NC-2009 SSp1: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention

  • NC_Schools_CS_SSp1-Type3-ConstructionPollutionPrev Diagram
  • Generally standard practice, anyway

    In general, complying with this prerequisite is standard practice in most urban and suburban areas, where most or all of the EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. (CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.) requirements have been adopted and implemented at the state or county level. Regulators at those levels often threaten heavy fines for not complying with CGP requirements, so most projects do so without the added incentive of the LEED prerequisite.

    Early on in project planning, compare your local code requirements to the CGP to determine which is more stringent. If your local code is more stringent, then you will meet the prerequisite just by following that. If it is less stringent, follow the CGP to achieve the prerequisite.

    Create an ESC plan

    The CGP extends compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters.) stormwater regulations to construction activities. It has three main categories that need to be addressed as you create an erosion and sedimentation control (ESC) plan:

    • Prevent the loss of topsoil during construction. Proper staging of earth-moving activities and the preservation of mature vegetation can aid in preventing topsoil loss and controlling stormwater pollutant discharge. Stabilization methods such as seeding, mulching, and the use of geo-textiles should also be included in your plan.  
    • Prevent the sedimentation of receiving streams. Your plan should outline the placement of planned structural control measures such as silt fences, drainage swales, and storm drain inlet protection. 
    • Prevent air pollution by particulate matter. Your plan should describe measures to prevent the tracking of soil onto paved surfaces off-site and the generation of dust from construction vehicles—for example, gravel skirts at drive entries and exits, transit ways for heavy vehicles, and wash stations for trucks.

    Simply put, your ESC plan implements good housekeeping on a site-wide basis, minimizing the impact of construction on local environmental resources and surrounding properties. 

    As written, the CGP applies to sites of one acre or larger. However, all projects pursuing LEED certification must meet the requirements of the CGP, regardless of size. 

    Often the civil engineer is responsible for creating the ESC plan, which is then implemented by the general contractor. Smaller projects may find the contractor is the one providing the plan, often one that is standard for their company.

    Documenting your plan

    The ESC plan may be submitted as documentation, in the form of a site plan or a narrative report. 

    Inlet protectionInlet protectionTo demonstrate that your ESC plan was implemented, your projects will also be required to provide one of the following: 

    • An inspection check list―signed, and dated periodically. 
    • Date-stamped photos of the following:  
    • measures to prevent topsoil loss including staging of earth-moving activities and stabilization techniques; 
    • measures to prevent sedimentation of nearby streams including structural controls and inlet protection;  
    • measures to prevent air pollution including tracking control at entrances and exits.
    • Description of corrective actions taken in response to problems with the performance of ESC measures.

    Zero lot lines

    Many urban projects have zero lot lines and, therefore, no associated “site.” If your project is like this, you are not exept from developing and implementing an ESC plan. However, strategies and BMPs will differ from those implemented on projects with site area. Inlet protection will still be required, even if storm drains are not immediately on site and within your LEED boundary. Tenting work areas and using temporary enclosures can prevent dust and airborne particulatesTotal suspended particulate matter found in the atmosphere as solid particles or liquid droplets. Chemical composition of particulates varies widely, depending on location and time of year. Sources of airborne particulates include: dust, emissions from industrial processes, combustion products from the burning of wood and coal, combustion products associated with motor vehicle or non-road engine exhausts, and reactions to gases in the atmosphere. (EPA) from leaving the project site. Vehicle tracking and concrete washout will also need to be addressed, and washout will likely have to be managed onsite somehow. Don't forget to include staging areas.

    Concrete washoutConcrete washoutDocument the plan with a narrative report explaining which CGP requirements don’t apply to your project conditions, which do, and how you plan to implement them.

    FAQs for SSp1

    Am I exempt from this prerequisite if I have a zero-lot-line building? What if the site work is minimal due to the scope? What about a renovation? What if the excavation and foundation work is minimal due to the construction materials I am using?

    No. You must always do an ESC plan according to the credit requirements. We have yet to hear of a project that didn't have some issues to address. See the above section titled "Zero lot lines."

    What are BMPs for steep slopes?

    BMPs for steep slopes should address soil retention, but not water retention. These could include silt fencing and straw wattles, hydro seeding and stabilized mulching, geotextiles and mats, and most importantly, preservation of natural vegetation.

    I have a technical question about a specific control measure and whether LEED requires it. What guidance is available?

