not abused. To ensure that preferred parking polices are respected, consider the following strategies:

    • Use signage in conjunction with parking permits.
    • A sticker program can be implemented to identify the carpool vehicles, which have access to preferred parking spaces. 
    • Clearly communicate to building occupants the steps required to acquire a parking permit or sticker from building management.

     


  • Minor costs may also be associated with enforcing preferred parking spaces.


  • If you’re not careful, limiting parking capacity could be frustrating for occupants, and not behavior-changing. Consider strategies that go above and beyond the credit requirements such as carpooling incentives and providing information on public transit options. This could also help projects earn an Exemplary Performance point for a Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan. 


  • Case 2: Residential


  • Determine which of the two options for residential projects is most appropriate:

    • Option 1: Do not exceed minimum zoning requirements for parking capacity, and provide infrastructure and programs to encourage carpooling and vanpooling.
    • Option 2: Provide no new parking.

  • Case 3: Mixed-Use


  • Mixed-use projects such as apartments over street-level retail, have two options to earn this credit, determine which option is best appropriate for your project:

    • Option 1: If the project is less than 10% commercial, follow the options for residential projects. If the project has more than 10% commercial space, the commercial space should follow the options for non-residential compliance and the residential portion should follow the options for residential compliance. 
    • Option 2: Provide no new parking.

Design Development

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  • Case 1: Non-Residential projects 


  • Depending on your compliance path option:

    • Option 1: Check local codes and make sure your planned parking capacity meets but does not exceed minimum parking requirements. Identify preferred parking spaces for carpools and vanpools for 5% of total parking capacity.
    • Option 2: Calculate the total number of parking spaces and the project FTE. Make sure the FTE number is consistent across all LEED credits. If your project provides parking for less than 5% of FTE occupants, identify the preferred parking for carpool and vanpools for 5% of the total parking spaces. 
    • Option 3: Verify that the project is not providing any new parking spaces.
    • Option 4: Review the applicable ITE study to determine the proper number of parking spaces for credit compliance.

  • If providing new parking for the project, begin developing literature or flyers that communicate to building occupants the programs and infrastructure to support the reduced use of single-occupancy vehicles.  


  • If new parking is provided within the LEED boundary, the owner must sign off on the LEED Online credit form stating that preferred spaces will be indicated with signage and will be communicated to building occupants (via flyers, bulletin boards, or handbooks, for example) or that discounted parking will be provided with at least a 20% discount rate to all customers and available for at least two years, and  communicated to building occupants. 


  • All parking spaces in the LEED boundary are affected, so 5% of the total parking spaces within the LEED boundary must be marked as “preferred,” even if only a portion of the parking area is for the project building’s use.


  • You may want to assess the likelihood that building occupants will carpool to work and use the reserved carpooling parking spaces; you may find that it is best to provide carpooling incentives to motivate people to minimize single-occupancy vehicles. 


  • Case 2: Residential Projects


  • Ride boardProceed based on your chosen compliance path:

    • Option 1: Check local zoning laws and make sure your project’s parking capacity meets but does not exceed minimum zoning requirements, and develop the infrastructure and support programs for minimizing single-occupancy vehicles. Consider incorporating programs for car-share, ride boards (or website), carpool drop off locations, designated parking for carpools, and shuttle services to mass transit. 
    • Option 2: Verify that the project is not providing any new parking spaces.

  • If providing new parking, determine infrastructure and programs that will be most effective at reducing single-occupancy vehicles at your project. This can include developing a carpooling policy, defining procedures and eligibility requirements for participating in a carpooling incentive program, creating and distributing tags for vehicle identification, creating communication materials about the carpool program, providing a rideshare board, and designated preferred parking and drop off areas for carpool. Begin developing materials to communicate these programs to occupants—this will be required for your LEED Online submittal.


  • Residential projects can include preferred parking spaces for carpools as part of their program to reduce single-occupancy vehicles. “Preferred parking” refers to designated spaces located nearest the building entrance, covered, or at a discount price, but not providing preference over disabled parking. 


  • Assess whether programs to minimize single-occupancy vehicles might be successful given the nature and location of the project. Consider surveying future building occupants about their interest in a commercial vehicle-sharing program or shuttle buses. Providing access to a vehicle-share program or to promote carpooling may help to attract occupants to a multi-tenant building.


  • Consider whether there are existing vehicle-share programs in the area that you can utilize. If not, research vendors that can help develop a program.


  • When choosing among options to reduce single-occupancy vehicles, consider the time that will be spent by building personnel in administering a car-sharing plan, keeping a ride-board updated, or organizing shuttle services. Also consider the type of infrastructure that may be needed for specific programs, like a carpool drop-off area with signage, or preferred parking spaces for carpools, car-share preferred parking space, website for ride-board, etc. Procedures and policies may need to be developed and maintained over time. 


  • Case 3: Mixed-Use Projects


  • Proceed depending on your chosen compliance path:

    • Option 1: Verify the proportions of residential and commercial areas in your project. If less than 10% of the development is commercial in nature, follow the requirements for Case 2 for residential spaces—see details above. If more than 10% of the development is commercial space, follow the requirements of Case 2 for the residential spaces, and Case 1 for the commercial portions—see details above.
    • Option 2: Verify that the project is not providing any new parking spaces.

