NC-2009 SSc7.1: Heat Island Effect—Non-Roof

  • NC_Schools_CS_SSc7-1_Type3_CoolNonRoof Diagram
  • New or existing hardscapes?

    This credit is fairly straightforward and easy to achieve if you are newly creating all the hardscapes. You may comply by applying prescriptive design measures outlined by LEED to 50% of your site’s hardscape, or by covering 50% of your project's parking spaces. If, however, your project includes a planned or existing surface parking lot, replacing the existing asphalt or finding a cost-effective alternative to new asphalt may be challenging and can make this credit difficult to achieve.

    There can be added costs and labor if your project needs to modify existing hardscapes to meet the prescriptive goals of the credit: for example, taking out a black asphalt parking lot to install a more reflective material.

    When dealing with existing hardscapes, it may be more cost-effective to shade areas with trees and architectural canopies, or clean and restore them to their original condition, than to replace them. This credit can be unattainable if your project’s hardscapes do not already comply and you do not have control over the design of hardscapes. 

    Limiting your hardscape makes it easier

    Before working to treat the hardscape surfaces on your project site, don’t forget that the most effective way to reduce heat islands and help with this credit is to limit the amount of hardscape and parking spaces provided in the first place.

    Open-grid pavingLimiting hardscape not only reduces the square footage you must treat with light-colored paving, shading, open-grid paving, or covering, it can also help you gain points under:

    What’s “SRI”?

    The “solar reflectance index” or SRI is the measure of a surface’s ability to reflect solar heat. Higher reflectivity is desirable, because it helps combat the urban heat islandA densely populated area in which pavement and buildings absorb, store, and release solar energy, making the vicinity warmer than it would be if the pavement and buildings were not present. effect. SRI can range from zero to over 100, with darker surfaces closer to zero and lighter surfaces approaching 100.

    FAQs for SSc7.1

    I do not know the SRI value of my hardscape materials. What can I do?

    LEED requires specific SRI values based on product or material—no exceptions. Your first step is to try reaching out to your product manufacturers to obtain this information, or searching for any SRI values that might be applicable, if your material is generic. If this cannot be found, your next option is to send your material to a lab to be tested. Getting this data can be hard with existing materials other than concrete. Finding a similar product and comparing it to yours with images will not be accepted.

    How do I find a lab for getting SRI values? What will it cost?

    Look for laboratories that calculate SRI, or that test reflectivity and emissivity—once you have those values the LEED Online form will complete the calculation. Searching for labs using keywords like surfaces or optics may also be helpful. Make sure the lab you are using follows the reflectivity and emissivity testing ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services criteria mentioned in LEED. Testing could cost $500 to $1,000 per sample.

    I have a mix of various hardscape types with different SRI values. Can I apply a weighted average to see if my project complies?

    Yes, per LEED interpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #5220 made on 07/30/2009, a weighted average is allowable similar to SSc7.2 for roof surfaces. The supporting weighted average calculator in LEEDuser's Documentation Toolkit section can be used to establish a weighted average for all hardscape materials used on your project.

    Should I use the SRI value of new or weathered concrete for my project?

    Concrete weathers over time and its SRI value goes down. Washing the concrete periodically during building operation is recommended. This LEED credit allows you to use the higher SRI value if the concrete is new. Old concrete should get a reduced value unless washed.

    What is hardscape? Is a gravel surface considered hardscape? How about artificial turf? Wood? Tennis courts?

    According to the LEED Reference Guide, "Hardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios." While this clearly demonstrates that gravel roads and paved tennis courts are hardscape, it leaves some gray area. LEEDuser is not aware of specific guidance relating to marginal surfaces like wood, turf, or pea-gravel, but when in doubt, we recommend considering any 'inanimate" surface hardscape, which would include all of those. This should be seen as an opportunity to meet the credit intent by using high-SRI materials.

    There is a reflecting pool on our site. What is the SRI of water? Should we include that in our calculations?

    No. LEED Interpretation #1412, issued 2/7/2006 sets the precedent here in stating that "Water features are excluded from the calculation."

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • This credit is fairly straightforward to achieve: You may comply by applying prescriptive design measures outlined by LEED to 50% of your project site’s hardscape or by covering 50% of your project's parking spaces. 


  • Surfaces absorb and emit varying degrees of heat based on color and material. The photo shows four adjacent surfaces at the same time on a summer day in Chicago. The new black asphalt has the highest temperature at 126 degrees, while the new white concrete is almost 20ºF less, at 108ºF. Image – YRG SustainabilityIf you need to modify existing hardscapes to meet the prescriptive goals of the credit, you can face added costs. For example, demo of a black asphalt parking lot to install a material with a lighter SRI would be an added expense compared with resurfacing the same asphalt. When dealing with existing hardscapes, it may be more cost-effective to shade areas with trees and architectural canopies than to replace the hardscapes with lighter SRI material.


  • Examine existing conditions to help guide site plan development. Does your existing site have shading from trees, covered parking, or light-colored hardscape? Are there ways to minimize your project site’s hardscape and parking areas (including gravel, which is considered hardscape)?   


  • Define your project’s LEED boundary, and ensure that it is consistent across all credits pursued by your project. The LEED boundary defines the scope of work, and must include any land that will be disturbed and or used by your project.


  • Benefits of reduced hardscapeYou won’t find it in the credit requirements, but the best strategy here is to limit the amount of hardscape and number of parking spaces provided in the first place. This not only reduces the hardscape square footage you must treat with light-colored paving, shading, open-grid paving, or covering, it can also help you earn:


  • Explore ways to share parking with adjacent sites, and encourage carpooling and other strategies to reduce the amount of parking area needed.