    LEED does not offer specific requirements on ESC control measures, beyond the standards that it references, and the documentation requirements. LEEDuser recommends working with a civil engineer who understands the LEED and EPA requirements, and relying on the professional judgment of the engineer for specific technical questions. LEEDuser has not heard that LEED reviewers are deeply scrutinizing ESC plans and coming back with highly technical questions.

    Is there a preferred method for documentation?

    This prerequisite offers several options for documentation, including date-stamped photographs, a narrative describing the ESC plan implementation, or a builder declaration of periodic inspection and documentation of ESC implementation. You can rely on project specifics to choose the best option for you—LEED has no preference.

    What suffices as far as a date-stamped photo?

    Ideally, use your cameras to imprint a visible date on a corner of the image. Most cameras offer this option. Digital files also typically encode a date when the file was created, or encode that date in the file name, and while these methods aren't ideal, some project teams have reported success submitting this type of documentation.

    Can I still earn the prerequisite if the project started considering LEED after work began?

    As long as the project has been actively implementing an ESC plan during the current development of the project site, you should be okay. If that's not the case, then the outcome will depend on project specifics, and you will likely need official guidance from GBCI.

    LEEDuser has advised teams that in multi-phase projects, it's okay to focus documentation of the ESC plan only on the current phase, when LEED became part of the project scope. In general, if there is some question about whether controls were in place during the LEED project, you may not be able to earn the prerequisite.

    How do I know if my local code is more or less stringent than the EPA CGP?

    USGBC has not identified specific standards for judging this, or defined certain codes as compliant with the credit, or not. The stringency of other codes relative to EPA's Construction General Permit is judged on a case-by-case basis.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Review pages B-1 through B-4 of the EPA Construction General Permit (CGP) (see Resources) to determine if your state administers the CGP requirements for all projects. 


  • In regions where the EPA CGP is not standard practice, compare the local code with the CGP and make adjustments, if necessary, to include all the CGP requirements.


  • Meeting the requirements of this prerequisite is standard practice in many regions and, therefore, no- or low-cost for LEED. 


  • The materials cost to implement these measures is minimal and can potentially save money by preserving the vegetation and topsoil on-site. 


  • Conduct a site evaluation to assess opportunities for minimizing the alteration of the natural stormwater runoff patterns of your site and the disruption of mature vegetation, especially trees. This will save money and time in terms of earth-moving and replanting vegetation. 


  • Ask your civil engineer about soil types and what type of drainage you will have once the topsoil and vegetation are disturbed.

Schematic Design

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  • Establish who will create your ESC and stormwater pollution prevention plans. Usually, the civil engineer creates them, and the contractor is responsible for their onsite implementation. 


  • It is best to include your ESC plan in both project drawings and project specifications so that the intention of the plan is clearly communicated to the project team, especially contractors and subcontractors. 


  • Determine whether the 2003 EPA CGP or local erosion and sedimentation control standards are more stringent―and follow the more stringent standards. Often the state department of environmental protection or equivalent will have a written ruling on the comparison of the CGP standards and the local standards.  


  • A good first step to determine which is more stringent is to review your local code to be sure it contains at minimum the general categories contained in the CGP. If not, you’ll know that you need to follow the CGP. If so, you’ll need to review your local code in detail to be sure that all of the requirements are included. The general categories are as follows: 

    • allowable stormwater discharges
    • allowable non-stormwater discharges
    • limitations on coverage
    • a stormwater pollution prevention plan
    • releases in excess of reportable quantities
    • treatment of spills.

  • If local standards are equal to or more stringent than the CGP,you'll need to provide a narrative report detailing this. Write the narrative when you do the comparison, so that it's fresh in your mind.  

Design Development

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  • Create a draft ESC plan drawing or a narrative report that outlines how your project will comply with the requirements of the CGP or the local standard. See the Documentation Toolkit for samples.


  • Make sure that you use the same LEED project boundary as all other LEED credits your project is attempting (this is particularly relevant with other Sustainable Sites credits).


  • A project drawing should include anticipated stormwater flows and indicate the location and type of any planned ESC measures. 


  • All written ESC plans must include the following:

    • an introduction describing the standard being followed, existing site conditions, and responsible parties
    • a list of the temporary and permanent control measures that will prevent loss of topsoil, sedimentation of receiving streams and storm sewers, and air pollution by particulate matter
    • details of the plan for implementation and ongoing maintenance to prove implementation, including one of the following measures: 
      • A checklist or inspection report demonstrating implementation of your ESC plan and providing sample dates, inspection frequency, at least three equally spaced inspections over the project timeline, and a description of any corrective actions taken. (For LEED documentation, you need to upload this document and have the builder or general contractor sign the LEED Online credit form.)
      • Date-stamped photos of implementation and corrective actions, as applicable, including at least three photos from three different monthly inspections equally spaced over your project site's work timeline. (For LEED documentation, you need to upload these images, but there is no specific required signatory for this option.)
      • A narrative outlining the implementation and corrective action taken to effectively implement your ESC plan. (For LEED documentation, you provide the narrative itself; there is no required signatory for this option.) 