  • If more than 10% of the total project area is non-residential space, you will need to follow two paths for the different portions (residential vs. non-residential) of the project. This may seem complicated but is really quite simple. Typically mixed-use buildings have separate parking for the commercial and residential portions of the building. In this case you would designate 5% of the commercial parking spaces as preferred parking. The portion for residents, is exempt from the preferred parking spaces but you will need to implement programs and infrastructure to reduce single-occupancy vehicles. If your parking area is shared between the commercial and residential portions of your building, you will determine the preferred parking spaces based on commercial FTE occupants, and provide 5% preferred parking for that portion of spaces. 

Construction Documents

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  • If pursuing an option that makes provisions for carpools, design your facility to include transportation amenities for a carpooling program such as appropriate drop-off areas, preferred parking for carpools and vanpools, and space to post ride-share program and other relevant information. 


  • Ensure that preferred parking spaces are included in your total parking count and on construction documents. 


  • Mark your parking areas, and any carpool drop-off areas, in the parking layout drawings. Preferred parking spaces must be clearly designated, for example with a sign that states, “Carpool and vanpool parking only.”


  • Finalize the carpooling program details and infrastructure, including any literature, employee brochures, newsletters and other materials that inform building occupants about the carpooling program and its benefits (either access to preferred parking or discounted parking rates). 

Construction

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  • When preferred parking is provided for carpooling or vanpooling, provide appropriate signage for the parking spaces. 


  • Complete the LEED Online credit form according to the following instructions, based on the approach taken.


  • Case 1: Non-Residential Projects


  • Confirm whether the project will be providing new parking within the LEED project boundary. 


  • Option 1: Provide minimum parking spaces required by local zoning code and total onsite vehicle parking capacity. Confirm if preferred parking will be in the form of designated parking spaces or discount parking rate. 


  • If designated parking spaces are being implemented provide the total onsite vehicle parking capacity, the number of preferred parking spaces for carpools or vanpools, and the owner must sign the LEED Online credit form stating that spaces will be reserved and indicated with signage and occupants will be made aware of these designated spaces. Projects will also need to upload a site plan showing parking areas with the preferred parking spaces highlighted. 


  • If discounted parking is being implemented the owner must sign the LEED Online credit form stating that the parking rate will be discounted at least 20%, it will be available to all customers and publicly posted at the parking entrance, that it will be available for at least two years, and that the discount will be communicated to building occupants. Projects will need to upload a document showing that building occupants have been made aware of the discounted rates (for example, with an excerpt from the employee handbook, or a brochure).


  • Option 2: Provide the non-residential FTE occupancy and total onsite parking capacity. Confirm if preferred parking will be in the form of designated parking spaces or discount parking rate. 


  • If designated parking spaces are being implemented, provide the total on-site vehicle parking capacity, the number of preferred parking spaces for carpools or vanpools, and the owner must sign the LEED Online credit form stating that spaces will be reserved and indicated with signage and occupants will made aware of these designated spaces. Projects will also need to upload a site plan showing parking areas with the preferred parking spaces highlighted. 


  • If discounted parking is being implemented the owner must sign the LEED Online credit form stating that the parking rate will be discounted at least 20%, it will be available to all customers and publicly posted at the parking entrance, that it will be available for at least two years, and that the discount will be communicated to building occupants. Upload a document showing that building occupants have been made aware of the discounted rates.


  • Option 3: The owner must sign the LEED Online credit form verifying that no new parking was incorporated within the LEED boundary. 


  • Option 4: Since this option was added in April 2010, after the LEED Online credit form was finalized, it is not currently mentioned on the form. Document this option using the alternative compliance path instead of one of the standard paths.


  • Case 2: Residential Projects


  • Confirm whether the project will be providing new parking within the LEED boundary. 


  • Option 1: Provide minimum parking required by local zoning and total onsite parking capacity. Upload literature showing the communications between building owner and residents as to the infrastructure and support programs that have been implemented to minimize single-occupancy vehicles usage. Upload a site plan showing any infrastructure related to this credit such as preferred parking spots or carpool drop-off areas.


  • Option 2: The owner must sign the LEED Online credit form verifying that no new parking was incorporated within the LEED boundary. 


  • Case 3: Mixed-Use Projects


  • Confirm whether the project will be providing new parking within the LEED boundary. 


  • Confirm whether the project is primarily residential (10% or less of the building is commercial) or mixed use.


  • If primarily residential, follow the Case 2 residential requirements above.


  • If mixed use, follow a combination of the Case 2 residential and Case 1 non-residential requirements above. 

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Communicate with building occupants about the infrastructure or programs in place to minimize single-occupancy vehicles. Take this opportunity to develop an educational program for occupants. Develop literature and post signs in public areas and on the company’s intranet. Make it as easy as possible for people to find out about and use the program. 


  • Using clear signage to designate areas for carpooling and sharing information about rides is a first step in facilitating communication about such programs. These areas should be easily accessible to all building occupants. 


