NC-2009 SSc8: Light Pollution Reduction

  • NC CS- SSc8 Light Pollution Reduction- Credit Requirements
  • Interior and exterior lighting

    Addressing both interior and exterior lighting, this credit seeks to reduce light pollution that can block our view of the night sky and cause human health problems as well as ecological problems for many birds, insects, and other animals. Light pollution often represents nighttime lighting that isn’t needed, wasting energy while causing light trespass and contrast, reducing visibility.

    SSc8 YouTube video

    Better lighting = Better safety, less energy

    Many people think that more lighting means better nighttime safety and security. However, too much exterior lighting can make outdoor and parking areas less safe by creating high contrast between lit and unlit spaces. Among other problems, when the human eye is flooded by bright light, it becomes harder to adjust to darker areas and shadows. Too much exterior lighting also means unnecessary energy consumption. Some objectives to keep in mind when striving for safe, efficient, and aesthetically pleasing lighting design are lighting uniformity, low contrast, no glare, and preventing light from spilling off the site. This can be achieved through judicious selection of fixtures with full cutoffA full cutoff luminaire has zero candela intensity at an angle of 90 degrees above the vertical axis (nadir or straight down) and at all angles greater than 90 degrees from straight down. Additionally, the candela per 1,000 lamp lumens does not numerically exceed 100 (10%) at an angle of 80 degrees above nadir. This applies to all lateral angles around the luminaire. that direct light toward the ground but prevent it from shining up into the night sky.

    Full-cutoff luminaires reduce light pollution, improving views of the night sky.

    The four requirements can make it complicated

    This credit has four separate requirements, which can make compliance complicated—though not necessarily difficult. One addresses indoor lighting spilling to the outdoors, and three deal with exterior lighting, including façade lighting, site lighting of areas like pathways and parking lots. In most circumstances, these requirements are relatively easy and cost-neutral to meet. The biggest challenge often comes in dealing with light-trespass limits—light bleeding off the project site into a neighboring site—on projects with small or constrained sites. You will also need to attain low lighting power densities per ASHRAE 90.1-2007, which is a good general practice and won’t require you to compromise on aesthetics or cost.

    LEED boundary is important

    You’ll need to pay careful attention to establishing a LEED project boundary, which plays an important part in meeting light trespass requirements. Involve an exterior lighting designer (or landscape architect) early in the design process to develop photometric plans and guide fixture selection during design.

    FAQs for SSc8

    Are residential spaces exempt from the interior lighting calculations?

    Yes, as of 4/1/12 per LEED for Homes 2008 Interpretation #10147, “residential spaces (dwelling units only) within the scope of other LEED projects are also exempt from the interior lighting requirements.”

    Do existing fixtures need to be included in the exterior lighting calculations?

    Yes, if they are within the LEED project boundary.

    Can the Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects be used for the exterior lighting requirements?

    Yes, as long as the entire site meets the requirements.

    Can a mix of Option 1 (opaque surfaces) and Option 2 (automatic controls) be used to meet the interior lighting requirements?

    Yes.

    Are hospitals exempt from interior lighting requirements?

    No, hospitals are not exempt from the interior lighting requirements.

    What effect did the November 2011 ASHRAE table 9.4.6 Addendum i have on exterior lighting power allowances?

    Significant reductions for tradable surfaces in LZ1 and LZ2 and some in LZ3. See the new table for details. It also added lighting power allowances according to light zones, removed a 5% adder, and introduced a base site allowance. Suggest revising response and adding a link to the Addendum i available for free download on ASHRAE website.

    What about zero lot line projects, where is the boundary?

    You can use the curb line.

    To calculate building façade lighting power density, how do you determine the area used in the calculation?

    Use only the area that has measurable light on the surface; baseline and proposed are the same.

    Where are vertical footcandles measured at the site boundary?

    At grade level.

    Is signage included in the LPD calculations for building façades?

    No, per ASHRAE table 9.4.5, you can exclude lights in display windows, advertising, and directional signs as long as they are switched separately from other lighting.

    Does uplight that is under a canopy count towards the limitation of total initial design fixture lumens at 90 degrees or higher from nadir?

    If the canopy blocks 100% of the light then yes, but this is unlikely. Any light spillage needs to be counted toward the uplighting limit, but calculating this can be difficult. Using downlights is recommended instead.

    Is flag lighting exempt from this credit?

    Not currently, but USGBC is looking at exempting flag lighting from LEED v4 requirements.

    Are city-owned lights within a project's property required to comply with credit requirements?

    According to LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #10236, street lighting that is required by the governmental authorities to be installed within the LEED project’s lighting boundary (whether existing or new) does not need to be included in any of the calculations.

    For campus projects, do all existing light fixtures need to comply with credit requirements at the time of a project's submittal?

    All existing fixtures within the LEED project boundary would need to comply with the SSc8 requirements at the time the project is submitted for review. However, if the project elected to use the campus property boundary as the "lighting boundary" for SSc8 as allowed by LEED Interpretation #10236, existing fixtures within the lighting boundary, but outside the specific LEED project boundary would not have to comply with any of the SSc8 requirements. Essentially, the "lighting boundary" is only used in such circumstances for evaluating that the light trespass requirements are met at that boundary by lighting located within the LEED project boundary.

    What advertising lights or signs must comply with credit requirements and which are exempt?

    Advertising and directional signage, as explained in Addendum i of ASHRAE 90.1-2007, and further defined in the Users Manual for ASHRAE 90.1-2007, is exempt.  Essentially, that means that internally illuminated advertising signs are exempt, but those illuminated by lighting that is not ‘integral’ to the signage itself must be included in the calculations.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Designate one responsible party to oversee exterior lighting-related LEED credit requirements. For large projects, this person may be the civil engineer or landscape architect. For small projects it may be the architect, lighting designer, or other relevant team member.


  • Identify the building owner’s goals for occupant safety and comfort as well as for architectural lighting, including façade lighting. Include these goals in the Owners Project Requirements for EAp1: Fundamental Commissioning


  • One of the biggest barriers to reducing light pollution is the cultural and aesthetic affinity for brightly lit buildings. Owners can play an important leadership role in contending with these expectations, establishing aesthetic goals that do not include excess lighting for purely aesthetic purposes. The design team can play an important role by maintaining low levels of lighting and highlighting specific façade architectural features with focused, low intensity lights.


  • Projects that demand brightly lit facades and entrances, such as casinos, hotels, theatres and commercial complexes, may have a hard time reconciling these desires with the requirements of this credit. Deliberate lighting design can forge a compromise between the desire to emphasize the building facades and the need to eliminate light pollution in order to meet the credit requirements.


  • Identify the urban lighting zone as defined by IESNA RP-33, based on the population density of the neighborhood, in order to establish lighting requirements.


  • Finalize the LEED project boundary in coordination with other LEED credits. The responsible party and the project team should identify the lighting fixtures close to the boundary that will be part of the lighting trespass analysis.