  • Some strategies for limiting the amount of hardscape include: 

    • Share parking with adjacent sites, and encourage carpooling and other ways to minimize demand for parking.
    • Stack the parking— either underground or in a parking garage. 
    • Analyze anticipated site walking patterns to discover ways to minimize the length of sidewalks from parking lots to buildings. Place building entrances where people will need them, not far across expanses of sidewalk.
    • If there are existing trees onsite, look for opportunities to place the project’s necessary hardscapes adjacent to the trees to utilize shading and plant new trees and anticipate the shading that will be present in five years.

Schematic Design

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  • After you have reduced your parking hardscape as much as possible through reduced parking spaces, stacked parking, minimizing sidewalks, and other strategies, try the following steps to reduce heat island effect even further.


  • Option 1: Treat 50% of Site Hardscapes 


  • Determine the square footage of all non-roof hardscape on your site. You'll need to integrate the strategies below for 50% or more of this area.


  • Although an area of hardscape may meet two different requirements, the area can only be counted once. For example, pavement that is both light-colored and shaded may not be counted twice in credit calculations.


  • Shading by Trees and Vegetated Landscape


  • Explore integrating hardscape shading by trees.


  • Consult with a landscape architect to specify native and adapted tree species with large canopies. This strategy can reduce the number of trees that need to be planted, watered, and maintained—while providing the maximum shading potential.


  • It is helpful to plant trees in vegetated strips within hardscape areas to maximize the shading potential. Strips can be placed between parking rows, or as a vegetated buffer between surface parking and walkways.


  • Trees may be able to provide not only shade for hardscapes but also shade and wind protection for the building—potentially reducing cooling as well as heating loads in the building, and saving operational costs. 


  • When calculating the shading area of trees, you may need to use modeling software. Google Sketchup is a free, easy-to-use application that can help you determine shading area. (See Resources.) 


  • Treed shadow graphicTo determine the shadow cast by a tree, average the shadow area cast by the three time of day shown in the diagram.Shading is calculated on the summer solstice (June 21). Take the average of the shaded areas measured at 10:00 a.m., 12:00 p.m., and 3:00 p.m. 


  • Shading by Architectural Canopies or Photovoltaic (PV) Structures


  • Solar PV over parkingConsider shading parking with solar PV panels, which will also contribute to EAc1 and EAc2. Image – YRG SustainabilityExplore integrating architectural canopies with an SRI equal to or greater than 29, or photovoltaic (PV) canopies.


  • The shading area used for this requirement is equivalent to the footprint of the covering as seen from above (not the average shading angle as used for trees).


  • You cannot count shading cast from the building itself, as your project building does not cover non-building hardscape area from an aerial view. However, you can count canopies that protrude from buildings and shade hardscapes.


  • Architectural devices need to have an SRI of 29 or higher. This gives you a variety of light-colored materials to choose from. Get specifications from manufacturers as you choose materials.


  • Canopies, terraces, balconies, and other architectural devices are covered by the calculations for this credit if they do not have conditioned space below them. Coverings that have conditioned space below are considered roofs and are covered under SSc7.2: Heat Island Effect—Roof.


  • Shading using Photovoltatic (PV) panels is a great way to contribute to this credit, but the PV panels have the potential to create a lot of glare. Be sure to orient the PV panels in a way that does not affect building occupants or drivers (while still making sense from the perspective of exposure to the sun to generate electricity).


  • Installing freestanding canopies can be very cost-effective and will require little maintenance in the long run.  


  • PV canopies will have more of an upfront cost (that can often be offset with government incentives), but is a great way to install renewable energy onsite, contributing to EAc2: Onsite Renewable Power, without losing the functionality of your parking.


  • Light-Colored Materials


  • Explore integrating the use of light-colored hardscape material with an SRI value of at least 29.


  • SRI is the measure of a material’s ability to reject solar heat and is determined by a material’s light reflectance and heat admittance. For example, dark colors have values close to 0 SRI absorb most of heat they receive, while lighter colors have higher values and tend to reflect heat.


  • Obtain the SRI value of materials you are considering from the manufacturer.


  • For concrete and asphalt, you can use the following default SRI numbers from the LEED Reference Guide:

     


  • Power-washing old concrete can help restore it to near-new SRI values. For the purposes of documenting the credit, it is assumed that the material has the new value, unless existing hardscape is being used. For existing hardscape, you must either use the weathered value, or document that surfaces have been cleaned and lightened enough to be equivalent to the default SRI values.


  • Concrete has higher SRI values than asphalt and so is preferable for this credit. However, it is also generally more expensive than asphalt, but it is more durable and often has a lower life-cycle cost, as it must be replaced less often. This is especially true in high-traffic areas, turnarounds, and areas of heavy-duty vehicle use. If concrete can’t be used everywhere due to the price, use it selectively in high wear-and-tear areas.  


  • Open-Grid Paving


  • Explore using 50% pervious, open-grid paving.


  • Using open-grid paving allows water to infiltrate the ground, which could also help your project team achieve the stormwater management credits SSc6.1 and SSc6.2


  • Open grid pavingOpen-grid paving is different from porous paving—Open grid paving is laid out in a pattern that exposes areas of the ground allowing vegetation to grow in the open cells.  Porous paving is continuous paving that allows water to penetrate it minimizing runoff.  Porous paving alone without an open grid will not help you earn the credit, as you need the vegetation and its associated evapotranspiration help mitigate the heat island effect. Porous paving can qualify as a light colored material, however, if it has an SRI of 29 or higher. 


  • The open-grid paving itself should be at least 50% pervious and contribute to 50% of your project's hardscape areas.


  • Open-grid paving can be just as durable as other types of paving, but it may require additional maintenance to ensure that open cells do not become clogged.


  • Open grid paving is the most beneficial when it is applied on top of permeable soil that promotes infiltration. Soils with high clay content, or land with shallow bedrock may prevent water infiltration thus making open grid paving less functional.