  • Building personnel are responsible for establishing procedures relating to carpooling or vanpooling and for administering any programs, as applicable. 


  • Building staff must administer the parking plan: preferred or discounted parking, or vehicle sharing. Procedures and policies must be developed. Consider implementing enforcement mechanisms as well. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    SS Credit 4.4: Alternative transportation - parking capacity

    2 Points

    Intent

    To reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use.

    Requirements

    Case 1 - Non-residential projects

    Option 1

    Size parking capacity to meet, but not exceed, minimum local zoning requirements.

    Provide preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system.1 for carpools or vanpools for 5% of the total parking spaces.

    OR

    Option 2

    For projects that provide parking for less than 5% of full-time equivalentFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 40 hours per week in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per week divided by 40. Multiple shifts are included or excluded depending on the intent and requirements of the credit. (FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.) building occupants:

    Provide preferred parking for carpools or vanpools, marked as such, for 5% of total parking spaces. Providing a discounted parking rate is an acceptable substitute for preferred parking for carpool or vanpool vehicles. To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all customers (i.e. not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area, and available for a minimum of 2 years.

    OR

    Option 3

    Provide no new parking.

    OR

    Option 4

    For projects that have no minimum local zoning requirements, provide 25% fewer parking spaces than the applicable standard listed in the 2003 Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) “Parking Generation” study at http://www.ite.org.

    Case 2 - Residential Projects

    Option 1

    Size parking capacity to meet, but not exceed, minimum local zoning requirements

    Provide infrastructure and support programs to facilitate shared vehicle use such as carpool drop-off areas, designated parking for vanpools, car-share services, ride boards and shuttle services to mass transit.

    OR

    Option 2

    Provide no new parking.

    Case 3 - Mixed use (residential with commercial/residential) projects

    Option 1 - Commercial and non-commercial requirements

    Mixed-use buildings with less than 10% commercial area must be considered residential and adhere to the residential requirements in Case 2. For mixed-use buildings with more than 10% commercial area, the commercial space must adhere to non-residential requirements in Case 1 and the residential component must adhere to residential requirements in Case 2.

    OR

    Option 2

    Provide no new parking.

    OR
    Option 3

    For projects that have no minimum local zoning requirements, provide 25% fewer parking spaces than the applicable standard listed in the 2003 Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) "Parking Generation" study at www.ite.org.

    1For the purposes of this credit “preferred parking” refers to the parking spots that are closest to the main entrance of the project (exclusive of spaces designated for handicapped persons) or parking passes provided at a discounted price. To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all eligible customers (i.e. not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area, and available for a minimum of 2 years.

    Streamlined path available

    Achievement of this credit can be documented via a LEED ND v2009 submittal. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Minimize parking lot/garage size. Consider sharing parking facilities with adjacent buildings. Consider alternatives that will limit the use of single occupancy vehicles.

    FOOTNOTES

    1 To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all customers (i.e., not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area, and available for a minimum of 2 years. (For the purposes of this credit “preferred parking” refers to the parking spots that are closest to the main entrance of the project (exclusive of spaces designated for handicapped persons) or parking passes provided at a discounted price.)

Web Tools

Ride sharing site

This website helps to organize carpooling trips and rewards members for reduced single-occupancy vehicles. 


Tips for Vanpooling

Provides general tips for setting up a vanpool program, and provides a template for writing a program for vanpooling. 


eRideshare.com

Website set up to organize carpooling.

Articles

Benefits of Carpooling

Article on the benefits and tips for carpooling. 

Software Tools

Carpooling network

For Short and Long Distance Carpooling: Through the Carpooling Network’s integrated software, you can find carpool mates for your single or long distance trips, whether in Canada or the United States.

Publications

Commuting Guide for Employers

This website outlines strategies employers can use to encourage employees to commute by bicycle. 


U.S. EPA and Department of Transportation, Best Workplaces for Commuters

This program publicly recognizes employers who have exemplary commuter benefits programs. It provides tools, guidance, and promotions to help employers give commuter benefits, reap the financial gains, and achieve national recognition.


U.S. EPA, Transportation and Air Quality

This site provides information on the types and effects of air pollution associated with automobile use  and links to resources for organizations interested in promoting commuter choice programs.

Organizations

Smart Commute

Smart Commute is a program of Research Triangle Park that has valuable information about telecommuting and carpool programs useful for any organization. 

Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan

These sample comprehensive transportation management plans demonstrate how to earn an Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point under SSc4. 

No New Parking

Pursuing the option to provide no new parking is straightforward to document, as with this sample narrative.

Site Plan – Parking Meeting Local Zoning Requirements

Option 1

Document Option 1 with a site plan like this one, showing parking meeting but not exceeding local zoning requirements.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 SS

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

354 Comments

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Vibha Pai Student University of Cincinnati
Jun 25 2016
Guest
122 Thumbs Up

Master's Research Survey

Project Location: United States

I am conducting a survey in affiliation with University of Cincinnati for my Master's thesis which would take just 10-15 minutes of your time. By answering the questions that are relevant to your experience, would help me in giving my research the required depth in understanding the achievability of the credit points in the Material and Resource category of LEED v2009 and v2013.