  • Projects with a zero lot line may choose to use the curb as the LEED boundary for the purposes of documenting light trespass only, while using the site boundary for other credits. This is one of the few exceptions to the rule that the LEED boundary and corresponding site area be consistent across multiple credits. Sites that abut public rights of way may similarly use the curb to establish the site boundary for the purposes of LEED documentation. It can be challenging for projects with zero lot lines or with little open space to meet the maximum exterior illuminance requirement of 0.1 footcandles at the site boundary. Project teams are only responsible for lights that are part of their project. For example, municipal lights about which the project has no control do not need to be considered. 


  • Campus projects can choose whether to comply with the requirements for the building site boundary or to meet the light trespass requirements for the campus as a whole. For a project on a campus, choosing to meet the light trespass requirements at the building level can be very difficult.


  • Identify local or regional lighting laws or required lighting levels for rights-of-way that may apply to the project site. These regulations may help teams identify areas to focus on when dealing with lighting trespass in the design.


  • Discuss fixture and lamp options with the landscape designer, civil engineer and other project team members, focusing on both reducing overall lighting power density, and on avoiding light trespass. Avoiding light fixtures that shine up into the sky is the easiest way to reduce light pollution and make better use of lighting. This can be done by eliminating exterior lighting entirely or by selecting “cut-off fixtures” with opaque covers that direct light downward.


  • Local or regional laws that regulate lighting levels typically do not require minimum input power in watts. Going beyond these local requirements by selecting energy-efficient fixtures can help your project meet codes for comfort and safety goals without compromising energy efficiency.


  • The credit requires a photometric study on site lighting that may add minor consultant costs but will add value by optimizing the design.


  • Optimizing lighting can eliminate unnecessary costs for extra lights and high-power fixtures.


  • Many smaller fixtures may make for a better layout than fewer high-wattage ones. The designer should be able to advise about additional infrastructure costs associated with an atypical lighting design. Low power density and light intensity may require higher first costs for fixtures that will save electricity costs during operations.


  • Rebates and incentives on the federal, state, and local levels are available for low-power and Energy Star lamps.


  • Safety concerns are not typically a valid excuse for higher exterior lighting allowances. Despite a perception of better safety with brighter lighting, floodlights can often create areas of deep shadow, and the high contrast can be difficult for the human eye to navigate. Use good design, downlights, and work with the owner to address any concerns.

Schematic Design

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  • Interior lighting


  • Be aware of all requirements for interior lights so that fixtures do not direct light through windows to the outdoors. Identify locations where fixtures might have a direct line of sight to a window or other opening. The lighting designer should either eliminate those fixtures from the design, provide shades to prevent more than 10% of light from shining outdoors, or include controls to reduce the input power by 50% between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m.


  • Interior lighting cannot spill out of the windows after business hours, defined as 11 p.m. – 5 a.m. in the credit requirements. Window coverings or automatic controls like timers, occupancy sensors, or master switches have to shut off or reduce the input power by 50% for all non-emergency indoor lights during that time.


  • Fixtures that throw 50% or more of the cone of light out a window are likely to present problems.


  • To avoid letting this credit slip through the cracks, project owners or architects should ask the lighting designers at the outset of the project how they plan to achieve each aspect of the credit.


  • Additional light controls and automatic window screens may add to construction costs, but controls can reduce electricity consumption.


  • Exterior lighting


  • Identify the project location and IESNA-designated zone to determine the threshold for exterior lighting levels.  Utilize resources like the website www.citydata.com to identify relevant population density and appropriate designation.


  • The lighting designer includes the design intent in Basis of Design for EAp1: Fundamental Commissioning, for all outside lighting requirements, listing minimum illuminance in footcandles, lumens, or candela for all spaces with controls, fixture requirements and design approach.


  • The lighting designer then develops the exterior lighting layout and selects fixtures that optimize light with low power use.


  • Nadir illustratedTo determine the total power density for the project, the lighting designer tabulates all exterior space and identifies the wattage of selected fixtures to compare it with the LPD allowable by ASHRAE 90.1-2004, Exterior Lighting Section. The selected fixtures should have full shielding or cutoff to reduce light directed toward the night sky.


  • The lighting designer develops a photometric study for exterior lighting intensity, the impact of shades and cutoff fixtures, and light trespass from the project boundary. Use the photometric study to inform any changes in the design.


  • The key to achieving this credit is to find the optimum balance between lighting quality and lighting energy consumption. It is often assumed that more light is better, but a low level of uniform lighting throughout a site will eliminate the need to install bright halogen lamps that illuminate some areas and leave others dark in contrast.


  • Exterior lighting includes all ground lighting, all façade lighting, flag lighting, any rooftop or terrace lighting, and any other fixtures outside the building. Pay careful attention to exterior light fixtures and light levels at building entrances close to the LEED site boundary.


  • Revisit the LPD calculations to make sure any design changes maintain the threshold limits.


  • ASHRAE’s exterior lighting density table lists exterior spaces under two categories. Tradable surfaces are those where the average LPD of all those surfaces are within the total LPD limits. For example, in LZ4, both sales canopy lighting and stairway lighting have a maximum of 1.0 Watts/ft2. The project may decide to increase sales canopy lighting to 1.1 Watts/ft2 as long as the stairways compensate with a decreased LPD of 0.9 Watts/ft2 (given that the surfaces are the same area) so that the average of the two is 1.0 Watts/ft2. For non-tradable surfaces, such as bank ATMs, each space must individually comply with the ASHRAE requirements. Identify whether exterior surfaces are tradable in order to provide flexibility.


  • A photometric study will facilitate communication about lighting levels among the designer, owner and the design team. The study entails computer modeling simulating the lighting intensity of the designed layout in footcandles, lux or candela. It allows the designer to see the resulting output, with iterative design options as the fixtures are reduced or replaced. Typically the photometric study measures light levels in a 10’x10’ grid. The analysis also investigates the maximum initial illuminance value at horizontal and vertical limits on the site boundary to ensure they are within the limits of the project zone. If you find that lights are above the threshold, the designer may want to explore alternative numbers of fixtures and fixture types and present these alternatives to the owner, who makes the final decision.


  • Avoid aiming light at highly reflective site and ground surfaces, such as white pavement and water features, which can exacerbate light pollution. The photometric study may not capture these characteristics.


  • Some lighting manufacturers will offer to perform a photometric study of your site if your team selects their product for the project.


  • Security-oriented lighting designs such as those for prisons, parking lots, and walkways often focus too much on big, bright lamps. This can be counterproductive, creating high contrast between lit and unlit spaces, worsening visibility in both places. Use more moderate, uniform light levels for improved designs.


  • Some types of lighting are exempt from the ASHRAE limits on power density. Examples include advertisement signage, transportation signage, athletic fields, storage, and historic landmarks and other public monuments. Refer to Exceptions under ASHRAE 90.1 2004 Section 9.4.5.


  • The lighting intensity of conventional fixtures such as halogens, incandescents, and sodium halide lighting, drops off significantly after the first year of operation. LED or fluorescent fixtures will better maintain their lighting intensity at the level of the installation—contrary to the common perception that low power wattage fixtures, such as LEDs or fluorescents, have low lighting intensities.


  • Full cutoff fixtures can generally be specified at zero cost premium.


  • Cost premiums for this credit may come from the higher number of (shorter) poles and fixtures needed to achieve greater lighting uniformity.


