NC-2009 SSp1: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention

  • NC_Schools_CS_SSp1-Type3-ConstructionPollutionPrev Diagram
  • Generally standard practice, anyway

    In general, complying with this prerequisite is standard practice in most urban and suburban areas, where most or all of the EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. (CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.) requirements have been adopted and implemented at the state or county level. Regulators at those levels often threaten heavy fines for not complying with CGP requirements, so most projects do so without the added incentive of the LEED prerequisite.

    Early on in project planning, compare your local code requirements to the CGP to determine which is more stringent. If your local code is more stringent, then you will meet the prerequisite just by following that. If it is less stringent, follow the CGP to achieve the prerequisite.

    Create an ESC plan

    The CGP extends compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters.) stormwater regulations to construction activities. It has three main categories that need to be addressed as you create an erosion and sedimentation control (ESC) plan:

    • Prevent the loss of topsoil during construction. Proper staging of earth-moving activities and the preservation of mature vegetation can aid in preventing topsoil loss and controlling stormwater pollutant discharge. Stabilization methods such as seeding, mulching, and the use of geo-textiles should also be included in your plan.  
    • Prevent the sedimentation of receiving streams. Your plan should outline the placement of planned structural control measures such as silt fences, drainage swales, and storm drain inlet protection. 
    • Prevent air pollution by particulate matter. Your plan should describe measures to prevent the tracking of soil onto paved surfaces off-site and the generation of dust from construction vehicles—for example, gravel skirts at drive entries and exits, transit ways for heavy vehicles, and wash stations for trucks.

    Simply put, your ESC plan implements good housekeeping on a site-wide basis, minimizing the impact of construction on local environmental resources and surrounding properties. 

    As written, the CGP applies to sites of one acre or larger. However, all projects pursuing LEED certification must meet the requirements of the CGP, regardless of size. 

    Often the civil engineer is responsible for creating the ESC plan, which is then implemented by the general contractor. Smaller projects may find the contractor is the one providing the plan, often one that is standard for their company.

    Documenting your plan

    The ESC plan may be submitted as documentation, in the form of a site plan or a narrative report. 

    Inlet protectionInlet protectionTo demonstrate that your ESC plan was implemented, your projects will also be required to provide one of the following: 

    • An inspection check list―signed, and dated periodically. 
    • Date-stamped photos of the following:  
    • measures to prevent topsoil loss including staging of earth-moving activities and stabilization techniques; 
    • measures to prevent sedimentation of nearby streams including structural controls and inlet protection;  
    • measures to prevent air pollution including tracking control at entrances and exits.
    • Description of corrective actions taken in response to problems with the performance of ESC measures.

    Zero lot lines

    Many urban projects have zero lot lines and, therefore, no associated “site.” If your project is like this, you are not exept from developing and implementing an ESC plan. However, strategies and BMPs will differ from those implemented on projects with site area. Inlet protection will still be required, even if storm drains are not immediately on site and within your LEED boundary. Tenting work areas and using temporary enclosures can prevent dust and airborne particulatesTotal suspended particulate matter found in the atmosphere as solid particles or liquid droplets. Chemical composition of particulates varies widely, depending on location and time of year. Sources of airborne particulates include: dust, emissions from industrial processes, combustion products from the burning of wood and coal, combustion products associated with motor vehicle or non-road engine exhausts, and reactions to gases in the atmosphere. (EPA) from leaving the project site. Vehicle tracking and concrete washout will also need to be addressed, and washout will likely have to be managed onsite somehow. Don't forget to include staging areas.

    Concrete washoutConcrete washoutDocument the plan with a narrative report explaining which CGP requirements don’t apply to your project conditions, which do, and how you plan to implement them.

    FAQs for SSp1

    Am I exempt from this prerequisite if I have a zero-lot-line building? What if the site work is minimal due to the scope? What about a renovation? What if the excavation and foundation work is minimal due to the construction materials I am using?

    No. You must always do an ESC plan according to the credit requirements. We have yet to hear of a project that didn't have some issues to address. See the above section titled "Zero lot lines."

    What are BMPs for steep slopes?

    BMPs for steep slopes should address soil retention, but not water retention. These could include silt fencing and straw wattles, hydro seeding and stabilized mulching, geotextiles and mats, and most importantly, preservation of natural vegetation.

    I have a technical question about a specific control measure and whether LEED requires it. What guidance is available?

    LEED does not offer specific requirements on ESC control measures, beyond the standards that it references, and the documentation requirements. LEEDuser recommends working with a civil engineer who understands the LEED and EPA requirements, and relying on the professional judgment of the engineer for specific technical questions. LEEDuser has not heard that LEED reviewers are deeply scrutinizing ESC plans and coming back with highly technical questions.

    Is there a preferred method for documentation?

    This prerequisite offers several options for documentation, including date-stamped photographs, a narrative describing the ESC plan implementation, or a builder declaration of periodic inspection and documentation of ESC implementation. You can rely on project specifics to choose the best option for you—LEED has no preference.

    What suffices as far as a date-stamped photo?

    Ideally, use your cameras to imprint a visible date on a corner of the image. Most cameras offer this option. Digital files also typically encode a date when the file was created, or encode that date in the file name, and while these methods aren't ideal, some project teams have reported success submitting this type of documentation.