  • Determine which path your project will follow to demonstrate implementation compliance: inspection report, photos, or narrative report. 


  • Photos are likely the easiest way to demonstrate compliance, unless an inspection report has already been completed. 


  • Develop a site-wide, earth-moving schedule to minimize the impact on established vegetation and to stockpile topsoil and protect it from erosion. This can also complement your strategy to achieve SSc5.1: Site Development—Protect or Restore Habitat, by limiting site disturbance and maintaining native vegetation.  


  • Proper scheduling and staging of earth-moving activities can lower the costs associated with sediment and erosion controls.


  • Retain as much of the existing vegetation as possible, not only to lower costs for replacements, but also to decrease the cost of structural controls.


  • Careful implementation of the stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) by the contractor should inform the design and installation of stormwater management systems onsite. This will enable those systems to be integrated to the greatest extent possible during construction, preventing unexpected stormwater discharges into receiving waterways.  


  • If attempting one or both of the stormwater management credits SSc6.1 and SSc6.2 confirm with the contractor that the SWPPP accurately represents the hydrologic characteristics of the site and is performing as anticipated. Check on assumed infiltration rates, suspected rate and quantity of run-off to receiving streams, and discuss potential storage options. Make changes to the stormwater management system accordingly to improve its effectiveness and ensure that the credit calculations are accurate.

Construction Documents

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  • Review your ESC and stormwater pollution prevention plans to ensure adequate measures will be implemented to meet the CGP, or local requirements. A discussion between the contractor and the civil engineer on the schedule and implementation of planned measures should be part of this review. 


  • Finalize your ESC plan drawings or narrative report. Verify that your plan is in compliance with the CGP or local standards. 

Construction

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  • Review all ESC project drawings and construction specifications prior to construction activities. 


  • Verify that all ESC measures are in place before any construction activities begin. 


  • The general contractor implements the ESC plan until construction is completed and all disturbed areas have been stabilized. 


  • Have a representative from the general contractor’s office onsite daily to monitor and implement necessary measures laid out in your ESC plan.


  • The civil engineer, contractor, or a third party should inspect your ESC plan measures on a weekly basis (bi-weekly if inspections are also conducted after any weather event involving more than 0.5 inches of rain), and submit status reports on ESC plan implementation. These reports should include labeled and dated photographs, an inspection log, or a narrative report describing the performance of the measures implemented. 


  • Provide corrective actions immediately after any rain event.


  • Corrective actions can range from adjusting the placement of silt fencing and removing debris from stormwater catchment basins to replanting areas of temporary seeding and adding material to gravel skirts at entrances and exits.


  • Preserve existing vegetation, especially mature trees, whenever possible. This will decrease costs for temporary stabilization measures and erosion controls. In addition, the vegetation may also be used as part of your landscaping plan. 


  • After completion of all construction activities, document credit compliance in LEED Online by uploading these documents: 

    • A narrative that declares the standard followed (2003 EPA CGP or local). If you used a local standard, write a narrative report detailing how it is equal to or more stringent than the CPG (Phases I and II, NPDES program). 
    • A written ESC plan or project drawings showing the control measures used.
    • Proof of implementation with one of the following: an inspection report with the required signature, nine photos, or a narrative report.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Implement an ongoing stormwater system maintenance plan with the landscape manager. This should include a regular schedule for monitoring the performance of the stormwater management system and guidelines for repairing or modifying site features that are causing problems. These guidelines could include replacing or increasing vegetation, redirecting runoff, and increasing storage.   

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    SS Prerequisite 1: Construction activity pollution prevention

    Required

    Intent

    To reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation, and airborne dust.

    Requirements

    Create and implement an erosion and sedimentation control plan for all construction activities associated with the project. The plan must conform to the erosion and sedimentation requirements of the 2003 EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. OR local standards and codes, whichever is more stringent. The plan must describe the measures implemented to accomplish the following objectives:

    • To prevent loss of soil during construction by stormwater runoff and/or wind erosion, including protecting topsoil by stockpiling for reuse.
    • To prevent sedimentation of storm sewers or receiving streams.
    • To prevent pollution of the air with dust and particulate matter.