  • New fixtures like LEDs with high lighting levels but low power density may cost more than conventional halogen fixtures, but most of the new fixtures have longer life and are less expensive to operate due to low electricity use and infrequent lamp replacement.


  • Costs for the photometric study can be decreased if manufactures agree to do their own calculations, which is common if you select their fixtures.

Design Development

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  • Come to an agreement among the owner, landscape designer and lighting designer about the appropriate lighting levels and site lighting distribution.


  • Demonstrate to the owner the project team’s decision about lighting levels for the final design. Owners may need to be shown similarly lit areas to understand the implications of a shift from a brightly lit façade and terrace.


  • Locally mandated lighting levels for exterior fixtures higher than LEED-mandated ASHRAE levels have been a stumbling block for credit compliance, but with proper documentation supported by a clear narrative, this challenge can be overcome. There is an option to not include those fixtures in the LPD calculations and light trespass requirement, but you must demonstrate that these fixtures are full cutoff. To document the credit, make the case that the legally mandated fixtures are beyond the control of the project. Demonstrate that the project has met the requirements with rest of the lighting. Provide a detailed photometric plan, the municipal regulations, and a narrative describing how the project has achieved all requirements of the credit except where the municipal regulations overrule it.

Construction Documents

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  • Confirm all the lighting fixtures are listed on the lighting plan. This ensures that the correct components are purchased and installed to maintain the credit requirements.


  • The designer reviews the final bid documents and budget estimates to confirm that the fixtures have not been substituted for by another type, and that interior lighting controls and window shades are not omitted. 


  • If your team undertakes a value engineering process, make sure the full cutoff fixtures are not eliminated from the list or replaced by incandescent or high-powered halogen fixtures. These changes are often overlooked and may cost the project this credit.


  • If the project is going for multi-party contractor bid, make sure the bid’s package reflects the fixture specifications and performance. Otherwise the contractor may replace the specification with a similar lower-cost fixture that doesn’t have the same wattage or a cover for cutoff.


  • Full-cutoff luminaires should not cost more than conventional fixtures, but other common strategies for meeting this credit may add costs. These include controls, timers, sensors, and  low-power lights like LEDs. Ensure that these features are not eliminated during value-engineering.       

Construction

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  • The designer should review shop drawings and visit the site for installation inspection. This ensures that the fixtures have a cut-off for uplighting, the ballasts are as specified, and the controls are all included.


  • The commissioning agent carries out the functional testing for all control sequences and timers if installed for lighting design.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Timer controls and automatic switches should be commissioned and inspected for performance periodically throughout their life to ensure they continue to serve the intent of the credit requirements.


  • The facility manager should be involved in the decision of whether to select light timers or automated blinds to comply with interior lighting requirements. Both solutions offer opportunities and challenges during building use, depending on how the building is used and occupied.


  • Long-life, low-power lamps like fluorescents and LEDs will help keep costs low for operations and maintenance.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    SS Credit 8: Light pollution reduction

    1 Point

    Intent

    To minimize light trespass from the building and site, reduce sky-glow to increase night sky access, improve nighttime visibility through glare reduction and reduce development impact from lighting on nocturnal environments.

    Requirements

    Project teams must comply with one of the two options for interior lighting AND the requirement for exterior lighting.

    For interior lighting

    Option 1

    Reduce the input power (by automatic device) of all nonemergency interior luminaires with a direct line of sight to any openings in the envelope (translucent or transparent) by at least 50% between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. After-hours override may be provided by a manual or occupant-sensing device provided the override lasts no more than 30 minutes.

    OR

    Option 2

    All openings in the envelope (translucent or transparent) with a direct line of sight to any nonemergency luminaires must have shieldingShielding is a nontechnical term that describes devices or techniques that are used as part of a luminaire or lamp to limit glare, light trespass, or sky glow. (controlled/closed by automatic device for a resultant transmittance of less than 10% between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m.).

    For exterior lighting

    Light areas only as required for safety and comfort. Exterior lighting power densities shall not exceed those specified in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 with Addenda i for the documented lighting zone. Justification shall be provided for the selected lighting zone. Lighting controls for all exterior lighting shall comply with section 9.4.1.3 of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1- 2007, without amendments1.

    Classify the project under 1 of the following zones, as defined in IESNA RP-33, and follow all the requirements for that zone:

    LZ1: Dark (developed areas within national parks, state parks, forest land and rural areas)

    Design exterior lighting so that all site and building-mounted luminaires produce a maximum initial illuminance value no greater than 0.01 horizontal and vertical footcandlesVertical footcandles occur on a vertical surface. They can be added together arithmetically when more than 1 source provides light to the same surface. (0.1 horizontal and vertical luxMeasurement of lumens per square meter.) at the LEED project boundary and beyond. Document that 0% of the total initial designed fixture lumens (sum total of all fixtures on site) are emitted at an angle of 90 degrees or higher from nadir (straight down).

    LZ2: Low (primarily residential zones, neighborhood business districts, light industrial areas with limited nighttime use and residential mixed-use areas)

    Design exterior lighting so that all site and building-mounted luminaires produce a maximum initial illuminance value no greater than 0.10 horizontal and vertical footcandles (1.0 horizontal and vertical lux) at the LEED project boundary and no greater than 0.01 horizontal footcandlesHorizontal footcandles occur on a horizontal surface. They can be added together arithmetically when more than 1 source provides light to the same surface. (0.1 horizontal lux) 10 feet (3 meters) beyond the LEED project boundary. Document that no more than 2% of the total initial designed fixture lumens (sum total of all fixtures on site) are emitted at an angle of 90 degrees or higher from nadir (straight down).

    LZ3: Medium (all other areas not included in LZ1, LZ2 or LZ4, such as commercial/ industrial, and high-density residential)

    Design exterior lighting so that all site and building-mounted luminaires produce a maximum initial illuminance value no greater than 0.20 horizontal and vertical footcandles (2.0 horizontal and vertical lux) at the LEED project boundary and no greater than 0.01 horizontal footcandles (0.1 horizontal lux) 15 feet (4.5 meters) beyond the site. Document that no more than 5% of the total initial designed fixture lumens (sum total of all fixtures on site) are emitted at an angle of 90 degrees or higher from nadir (straight down).

    LZ4: High2 (high-activity commercial districts in major metropolitan areas)

    Design exterior lighting so that all site and building-mounted luminaires produce a maximum initial illuminance value no greater than 0.60 horizontal and vertical footcandles (6.5 horizontal and vertical lux) at the LEED project boundary and no greater than 0.01 horizontal footcandles (0.1 horizontal lux) 15 feet (4.5 meters) beyond the site. Document that no more than 10% of the total initial designed fixture lumens (sum total of all fixtures on site) are emitted at an angle of 90 degrees or higher from nadir (straight down).

    LZ2, LZ3 and LZ4 - For LEED project boundaries that abut public rights-of-way, light trespass requirements may be met relative to the curb line instead of the LEED project boundary.

    For all zones

    Illuminance generated from a single luminaire placed at the intersection of a private vehicular driveway and public roadway accessing the site is allowed to use the centerline of the public roadway as the LEED project boundary for a length of 2 times the driveway width centered at the centerline of the driveway.