The following is the link to complete the web based questionnaire.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/XR3ZVZN
Thank you in advance for your time!

Post a Reply
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Tim Gaidis Sustainable Design Leader HOK
Jun 17 2016
LEEDuser Member
96 Thumbs Up

CASE 1 NON RESIDENTIAL OPTION 3

Project Location: Canada

Hi there,
For our project in StJohn's, Newfoundland, we are providing 3 Barrier Free spaces and 3 Maintenance Parking spaces (for maintenance facility users to use, but are not always used).

We would like to know if for CASE 1 NON RESIDENTIAL OPTION 3 (5% for NC), can we count one of these Maintenance Parking spaces as a Carpooling space? Or does the Carpooling Space (we only need 1) have to be a special designated space?

Thanks!

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Consultant, Integral Group Jun 23 2016 LEEDuser Expert 304 Thumbs Up

Hi Tim, unless the maintenance parking space is open for all users (which it doesn't sound like it is), I would say this could be a hard sell. Also keep in mind this space needs to be preferred, ie typically closest to the main entrance.

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Jeff Ross-Bain, PE, LEED Fellow Principal Ross-Bain Green Building
May 05 2016
LEEDuser Member
206 Thumbs Up

Local code offers voluntary option for no parking

Project Location: United States

We are working on a 50,000 ft2 medical office building (MOB) that is near a metro rail station. Local codes do not require buildings within 1,000 ft. of a rail station to provide parking. The project is within 1,000 ft. yet does require parking (105 spots) due to high transient occupancy. If this project were outside the 1,000 ft. radius, the provided parking would be less than local code maximum.
Question: if the local code does not "require" parking spaces, does that also mean that the local code parking allowance, per LEED, is also zero? We ask because this requirement seems to be more of an option rather than a mandate and wonder how LEED would interpret this scenario.

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Consultant, Integral Group May 06 2016 LEEDuser Expert 304 Thumbs Up

Hi Jeff,

I would focus on the credit intent and if you feel your project clearly meets it, then suggest you submit a detailed narrative explaining your case.

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Alejandro Macias
Feb 19 2016
Guest
58 Thumbs Up

No parking place

Project Location: Mexico

Hi, I'm starting to work on the certification of a building in a small town in Oaxaca,Mexico.It consists of bedrooms for children so they can stay and attend classes, it is like a Hostel /dormitory.
In the town most people move on foot , so there is no need to use the car. But the client needs to have a parking place for an ambulance and one for a bus in case it is needed.
Could I apply for "No New Parking" as an option?

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Consultant, Integral Group Mar 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 304 Thumbs Up

Hi Alejandro, this isn't clear cut so I would submit a narrative with your documentation to explain the situation, that the spaces are required, and see what the reviewers say. It might help your case if you can clearly show those spaces are designated for ambulance and bus only and not for use by project occupants, though I don't think it's a guaranteed point.

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting
Feb 17 2016
LEEDuser Member
781 Thumbs Up

City Street Parking Around Site

Project Location: United States

We are working on a major renovation of 3, connected parcels in a major metropolitan area. Our project itself is including no new parking. There is existing street parking outside of the LEED project Boundary adjacent to the site which is general street parking and not dedicated to the parcels. There is a potential for the city to re-angle some of the existing parking spaces which would create more than is currently there, but this would not be part of the project scope or project design. Given this scenario, could we pursue "No New Parking" as an option? Thank You!

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting Feb 29 2016 LEEDuser Member 781 Thumbs Up

Any insight into this matter? Thanks.

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Marilyn Specht Sustainability Consultant, Integral Group Mar 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 304 Thumbs Up

Sara, the answer would be based off of your LEED Boundary and your LEED scope of work. If neither include new parking then, yes.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K
Nov 30 2015
LEEDuser Member
716 Thumbs Up

No local zoning requirements

Project Location: Poland

Is there an Alternative Complance Path for projects outside the US with no minimum local zoning requirements?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Dec 07 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4284 Thumbs Up

Hi Agata, Option 4 is available to projects that have no minimum local zoning requirements. For this option you must provide 25% fewer parking spaces than the applicable standard listed in the 2003 Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) “Parking Generation” study at http://www.ite.org. There's a good FAQ above about this option that's worth checking out.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K Dec 08 2015 LEEDuser Member 716 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your answer. I already checked the Parking Generation study and it turnes out that for my building type - warehouse - there is an average number of parking spaces per person and per 1000sf. Do you know which of these to we should choose? Should we choose the one that is more strict for our project?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Dec 08 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4284 Thumbs Up

I think it makes sense to pick the more strict calculation. If that's an issue you might want to check in with GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). to get confirmation, since this isn't something that can be easily adjusted later!

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Jason Biondi Managing Director Energy Cost Solutions Group
Nov 11 2015
LEEDuser Member
439 Thumbs Up

Residential - SSc 4.4 Requirements

Project Location: United States

For a residential project not exceeding local zoning requirements for parking capacity, which of the following strategy needs to be implemented to successfully earn SSc 4.4

(1) Provide a carpool rider board easily found and viewable by residents; (2) provide a clearly marked drop-off area that allows 30 min. parking for at least one vehicle
(3) Provide Zipcars for 5% of occupants with a contract for at least 2 years, and a preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. is also provided for the Zipcars.