  • Option 2: Cover 50% of the Site Parking


  • Determine the number of parking spaces needed for your project. Fifty percent or more of those need to be under cover—underground, under deck, under roof, or under the building. Parking roofs must have an SRI value of at least 29, or be vegetated, or be covered by architectural canopies or PV arrays (following the options listed above).


  • Consider locating parking underground, freeing up more site area for other uses, such as larger building footprints, open space, and landscaping.


  • If 50% of your project’s parking is underground or under the building, there is no parking roof requiring any SRI value. The building roof would be calculated according to SSc7.2 requirements even though the building covers parking spaces. 


  • If you use photovoltaic structures to shade hardscapes, they can count either toward shading hardscapes under Option 1, or shading parking spaces under Option 2—but not both.  Decide which compliance path you want the PV to fall under.  


  • Parking spots apply to all parking areas within the LEED boundary. Off-site parking outside the LEED boundary is not included in this credit.

Design Development

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  • Revisit your site hardscape area calculations to ensure that you are still meeting the requirement that 50% of the site hardscape is shaded, open-grid paved, or light-colored—or that 50% of the parking is under cover.  


  • Be sure to collect the SRI values for all hardscape materials you are planning to use toward this credit.


  • Create a site plan for the LEED submittal that clearly indicates the following:

    • For Option 1: Square feet of all hardscapes. This should be indicated for each type of hardscape material. Indicate the SRI value, shading area, and or open grid paving area on the plan for each hardscape type.
    • For Option 2: How many total parking spaces exist onsite, and how many are under cover.

Construction Documents

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  • Include any specific material properties and SRI criteria in the construction and landscaping specifications. 

Construction

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  • Ensure that the materials and landscaping are used according to your specifications for credit compliance.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Include regular cleaning practices for hardscapes and coverings, especially for light-colored surfaces, as their SRI value will tend to drop, making them less reflective, as they get darker and dirtier. Committing to this is not required to earn the credit, but helps realize the benefit of it.


  • Include regular weeding practices for any open-grid paving, to keep the material durable and ensure that the spaces do not become clogged.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    SS Credit 7.1: Heat island effect - nonroof

    1 Point

    Intent

    To reduce heat islands1 to minimize impacts on microclimates and human and wildlife habitats.

    Requirements

    Option 1

    Use any combination of the following strategies for 50% of the site hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. (including roads, sidewalks, courtyards and parking lots):

    • Provide shade from the existing tree canopy or within 5 years of landscape installation. Landscaping (trees)

      must be in place at the time of occupancy.
    • Provide shade from structures covered by solar panels that produce energy used to offset some nonrenewable resource use.
    • Provide shade from architectural devices or structures that have a solar reflectanceAlso known as albedo: the fraction of solar energy that is reflected by a surface on a scale of 0 to 1. Black paint has a solar reflectance of 0; white paint (titanium dioxide) has a solar reflectance of 1. The standard technique for its determination uses spectrophotometric measurements, with an integrating sphere to determine the reflectance at each wavelength. The average reflectance is then determined by an averaging process, using a standard solar spectrum, as documented by ASTM Standards E903 and E892 index2 (SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces.) of at least 29.
    • Use hardscape materials with an SRI of at least 29.
    • Use an open-grid pavement system (at least 50% pervious).

    OR

    Option 2

    Place a minimum of 50% of parking spaces under cover3. Any roof used to shade or cover parking must have an SRI of at least 29, be a vegetated green roof or be covered by solar panels that produce energy used to offset some nonrenewable resource use.

    1 Heat islands are defined as thermal gradient differences between developed and underdeveloped areas.
    2 The solar reflectance index (SRI) is a measure of the constructed surface's ability to reflect solar heat, as shown by a small temperature rise. It is defined so that a standardblack surface (reflectance 0.05, emittance 0.90) is 0 and a standard white surface (reflectance 0.80, emittance 0.90) is 100. to calculate the SRI for a given material, obtain the reflectance value and emittance value for the material. SRI is calculated according to ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services E 1980. Reflectance is measured according to ASTM E 903, ASTM E 1918, or ASTM C 1549. Emittance is measured according to ASTM E408 or ASTM C 1371.
    3 For the purposes of this credit, under cover parking is defined as parking underground, under desk, under roof, or under a building.


    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Employ strategies, materials and landscaping techniques that reduce the heat absorption of exterior materials. Use shade (calculated on June 21, noon solar time) from native or adapted trees and large shrubs, vegetated trellises or other exterior structures supporting vegetation. Consider using new coatings and integral colorants for asphalt to achieve light-colored surfaces instead of blacktop. Position photovoltaic cells to shade impervious surfacesSurfaces that promote runoff of precipitation volumes instead of infiltration into the subsurface. The imperviousness or degree of runoff potential can be estimated for different surface materials..

    Consider replacing constructed surfaces (e.g., roof, roads, sidewalks, etc.) with vegetated surfaces such as vegetated roofs and open grid paving or specify high-albedoAlbedo is synonymous with solar reflectance. materials, such as concrete, to reduce heat absorption.

Organizations

ASTM

This is the organization that sets the testing standards for material heat emissivityEmissivity is the ratio of the radiation emitted by a surface to the radiation emitted by a black body at the same temperature. and reflectance that help determine a material’s SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces..


American Concrete Pavement Association

This national association represents concrete pavement contractors, cement companies, equipment and material manufacturers, and suppliers. See Albedo: A Measure of Pavement Surface Reflectance, R&T Update (3.05) (June 2002).


Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Heat Island Group

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory conducts heat island research to find, analyze, and implement solutions to minimize heat island effectHeat island effect refers to the absorption of heat by hardscapes, such as dark, nonreflective pavement and buildings, and its radiation to surrounding areas. Other sources may include vehicle exhaust, air-conditioners, and street equipment. Reduced airflow because of tall buildings and narrow streets exacerbate the effect.. Current research efforts focus on the study and development of more reflective surfaces for roadways and buildings.

Web Tools

Sketch-up

Use this software to model shaded areas from trees.


U.S. EPA, Heat Island Effect

This site offers basic information about heat island effectHeat island effect refers to the absorption of heat by hardscapes, such as dark, nonreflective pavement and buildings, and its radiation to surrounding areas. Other sources may include vehicle exhaust, air-conditioners, and street equipment. Reduced airflow because of tall buildings and narrow streets exacerbate the effect., its social and environmental costs, and strategies to minimize its prevalence.

Non-Roof Weighted Average Calculator

LEED BD&C allows projects with a mix of hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. surface types (or projects with one hardscape type whose SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. is lower than the threshold but more than 50% of the total hardscape area) to demonstrate compliance through a "weighted" calculation, which can be performed with this spreadsheet.

Site Plan – 50% Parking Spaces Under Cover

Option 2

This site plan from a LEED project shows SSc7.1 compliance, with 50% of parking spaces located under cover.

Product Cut Sheets

Check the SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. index of products specified to earn this credit. The pavers in these examples have varying SRI values, some of which would contribute to the credit, and some of which would not.

SRI Calculator

This calculator produced by Lawrence Berkeley National Labs (LBNL) allows you to compute solar reflectanceAlso known as albedo: the fraction of solar energy that is reflected by a surface on a scale of 0 to 1. Black paint has a solar reflectance of 0; white paint (titanium dioxide) has a solar reflectance of 1. The standard technique for its determination uses spectrophotometric measurements, with an integrating sphere to determine the reflectance at each wavelength. The average reflectance is then determined by an averaging process, using a standard solar spectrum, as documented by ASTM Standards E903 and E892 index (SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces.) and roof surface temperature based on solar reflectance and thermal emittance based on ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services standard E 1980.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 SS

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

285 Comments

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Alejandro Macias
Apr 13 2016
LEEDuser Member
16 Thumbs Up

Credit 7.1 and 7.2

Project Location: Mexico

I am working on a dormitory Project and it has different buildings (one for the kitchen, one for administration, girls dormitory….).The roof of this buildings are connected with each other, so almost all the hardscapes have shade provided by the roof. If I obtain credit 7.2 by having an SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. of at least 29, would I obtain the credit 7.1?

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Marina Wrensch Landscape Architect Cameron McCarthy Landscape Architecture & Planning
Apr 12 2016
Guest
28 Thumbs Up

Artificial Turf - Considered Hardscape?

Project Location: United States

I am working on the LEED documentation for SSc7.1 for a softball stadium. The infield is clay and the outfield is artificial turf. I am assuming that neither of them meet the required SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. to count towards achieving the credit. However, is the artificial turf and clay actually considered hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios.? Do we count it at all within this credit?
Thank you!

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Erin Holdenried Sustainable Design Manager AECOM
Apr 05 2016
LEEDuser Member
106 Thumbs Up

Cold Climate

Project Location: United States

Does anybody have experience using an alternate compliance path for a project in a cold climate?

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Robert Hink Principal, LEED Faculty The Spinnaker Group
Feb 22 2016
LEEDuser Member
756 Thumbs Up

SRI of artificial turf

Is there a high SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. artificial turf out there in the market? Been trying to do some research, no luck.

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Allen Cornett Sustainable Consultant INSPEC Sustainability Group LLC
Feb 02 2016
LEEDuser Member
208 Thumbs Up

Exemplary Performance

Project Location: United States

Can exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. be documented by combining Option 1 and Option 2? For example if 1,000 parking spaces are in a parking garage, and 10 "twenty minute parking only" surfaces spaces are on a hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. materials with an SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. of at least 29 will exemplary performance be reached?

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Susan Di Giulio Project Manager Zinner Consultants
Jan 27 2016
LEEDuser Member
1641 Thumbs Up

Deck over parking; do I have this right?

Project Location: United States

Our project has multiple levels of parking under a large podium plaza. I believe this is what what the Reference Guide (p 112) refers to as a "deck", right? Which means, if I read correctly, that we do not have to provide SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces./shade/green roof compliance, correct? The team has endeavored to use high SRI materials, but there are many different materials types, from green roofs to granite to rubber surface for playgrounds, etc.

Also, there are some bits of unoccupied space under the podium (but over other parking) that house mechanical equipment, and there are some stairs. As this is not over conditioned space, I do not have to treat these as roof for SSc7.2, right?

Thanks for your thoughts....

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Nina Starynina
Oct 14 2015
LEEDuser Member
33 Thumbs Up

Glazing cover of parking area

Project Location: Russian Federation

Hi,
The project has a covered parking. The Owner is chosing the cover material and considers to implement glazing for the cover (SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. value is 30, SHGCSolar heat gain coefficient (SHGC): The fraction of solar gain admitted through a window, expressed as a number between 0 and 1. is 50). Is this decision available for the purpose of SSc7.1 credit, option 2?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Nina, yes, that works for Option 3, which requires an SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. of at least 30.

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Jonathan Weiss
Aug 21 2015
LEEDuser Member
2450 Thumbs Up

Covered parking - fabric covers?

We are working on a project where we want to use a fabric parking cover, and the manufacturers do not seem to have the SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. values or equivalent to calculate 29 SRI. Does anyone have experience with using this sort of structure to meet the "Covered Parking" requirement of the credit? The project is located in the Middle East so heat, dust and sand are more critical than water for the cover.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Jonathan, since your question was posted a while ago I was wondering if you found any resources on this? I don't supposed the manufacturer has any insight?