    The EPA’s construction general permit outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters.) program. While the permit only applies to construction sites greater than 1 acre, the requirements are applied to all projects for the purposes of this prerequisite. Information on the EPA construction general permit is available at http://cfpub.epa.gov/ npdes/stormwater/cgpEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program..cfm.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Create an erosion and sedimentation control plan during the design phase of the project. Consider employing strategies such as temporary and permanent seeding, mulching, earthen dikes, silt fencing, sediment traps and sediment basins.

Publications

EPA – Construction General Permit

Referenced Standard.


Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plans for Construction Activities

Resources here include Developing Your Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan: A Guide for Construction Sites, SWPPP Templates, Sample Inspection Form, Example SWPPPs, Key Resources, and Selected State BMPBest Management Practice/Guidance Manuals.


BMP Manual

BMPBest Management Practice Manual.

Organizations

International Erosion Control Association

Connect with worldwide member based erosion and sediment control community.


Certified Professional in Erosion and Sedimentation Control

Provides certification programs a list of qualified professionals. 

Technical Guides

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

A variety of Canadian resources on stormwater management and BMPs.

Photos

Take photos like these to document proper implementation of your ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan.

Erosion and Sedimentation Control Plan Drawings

Posted here are sample drawings for erosion and sedimentation control (ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation) plans from a LEED project.

LEED-NC Platinum Senior Housing Sample Documentation

Samples from this LEED Platinum project demonstrate how to document SSp1. This 8-story, 100-unit public senior housing development will use 50% less energy than a comparable code compliant building. Although on a tight urban site, the project also features innovative stormwater management plans, and a pilot graywaterGraywater is untreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater typically includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washer and laundry tubs, though definitions may vary. Some states and local authorities also allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. reuse system—all on a tight budget under a major urban housing authority.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms: (newest)

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

206 Comments

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer Lile Engineering LLC
Jul 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
1225 Thumbs Up

Dust control

What are the common measures used for dust control? SWPP plans I see around here always deal with soil erosion, but dust control is commonly ignored by inspectors and on most construction sites. We are in an area with about 30" rainfall per year.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

Lawrence, I typically use on site water trucks to wet down the disturbed areas as needed. Additionally, if wind is an issue, you should use tarps over any topsoil stockpiles.

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Jul 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 1225 Thumbs Up

We are trying to respond to a review comment on this project asking about dust control. About the only thing I am sure that was done, was to have a water cannon spraying down a concrete-framed structure as it was being torn down with track-hoes. Most of the site was graveled during the construction period, but there was no wetting of exposed soil or covering of piles with tarps. We do not live in an area with much in the way of wind, nor much problem with blowing dust (fighting mud is a normal and constant problem though), and I can't remember ever seeing a project around here in the Midwest in the last 30 years where any wetting of soil or covering of piles was ever done. This sounds like the kind of comment you'd get from a reviewer from dry California who'd never been to Flyover country! I am wondering if the whole prerequisite will be rejected if we can't respond to this review comment?

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Rustem Saitov
Jul 01 2014
Guest
6 Thumbs Up

Sandy soil

Could anyone kindly clarify the following issue:
I work with a project on construction of industrial plant. Prior to construction activities the topsoil was completely removed from the site leaving underlying soil layer exposed. Since this layer consists of sand only (a few tens of meters deep) and construction activities take place on 99.9% of the site area, I have at least 3 questions that I struggle to find answer to:
1. Stabilization of soil. Are there any measures that are relevant to this case?
2. Dust control. Sprinkling is adopted for the project to prevent erosion and air pollution. What more can be done?
3. Since an access to the construction site is provided by a 600m (away from paved road) stretch of gravel/dirt road, does it make any sense to minimize sediment track-out (as in art.2.1.2.3 EPA CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.)?
Thank you very much.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

1. Soils stabilization. Standard practice is to really only strip the topsoil far a few days worth of work. Typically 3. If the entire site is stripped, any areas to be open for longer than 3-4 days should be seeded and stabilized with hay at a rate of at least 1 ton per/acre, this will achieve approximately 87% less soil loss than an unprotected area. 2 tons will get you about 98.

2. On-site water is really the only thing you can do.

3. A construction entrance is typically larger d50 stone than ordinary gravel. A gravel drive is not going to be very effective.