    Can I still earn the prerequisite if the project started considering LEED after work began?

    As long as the project has been actively implementing an ESC plan during the current development of the project site, you should be okay. If that's not the case, then the outcome will depend on project specifics, and you will likely need official guidance from GBCI.

    LEEDuser has advised teams that in multi-phase projects, it's okay to focus documentation of the ESC plan only on the current phase, when LEED became part of the project scope. In general, if there is some question about whether controls were in place during the LEED project, you may not be able to earn the prerequisite.

    How do I know if my local code is more or less stringent than the EPA CGP?

    USGBC has not identified specific standards for judging this, or defined certain codes as compliant with the credit, or not. The stringency of other codes relative to EPA's Construction General Permit is judged on a case-by-case basis.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Review pages B-1 through B-4 of the EPA Construction General Permit (CGP) (see Resources) to determine if your state administers the CGP requirements for all projects. 


  • In regions where the EPA CGP is not standard practice, compare the local code with the CGP and make adjustments, if necessary, to include all the CGP requirements.


  • Meeting the requirements of this prerequisite is standard practice in many regions and, therefore, no- or low-cost for LEED. 


  • The materials cost to implement these measures is minimal and can potentially save money by preserving the vegetation and topsoil on-site. 


  • Conduct a site evaluation to assess opportunities for minimizing the alteration of the natural stormwater runoff patterns of your site and the disruption of mature vegetation, especially trees. This will save money and time in terms of earth-moving and replanting vegetation. 


  • Ask your civil engineer about soil types and what type of drainage you will have once the topsoil and vegetation are disturbed.

Schematic Design

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  • Establish who will create your ESC and stormwater pollution prevention plans. Usually, the civil engineer creates them, and the contractor is responsible for their onsite implementation. 


  • It is best to include your ESC plan in both project drawings and project specifications so that the intention of the plan is clearly communicated to the project team, especially contractors and subcontractors. 


  • Determine whether the 2003 EPA CGP or local erosion and sedimentation control standards are more stringent―and follow the more stringent standards. Often the state department of environmental protection or equivalent will have a written ruling on the comparison of the CGP standards and the local standards.  


  • A good first step to determine which is more stringent is to review your local code to be sure it contains at minimum the general categories contained in the CGP. If not, you’ll know that you need to follow the CGP. If so, you’ll need to review your local code in detail to be sure that all of the requirements are included. The general categories are as follows: 

    • allowable stormwater discharges
    • allowable non-stormwater discharges
    • limitations on coverage
    • a stormwater pollution prevention plan
    • releases in excess of reportable quantities
    • treatment of spills.

  • If local standards are equal to or more stringent than the CGP,you'll need to provide a narrative report detailing this. Write the narrative when you do the comparison, so that it's fresh in your mind.  

Design Development

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  • Create a draft ESC plan drawing or a narrative report that outlines how your project will comply with the requirements of the CGP or the local standard. See the Documentation Toolkit for samples.


  • Make sure that you use the same LEED project boundary as all other LEED credits your project is attempting (this is particularly relevant with other Sustainable Sites credits).


  • A project drawing should include anticipated stormwater flows and indicate the location and type of any planned ESC measures. 


  • All written ESC plans must include the following:

    • an introduction describing the standard being followed, existing site conditions, and responsible parties
    • a list of the temporary and permanent control measures that will prevent loss of topsoil, sedimentation of receiving streams and storm sewers, and air pollution by particulate matter
    • details of the plan for implementation and ongoing maintenance to prove implementation, including one of the following measures: 
      • A checklist or inspection report demonstrating implementation of your ESC plan and providing sample dates, inspection frequency, at least three equally spaced inspections over the project timeline, and a description of any corrective actions taken. (For LEED documentation, you need to upload this document and have the builder or general contractor sign the LEED Online credit form.)
      • Date-stamped photos of implementation and corrective actions, as applicable, including at least three photos from three different monthly inspections equally spaced over your project site's work timeline. (For LEED documentation, you need to upload these images, but there is no specific required signatory for this option.)
      • A narrative outlining the implementation and corrective action taken to effectively implement your ESC plan. (For LEED documentation, you provide the narrative itself; there is no required signatory for this option.) 

  • Determine which path your project will follow to demonstrate implementation compliance: inspection report, photos, or narrative report. 


  • Photos are likely the easiest way to demonstrate compliance, unless an inspection report has already been completed. 


  • Develop a site-wide, earth-moving schedule to minimize the impact on established vegetation and to stockpile topsoil and protect it from erosion. This can also complement your strategy to achieve SSc5.1: Site Development—Protect or Restore Habitat, by limiting site disturbance and maintaining native vegetation.  


  • Proper scheduling and staging of earth-moving activities can lower the costs associated with sediment and erosion controls.


  • Retain as much of the existing vegetation as possible, not only to lower costs for replacements, but also to decrease the cost of structural controls.


  • Careful implementation of the stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) by the contractor should inform the design and installation of stormwater management systems onsite. This will enable those systems to be integrated to the greatest extent possible during construction, preventing unexpected stormwater discharges into receiving waterways.  


  • If attempting one or both of the stormwater management credits SSc6.1 and SSc6.2 confirm with the contractor that the SWPPP accurately represents the hydrologic characteristics of the site and is performing as anticipated. Check on assumed infiltration rates, suspected rate and quantity of run-off to receiving streams, and discuss potential storage options. Make changes to the stormwater management system accordingly to improve its effectiveness and ensure that the credit calculations are accurate.