I would contact the Cool Roof Rating Council, or the Heat Island Group at LBNL, to see if they have any ideas.

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Eliel Pugaoan
May 06 2015
Guest
14 Thumbs Up

Tower’s Parking Located in a Non-LEED Podium’s Basement Parking

We have a Tower pursuing LEED NC certification being built on top of an existing Podium with basement parking. The Tower officially starts on top of the Podium. Its LEED boundary is its footprint on the Podium’s roof deck. The Owner of the tower will buy parking slots from the Podium’s basement parking to meet its required number of parking. Our query is this: The LEED User SSc7.1 checklist stated that “Parking spots apply to all parking areas within the LEED boundary. Off-site parking outside the LEED boundary is not included in this credit.” However, with this set-up, we’d like to know if we can we still pursue SSc7.1 as the basement parking is not within the tower’s LEED boundary but essentially not an off-site parking as the tower is within the project site. We are trying to pursue 100% parking underground and it seems that it is achievable in this situation. Any thoughts please?

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Cindy Estrada LEED AP BD&C, SDS Architects, Inc. Jul 07 2015 LEEDuser Member 855 Thumbs Up

Good question, but it sounds to me like the underground parking would still be considered off-site since it is not within your LEED boundary and would be leased. It also sounds like you have very little site hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. to help meet the intent of the credit

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E H Sustainability Architect
Feb 18 2015
Guest
3903 Thumbs Up

Ancillary site buildings

Project Location: Vietnam

Are unoccupied ancillary site buildings included in the credit? Or SSc7.2?

Thanks for your feedback!

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Lewis Hewton Cundall Feb 18 2015 Guest 639 Thumbs Up

If they are inside the LEED boundary and part of the new construction contract then they would be applicable to SSc7.2.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Mar 10 2015 LEEDuser Member 1429 Thumbs Up

Per the original MPR Supplemental Guidance (2009), p19, these types of "small buildings" could be excluded if they met certain criteria. However, in subsequent revisions, this guidance went away yet the list of changes in the revisions does not mention why.

In the 2011 revision, on p 25-26 under "Project boundaries that include other buildings" it says:
NON-LEED-CERTIFIABLE BUILDING ON SITE
If there is a non-LEED-certifiable building within the LEED project boundary, the project team can include the non-certifying building within the project boundary in ALL
relevant submittals that are allowed and appropriate for each individual credit and prerequisite, essentially treating the non-certifying building as an extension of the certifying building.

It seems there is quite a bit of interpretation left up to the team in the more recent version. I have a similar situation on a current project and would appreciate some feedback. For instance, a little storage shed not big enough to be occupied? Or a single-person ticket booth that is occupied, but not conditioned?

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Devani PERERA Green Building Consultant, ELAN Mar 12 2015 Guest 394 Thumbs Up

I had a similar case where I had a security post at the entrance to the project site that fell into the non-LEED certifiable category since it was too small. During the review process I was asked to include this space in all my documentation considering it as an extension of the building pursuing LEED certification.
This complicated the justification process and required for example including entry-way systems for the security post. As this as turned out to be rather painful process for anther similar project we have decided to follow the campus certification path, thus giving us the possibility to exclude the security post at the entrance to the project. We are waiting to see if this is in fact the best path to take in such situations. Anyone else had the same experience?

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Magda Aghababyan CEO Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
Feb 10 2015
LEEDuser Member
930 Thumbs Up

50% periouvs paving

May be this is a very basic question.
But I would like to know from you all, how can we determine whether a open grid paving block is 50% previous or not? Does that mean out of the total foot print of the block more than 50% is open and accommodates vegetation?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Magda, great question that I have wondered about myself. I have never heard a definition of this but I think that 50% open is a good bet.

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Paul Rogers Architect BAU Architects
Dec 26 2014
LEEDuser Member
143 Thumbs Up

Plaza at grade building above.

Project Location: Sweden

I am working on a project where the exterior space consists of an alley way and an outdoor plaza. The outdoor plaza is on columns under the building volume. Am I right in thinking that the outdoor plaza is to be excluded from this credit (ss7.1 Non-roof) ?

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders Dec 29 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

Paul,

I would also agree that since the outdoor plaza is directly under the building it would be excluded from SSc7.1 Non roof.

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Paul Rogers Architect, BAU Architects Dec 30 2014 LEEDuser Member 143 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the reply, another question regarding the adjacent alley which is beside the building . . . so long as the building has an SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces.>29 am I able to factor in the shading (average shading) produced by the building?

I see in the checklist provided above for this credit as well as an earlier post that 'You cannot count shading cast from the building itself, as your project building does not cover non-building hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. area from an aerial view. However, you can count canopies that protrude from buildings and shade hardscapes.' If this is the case, it does not seem very logical to me in my case as the adjacent alley is rather narrow and the building's on either side over 8 stories tall so the alley will be mainly shaded for a majority of the time.

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Founder DCarbon
Nov 20 2014
Guest
810 Thumbs Up

Gravel nonroof area

Project Location: Greece

Under what circumstances could a nonroof area covered with light gravel be considered as non-hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios.? This area is a permeable area as it contributes to an effective stormwater management and consists of loose soil substrates allowing water infiltration.
Additionally, would SR values for gravel from international references and the LEED Reference Guide be accepted by the reviewers?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Charalampos, I think you are out of luck here. The infiltration aspect is great, but that's a different credit. For heat island effectHeat island effect refers to the absorption of heat by hardscapes, such as dark, nonreflective pavement and buildings, and its radiation to surrounding areas. Other sources may include vehicle exhaust, air-conditioners, and street equipment. Reduced airflow because of tall buildings and narrow streets exacerbate the effect., SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. is the measure, and for all but concrete you must use actual values. And this sounds like hardscape—no way around that.