    1The requirement to use ASHRAE Addenda is unique to this credit and does not obligate Project teams to use ASHRAE approved addenda for other credits.
    2 To be LZ4, the area must be so designated by an organizations with local jurisdiction, such as the local zoning authority.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Adopt site lighting criteria to maintain safe light levels while avoiding off-site lighting and night sky pollution. Minimize site lighting where possible, and use computer software to model the site lighting. Technologies to reduce light pollution include full cutoff luminaires, low-reflectance surfaces and low-angle spotlights.

Organizations

Illuminating Engineering Society of North America

This organization provides general exterior lighting design guidance.


International Dark-Sky Association IDA

Links to manufacturers with IDA-approved fixtures, information sheets and practical guides, and resources for learning.


Lighting Research Center

This website is associated with the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic.

Software Tools

SUPERLITE 2.0 ( Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

SUPERLITE 2.0 is a lighting analysis program designed to accurately predict interior illuminance in complex building spaces due to daylight and electric lighting systems.


Litescape 3.0 (Standard Performance Evalutation Corporation)

Lighting simulation software.


Visual 3D

For someone who does not design lighting as their primary service, this free lighting calculation software can be downloaded here.

Other

Elights (Dark-Sky Lighting Products)

Elights sells full cut-off light fixtures.

Technical Guides

Lighting Power Density

A comprehensive source for understanding the lighting models underlying the commercial lighting power limits developed in ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004.


Outdoor Site-Lighting Performance: A Comprehensive and Quantitative Framework for Assessing Light Pollution

This paper describes a method of measuring and predicting glow, glare and trespass in outdoor lighting.


Lighting for Exterior Environments

This publication from the Illuminating Engineering Society defines urban lighting zones according to population density.

Exterior Lighting Power Density

All Options

Perform calculations to demonstrate credit-compliance with exterior lighting power density requirements.

Compliant Light Fixtures

Refer to manufacturer cut sheets for the angle of light spilling above horizontal, the candela graph for maximum candela notation, and watts.

Intersection of Driveway and Roadway

This graphic illustrates SSc8's particular rule for how the site boundary relative to illuminance can expand when a driveway meets a public roadway.

Luminaire Schedule

The schedule lists all the exterior fixtures that will be accounted for in the the lighting power density calculations required for this credit.

Exterior Lighting Layout

Provide documentation like this example to showcase the exterior lighting layout plan. You'll refer to this plan in providing fixture and photometric analysis.

Annotated Photometric Plans

This set of annoatated photometric plans was created by Bill Swanson, P.E. for LEEDuser as a teaching tool for SSc8 documentation issues. They are not intended as examples of actual documentation, though a lot can be learned from them. These documents include a detailed plan showing a compliant site with light levels in the site and as required around the boundary, with advice and useful tips. The fixture comparison document is a means to better understand and compare the spill light from different light fixtures and placements. Think of the purple line as the edge of a cutout with a pin thru the paper where the pole is.  Move the cutout over the site when locating poles, if the cutout overlaps the line beyond the property line then that fixture cannot be located and aimed as placed. The driveway entrance example shows the impact of fixture placement around driveway entrances, and the special allowance for the site boundary around those entrances.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms: (newest)

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

588 Comments

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CT G
Mar 20 2015
LEEDuser Member
306 Thumbs Up

Facade lighting / Advertising

A project we are working on is considering including facade lighting with LEDs. The lighting on the facade is intended to take the form of a logotype associated with the client, so it is both facade lighting AND advertising signage. Can it therefore be excluded from the 90.1 calculations?

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CT G Apr 07 2015 LEEDuser Member 306 Thumbs Up

Any help??

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Apr 07 2015 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

Sorry for the delay. Spring gets busy.

If it is internally illuminated signage, I would exclude it from the calculations. If the signage is decorative and shines on the façade, I would still consider it building signage that is excluded. Just make sure you explain the lighting is in the form of the company logo, and internally lit.

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ÅF Lighting ÅF Infrastructure
Mar 17 2015
Guest
22 Thumbs Up

Use of LPD Calculation Template

Project Location: Sweden

Hi,

I have a question about the use of the LPDLighting power density (LPD) is the amount of electric lighting, usually measured in watts per square foot, being used to illuminate a given space. Calculation Template which we found here in the Documentation Toolkit.
We are working on a project with two entrance canopies which each cover a rather small area and have thus an "Actual LPD" which exceeds the "ASHRAE 90.1.2007 Allowable LPD". If we additionally want to use the base site allowance, where do we add the value to the table?
Or is it allowed to use a different/adjusted calculation table instead of the LPD Calculation Template?

Thank you in advance!

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Mar 17 2015 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

Tristan, I think your LPDLighting power density (LPD) is the amount of electric lighting, usually measured in watts per square foot, being used to illuminate a given space. Calculation Template needs to be updated with values from the new LPD table issued by USGBC.

Until then there is the sample credit form available on the USGBC website. I'm looking at version 4 of this form.
https://www.leedonline.com/irj/go/km/docs/documents/usgbc/leed/content/C...

When you pick your LZ there should be a number that is shown in the box below. LZ3 will display 750 Watts. I wish it was automatically added to the table below but it's not. In Table SSc8-1 there are some blue boxes. These are what you can enter numbers into. The white boxes are automatically filled. On the right side of the table, 3 lines up from the bottom there is another empty blue box. The line says "ASHRAE Base Site Allowance used (Optional)" This is where you add the base site allowance.

Another qwerk I've noticed is the last line of the table will always say "No" unless you enter a "Lighting Location Description" into each line for the surface types above.

Let me know if this helps you or tell me more so I can try a different approach.

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ÅF Lighting ÅF Infrastructure Mar 18 2015 Guest 22 Thumbs Up

Thanks Bill! The sample credit form works perfectly. Since we have no non-tradable surfaces lit in the project, is it okay to just leave that table (Table SSc8-2) empty or should we set it to e.g. facades and enter 0 for the actual lighting power? (the function in the summary, to calculate the compliance seems to only work if everything is filled in)

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Mar 18 2015 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

The non-tradable surfaces table doesn't like being empty. Just enter a line, call it "None", select facades, area of 1, and 0 watts.

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ÅF Lighting ÅF Infrastructure Mar 25 2015 Guest 22 Thumbs Up

Okay great! Then we'll use that for the non-tradable surfaces. Thank you for the help!

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Ghaith Moufarege
Mar 12 2015
LEEDuser Member
8892 Thumbs Up

uplighting requirement

Hello,
in LZ3, no more than 5% of the total initial designed fixture lumens should be emitted at an angle of 90 degrees or higher from nadir (straight down). Do you think we can propose meeting this requirement by turning off part or all of the external lighting during night (eg. from 11pm to 5 am, same as for interior lighting), while not necessarily having cut-off luminaires. Any idea this could work?
Thank you

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Mar 12 2015 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

You can propose anything, but this is not likely to be accepted. The interior and exterior requirements are separate, and it would be too easy to change the shutoff time for the exterior lights.

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Ghaith Moufarege Mar 12 2015 LEEDuser Member 8892 Thumbs Up

Thank you Bill for your quick response

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Michele Helou Principal Sage Design & Consulting
Mar 11 2015
LEEDuser Member
941 Thumbs Up

Light Trespass Clarified for Campus Projects?