Construction Documents

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  • Review your ESC and stormwater pollution prevention plans to ensure adequate measures will be implemented to meet the CGP, or local requirements. A discussion between the contractor and the civil engineer on the schedule and implementation of planned measures should be part of this review. 


  • Finalize your ESC plan drawings or narrative report. Verify that your plan is in compliance with the CGP or local standards. 

Construction

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  • Review all ESC project drawings and construction specifications prior to construction activities. 


  • Verify that all ESC measures are in place before any construction activities begin. 


  • The general contractor implements the ESC plan until construction is completed and all disturbed areas have been stabilized. 


  • Have a representative from the general contractor’s office onsite daily to monitor and implement necessary measures laid out in your ESC plan.


  • The civil engineer, contractor, or a third party should inspect your ESC plan measures on a weekly basis (bi-weekly if inspections are also conducted after any weather event involving more than 0.5 inches of rain), and submit status reports on ESC plan implementation. These reports should include labeled and dated photographs, an inspection log, or a narrative report describing the performance of the measures implemented. 


  • Provide corrective actions immediately after any rain event.


  • Corrective actions can range from adjusting the placement of silt fencing and removing debris from stormwater catchment basins to replanting areas of temporary seeding and adding material to gravel skirts at entrances and exits.


  • Preserve existing vegetation, especially mature trees, whenever possible. This will decrease costs for temporary stabilization measures and erosion controls. In addition, the vegetation may also be used as part of your landscaping plan. 


  • After completion of all construction activities, document credit compliance in LEED Online by uploading these documents: 

    • A narrative that declares the standard followed (2003 EPA CGP or local). If you used a local standard, write a narrative report detailing how it is equal to or more stringent than the CPG (Phases I and II, NPDES program). 
    • A written ESC plan or project drawings showing the control measures used.
    • Proof of implementation with one of the following: an inspection report with the required signature, nine photos, or a narrative report.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Implement an ongoing stormwater system maintenance plan with the landscape manager. This should include a regular schedule for monitoring the performance of the stormwater management system and guidelines for repairing or modifying site features that are causing problems. These guidelines could include replacing or increasing vegetation, redirecting runoff, and increasing storage.   

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    SS Prerequisite 1: Construction activity pollution prevention

    Required

    Intent

    To reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation, and airborne dust.

    Requirements

    Create and implement an erosion and sedimentation control plan for all construction activities associated with the project. The plan must conform to the erosion and sedimentation requirements of the 2003 EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. OR local standards and codes, whichever is more stringent. The plan must describe the measures implemented to accomplish the following objectives:

    • To prevent loss of soil during construction by stormwater runoff and/or wind erosion, including protecting topsoil by stockpiling for reuse.
    • To prevent sedimentation of storm sewers or receiving streams.
    • To prevent pollution of the air with dust and particulate matter.

    The EPA’s construction general permit outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters.) program. While the permit only applies to construction sites greater than 1 acre, the requirements are applied to all projects for the purposes of this prerequisite. Information on the EPA construction general permit is available at http://cfpub.epa.gov/ npdes/stormwater/cgpEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program..cfm.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Create an erosion and sedimentation control plan during the design phase of the project. Consider employing strategies such as temporary and permanent seeding, mulching, earthen dikes, silt fencing, sediment traps and sediment basins.

Publications

EPA – Construction General Permit

Referenced Standard.


Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plans for Construction Activities

Resources here include Developing Your Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan: A Guide for Construction Sites, SWPPP Templates, Sample Inspection Form, Example SWPPPs, Key Resources, and Selected State BMPBest Management Practice/Guidance Manuals.


BMP Manual

BMPBest Management Practice Manual.

Organizations

International Erosion Control Association

Connect with worldwide member based erosion and sediment control community.


Certified Professional in Erosion and Sedimentation Control

Provides certification programs a list of qualified professionals. 

Technical Guides

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

A variety of Canadian resources on stormwater management and BMPs.

Photos

Take photos like these to document proper implementation of your ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan.

Erosion and Sedimentation Control Plan Drawings

Posted here are sample drawings for erosion and sedimentation control (ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation) plans from a LEED project.

LEED-NC Platinum Senior Housing Sample Documentation

Samples from this LEED Platinum project demonstrate how to document SSp1. This 8-story, 100-unit public senior housing development will use 50% less energy than a comparable code compliant building. Although on a tight urban site, the project also features innovative stormwater management plans, and a pilot graywaterGraywater is untreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater typically includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washer and laundry tubs, though definitions may vary. Some states and local authorities also allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. reuse system—all on a tight budget under a major urban housing authority.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms: (newest)

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

245 Comments

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esra özkonuksever architect İltay Mimarlık
Jan 23 2015
Guest
3 Thumbs Up

International Project Epa CGP

Project Location: Turkey

Hi Y'all,
we re working on a project in Turkey and creating an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation and a SWPPP plan. but as an international project do we have to apply for CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. submitting a NOI and everything or do we only need to apply the restirictions of EPA in our project
Thanks!'

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jan 23 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

No, you're not actually applying for a permit because you are outside of the regulatory authority of the United States. However, design your E&S as if you were applying for the permit.