Use the design that is best for the project—not chasing LEED credits. Or, use an alternative design such as an infiltrating turf area.

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Juliane Muench
Nov 14 2014
LEEDuser Member
1031 Thumbs Up

No test of SRI?

Project Location: Denmark

Hi! We are using new light grey concrete and new light grey concrete stones on our site.
LEED provides typical SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. values, f.ex. for new grey concrete which is 35 according to the LEED manual.
From previous comments in this forum i presume that it enough to show compliance with this credit by proving that new grey concrete and new grey concrete stones are used?
Thanks in advance!!

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders Nov 14 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

Yes, just upload product data showing the concrete stone are grey colored.

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Jun 16 2015 LEEDuser Expert 10094 Thumbs Up

Folks should be aware that a 5/9/2011 Addendum (now Correction) to the Reference Guide changed the SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. value for typical new gray concrete from 35 to 38. See http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=100000912 for BD+C and O+M (http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=100000958 for ID+C (SSc1) and http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=100000801 (dated 2/2/11) for ND Built Project (SSc3)).

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Lewis Hewton Cundall
Oct 02 2014
Guest
639 Thumbs Up

Drop off spaces only

Project Location: Australia

Hi all

Our project has drop off zones only and no new parking on-site. The drop off zones are physically identical to car parking spaces it's just you're not allowed to park in them for more than a minute or two. If they are under the main building structure I'm assuming this achieves the same environmental outcomes and would comply with Option 2 (min 50% parking undercover)?

Would appreciate your thoughts/experience.

Thanks.

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders Oct 02 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

Lewis,

I would agree and count the drop off zone parking spots as covered and use Option 2 method for documentation.

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Julie Chagas
Sep 25 2014
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

Paking covering

Hi! My project will have a lot of parking spaces that cant be shaded by trees or with open grid pavement.
i am looking for suppliers of flexible car coverages that comply with the SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. requirements, but, if my coverage is white, can I use the standart values of reflectance (0.8) and emmitance (0.9)? Tks!

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Karim Farah Sustainability Manager / USGBC Faculty Dar Al-Handasah
Sep 23 2014
LEEDuser Member
35 Thumbs Up

SRI of sand

Project Location: Saudi Arabia

Does anybody know the SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. of natural sand?

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Andrew Carman Sustainability Consultant, Sebesta Sep 25 2014 Guest 74 Thumbs Up

That totally depends on the composition of the sand. You'd have to have it measured or find a vendor or manufacturer that has an SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. value for sand you could use.

In terms of the application of the material, the SRI requirements for SSc7.1 only apply to hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios., and on the one hand I suppose sand would/could be considered "inanimate" but on the other hand, it is not like the examples offered in the definition, which are "pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios." I would think unless it's used on a "roadway" it would be considered permeable surface rather than hardscape.

Anyone have an alternate judgement on sand as hardscape?

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Andrew Carman Sustainability Consultant, Sebesta Sep 25 2014 Guest 74 Thumbs Up

There is a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide that rules aggregates and chat are considered hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. (So I guess "inanimate" takes precedent in the definition). This is also from the ruling:

Aggregate may be tested using ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services E1918-06 (Solar ReflectanceAlso known as albedo: the fraction of solar energy that is reflected by a surface on a scale of 0 to 1. Black paint has a solar reflectance of 0; white paint (titanium dioxide) has a solar reflectance of 1. The standard technique for its determination uses spectrophotometric measurements, with an integrating sphere to determine the reflectance at each wavelength. The average reflectance is then determined by an averaging process, using a standard solar spectrum, as documented by ASTM Standards E903 and E892) and ASTM E408-71(2008) (Thermal Emittance) and then the SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. may be calculated using ASTM E1980. Applicable internationally.
Best,
Andy

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Veronica Alexandrova
Sep 15 2014
Guest
19 Thumbs Up

Covered parking spaces

Hello dear colleagues!
We are working on industrial project (pump production factory). The project team and the Owner have come to a decision to achieve SSc7.1 credit through option 2 and provide cover for 65 of the total 130 parking spaces aimed for the project. All 130 parking spaces are located outside the main building on specially designated outside areas. To cover 65 spaces, the Owner has ordered covered structures (roof on stakes; SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. for roof covering meets LEED requirements). Moreover, open-grid paving will be provided under each covered structure. Theoretically, we meet the intent of the credit - to reduce heat-island effect. But will such solution be counted for LEED, if to take into account that our covered places are not under the main building itself and are not located on the lower level of the multi-level parking zone?

Thank you in advance!

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders Sep 16 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

Veronica,
Is this parking space area located within your LEED project boundary? If it's in the leed project boundary but not located under the building itself your solution DOES comply with the credit intent.

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Veronica Alexandrova Sep 16 2014 Guest 19 Thumbs Up

Crissy,
Thank you for the response!

Yes, all parking areas are located within project boundary. So, does it mean that we comply with the credit even if our covers are special architectural structures to cover parking lots?

Thank you!

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Karen Loysen Loysen + Kreuthmeier Architect
Sep 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
29 Thumbs Up

Doubling Area

A site has reflective pavement (SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. 29+) that is partially shaded by trees. Do I count that area as shaded and subtract it from the area of reflective pavement? Otherwise that area will be counted twice (i.e. doubled) in LEED table ssc7.1-2 of the form.

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders Sep 16 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

Karen,

I would suggest counting the areas that have reflective pavement and shading as the higher SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. parking spaces and NOT count them as partially shaded. This method should only count the spaces once.

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Salvador Davila Sep 30 2014 Guest 6 Thumbs Up

I didn't see a note mentioning that the area was parking so I was a bit confused on your response Crissy. I have the same issue, it is an open space dining area where its a plus SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. of 29 and we have quite a bit of tree cover. Are you saying we can use either the total sf of the paving area that is plus SRI 29 OR we use the area of shade on the paving but not both?