Project Location: United States

We have a campus project which includes exterior lighting added within our scope and on our site to illuminate an adjacent private drive and an adjacent parking lot. (all campus properties). Neither drive nor parking are included in the LEED project boundary as they are existing and not used by occupants of our project. We will meet the interior escape, exterior uplighting and LPDLighting power density (LPD) is the amount of electric lighting, usually measured in watts per square foot, being used to illuminate a given space. requirements for this credit. The issue is the light trespass component. I understand the LEED lighting boundary can be extended as per CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide 10236. However, extending this by 5 feet does not help us (lighting the street and parking is the goal) and documenting trespass around the entire campus boundary would be irrelevant and nearly impossible. So, my question is whether we can use the third provision of CIR 10236 to extend the lighting boundary to include just the parking and just the property across the drive as they are all campus lots. Or, would it be wiser, to make a case to omit this lighting from the site photometrics altogether as it is essentially meets the same intent as the exemption for municipal street lighting. (which is, of course, safety)

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Glenn Heinmiller IALD, LC, LEED AP, Principal, Lam Partners Mar 11 2015 Guest 1843 Thumbs Up

Michele,

I'm not sure I understand your question, but I think you may be misunderstanding how the credit works with the Lighting Boundary. Trespass "measurements" are made at the Lighting Boundary, but only fixtures that are within the LEED Project Boundary have to be included in the calculations. So the parking lot and drive and any other contiguous properties owned by the school, of the same or higher LZ, can be combined and the Lighting Boundary moved out to the edge of these properties. If the boundary ends up a long long way from the LEED project boundary, then it pretty easy to say that you are going to have zero light from all the exterior fixtures within your LEED project site. You could just provide a map showing the lighting boundary, and not even bother with computer modelling. If some of the lighting boundary is close, then you can do the modelling. Or considier using the v4 version of the credit (which you are allowed to do on 2009 projects) and you can use the BUG method which does not require computer modelling.

The 5ft. offset you mention applies to Publicly owned hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios., and you say that everything is owned by the school. The lighting for the drive and parking could not be exempted unless it was specifically required by the government (which seems unlikely).

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Mar 12 2015 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

Are you referring to this text?
"-When there are additional properties owned by the same entity that are contiguous to the property, or properties, that the LEED project is within and have the same or higher lighting zone designation as the LEED project, the lighting boundary may be expanded to include those properties."

If the campus property is on either side of the street then the property is not contiguous. If the campus owns the street, then it is and the drive can be included within the lighting boundary.

You can only exempt the light from within your project boundary if the city is requiring this light. And then this needs to be proven in writing from the city's ordinance or some official communication from the city. Employees from my local city have told me that it is their responsibility alone to provide lighting on the streets they control.

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting
Mar 04 2015
LEEDuser Member
269 Thumbs Up

Government Site with Statues/ War Relics

Project Location: United States

We are working on a government facility which will potentially have Statues and/ or large War Relics displayed on-site. Could the lighting for these types of items be considered, "special feature area" which is referenced in the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Table 9.4.5?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Mar 05 2015 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

I think it would be fair to call it a special feature area.

Your bigger problem is going to be the uplight.

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting Mar 05 2015 LEEDuser Member 269 Thumbs Up

Bill, thanks for your input. Yes, there will most likely be uplighting around these features and I wanted to know if I had the option to "trade" this lighting, as a special feature, which is allowable per Table 9.4.5 in the ASHRAE handbook.

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Peter Lindabury Project Manager GHD
Feb 06 2015
LEEDuser Member
24 Thumbs Up

LEED Boundary on Military Base

We have a project located on a military base where we are lighting a parking lot classified in an LZ3 zone. Our calculations show we are getting 0.01 vertical foot-candles in the parking lot across the road from our construction work area. The parking lot across the road is also part of the military base. Can the credit be achieved with a LEED boundary and the noted light levels being across the road in the other parking lot?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Feb 06 2015 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

The LEED boundary is suppose to be at the centerline of the public road.

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Ahmed Mosa Sustainability Consultant - Sustainable Design Researcher P&T Architects and Engineers
Jan 28 2015
LEEDuser Member
339 Thumbs Up

Exterior Lighting - shielded Up lights with Trees or structures

Hi All,

We are considering using some of up-lights to light some trees at night, I wonder if there is a way to calculate the lumens shielded by trees or by a canopy structure on top of it (very narrow spaced fins).

How to allow for that in the light spill evaluation?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jan 28 2015 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

LEED does not consider any vegetation to be a shield of lighting. All of the uplight will be counted as uplight.

A built canopy structure can be considered a shield but it is very difficult to calculate exactly how much uplight is blocked. You'll need a detailed analysis of the ies file to know how much light is emitted at each angle and then draw a sketch showing what angles are blocked by the canopy. The light that is not blocked gets counted as uplight. I've never found it to be worth the effort to figure this out.

A spill light evaluation I always use a lighting model. Ignore trees and other plants since they are not considered. If there is a wall along the perimeter of the project I will draw the solid wall in the lighting model which blocks some of the spill light. If there is a see thru fence I ignore that too because there is no way to estimate where a line of light will pass thru the fence and where it will be blocked.

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Glenn Heinmiller IALD, LC, LEED AP, Principal, Lam Partners Jan 28 2015 Guest 1843 Thumbs Up

Are you in LZ3 or LZ4 according to the lighting zone definitions used in the LEED v4 version of this credit? In LEED v4, landscape lighting is exempt from the uplight limits if you are in LZ3 or LZ4. You can use the v4 version of the credit on LEED-2009 projects

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Ahmed Mosa Sustainability Consultant - Sustainable Design Researcher, P&T Architects and Engineers Jan 31 2015 LEEDuser Member 339 Thumbs Up

Hi Bill and Glenn,

The project is in LZ3, seems like LEED v4 for this credit is the only option for this project then, will have a look at it.

Thanks

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Glenn Heinmiller IALD, LC, LEED AP, Principal, Lam Partners Feb 02 2015 Guest 1843 Thumbs Up

Ahmed,

Be careful about the LZ definitions used in v4 which are from the Model Lighting Ordinance User Guide (MLO). The can be more stringent than the definitions used in LEED-2009. Projects that would qualify as LZ3 with LEED-2009 definition sometimes come out as LZ2 when using MLO definitions. It's your call to interpret the definitions and determine what LZ you are in, but make sure you have some defensible.

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Ahmed Mosa Sustainability Consultant - Sustainable Design Researcher P&T Architects and Engineers
Jan 28 2015
LEEDuser Member
339 Thumbs Up

Exterior Lighting - Driveways

hi everyone,
I cant seem to find any information about the lighting on driveways.

The only reference to roads I can find is under “uncovered parking areas, parking lots and "drives” which is 1.6 W/m2.

it would be great if someonce can inform me or confirm the matter

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jan 28 2015 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

Driveways would fall under the category you referenced.

If your project was registered after November 2011 you're going to need to use the updated Table 1 for the lighting power allowances. (See link in the FAQ above) Drives were reduced and range from 0.4 to 1.3 W/m2.