Clear as mud?

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esra özkonuksever architect , İltay Mimarlık Jan 23 2015 Guest 3 Thumbs Up

thanks Michael ! helps a lot

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Erika Duran Sustainability Consultant Dagher Engineering
Jan 20 2015
LEEDuser Member
1174 Thumbs Up

What does LEED consider as Sitework?

Project Location: United States

Project sitework and stabalization techniques were implemented during the beginning stages of the project and followed our ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan as well as local jurisdiction requirements. We submitted our documentation for this project however the comment that was returned states that there needs to be record of this work from the dates we stated in PIf4 as beginning of construction and substantial completion of construction. Does anyone know if LEED defines "site work" for this credit? It is confusing because sitework to the contractor means a different thing than site work as in "work being done on the site through the life of the project" Can someone clarify this?

Thanks.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jan 23 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

Site work, as it pertains to erosion and sediment control, is earth disturbance...unstabilized earth....earth that is not permanently stabilized with 70% perennial growth. Locally, an area of 1,00 sf -5,000 sf is typically applied before this is classified as qualifying site disturbance. However, for LEED, there is no such area requirement, as this applies to all projects

What does your contractor think "site work" is??

You'll see the requirements for this Pre-Req state that the plan must be in place for "all construction activities associated with the project."

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Aly Adel
Jan 06 2015
Guest

Cnstrctn began with no LEED intent nw thy wnt rsume seeking LEED

Project Location: Egypt

Hello!
We have a project that started construction some time ago, and stopped 1 yr ago, leaving only phase 1 (concrete slabs only). At this time, they were not considering LEED as an objective.
They want to reactivate construction, and they are truly interested in pursuing LEED Certification and addressing environmental impact of their construction.
The question is, if they start implementing the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation Plan as soon as the construction process reactivates and through the rest of construction, is it acceptable to earn the prerrequisite, even though on the previous "phase" they didn't implement it??
Thanks!!

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Michael Johnson Architect Chenevert Architects
Dec 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
1092 Thumbs Up

LEED Boundary / Silt Fencing

Project Location: United States

Currently working on a project that is a large site with an existing building currently on the site. The new LEED building is away from this current building creating a smaller LEED Boundary than that of the entire site. We plan to locate a silt fence around the entire site and not around the LEED Boundary of the building. Is this an acceptable way to maintain the SS Pre-Req. or do we need to have silt fencing encompassing the LEED Boundary as well? Essentially double fencing?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 31 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, the silt fencing should be located in a logical way relative to meeting the objectives of the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan. It has no relation to the LEED boundary.

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Michael Johnson Architect, Chenevert Architects Jan 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 1092 Thumbs Up

rad. thanks Tristan

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Hrvoje Kvasnicka
Dec 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
60 Thumbs Up

Checking ESC plan at design stage?

Hi All
Since this is a prerequisite which forms part of construction stage submittal, I was wondering if it there is a way to have the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan reviewed by GBCI at design stage. This way we could be sure not to lose this prerequisite and make the project ineligible for certification at a stage where nothing can be done about it anymore.
Thanks in advance

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Dec 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

Is your project located in the United States. I ask this because if it is, your plan needs to be reviewed by the local conservation district or environmental protection agency, and the GBCI submission is more a formality.

I'm not sure that GBCI actually has staff qualified to review the actual ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan and design calculations, short of you demonstrating that it is in place through photos, checklists, etc outlined above.

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Hrvoje Kvasnicka Dec 17 2014 LEEDuser Member 60 Thumbs Up

Hi Michael, thanks for your response.
The project is in Croatia so no one will formally review it except for GBCI.
What do you think would be a good strategy to make sure we don't lose this prerequisite? We are planning to prepare and implement the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan and follow the LEED requirements as best as we can but I don't want to risk that GBCI comes back to us at the end and says "you haven't done this or that" and therefore you are ineligible for certification...

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Civil Engineer Dec 17 2014 Guest 3 Thumbs Up

I find the original reply to this query troubling.

The credit language for SS Prereq 1 states "Create and implement an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan ..."
The local conservation district or environmental agency can certainly verify if an ESC plan has been "created" that meets their standards, however the legal obligation to "implement" the plan rests with the owner. Periodic inspection by the local conservation district or environmental agency does not guarantee implementation. Conservation districts are typically understaffed and underfunded and have little real enforcement ability. I know of one LEED building owner whose interpretation of "implement" is very clearly "do not get caught." I am sure there are others.

How does GBCI verify implementation?

Also to the best of my knowledge, in my state the ESC plan is not required to include measures to prevent air pollution from particulate matter. So this requirement would not be captured in the local approval and should be separately verified by GBCI.

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Yodi Danusastro Dec 17 2014 Guest 2 Thumbs Up

Just follow the EPA CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. and you'll be safe.

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Hrvoje Kvasnicka Dec 31 2014 LEEDuser Member 60 Thumbs Up

Thanks all for your help!

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SoYoung Lee LEED AP BD+C Director, HnC
Dec 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
5 Thumbs Up

Previously developed or graded land

We are planning to pursue LEED certification for the official buildings. The site areas are being developed for those municipal buildings relocation and as part of the urban redevelopment (or, reorganization) plan executed by the municipal regulations, which include adjacent large residential complex construction.
The site area is located in the urban area surrounded by the mountains and already been cleared for the use of the municipal agencies.
The question is if this site would be classified as “previously developed”, or “graded” sites.
From the credit language, “previously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiate and those that have been graded or modified by human activity” seems to assume the site as ‘previously developed’. But from the second part of the credit language, “Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land” seems to consider the site to be ‘undeveloped land’.
The last part of language is also confusing. It is saying that, “The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development.”