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Amanda Johnson Penicaud Green Building
Jun 30 2014
Guest
92 Thumbs Up

Preliminary earthworks before project registration

Hello,
For complicated planning reasons on a large (probably Campus) project some preliminary earthmovement and demolition will take place soon, but the project is not yet registered. An ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan will be included with the bid-set and will be implemented during the work, as well as any waste tracking.
Is this going to be a problem?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 30 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Amanda, this is not a problem with regards to LEED. There is no requirement to have a LEED registration in place before project work begins. I would just recommend being aware of key prerequisites and documentation needs, as you seem to be.

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Razan Nejem Environmental Engineer, LEED AP BD+C
Jun 22 2014
Guest
304 Thumbs Up

ESC Plan for International projects

according to the prerequistes language the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan must conform to the construction general permitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. and the plan must describe the measures implemented to accomplish the following objectives:

To prevent loss of soil during construction
To prevent sedimentation of storm sewers or receiving streams.
To prevent pollution of the air with dust and particulate matter.

for international projects, do we have to comply with all requirements of the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. "including dewatering" or do we just write a plan describing BMPBest Management Practice for the above of measures?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 30 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Razan, note that the credit language calls for following the requirements of a CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. or local codes, whichever is more stringent. So, if dewatering is part of the CGP but not local code, I would not advise excluding it.

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Razan Nejem Environmental Engineer, LEED AP BD+C Jun 30 2014 Guest 304 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan,

Would reinjecting into a nearby water table be acceptable?
Would there be any water treatment requirments? According to CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. treatment must accur when mixing with storm water?

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Civil Engineer
Jun 17 2014
Guest
2 Thumbs Up

Implementation of ESC Plan

My question is in regard to the following requirement from SS Prereq 1: "Create and implement an erosion and sedimentation control plan…"

In particular I am interested in USGBC's interpretation of "implement".

I live in a rural area. Erosion and sedimentation control (ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation) is required by law but local construction practices are far from ideal and inspection and enforcement is very weak.

The following occurred on two recent projects:

1. Contractor was cited for minor violations of ESC plan by local inspector. Corrective action was taken by the contractor and no pollution occurred.

2. Contractor failed to install perimeter controls (silt fence, sock, etc) in one part of the site. Uncontrolled transport of sediment off site occurred during heavy (cut less than design storm) rain events. This was never noticed, cited or corrected by the inspector. It was only brought to my attention by a local citizen after completion of the project.

I am concerned how the above events might affect LEED certification on these two projects?

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jun 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

Minor violations occur on every project, so I don't feel that they would weigh negatively on a project.

But if we are talking about developing an E&S plan, then flat out ignoring it, and not putting it into practice ..... it is a pre-requisite, it must be done.

Now GBCI and USGBC do not have inspectors out on the job site, so proving the plan was never implemented would be tough, IMO. You could get into this with all the credits though, energy not performing as required, water savings not up to snuff, etc.

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SAMER ALHMDAN
Jun 01 2014
LEEDuser Member
17 Thumbs Up

Sediment Basin / Trap

Can we use the Infiltration Pond which is originally design for storm water collection during the operation phase of the project, can we use it as sediment trap during construction phase, noting that it is located outside the Project LEED boundary. we have a minimal average annual rainfall in dubai which is less than 100 MM.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jun 01 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

Using permanent Stormwater facilities as sed traps is a common component of the E&S plan provided appropriate measure are taken to preserve the infiltration capacity of the sub grade soils.

Proper sequencing and construction practices should be followed to ensure that the pond will function in the permanent condition as intended.

If this is outside your LEED boundary, is this basin already serving a Stormwater function for a built condition? If that is the case, then this approach may not be acceptable, but you should verify with your local agency that has jurisdiction over Stormwater discharges.

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SAMER ALHMDAN Jun 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 17 Thumbs Up

Hi Michael,

The Pond is outside the LEED boundary but still it is within the Landlord plot limits.

The client has got a big plot and the intention is to have future extensions or phases.

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Michael Hoffner
May 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
4 Thumbs Up

Can a Graded Pad Site Meet SSp1?

Our client has purchased a graded pad site from a developer and wants to build a LEED certified project. So can we still meet the prerequisite by following the instructions for erosion control plan, etc. or are we on the hook for whatever the developer did before our client takes official possession of the site. Thank you for your help.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates May 15 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

Michael, is there an approved E&S Plan in place for the work that has already been completed?

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Michael Hoffner May 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 4 Thumbs Up

Not sure. I will find out what they did and reply.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 15 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

See the FAQ above, "Can I still earn the prerequisite if the project started considering LEED after work began?" (You'll have to sign on as a member, which you can do with a free trial at the top of the page.)