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Ahmed Mosa Sustainability Consultant - Sustainable Design Researcher, P&T Architects and Engineers Jan 31 2015 LEEDuser Member 339 Thumbs Up

Thanks Bill

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Todd Bundren Director of Sustainabilty - Architectural Project Manager Lawrence Group
Jan 23 2015
LEEDuser Member
1397 Thumbs Up

LIghitng for Security Reasons

Project Location: United States

I have a new student housing project on a large University campus. There is a cafeteria and student union inside of the new building. Across the street from the new building are all of the fraternity houses. As you can imagine these students are being encouraged to use the new facilities (cafeteria / student union) which are both open 24hours a day. With that being said, the University wants us to make sure the lighting on the street that separates the new building from the frat houses is adequate for safety reasons, which has pushed our allowable lighting power densities slightly beyond what is allowed on the street (which is not owned by the campus). Are there any allowances for slight deviations from the requirements based on safety reasons? The project complies with all other requirements set forth in the LEED guidelines. Thanks!

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jan 23 2015 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

"... which has pushed our allowable lighting power densities slightly beyond what is allowed on the street (which is not owned by the campus)."

This sentence confused me.

Safety has rarely been allowed as an excuse to exceed light levels in the Credit. This situation will not be allowed a deviation.

Are you sure you are doing everything accurately. Have a second set of eyes in your office or on the design team that knows lighting try to show compliance.

Try another calculation option. There is one option for the v2009 credit and two options of the v4 credit. Sometimes if one doesn't work another one will.

Express to the City the need for additional lighting at this crossing.

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Ryan Kurlbaum CHARLES ROSE ARCHITECTS
Oct 29 2014
Guest
16 Thumbs Up

Automatic Shading Devices - 2nd attempt

Project Location: United States

I was still hoping for an answer to the following regarding Automatic Shading Devices:

This credit asks for uploads of product specifications, location plan, and riser diagram for automatic shading devices. Due to budget constraints our project will not have any automatic shading. Is this something I can simply document in the narrative, or do we need to specify some type of manual shade (ie: blinds) for the contractor to install? Please advise - thank you!

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Ryan Kurlbaum CHARLES ROSE ARCHITECTS
Oct 27 2014
Guest
16 Thumbs Up

Automatic Shading Devices

Project Location: United States

This credit asks for uploads of product specifications, location plan, and riser diagram for automatic shading devices. Due to budget constraints our project will not have any automatic shading. Is this something I can simply document in the narrative, or do we need to specify some type of manual shade (ie: blinds) for the contractor to install? Please advise - thank you!

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Oct 29 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

You don't need to ask the same question multiple times. I have stated previously on this site, "Manual shades don't count as shieldingShielding is a nontechnical term that describes devices or techniques that are used as part of a luminaire or lamp to limit glare, light trespass, or sky glow. since they are not automatic and can be left open." The key word for interior lighting control is "automatic" in both option 1 and option 2.

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James Weingarten Electrical Designer MEP Associates
Oct 23 2014
Guest
138 Thumbs Up

Road runs through site

Technical college campus has a road that runs along side my project. If the college owns the land on both sides of the road, does my lighting boundary stop at the centerline of the road or can I extend my lighting boundary across the road as the college owns both sides? Would it make any difference if the college "owned" the road in terms of be responsible for maintenance and snow removal?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Oct 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

If the college owned the road it would be considered part of the campus. If the government owns the road then it will need to comply with the centerline of road rules as we do with all public roads. I'll bet a lot of colleges have this issue.

You might be able to argue for an exception but the campus rules require a continuous property.

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Glenn Heinmiller IALD, LC, LEED AP, Principal, Lam Partners Oct 31 2014 Guest 1843 Thumbs Up

I just ran into this very situation on one of my own projects (although it is a commercial development not a campus.) Speaking as someone who had something to do with the creation of the Lighting Boundary concept, I can say that this situation probably wasn't considered when the definition was written. Conceptually, the Lighting Boundary should be able to "jump" across a public street when the property on the opposite side has same owner. The idea of putting the boundary at the centerline of the roadway was based on the assumption that a different property owner was on the opposite side of the street and that each of the two property owners (you and your neighbor across the street) get to "split" the public street. But if you are your own neighbor across the street, you effectively have contiguous properties by same owner that meet at the centerline of the street. That's my opinion. We should definitely get an official LEED interpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. on this. James, you may want to apply for special circumstances using my reasoning.

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María Fernanda Aguirre Architect LEED AP BD + C - LEED AP ID + C Renato Miranda and Associates
Oct 22 2014
Guest
423 Thumbs Up

Project without exterior lighting

Project Location: Chile

My project is a Data Center located within a very urbanized area and surrounded by other buildings (located very close) thus any kind of lighting is not needed. Do we have to develop anyway a photometric study or can we show compliance just by providing lighting plans were no exterior luminaires are considered?. This building has very few glazing as most of it is equipment dedicated so interior lighting requirements will be also achieved.
Thanks for your help!!

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Oct 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

I'd be surprised with no light but if there is nothing then submit the form with an explanation that there is no light. You may need to trick the form to get it to show a point.

Hey Tristan, I like the new option to list the project location.

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Dan Barton via Greengrade LEED Management Software
Oct 17 2014
Guest
433 Thumbs Up

LEED Projecdt Boundary and SSc8

Project Location: United States

Our project is a major rehab of an existing classroom, class lab and academic department office building located on a college campus. The site has frontage on the campus ring road just outside our LEED boundary. Within our LEED boundary are 3 old snakehead street lights that are designed to illuminate the ring road. These lights are energized from the project building electrical service. The streetlights do not meet current light cutoff standards and their light is designed to spill outside of the project site boundary onto the roadway. My problem is if I include the roadway they illuminate with the project boundary I can’t achieve SSc5.2. And if I exclude the roadway I can’t meet the light trespass requirements of SSc8. We’re looking for an option that allows us to exclude these lights from our LEED boundary but we keep bumping into the fact that they are energized from our building. Any suggestions?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Oct 20 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

ID#10236 made on 10/01/2012

Prerequisite/Credit: SSc8 - Light pollution reduction
Rating System Family: Building design + construction, Neighborhoods
Rating System Version: v3 - LEED 2009, v2 - Schools 2007, v2 - LEED 2.2, v2 - LEED 2.0

Inquiry

Can light trespass extend beyond the LEED Project Boundary if the adjacent land is owned by the project owner? Can projects use the actual property boundary/property line rather than the LEED Project Boundary (if the LEED Project Boundary is smaller than the property line) for the light trespass aspects of this credit? Can the lighting boundary be used in place of the LEED Project Boundary or site boundary for the purposes of this credit? When can the lighting boundary be modified? Can campus projects use the campus boundary for this credit? Do all SSc8 credit exterior requirements need to met at the lighting boundary? Does street lighting need to be included? How is the lighting zone determined when the project contains, or is adjacent to, a sensitive area?