Do we need to facilitate all (1), (2) and (3) requirements together, or by complying with only (1) and (2), we will meet the intent of the credit?

Please advice.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Jason, unde this option, you are asked to provide "carpool drop-off areas, designated parking for vanpools, car-share services, ride boards and shuttle services to mass transit." You don't have to provide zipcars, etc.

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Jason Biondi Managing Director, Energy Cost Solutions Group Nov 29 2015 LEEDuser Member 439 Thumbs Up

Tristan,

you asked to provide "car-share service"; however you also mentioned that "you don't have to provide zip-cars, etc." I don't think you understood my question ! What I am asking is "How many different-different support programs are required for "mixed Use (< 10% Commercial) project ?

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Dec 02 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3146 Thumbs Up

This isn't well defined and there isn't a minimum number of strategies required. A multifaceted approach that includes 3-4 of the noted components for residential projects should suffice.

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John Covello LEED AP BD+C, EBOM, LEED and Sustainability Manager Development Management Group
Oct 30 2015
LEEDuser Member
695 Thumbs Up

Motorbike, motocycle & Scooter parking count towards SS CR 4.4?

Project Location: Thailand

Hello everyone,

I see in earlier posts that it is unclear if motorbike, scooters & motorcycles parking counts towards this credit's total or not. We have a project where we are considering adding an area to park 125 motorbikes above and beyond the minimum parking for cars. Anyone have recent feedback on situations like this?

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Oct 30 2015 LEEDuser Member 3100 Thumbs Up

We've been doing this for years with projects in Vietnam since the population overwhelmingly rides scooters. We believe that in the spirit of the LEED credit we should comply with the scooters too, so we add plugs for electric scooters, though shared parking is a bit strange. When we have explicitly included the scooter parking in the submittal, the reviewer has asked us each time to re-submit only including car parking. So I compromise now: I submit the car parking documentation but note in the narrative what we've done in addition for the scooters! And by carrying it out in any case, should GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). change their mind about this we'll be prepared.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Sep 29 2015
LEEDuser Member
3018 Thumbs Up

car pool requirement vs no car for commuting restriction

LEED NC SSc4.4 requires preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for carpool or vanpools for 5% of total parking spaces.
In our project of a company’s head quarter, there are certain numbers of parking will be installed which are only available to monthly lessee living the neighborhood while all FTEs are prohibited to come to work by car. We wonder if we can assume the rule can satisfy the car pool/ vanpool requirement as the fact no FTE uses car achieves higher level of qualification than the usage of car pool/ vanpool

We appreciate your guidance.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Noriko, this is a little tricky. It actually sounds like Option 3: no new parking is the best fit for this project, but you are providing some parking, so I'm not sure how to handle that. I wonder if you can exclude the parking from the LEED boundary, if it doesn't support your daily operations? Or apply some kind of LEED requirement to those spaces?

I don't think you can earn this credit without dealing with the leased parking spaces in some way.

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Peter Doo President Doo Consulting, LLC
Sep 17 2015
LEEDuser Member
3545 Thumbs Up

credits for zipcar, uber and shuttle bus

Hi all,
Our project is an outdoor amphitheater and we are looking to achieve some sort of credit under the SSc4 category. The parking lot is going to include preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. and a separate entrance/exit lane for Zipcar, Uber supersite and Rally Bus supersite (a bus service for concert goers). Does anyone have any experience regarding these factors and whether or not they would qualify to earn credit under community connectivity, alternative transportation, LEV or alternative parking? Thank you in advance!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Peter, help us out a bit... do you see credits/options where there is a fit? For example, how might the calcs work under Case 1, Option 1 of this credit?

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Sadie Martin
Sep 13 2015
Guest
194 Thumbs Up

Carpool Hours

Hi, has anyone has success with noting the carpool stalls are only used during certain hours of the day (like during typical office hours)? We have a large garage that is being used by several businesses, one being a hotel and the Owner would like to know if we could remove the "carpool" designation after 6pm, when the office tower is closed.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Sadie, this seems reasonable but is outside the LEED requirements, so I would communicate with GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). about it.

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Douglas Flandro Designer, Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. Jun 06 2016 LEEDuser Member 15 Thumbs Up

Sadie,
Can you tell me how this turned out? I have a university client who wants to put up a sign that says "Reserved for Carpool Parking 7AM - 9:30AM, Hang TagLEED Technical Advisory Group (TAG): Subcommittees that consist of industry experts who assist in developing credit interpretations and technical improvements to the LEED system. Required." It is for an administrative office and not for classrooms. I think it would go a long way to addressing the intent of the credit, but not sure it will fly with the review board.

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Magda Aghababyan CEO Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
Aug 26 2015
LEEDuser Member
1016 Thumbs Up

Meeting parking requirements for residential spaces

Project Location: Sri Lanka

Dear Sir/ Madam,

Our project (Hotel) is in a location where there are no defined local zoning requirements for parking. And since it is a hotel project we think it is more appropriate to consider the project as mixed use with more than 10% commercial space. But since there are no local zoning requirements defined, we have a problem of how to meet the parking requirements for residential occupancy category.