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Yodi Danusastro
Dec 12 2014
Guest
2 Thumbs Up

Job Specific Environment Analysis

Project Location: Indonesia

Does anyone has the template of JSEA? I've been ask to create ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation with inclusion of JSEA template. Where an I find this template?

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FABIO VIERO Head of Sustainability Manens-Tifs s.p.a.
Dec 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
773 Thumbs Up

SSp1 and EPA in KSA

Project Location: Saudi Arabia

We are working on two projects located in Saudi Arabia under LEED 2009 certification.

We are looking for finding the appropriate measures to be applied, as per EPA’s Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. and NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. requirements, to match the intent of the SS Prerequisite 1.

We are aware about LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. n.5114 (http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=5114) which basically recognized minimal stormwater erosion concerns in case of desert area (“arid areas” as per EPA’s definition means an average annual rainfall of 0 -10 inches, Jeddah=2,1, Riyadh=4) and actually allows to avoid mitigation measures due to stormwater; so inspection could be conducted once a month, as per paragraph 3.10 of the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. Fact sheet(http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/npdes/stormwater/upload/cgp2003_fs.pdf), instead of on weekly basis.

Regarding other items addressed within SSp1 we are wondering the following:

1) best way to manage the loss of soil due to wind, since sandstorm are very common for that climate, which actually make itself loss of soil other than fust.

2) best way to manage the air pollution from dust, considering that water availability could be an issue for that climate and therefore mitigation measure such as sprinkling would not be appropriate.

Do you have any advice/recommendation about those items, based on previous LEED certified projects located in KSA or similar climate?

Thank you.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International
Nov 20 2014
LEEDuser Member
1946 Thumbs Up

No exposed soil - how to comply with ESC?

Project Location: Mexico

We have a small project that consists af an existing one level building that will have an major renovation. No exposed soil is present nor there is a garden or landscape therefor during the major renovation no exposed soil will be present.

We would like to have an advice on how to comply with a ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan where no exposed soil will be present. Dust generation will be present an mitigated, however typical issues of a project where a big amount of soil will be disturbed is not our case.

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy
Oct 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
1683 Thumbs Up

Reactivating construction with ESC Plan, no ESC Plan before

Project Location: Mexico

Hello!
We have a project that started construction some time ago, and stopped 1 yr ago, leaving only the foundation. At this time, they were not considering LEED as an objective.
Now, the project has changed (scope and the proposed building itself), there are different investors (same owner, though) and they have a different commercial focus.
They want to reactivate construction, and they are truly interested in pursuing LEED Certification and addressing environmental impact of their construction.
The question is, if they start implementing the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation Plan as soon as the construction process reactivates and through the rest of construction, is it acceptable to earn the prerrequisite, even though on the previous "phase" (foundation) they didn't implement it??

Thanks!!

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International Dec 09 2014 LEEDuser Member 1946 Thumbs Up

Did you ever get a response by GBCI? I am interested in this case.

Greetings.

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Nadhielly Guzman Dec 29 2014 Guest

I am interested too.

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Gabriela Mesquita
Oct 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
4 Thumbs Up

Perimeter Controls

Project Location: Paraguay

Good day I want to consult in relation to a project in a lot of 10 hectares (about 25 acres) with a perimeter of 1377 m (about 4500 ft). One of the longer sides of the perimeter has input waters from higher ground. Altimetry due to the other three sides, is output water from the batch of the project. You may meet the requirement of the Plan taking into account the following edge care:
1. compacted earth dike on the side of greater height, to prevent entry of water from other lots,
2. Perimeter Control with silt fence on the other three sides
Or they need to have more perimeter control measures?
I clarify that a third of the property remain undisturbed, so it may not take that edge protection or equal silt fence should be placed? The area where there is no disturbance is 130 feet wide and 240 m long (426 x 787 feet).
Thanks in advance for the help

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Oct 30 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

A site of that size probably needs 1 or more sed basins. But it's really impossible to answer this question without seeing the plan. Your E&S design should be done by a competent civil engineer or CPESC.

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Gabriela Mesquita Nov 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 4 Thumbs Up

The schematic plan can be found at the following link: https://www.dropbox.com/s/559tjbe2xmjl36h/Planta%20General%20SSp.1%20con....
As you can see there is an area a third of the land that remains unaffected, that is why I consult if possible to ignore perimeter control measures in that area, and that area will not be considered for sizing the sedimentation volume needed. Thanks for the help!

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Alicia Silva CEO, Revitaliza consultores Jan 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 1704 Thumbs Up

Hi Gabriela,

We have a similar case, were you able to ignore the installation of a silt fence in the undisturbed side of the property?

Thanks!

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jan 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

Sorry for the late reply, I must have missed this. But in the drawing above, you don't need any E&S controls on the undisturbed side, because it is "undisturbed" and presumably permanently stabilized with grass or growy things.

Just put your BMPs on the downhill side of the disturbed area, whether this is silt fence, filter socks, sediment basins/traps, etc.