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Apr 10 2015 Guest 2512 Thumbs Up

Salvador - Count the area for one (shaded) or the other (High SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces.), don't double count an area. Each area is in only one of the two categories. Once you have areas counted up, you can add shaded and high SRI areas together to get a total. Is that your question?

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Rashida Mogri Design Performance Leader Gensler
Aug 27 2014
Guest
6 Thumbs Up

LEED Boundary & Covered Parking (Vegetated Roof)

We designed a building/garage right up against an existing building/garage. All of our new construction parking (within the LEED boundary) is either under the tower footprint, or under or vegetated green roof. During our preliminary construction review, the technical advice (action item) stated that existing satellite imagery indicated that the existing garage parking was not covered, and therefore we did not meet the credit requirements. If those are outside our LEED boundary, and not part of our building, shouldn't those be excluded? I was hoping to just resubmit a plan with the LEED boundary explicitly showing those spaces outside the LEED boundary.

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders Sep 16 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

I would suggest making a case for clearing definining what is within the LEED project boundary and making the case that the existing parking lot is not part of the boundary. Does the existing parking lot have the same owner as your building/garage? If not it further strenghtens your argument that this should not be counted as part of your project.

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Laura Long Project Manager NORR
Aug 27 2014
LEEDuser Member
340 Thumbs Up

Regular Maintenance Program for Pressure Washing Concrete

Hi,

Could anyone tell me what would be considered "regular" maintenance for pressure washing concrete to be able to use the higher SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. value for the concrete? Is there a suggested amount of times per year to pressure wash the concrete?

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders Aug 27 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

Laura,

I don't think there is an official statement for regular maintenance. The SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. is based off if the color of the concrete not on the maintenance.

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GBC Council CL Chile GBC
Aug 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
162 Thumbs Up

What about buildings occupying the whole site?

Hi! We have a building which occupies 100% of the project site as it is located in a densely developed area which allows it. This building has no parking, thus we can achieve SS c4.4 but what about SS c7.1? Can we achieve it if we have no hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. at ground level?. Thanks so much for your help.

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LEEDme STRATEGIE SRL STRATEGIE SRL Aug 29 2014 Guest 268 Thumbs Up

I think that a Zero lot line building can’t achive the credit 7.1. The purpose of this credit is to reduce the heat island effectHeat island effect refers to the absorption of heat by hardscapes, such as dark, nonreflective pavement and buildings, and its radiation to surrounding areas. Other sources may include vehicle exhaust, air-conditioners, and street equipment. Reduced airflow because of tall buildings and narrow streets exacerbate the effect. on the non-roof surfaces. If the project does not present hardscapes it will not be possible to implement any strategy that meets the requirements listed in the credit.

Alberto - LEEDme

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GBC Council CL Chile GBC Sep 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 162 Thumbs Up

We have the same issue, thus, we were wondering......what if a Zero lot line building achieves SSc7.2? Could it automatically get SSc7.1?.

Regards,

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant Taitem Engineering
Aug 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
1623 Thumbs Up

Shading by trees

Hello,

I have never documented this credit by using the shading option from existing tree canopy. I understand you'll need to calculate shaded area from each tree on June 21 at 10, 12, and 3pm. My question is how do I get those values? Thanks!

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Scott Adams Principal, Sustainable Integration LLC Aug 12 2014 Guest 205 Thumbs Up

You need to determine the diameter of the canopy and the height of each tree. With that information you can determine the shade area the same way you do for structures.

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Apr 10 2015 Guest 2512 Thumbs Up

Once the trees dimensions are approximated, The shading can be modeled in Sketchup or lighting software (like AGI32) that does daylight calculations. Not hard, but can be a little time consuming.

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Nicole Kimoto RIM Architects
Jul 30 2014
Guest
775 Thumbs Up

Asphalt Paving Coatings?

The client has decided to proceed with providing new asphalt paving instead of concrete, but they are planning on providing a coating or thermoplastic paint over. If the coating/paint has an SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. of 29 or greater would this work to achieving this credit?

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders Aug 05 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

Nicole,

If the painting/coating has a SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. of 29 or higher this would allow you to achieve the credit. I have used this approach on another project that achieved the credit.

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Cindy Estrada LEED AP BD&C, SDS Architects, Inc. Apr 09 2015 LEEDuser Member 855 Thumbs Up

Crissy,
Can you or anyone recommend a process or company for this approach? I am wondering about maintenance as well. Our project is in the "snowy" Midwest and I would like to give our client some information on upkeep.

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Q +
Jul 17 2014
Guest
95 Thumbs Up

Grass pavers?

Good morning.

Anyone know if grass pavers count as hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios.? We've used this material instead of asphalt in a number of locations on a project, but if I can't count it as hardscape, I won't be able to categorize the positive impact on the potential heat island effectHeat island effect refers to the absorption of heat by hardscapes, such as dark, nonreflective pavement and buildings, and its radiation to surrounding areas. Other sources may include vehicle exhaust, air-conditioners, and street equipment. Reduced airflow because of tall buildings and narrow streets exacerbate the effect..

Thanks!

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders Jul 17 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

Grass pavers do count as hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. and should be calculated in the open grid paving system square footage.

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Q + Jul 17 2014 Guest 95 Thumbs Up

Great! Thanks so much, Crissy - both for the information and for getting back to me so quickly.

Have a good day!

Q

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Sahar Abi-Ziki
Jul 01 2014
Guest
151 Thumbs Up

any SRI requirements for pavers and roads on site?