Has anyone come across this situation before? Please advise.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Magda, have you considered designating it a commercial space? A hotel would be considered "commercial" under common definitions.

Also, consider LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 2106—see the discussion on that below.

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Susan Di Giulio Project Manager Zinner Consultants
Jul 24 2015
LEEDuser Member
1820 Thumbs Up

How to deal with a hotel.

Project Location: United States

Others have asked this before and not gotten an answer so I'm taking another shot. Can someone please verify this approach?

It seems like, for this credit, regardless of the area of guestrooms vs BOH and other, a basic hotel with a few meeting rooms needs to be classified as mixed use/mostly residential. Hotels guests count as residents, employees as FTEs and day visitors as transients.

It seems like carpool space requirement should apply to FTEs only. The rest of the users, guests and day visitors, would need to be covered by a TDM program to encourage ride-sharing.

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Kuntal Thakkar ECSG Jul 24 2015 Guest 65 Thumbs Up

Susan,

Since you project is a "Hotel", I believe you can apply LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. - 2106 in your case; See following link for more details:

http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?clearsmartf=true&keys=2106

All you have to do is provide 5% of preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. of the total employee parking capacity,

Thanks

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Akshat Patel Oct 30 2015 Guest 33 Thumbs Up

Susan,
Have you gotten to the bottom of your situation? Was Kuntal's advice applicable to your project?

I am working on a very standard and straightforward hotel construction project and I'm not really sure how to approach this credit form. I am not in the same circumstances as described in Interpretation #2106 so I am not sure if it is relevant or will apply.

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant Taitem Engineering
Jun 09 2015
LEEDuser Member
1768 Thumbs Up

If using Option 4

Do you still need to provide preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for carpools and vanpools? The flow chart listed above seems to suggest you do not.

Thanks!

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William Weaver LEED Fellow, WELL AP, JLL Jun 09 2015 LEEDuser Member 2108 Thumbs Up

If pursuing Case 1, Option 4 preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. isn't required. You will, however, have to provide parking plans of all parking areas and provide an explanation of assumptions used to determine the total vehicle capacity relative to the applicable ITE standard.

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant, Taitem Engineering Jun 10 2015 LEEDuser Member 1768 Thumbs Up

Yes, got it. Did that already. Thanks, William!

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Jatuwat Varodompun Dr Green Building Soultion
May 01 2015
LEEDuser Member
1964 Thumbs Up

Actual Operation of Carpool parking

Project Location: Thailand

We have a restaurant apply for LEED NC retail, We have the carpool parkings for both customers abd staffs. The reviewer asked about the operation of these carpool parkings?

Can we say that the restaurant staffs or guard are watching over these parking. If there is a single pessenger car coming to park, the staff or guard will warn the driver to park elsewhere.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

That sounds reasonable. I am confused why the reviewer asked this question, because signage is usually enough. Is that provided?

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant
Apr 23 2015
LEEDuser Member
2740 Thumbs Up

Case 2, Option 1 - how many different support programs required?

Project Location: United States

There is a thread below (started April 2013, subject line: Mixed use <10% Commercial). That I would really like to hear follow-up on.
It's been 2 years... has anyone had any direct experience with this option?

What are the LEED reviewers requiring in terms of the number of support programs provided? There are several listed in the credit requirements (carpool drop-off, parking for vanpools, car-share, ride boards and shuttle services), but these read as "suggested" rather than "requried". I assume they are definitely not requiring ALL of those.

I've read CIRs 518 and 1444, but neither of these address how far the owner must go in providing support. Any experiential advice would be appreciated!

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Annalise Reichert Project Manager, stok Mar 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 381 Thumbs Up

I have the same question, has gotten review comments on projects for not providing enough support programs for shared infrastructure? I am working on a residential project that is providing zipcars for resident's use, is that sufficient or does it need to be combined with another strategy?

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G Mar 29 2016 LEEDuser Expert 477 Thumbs Up

Hi Erica and Annalise,

This credit is tricky because as you mention, the Reference Guide does not require a set number of strategies to address ride-share infrastructure for residential buildings. The approach that I have taken on residential projects with some small commercial space is choosing strategies that best fit the building and that are sufficient enough to meet the intent of the credit.

For example, providing public transit information for the public in the commercial spaces, providing carpool drop off areas, a website with a carpool portal for residents, and providing zipcar spaces could all be used in conjunction to meet the intent of the credit. GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). will want to see that enough infrastructure is in place that occupants not only have the option of ride-share, but are encouraged to use the ride-share options rather than drive themselves around town. In many cases, for residential, there is an existing online portal for residents that could easily incorporate transit and ride-share information.

My advice is to choose 3-4 strategies that best fit the building and demonstrate how those strategies are sufficient to provide all residents with ride-share infrastructure.

Hope that helps!