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Gabriela Mesquita Jan 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 4 Thumbs Up

Hi Alicia, I still didn´t realize the Plan because the project was delayed in its schedule.
Hi Michael, thank you for your answer, it will be very usefull to me.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jan 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

Now keep in mind, this goes for future readers, my reply only pertains to that drawing above, and similar site conditions.

If that site drained east-west, with the undisturbed area draining through the disturbed, you would need to either divert this clean water around the site, or account for it in the calcs for your proposed BMPBest Management Practice

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS. INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ
Oct 16 2014
LEEDuser Member
578 Thumbs Up

Sediment Basin

Project Location: Argentina

Hello again, we are working on a project for which we are installing a sediment basin. According to EPA we could use the calculation of 3600 ft3 / acre drained to size it. Most of the drainage area will remain undisturbed since it will be a preserved area. Diverting the water from undisturbed areas is quite difficult because of topographical constraints. We found in a manual that from undisturbed areas, we could use a runoff value of 500 ft3/acre drained in addition to the 3600ft3/acre drained of disturbed areas. Would doing this be compliant with EPA's regulations? We are outside the US and not very familiar with these regulations. Thanks!

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Oct 16 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

All I have ever seen or used is 3600 cf/ac or 5000 cf/ac for high quality watersheds.

Compost filter socks can be installed in virtually any terrain, and used for diversion. Have you considered these?

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS., INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ Oct 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 578 Thumbs Up

Thanks Michael, here is where we found the reference to the 500 ft3/acre drained from undisturbed areas:
http://www.udfcd.org/downloads/pdf/critmanual/Volume%203%20PDFs/chapter%...
We live in a place where things as compost filter socks are not commercially found, so practically any diversion would have to be made doing earthwork, which we are trying to avoid. The site where the basin would stand is also constrained and almost not enough to divert 3600 ft3/acre from all areas. Do you think we would comply using 500cf/ac in undisturbed areas?

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS. INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ
Oct 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
578 Thumbs Up

Concrete Washout

Hello everyone,

we are working on a project in an estate, part of this estate is the current LEED project, with its own LEED boundary. The estate has many projects going on and the construction company which works exclusively for the project owner, has its own concrete manufacturing plant within the estate, but outside de LEED boundary. The plant has a concrete washout facility that is well documented and that they use for all the projects they are working on. They fill the concrete mixer trucks with water inside the LEED boundary and do the washout when they arrive to the plant, a few miles away. Will this practice be OK with the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation Plan requirements? A concrete washout area for small hand or electric mixers has been provided on site. Thanks

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Oct 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

I see no problem with this. Just document it in the narrative.

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS., INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ Oct 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 578 Thumbs Up

Thank you Michael!

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy
Aug 26 2014
LEEDuser Member
1683 Thumbs Up

Vehicular control - Tire washing control

Hello all,

I have a question regarding the control measure for the control for all the vehicles leaving the project, the most common is cleaning all the vehicles (washing the tires) before leaving the project in order to keep the public roads clear of debris and mud.

There is a project we are working on, where the access road outside the site is unpaved, it is a 400 yards road of exposed soil and this road goes directly to the main street which is paved.

What king of strategy can be documented, if washing tires can damage the roads, because the vehicles will affect this road when leaving the project site. Should the outside road also have a control measure even if it is outside the LEED boundary? or can we comply with the pre-requisite only documenting the measures inside the boundary?

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer Lile Engineering LLC
Jul 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
1757 Thumbs Up

Dust control

What are the common measures used for dust control? SWPP plans I see around here always deal with soil erosion, but dust control is commonly ignored by inspectors and on most construction sites. We are in an area with about 30" rainfall per year.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

Lawrence, I typically use on site water trucks to wet down the disturbed areas as needed. Additionally, if wind is an issue, you should use tarps over any topsoil stockpiles.

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Jul 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 1757 Thumbs Up

We are trying to respond to a review comment on this project asking about dust control. About the only thing I am sure that was done, was to have a water cannon spraying down a concrete-framed structure as it was being torn down with track-hoes. Most of the site was graveled during the construction period, but there was no wetting of exposed soil or covering of piles with tarps. We do not live in an area with much in the way of wind, nor much problem with blowing dust (fighting mud is a normal and constant problem though), and I can't remember ever seeing a project around here in the Midwest in the last 30 years where any wetting of soil or covering of piles was ever done. This sounds like the kind of comment you'd get from a reviewer from dry California who'd never been to Flyover country! I am wondering if the whole prerequisite will be rejected if we can't respond to this review comment?

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Rustem Saitov
Jul 01 2014
Guest
14 Thumbs Up

Sandy soil

Could anyone kindly clarify the following issue:
I work with a project on construction of industrial plant. Prior to construction activities the topsoil was completely removed from the site leaving underlying soil layer exposed. Since this layer consists of sand only (a few tens of meters deep) and construction activities take place on 99.9% of the site area, I have at least 3 questions that I struggle to find answer to:
1. Stabilization of soil. Are there any measures that are relevant to this case?
2. Dust control. Sprinkling is adopted for the project to prevent erosion and air pollution. What more can be done?
3. Since an access to the construction site is provided by a 600m (away from paved road) stretch of gravel/dirt road, does it make any sense to minimize sediment track-out (as in art.2.1.2.3 EPA CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.)?
Thank you very much.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

1. Soils stabilization. Standard practice is to really only strip the topsoil far a few days worth of work. Typically 3. If the entire site is stripped, any areas to be open for longer than 3-4 days should be seeded and stabilized with hay at a rate of at least 1 ton per/acre, this will achieve approximately 87% less soil loss than an unprotected area. 2 tons will get you about 98.