We are trying to achieve SS.c7.1, we have more then 50% of parking underground. we have few parking on site (outside and not covered) and we were wondering if there is any requirements of SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. for these parking spots. Is there any SRI minimum requirements for the pavers, walkways, and roads on sites? I have problems feeling the LEED letter for this credit , I am choosing case 1 (option 2) but I am not able to achieve 1 point by only entering the info regarding number of parking spots, am I missing something here?

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders Jul 17 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

First I would document the credit as Case 2 - Parking Undercover and input the parking spaces there.

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Jonathan Weiss
Jun 24 2014
LEEDuser Member
2450 Thumbs Up

Louvered Parking Cover

I've been working on this type of strategy for a long time but our design team asked me a question I could not answer:

For a project in a hot, arid climate we are designing parking coverage for 100% of the parking spaces - freestanding canopies - and we want to leave some open-ness so that air can move through and to minimize sand and dust accumulation on the canopies.

Is there guidance on how "covered" the covered parking needs to be? If we have 100% of parking that is 80% covered, is that equivalent to 80% of parking 100% covered? The template only offers a space for number of covered spaces, but is this a valid alternative compliance path?

Is the cover calculated by sunlight directly overhead? 12 noon on the equinox? Average of 10 AM and 2 PM?

Thanks!

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader Opsis Architecture
May 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
1429 Thumbs Up

Glass Canopy over Compliant Hardscape

We have a glass canopy over a plaza with compliant hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios.. Do we have to include the glass's SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces.? Does anyone know of a default SRI for glass?

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Jun 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 1429 Thumbs Up

Just wanted to bump this back into the conversation. Does anybody have a similar experience with an exterior glass canopy and have any knowledge of how that is considered for Heat Island effectHeat island effect refers to the absorption of heat by hardscapes, such as dark, nonreflective pavement and buildings, and its radiation to surrounding areas. Other sources may include vehicle exhaust, air-conditioners, and street equipment. Reduced airflow because of tall buildings and narrow streets exacerbate the effect.?

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E H Sustainability Architect
May 05 2014
Guest
3903 Thumbs Up

SRI of wood?

I have a project with wood (not composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard.) deck areas. How does one determine the SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. of the wood? Is there a default value available for light, medium, or dark wood?

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders May 06 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

EH,

I haven't worked on a project that has deck areas, so I'm not quite sure how to determine the SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. of wood. Sorry.

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Florian Schmidtchen EGS-plan International GmbH Feb 20 2015 LEEDuser Member 605 Thumbs Up

Hi EH,
I have the same problem with the terrace of my project. Did you find some information about the default value of SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. available for light, medium, or dark wood?
Thanks in advance for your help

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant / Facility Planner, Jacobs Engineering Jul 07 2015 LEEDuser Member 951 Thumbs Up

No insight here yet? I have a potentially huge portion of a harbor walk and marina dock in my project boundary that could be wood, and am wondering how to treat it in terms of reflectivity. I will be counting it as hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios..

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Cindy Estrada LEED AP BD&C, SDS Architects, Inc. Jul 07 2015 LEEDuser Member 855 Thumbs Up

From the web site I found linked below it looks like wood shingles have a 21.9 SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces.. Some were tested with a tinted coating which maybe another question for your project. If you search the word "wood" at the link below, you'll see what I found. Hope this helps, it seems like there should be more on this somewhere!

http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/publications/html/fsec-cr-670-00/

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Florian Schmidtchen EGS-plan International GmbH Jul 08 2015 LEEDuser Member 605 Thumbs Up

Hi Emily Reese,
we just had a answer from a laboratory about the wood in our terrase that SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. = 38. This is a RED_Balau_Wood with a natural color that the manufacturer and architect defined as a Light-Colored. The natural color of this kind of wood is more light with the time. The next week we have a answer from the Review about this Credit and than I can tell you more information about.
But I know that if you using for your project a similar wood like our wood, you can use this value for SRI and you have need to explane why they are similar.

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant / Facility Planner, Jacobs Engineering Jul 08 2015 LEEDuser Member 951 Thumbs Up

Ok, thanks, y'all!
Ermal, please do let us know what the reviewers say when you get a chance.

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Florian Schmidtchen EGS-plan International GmbH Jul 31 2015 LEEDuser Member 605 Thumbs Up

Hi Emily,
yes the review accepted our value of SRiSolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. about the wood and we achieved this credit. We used the excel-tools "SSc7.2_Weighted Calc-1.xlsx" to calculate the mix area of our roof (green, wood, gravel and concrete) that you find on line at the follow link:
http://www.leeduser.com/credit/nc-2009/ssc7.2#doc-tab
See the calculator in LEEDuser's Documentation Toolkit.
If you have need for other informations, let me know about.
Ermal

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FABIO VIERO Head of Sustainability Manens-Tifs s.p.a.
Apr 01 2014
LEEDuser Member
1135 Thumbs Up

Carparking spaces located under ground level

We have 100% of carparking spaces located in 2 stories below ground level.
All the roofs of the upper floor form the pedestrian hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. for the plaza situated above.
In addition the plaza is located 7 meters below ground level and it is an open space to sky.
We would like to follow Option 2.
Questions:
1) Can we consider the parking as underground parking spaces
2) Does the pedestrian hardscape have an SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. requirement?

Thanks in advance for your help

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Crissy Tsai Sustainability Coordinator, Webcor Builders May 06 2014 Guest 1303 Thumbs Up

1) Yes, your parking will be considered 100% of spaces are underground.
2) The pedestrian hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. should have an SRISolar Reflectance Index (SRI) incorporates solar reflectance and emittance in a single quantitative value representing a material's temperature in the sun relative to standard black or white surfaces. of at least 29. If you have concrete you will meet this requirement as concrete is SRI 30.

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Apr 30 2016
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