Ruling

All instances in the credit language of "LEED project boundary" or "site boundary" shall be considered to refer to the "lighting boundary", for the purposes of this credit only. The lighting boundary is located at the property lines of the property, or properties, that the LEED project occupies. The lighting boundary can be modified under the following conditions:
-When the property line is adjacent to a public area that is a walkway, bikeway, plaza, or parking lot, the lighting boundary may be moved to 5 feet (1.5 meters) beyond the property line.
-When the property line is adjacent to a public street, alley or transit corridor, the lighting boundary may be moved to the center line of that street, alley or corridor.
-When there are additional properties owned by the same entity that are contiguous to the property, or properties, that the LEED project is within and have the same or higher lighting zone designation as the LEED project, the lighting boundary may be expanded to include those properties.

If the LEED project boundary is smaller than the property line, projects can use the lighting boundary to meet the light trespass requirements of this credit. Buildings that are part of campuses or shared properties can use the "campus boundary", i.e. the campus property line, to comply with the light trespass requirements of this credit. All LEED projects attempting SSc8 should continue to meet all exterior requirements (LPDLighting power density (LPD) is the amount of electric lighting, usually measured in watts per square foot, being used to illuminate a given space., uplight, trespass) based all of the exterior luminaries within the LEED project boundary. The lighting boundary is only for the purposes of the trespass calculation, based on the light emitted by the luminaires within the LEED project boundary. Project teams should take note that the LEED project boundary must be appropriately defined and comply with Minimum Program Requirement (MPR) #3- "Must be a reasonable site boundary".

Street lighting that is required by governmental authorities to be installed within the LEED project, specifically for the purposes of lighting a public street, does not need to be included in any of the calculations. Project teams should provide documentation of the government requirement and a narrative describing the application of this exemption to the project.

Determination of the appropriate lighting zone is critical for this credit. For properties that contain sensitive areas (such as sleeping units or species habitats), the project must meet the light trespass requirements at the boundary of the sensitive area. An area is considered sensitive if it has a lower lighting zone designation than adjacent areas. If there are any parcels within the property that have a lower lighting zone designation, the exterior lighting requirements must be met at the lighting boundary of those areas.

Applicable Internationally.

***Update 1/1/13:This interpretation is written in an attempt to clarify the number of questions and ambiguities that exist around the 'lighting boundary'. This interpretation supersedes LI 1622, LI 2342, LI 5272 and LI 10114

**Update 4/2/2014 strictly for Neighborhood Development projects:
Only the following portion of this ruling was made applicable to Neighborhood Development projects: "Street lighting that is required by governmental authorities to be installed within the LEED project, specifically for the purposes of lighting a public street, does not need to be included in any of the calculations. Project teams should provide documentation of the government requirement and a narrative describing the application of this exemption to the project."

Internationally applicable

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EBRU UNVER LEED AP BD+C
Oct 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
206 Thumbs Up

Exterior Lighting- Roof

Project Location: Turkey

hi everyone,
i ve been looking up to the documents about exterior lighting on the ssc8 but i cant seem to locate any information about the lighting on the roofs for roof gardens etc, i m wondering in which surface category(tradable of non tradable) it would fall.
it would be great if someonce can inform me on the matter.
thanks!

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Oct 03 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

It could be a combination of walkways less than 10' wide and landscaping.

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting
Sep 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
269 Thumbs Up

Line of Site into Multi-Story Dorm & Ceiling Mounted Glazing

Project Location: United States

Has anyone found an answer to the questions regarding line of sight and angles it covers..? My project is a multi-story dormitory where, if you look up from the sidewalk parallel to the building, you can sometimes see the ceiling mounted fixtures in the dorm rooms on the 3rd-5th stories of the building. Do the requirements cover vision into the building at ANY angle?

Thanks!

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting Sep 25 2014 LEEDuser Member 269 Thumbs Up

Would LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #10147 answer my question, allowing the dorm rooms to be exempt from Interior Lighting Requirements?

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Glenn Heinmiller IALD, LC, LEED AP, Principal, Lam Partners Sep 25 2014 Guest 1843 Thumbs Up

If you use the LEED v4 version of this credit (which you are allowed to do on v3 2009 projects) then you don't have any interior lighting requirements.

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Sep 26 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

The requirements do mean view from any angle.

I think you can use LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #10147 to exempt only the dorm rooms from the interior lighting requirements. Any other places that people are not living in would have to comply. This would include the stairwells, corridors, lobby, common laundry room, etc.

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Allan Francis Manlapig Electrical Engineer Thomas J Davis Inc.
Sep 12 2014
Guest
4 Thumbs Up

SS Credit 8 Lighting Pollution Reduction Non-Tradable Surfaces

Hi,

I have problem using the form for SS Cr 8.
I don't have any Nontradable surfaces in my project so I just leave the LPDLighting power density (LPD) is the amount of electric lighting, usually measured in watts per square foot, being used to illuminate a given space. portion for exterior nontradable portion blank.But when I do check compliance, the form is not allowing me to have credit. It requires me to fill in LPD for non-tradable surface. Please help me resolve this problem.

Thank you in advance.

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Sep 16 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

Someone else had that problem 2 years ago. This was my suggestion that seemed to work.

"In the form for the table of non-tradeable surfaces. Describe the location as "None". Pick the first item in the drop down menu. Enter an area of 1. Enter a wattage of 0. That should do it."

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Allan Francis Manlapig Electrical Engineer, Thomas J Davis Inc. Sep 16 2014 Guest 4 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the response Bill.

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David Hubka Director - Operations Transwestern Sustainability Services
Aug 11 2014
LEEDuser Expert
1717 Thumbs Up

Search Light at Prison

Would a prison search light be exempt from the credit requirements?

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Glenn Heinmiller IALD, LC, LEED AP, Principal, Lam Partners Aug 11 2014 Guest 1843 Thumbs Up

It would not be specifically exempt but I think you could claim a special circumstance. It is certainly in line with other types of lighting that are exempted. i think it would be important to state that the light is only used under emergency situations (assuming this is true). I must say though, I'm having a hard time getting my head around the idea of prison exterior lighting ever being able to meet the credit requirements.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Aug 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1717 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the response Glenn, and i would agree that it lines up with the other types of lighting that are exempted.

The project is not a prison, I asked the question in this manner to help illustrate the way the specific light fixture would be used. This project building is in a remote location of the world and the light is used to make sure animal(s) are not in the area so that occupants are safe/secure when they leave the facility. It will only be used during an emergency event.

thanks for the quick response.

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Aug 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

I have not heard of them allowing any exceptions for security related lights. Even if they are rarely turned on they must meet the credit requirements.

ID#5192 made on 05/06/2009
Prerequisite/Credit: SSc8 - Light pollution reduction
Rating System: LEED BD+C: New Construction, LEED BD+C: Schools, LEED BD+C: Core and Shell Rating System Version: v2 - LEED 2.2, v3 - LEED 2009, v2 - Schools 2007

Inquiry
Our project is an office building located in an area surrounded mostly by residential properties. The office building and site will comply with the Light Pollution Reduction credit. The firm that will occupy this office building works on many projects of a sensitive nature so security is a significant concern, both for employees arriving early or working after dark and for protection of the facility from intrusion. Is it acceptable to include motion-sensor activated lights that do not fall within the allowable site lighting wattage? These lights would be located in the immediate vicinity of the building and would only be enabled to turn on when other site lights are off. They would only remain on for a limited time following activation. If such motion-sensor activated lights are allowed, can they be excluded from the other requirements of this credit, property line illuminance and uplight components, since their purpose is only safety and security?