2. On-site water is really the only thing you can do.

3. A construction entrance is typically larger d50 stone than ordinary gravel. A gravel drive is not going to be very effective.

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Amanda Johnson Penicaud Green Building
Jun 30 2014
Guest
270 Thumbs Up

Preliminary earthworks before project registration

Hello,
For complicated planning reasons on a large (probably Campus) project some preliminary earthmovement and demolition will take place soon, but the project is not yet registered. An ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan will be included with the bid-set and will be implemented during the work, as well as any waste tracking.
Is this going to be a problem?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 30 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Amanda, this is not a problem with regards to LEED. There is no requirement to have a LEED registration in place before project work begins. I would just recommend being aware of key prerequisites and documentation needs, as you seem to be.

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Razan Nejem Environmental Engineer, LEED AP BD+C
Jun 22 2014
Guest
324 Thumbs Up

ESC Plan for International projects

according to the prerequistes language the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan must conform to the construction general permitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. and the plan must describe the measures implemented to accomplish the following objectives:

To prevent loss of soil during construction
To prevent sedimentation of storm sewers or receiving streams.
To prevent pollution of the air with dust and particulate matter.

for international projects, do we have to comply with all requirements of the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. "including dewatering" or do we just write a plan describing BMPBest Management Practice for the above of measures?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 30 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Razan, note that the credit language calls for following the requirements of a CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. or local codes, whichever is more stringent. So, if dewatering is part of the CGP but not local code, I would not advise excluding it.

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Razan Nejem Environmental Engineer, LEED AP BD+C Jun 30 2014 Guest 324 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan,

Would reinjecting into a nearby water table be acceptable?
Would there be any water treatment requirments? According to CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. treatment must accur when mixing with storm water?

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Civil Engineer
Jun 17 2014
Guest
3 Thumbs Up

Implementation of ESC Plan

My question is in regard to the following requirement from SS Prereq 1: "Create and implement an erosion and sedimentation control plan…"

In particular I am interested in USGBC's interpretation of "implement".

I live in a rural area. Erosion and sedimentation control (ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation) is required by law but local construction practices are far from ideal and inspection and enforcement is very weak.

The following occurred on two recent projects:

1. Contractor was cited for minor violations of ESC plan by local inspector. Corrective action was taken by the contractor and no pollution occurred.

2. Contractor failed to install perimeter controls (silt fence, sock, etc) in one part of the site. Uncontrolled transport of sediment off site occurred during heavy (cut less than design storm) rain events. This was never noticed, cited or corrected by the inspector. It was only brought to my attention by a local citizen after completion of the project.

I am concerned how the above events might affect LEED certification on these two projects?

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jun 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

Minor violations occur on every project, so I don't feel that they would weigh negatively on a project.

But if we are talking about developing an E&S plan, then flat out ignoring it, and not putting it into practice ..... it is a pre-requisite, it must be done.

Now GBCI and USGBC do not have inspectors out on the job site, so proving the plan was never implemented would be tough, IMO. You could get into this with all the credits though, energy not performing as required, water savings not up to snuff, etc.

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SAMER ALHMDAN
Jun 01 2014
LEEDuser Member
52 Thumbs Up

Sediment Basin / Trap

Can we use the Infiltration Pond which is originally design for storm water collection during the operation phase of the project, can we use it as sediment trap during construction phase, noting that it is located outside the Project LEED boundary. we have a minimal average annual rainfall in dubai which is less than 100 MM.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jun 01 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

Using permanent Stormwater facilities as sed traps is a common component of the E&S plan provided appropriate measure are taken to preserve the infiltration capacity of the sub grade soils.

Proper sequencing and construction practices should be followed to ensure that the pond will function in the permanent condition as intended.

If this is outside your LEED boundary, is this basin already serving a Stormwater function for a built condition? If that is the case, then this approach may not be acceptable, but you should verify with your local agency that has jurisdiction over Stormwater discharges.

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SAMER ALHMDAN Jun 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 52 Thumbs Up

Hi Michael,

The Pond is outside the LEED boundary but still it is within the Landlord plot limits.

The client has got a big plot and the intention is to have future extensions or phases.

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Michael Hoffner
May 15 2014
Guest
7 Thumbs Up

Can a Graded Pad Site Meet SSp1?

Our client has purchased a graded pad site from a developer and wants to build a LEED certified project. So can we still meet the prerequisite by following the instructions for erosion control plan, etc. or are we on the hook for whatever the developer did before our client takes official possession of the site. Thank you for your help.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates May 15 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

Michael, is there an approved E&S Plan in place for the work that has already been completed?

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Michael Hoffner May 15 2014 Guest 7 Thumbs Up

Not sure. I will find out what they did and reply.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 15 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

See the FAQ above, "Can I still earn the prerequisite if the project started considering LEED after work began?" (You'll have to sign on as a member, which you can do with a free trial at the top of the page.)