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Lewis Hewton Cundall
Feb 16 2015
Guest
737 Thumbs Up

Combined car pooling + LEV signage for projects < 10 spaces

Hi all,

I can see from a few discussions on here that it seems acceptable to combine carpooling + LEV signage provided there is no double counting i.e. a total of 10% of spaces are reserved. However if the project has a total of less than 10 spaces then it would only be required to provide one appropriately signed space to satisfy both SSc4.3 & 4.4.

I assume this is an appropriate compliance strategy but any thoughts, suggestions or alternative points of view?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Lewis, if you're trying to earn both credits, the parking spaces allocated should be additive, not conflated. I don't see how you can earn both credits with just one spot.

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant Taitem Engineering
Jan 07 2015
LEEDuser Member
1768 Thumbs Up

no new parking, but how to use local zoning for off-site park?

there will be no new parking in our LEED boundary, but we'll be allocating a few spots in the neighboring parking lot for the use of our building. We are not eligible under "no new parking," i get that, but then how do i go about pursing another option? do i need to find out the the existing parking lot doesn't exceed the zoning requirements (option 1) even tho i am only using a couple spaces or pursue option 2 and use the our LEED buildings FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. to calculate number of spots?

Thanks!

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Lewis Hewton Cundall Feb 16 2015 Guest 737 Thumbs Up

Hi Courtney - if it's existing and outside the LEED boundary (and being negotiated through a contract separate to the new construction works) you won't be impacting the load on the local transport infrastructure so I would think there are grounds to claim the 'no new parking' option?

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Alicja Bieszyńska Skanska
Nov 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
1407 Thumbs Up

Parking spaces for trucks

Project Location: Poland

My project is a distribution center that serves number of loading trucks every day. Obviously, the site plan includes parking spaces for them.
However, the local zoning requirements define only the number of parking spaces for building staff, not for the truck drivers.
Does it mean, that in order to get the credit we only need to meet the requirement for parking spaces for FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. and we can provide as many parking spaces for the trucks as we want?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

I would most likely consider the truck spaces an operational space and not a vehicle parking space, per se, and not subject to hte FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. requirements.

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Vince Capogna President Synergy Green Building Consulting, LLC
Oct 29 2014
LEEDuser Member
12 Thumbs Up

Auto Dealership

Project Location: United States

Would exterior on-site inventory/display parking of new cars for sale at an auto dealership count towards the total number of parking spots provided? These parking spots are called out as inventory/display on the construction drawings and would not be used for customers or employees.

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant, Taitem Engineering Oct 15 2015 LEEDuser Member 1768 Thumbs Up

Hello Vince,

Did you ever get resolution on your question? I have the same inquiry as i have a auto dealership going for LEED and I am not sure how to handle the parking capacity credit, along with the LEED boundary. Do I need to include the inventory parking spots into the credit and boundary?

Thanks!
Courtney

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 20 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

I recall a LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. that was addressed to a rental car facility. I think it limited the scope of the credit. Have you guys looked in the database? 

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant, Taitem Engineering Oct 21 2015 LEEDuser Member 1768 Thumbs Up

I have not, but I will take a look and see if I can find any claification. Thank you for your response.

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John Covello LEED AP BD+C, EBOM, LEED and Sustainability Manager Development Management Group
Oct 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
695 Thumbs Up

Parking for Electric Buggies (golf carts)

I am with an eco-resort project in Thailand. We are using electric buggies as the primary means of transportation around the resort. We were planning on applying for Option 1 and not exceed the local minimum capacity. Would parking for these buggies count towards the parking capacity? They are commuter vehicles and stay only on site. Thanks for your feedback.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Member 3018 Thumbs Up

Hi John,

Do those buggies have license plates like conventional vehicles? If yes, I would include them in my calculations.

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John Covello LEED AP BD+C, EBOM, LEED and Sustainability Manager, Development Management Group May 27 2015 LEEDuser Member 695 Thumbs Up

Hi Noriko. No license plates. They are internal to the resort only.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Sep 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
3018 Thumbs Up

Parking spaces for transients only

Our project is located central area of metropolitan city. The facility is university campus building. Some public transportation systems are available, so workers and students are banned to use parking spaces for commuting by the university rule. There are several parking spaces planned within the project boundary, but these are for transients visitors only. In this case, it is unpractical for our project to provide car pool or van pool, because no one uses these spaces. Is it impossible for our project to achieve this credit points, even if the number of parking spaces don't exceed the local minimum zoning requirement for parking spaces?

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Eric Thompson Architect NBBJ
Jul 02 2014
LEEDuser Member
586 Thumbs Up

"Preferred" Parking = reserved, cannot be used by others?

I have a project where we only have 3 parking spaces provided, resulting in a substantial reduction from the baseline.

However, the client is reluctant to reserve these exclusively for carpools/vanpools, since there are so few spaces. The language in the LEED credit / Reference Guide does not specifically say that these have to be reserved for only carpools / vanpools, just that they should be "preferred" or prioritized, and that they need to be the nearest one, etc. However, examples of signage I've found, including the one in the description at the top of this page, seem to say that they are reserved only for carpool/vanpool.

Can someone confirm either way, and if it does have to be reserved for only these vehicles, can you show me the citation where it says that?

Thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 03 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Eric, the parking should be reserved for carpools/vanpools. If it is not, then the signage and credit requirements really have no meaning. The credit language states this, I believe.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Member 3018 Thumbs Up

Hi Eric,

Tristan is correct.

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Sadie Martin
Jun 02 2014
Guest
194 Thumbs Up

Parking Capacity includes capacity for Future Development

We are working on a project that is trying to jumpstart development in the city center. Our project is providing more parking then needed by the building so that future buildings nearby can tie into the parking garage instead of creating new surface lots. Has anyone had success with arguing for a case like this? If we receive a signed letter of intent from these future devopements saying that they will be tieing into this parking garage, could we only count the spaces that will be reserved for our building within our LEED documentation even though the entire garage is within our boundary?

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William Weaver LEED Fellow, WELL AP, JLL Jun 02 2014 LEEDuser Member 2108 Thumbs Up

Sadie,

I think what you are arguing is feasible. To do so, you would need to provide a parking plan that clearly defines which parking spots are dedicated to which development. In addition to the letter, you may also need to provide signage details showing how the parking restrictions will be communicated to visitors. If you're not providing this signage, you likely won't achieve the credit as someone visiting one building could easily park in a section dedicated to another development.

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Jun 02 2014 LEEDuser Expert 20755 Thumbs Up

How sure are these future developments? It seems to me that the only way this will be acceptable is if they are under construction and agreements are in place between your project and other projects. If those projects go for LEED certification, how will those projects dedicate parking in your project? Who is maintaining the garage?

The intent of the credit is to minimize the impacts of automotive traffic and it sounds like your project doesn't fit that intent. Not all credits fit all projects.

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Katie Peterschmidt Associate Director, CORE Steward, Cooper Carry Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Member 147 Thumbs Up

Sadie - did you have any success with this approach? We have a similar project that will build a garage for future development / separate LEED project. The difference being the future phase is owned by same entity, and will have to achieve LEED Silver by mandate of the jurisdiction. Still, I see Susan's point - how is the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). to know that the future phase actually moves forward? Any insight is appreciated. Thanks.

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Sadie Martin Sep 13 2015 Guest 194 Thumbs Up

Katie, We did have success on this. We provided info to the Reviewers about the parking study done to determine how many stalls would be needed for our project and how that was fewer than what was required by zoning. We used the number determined by the parking study as our total parking count and the rest of the stalls in our parking garage are basically being reserved for the future development. So, the reviewers are basically letting us pro-rate our parking.

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Ellen Mitchell Director of Sustainability HKS, Inc.
May 29 2014
LEEDuser Expert
5077 Thumbs Up

ITE Analysis

Hi Tristan,
I am looking for information on the ITE study for a project in Mexico. When I click on the "LEEDuser's analysis of the ITE study" link located in FAQs, nothing happens. Can you check to make sure that it is working properly on your end?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Ellen, I'm sorry for the slow response. I have fixed the link above, and here it is as well: http://www.leeduser.com/topic/money-guesswork-ite-parking-generation-study-2003-SSc4.4-LEED-NC-certification

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Francis Porter
Mar 31 2014
Guest
393 Thumbs Up

Mixed-Use vs. Non-residential Classification for a Hotel

Hi,

I am working on a hotel which has several buildings, one main building, two different groups of clusters, 2 suite buildings, and a seperate back of house and a seperate employee residences. The hotel is far away from any town so there is a residential facility for the employees. My question is if we should treat this project as a mixed-use (hotel + residential) or if we should treat this project as a non-residential (hotel only excluding the employee residences treating them as part of the hotel)?

Cheers!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Francis, it sounds mixed use to me, relative to this credit. Relative to LEED as a whole, I would check MPR2 and whether it's a good idea to lump all those buildings together under one LEED certification.

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Eddie Cuevas
Mar 25 2014
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Exemplary Performance Compliance

I am currently working on a nonresidential project on a college campus that is seeking to obtain an EP point by implementing parking for high-occupancy vehicles. The project building is providing no new parking. In order to meet the exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. requirements, we would like to convert several parking spots located on the site of an adjacent building (that the project building is serving as an expansion for) to reserved spots for carpools. Would this be an acceptable way to obtain an exemplary performance point?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Eddie, I don't think so, as that is not an established way to earn and EP point under this credit. You would need to complete an comprehensive transportation management plan like the example shown in the Documentation Toolkit above.

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Keith Steurer Structural Engineer Shive-Hattery, Inc.
Mar 14 2014
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464 Thumbs Up

Stall count: Vehicles vs. Mopeds

For a project at a University, we are providing 102 parking spaces for cars and 50 spaces for mopeds. Any advice on weather we would enter the total number of parking spaces as 102 or 152, or something different? Thanks.

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E H Sustainability Architect Mar 14 2014 Guest 4024 Thumbs Up

Hi Keith. You would exclude the moped parking from the overall parking count for SSc4.3 & 4.4. However, when looking at SSc7.1, you need to include all the parking areas. (This is what we have been instructed to do by GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). on past projects, still waiting for the addenda to clarify this offically.)

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