Ruling
The applicant is requesting confirmation if it is acceptable to exceed the lighting power density requirements with motion responsive after hours security lighting that is only enabled when the other site lighting is off. Based on the description provided, this strategy is only acceptable provided that when the security lighting is ON, the combined security and general lighting that remains ON, does not exceed the lighting power density thresholds and the security lighting is capable of being controlled to prevent simultaneous operation with the offsetting exterior luminaires. The second question asks if the lights can be excluded from the other requirements of SSc8 and the answer is no. These luminaires must meet the light trespass requirements relative to their declared environmental zone at the applicable site boundary, as well as the sky glowSky glow is caused by stray light from unshielded light sources and light reflecting off surfaces that then enter the atmosphere and illuminate and reflect off dust, debris, and water vapor. Sky glow can substantially limit observation of the night sky, compromise astronomical research, and adversely affect nocturnal environments. requirements of the credit. Applicable Internationally.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Aug 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1717 Thumbs Up

thanks for the response Bill and for tracking down this info.

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy
Jun 24 2014
LEEDuser Member
1897 Thumbs Up

Building operating 24 hours

Hello,

We are working on a project which is an industrial facility that will operate 24 hours, for the interior lighting in the offices area we will reduce the input power, in the manufacturing area the night shift will only operate 2 of 6 lines, the illumination in these 2 lines will be the only ones that will be working during the night and the other 4 lines will be programmed to be turned off, this represents about a 60% of reduction in the interior lighting, can this be acceptable as a reduction in the interior lighting?

Thank you in advance!

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jun 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

If business picks up will they operate 4 of the 6 lines?

Technically the wording of the credit says that every light that shines directly outside must have power reduced by 50% at night. You may find a sympathetic reviewer that will let you reduce the power in the room by more than 50%. But the controls need to be automatic and not reliant on someone flipping a switch.

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy Jun 30 2014 LEEDuser Member 1897 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your answer Bill, we will try to submit the credit via reducing the input power more than 50% in the room, as you commented.

I will let you know if this criteria was accepted.

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy
Jun 24 2014
LEEDuser Member
1897 Thumbs Up

Temporary lighting fixtures

Hello,

We are working on a project that in a future includes an addition, the LEED boundary for the current project is just in the limit between the 1st building and the addition, for this 1st building there are some wall packs just in the LEED boundary that will not comply with the lighting trespass requirements, but these wall packs are temporary because they will be eliminated when the addition will be completed. Should we include these temporary wall packs in the calculation?

Also, I would like to confirm that we can apply for this credit following the LEED v4 requirements that only considers exterior lighting requirements, because the building will be used 24 hrs.

Thank you in advance!

Thank you in advance.

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jun 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

http://www.usgbc.org/articles/use-v4-credits-your-v2009-project
These are the rules for using a v4 version of the credit.

Any light fixtures that are installed in this phase of work need to be considered. Some times the most permanent work was originally intended as temporary. How many projects in 2008 got put on hold indefinitely when the global economy tanked. The future is uncertain so measure the present scope of work. If these wall packs are a problem try selecting something else that is compliant.

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Glenn Heinmiller IALD, LC, LEED AP, Principal, Lam Partners Jun 25 2014 Guest 1843 Thumbs Up

Rosemaria,

You should definitely use the v4 version of this credit. It may also solve your wallpack problem. If the area where the addition will be is on the same piece of property as the project, or a piece of property owned by the same owner and the same or lower LZ designation, then your trespass calculations are made farther away than the LEED project Boundary. See the "Lighting Boundary" in the v4 credit.

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy Jun 30 2014 LEEDuser Member 1897 Thumbs Up

Thank you Bill and Glenn,

This will be my 1st time submitting one credit of the v4 version in a building looking for LEED NC version v2009, so I have some questions about it. I would just like to confirm that this credit in the v4 version does not include any requirement for the interior lighting, and also, do I have to include a narrative stating that the credit will be submitted in the v4 version? or how can I specify that this credit will be in the new version V4?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jun 30 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

You can read the V4 credit language here.
http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-v4/SSc6#lang-tab

There are no interior lighting requirements.

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Glenn Heinmiller IALD, LC, LEED AP, Principal, Lam Partners Jun 30 2014 Guest 1843 Thumbs Up

Rosemaria,

you can download the interactive pdf of the LEED online submittal form for the v4 version of the credit in the LEED credit library. Fill that out and then make a pdf of it and upload it in LEED Online as a supporting document and put in a comment in LEED online that you are using the v4 version. Don't know if this is the right way, but it is what we have done.

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy Jul 02 2014 LEEDuser Member 1897 Thumbs Up

Thank you both, Bill and Glenn.

Regards!

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Stella Stella
Jun 20 2014
Guest
251 Thumbs Up

Actual exterior Lux reading

Can actual lighting level measurements be used as for compliance for this credit?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jun 20 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

I've only seen actual measurements allowed for existing building.

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Stella Stella Jun 25 2014 Guest 251 Thumbs Up

Thanks Bill. We have a project which is a new development (LEED NC 2009) but there were some exterior luminaries installed some 20 years ago when the whole site and the other existing buildings were developed. Now some of these existing lamps fall within our LEED boundary for the new development. Do we need to perform exterior lighting simulation to show light trespass beyond the site boundary? If yes we don’t have the data for the existing lamps, so can we use a generic ELUMDAT file for those? Please advise. Thanks.

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jun 26 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

It sounds like you have something similar to a campus project. You may want to extend the "lighting boundary" to include the whole campus if it helps with your lighting calculation. But any of your existing fixtures within the "project boundary" will need to comply with this credit. Moving the lighting boundary out past the project boundary may make it easier to show that these existing fixtures are compliant. The uplight limits will be a challenge still for these existing fixtures. How many existing fixtures are inside the project boundary? Any appetite to replace just these 20 year old fixtures?

I can understand finding an IES file for this old fixture will be difficult. If you have a generic file or a similar product file it should be acceptable. Things can change a lot on a 20 year old fixtures. I see many that have a very yellow lens from years of UV exposure. I'm sure this has significantly changed the light output of the fixture. All we can due is make a reasonable effort and get as close as possible.

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Stella Stella Jun 26 2014 Guest 251 Thumbs Up

Thanks Bill. But is it possible to exclude those existing lamps since they weren’t installed as a part of this new development and analyse the only the newly installed ones?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jun 27 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17325 Thumbs Up

Only if they are owned by the city for use by the city.

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ADRIENN GELESZ LEED AP ABUD Engineering Ltd.
Jun 19 2014
Guest
1594 Thumbs Up

Industrial site lighting

Hi all,

A question about industrial sites:
According to ASHRAE 90.1- section 9.4.5 Exterior Building Lighting Power, lighting used for the following exterior applications
is exempt when equipped with a control device
independent of the control of the nonexempt lighting:
g) Lighting for industrial production, material handling,
transportation sites, and associated storage areas.

Does this mean that the truck roads, loading dock shouldn't be included in the lighting calculation, nor in the energy model, if they have separate control? What about the illuminance values, can these lights also be excluded?
If they are not on a separate control, then what values can be used; for parking and drives? plazas?

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