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Michael Hoffner May 15 2014 Guest 7 Thumbs Up

OK, thanks. I've subscribed and read the FAQ. We have not begun work, but the speculative developer who is selling the site to my client had already graded the pad site before offering for sale. Are we responsible for his actions having chosen this site, or are we allowed to start with what we've inherited and begin E&S/documentation at this time?

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates May 15 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

Michael, did he grade the site under an approved E&S permit? Is this in the USA?

What I am getting at here, if the seller was on the up and up, and in the USA, his earthmoving activities should be covered under an existing permit (unless we are talking about a very small site?), or he ignored all the rules, in which case I'd hate to see this held against a new owner, but i'd defer to GBCI with your specifics if that is the case.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 15 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

As Michael indicates, I would do some due diligence in finding out what permits and plans the seller was working under. If these are LEED-compliant, that's ideal. If not, my opinion is that it wouldn't be held against you, as a different owner commencing the LEED project.

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JP Rout
May 07 2014
Guest
515 Thumbs Up

Maintenance Plan for ESC

Is maintenance plan a mandatory requirement under ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation and what should be its content?
Kindly share if any sample is available. Thanks in advance.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates May 07 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2983 Thumbs Up

Define "maintenance plan" please.

Maintenance of the E&S BMPs? Such as clean sediment from sed traps when you reach the cleanout mark, replace failed silt fencing, maintain tree protection zones, wash roadways of any transported sediment, etc ?

Yes, these are common features of an E&S Plan, and should be included in your calculations, sequencing, and narrative.

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Hazem Yusuf Mechanical Team Leader Engineering Solutions Flow
May 04 2014
LEEDuser Member
6 Thumbs Up

In which construction phase can I certify my building?

Construction phase of an office building is consisting of multi stages. Those stages are including but not limited to; excavation stage, concrete skeleton stage, block work and plastering stage, curtain wall stage, MEP construction stage, interior finishing stage, exterior finishing stage, landscaping and landscaping stage and so on. Now, I bought a new building that its skeleton ONLY had been finished and still the rest of construction stages not developed until now. I am planning to develop that building to be a green building through applying green activities in construction and design phases. I want also to register the building under LEED for Core& Shell rating system v2009.

My question is regarding SSp1: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention. Can I achieve this prerequisite by implementing an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan starting from this stage until the end of construction phase? The current building situation as mentioned is simply a concrete skeleton consisted of two basements, ground and six typical floors.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes.

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Mario S. Oct 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 521 Thumbs Up

Dear Tristan,

How is it possible to document compliance with an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan in the above case given that the intent of this prerequisite is to avoid soil loss from the project site, which could be already done anyways?

Moreover, in such a case where a project has been registered beyond the excavation stage and well into the concrete stage, what would the ESC plan include then and what is the documentation required for compliance?

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SAMER ALHMDAN
Apr 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
52 Thumbs Up

Project In Dubai.

we have got a project in Dubai, the site witnesses very nominal rainfall in a year (average < 100 mm per year). since the storm water is not a major concern of CAPPP, and the primary objective is to control dust generated during construction activities, is it enough to erect Fencing and hoarding all around the site boundary which will mitigate dust generation, in addition to do the watering to main access roads within the site on daily basis.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 15 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Samer, please see the FAQ posted above here on LEEDuser,  "I have a technical question about a specific control measure and whether LEED requires it. What guidance is available?"

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Rob Flammang Corporate Development Manager Folsom Ready Mix
Mar 03 2014
Guest
12 Thumbs Up

Are there LEED Credits for AFV transporting materials to jobs?

I am not sure if this would fall under SSp1 or SSc4.3 but I am not seeing any provisions when it comes to the transportation of materials to a construction site. We are a Concrete Manufacturer/Supplier and we are looking into AFV for our fleet of Mixer Trucks and trying to see if there are any advantages delivering materials with a CNG Mixer Trucks when it comes to LEED projects. Any information we be greatly appreciated.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 03 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Rob, this would fall under SSp1, or possibly IEQc3.1. However, I don't think this is the kind of thing that would affect whether or not a LEED project earns this prerequisite. It's a good thing to reduce vehicle emissions, and it could be mentioned in a project's plan, but I don't think it's a difference-maker for LEED.

However, I would suggest you take a look at LEED's Clean Construction pilot credit. This might be where you could have an impact.

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Rob Flammang Corporate Development Manager, Folsom Ready Mix Mar 03 2014 Guest 12 Thumbs Up

Thank you Tristan. I appreciate the information. I will check out the CCPC.

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Richard Palmer Mr Salimus Consultancy JLT
Feb 19 2014
Guest
4 Thumbs Up

BMP Non Compliance and / or Removal of BMP Mid-project.

Please could someone advise as the best way to report the removal of a BMPBest Management Practice from the ESCP midway through the project? For example the initial site boundary has been brought in and now does not include BMP4a - Storm Water Inlets as they are now outside the site boundary. Do we need to revise and resubmit the entire ESCP, or can the client/site engineer/LEED consultant all 'sign off' BMP4a from the report - saying effectively that its ok that the BMP is 'decommissioned' from the ESCP as it is no longer required? Many Thanks in advance for any advice.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 03 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Richard, I would not overthink this. I think that having the engineer or appropriate person sign off on it with a note that it is no longer required would be fine from LEED's perspective.

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