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Michael Hoffner May 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 4 Thumbs Up

OK, thanks. I've subscribed and read the FAQ. We have not begun work, but the speculative developer who is selling the site to my client had already graded the pad site before offering for sale. Are we responsible for his actions having chosen this site, or are we allowed to start with what we've inherited and begin E&S/documentation at this time?

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates May 15 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

Michael, did he grade the site under an approved E&S permit? Is this in the USA?

What I am getting at here, if the seller was on the up and up, and in the USA, his earthmoving activities should be covered under an existing permit (unless we are talking about a very small site?), or he ignored all the rules, in which case I'd hate to see this held against a new owner, but i'd defer to GBCI with your specifics if that is the case.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 15 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

As Michael indicates, I would do some due diligence in finding out what permits and plans the seller was working under. If these are LEED-compliant, that's ideal. If not, my opinion is that it wouldn't be held against you, as a different owner commencing the LEED project.

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JP Rout
May 07 2014
Guest
488 Thumbs Up

Maintenance Plan for ESC

Is maintenance plan a mandatory requirement under ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation and what should be its content?
Kindly share if any sample is available. Thanks in advance.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates May 07 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

Define "maintenance plan" please.

Maintenance of the E&S BMPs? Such as clean sediment from sed traps when you reach the cleanout mark, replace failed silt fencing, maintain tree protection zones, wash roadways of any transported sediment, etc ?

Yes, these are common features of an E&S Plan, and should be included in your calculations, sequencing, and narrative.

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Hazem Yusuf Mechanical Team Leader Engineering Solutions Flow
May 04 2014
Guest
2 Thumbs Up

In which construction phase can I certify my building?

Construction phase of an office building is consisting of multi stages. Those stages are including but not limited to; excavation stage, concrete skeleton stage, block work and plastering stage, curtain wall stage, MEP construction stage, interior finishing stage, exterior finishing stage, landscaping and landscaping stage and so on. Now, I bought a new building that its skeleton ONLY had been finished and still the rest of construction stages not developed until now. I am planning to develop that building to be a green building through applying green activities in construction and design phases. I want also to register the building under LEED for Core& Shell rating system v2009.

My question is regarding SSp1: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention. Can I achieve this prerequisite by implementing an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan starting from this stage until the end of construction phase? The current building situation as mentioned is simply a concrete skeleton consisted of two basements, ground and six typical floors.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes.

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SAMER ALHMDAN
Apr 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
17 Thumbs Up

Project In Dubai.

we have got a project in Dubai, the site witnesses very nominal rainfall in a year (average < 100 mm per year). since the storm water is not a major concern of CAPPP, and the primary objective is to control dust generated during construction activities, is it enough to erect Fencing and hoarding all around the site boundary which will mitigate dust generation, in addition to do the watering to main access roads within the site on daily basis.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 15 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Samer, please see the FAQ posted above here on LEEDuser,  "I have a technical question about a specific control measure and whether LEED requires it. What guidance is available?"

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Rob Flammang Corporate Development Manager Folsom Ready Mix
Mar 03 2014
Guest
9 Thumbs Up

Are there LEED Credits for AFV transporting materials to jobs?

I am not sure if this would fall under SSp1 or SSc4.3 but I am not seeing any provisions when it comes to the transportation of materials to a construction site. We are a Concrete Manufacturer/Supplier and we are looking into AFV for our fleet of Mixer Trucks and trying to see if there are any advantages delivering materials with a CNG Mixer Trucks when it comes to LEED projects. Any information we be greatly appreciated.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 03 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Rob, this would fall under SSp1, or possibly IEQc3.1. However, I don't think this is the kind of thing that would affect whether or not a LEED project earns this prerequisite. It's a good thing to reduce vehicle emissions, and it could be mentioned in a project's plan, but I don't think it's a difference-maker for LEED.

However, I would suggest you take a look at LEED's Clean Construction pilot credit. This might be where you could have an impact.

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Rob Flammang Corporate Development Manager, Folsom Ready Mix Mar 03 2014 Guest 9 Thumbs Up

Thank you Tristan. I appreciate the information. I will check out the CCPC.

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Richard Palmer Mr Salimus Consultancy JLT
Feb 19 2014
Guest
3 Thumbs Up

BMP Non Compliance and / or Removal of BMP Mid-project.

Please could someone advise as the best way to report the removal of a BMPBest Management Practice from the ESCP midway through the project? For example the initial site boundary has been brought in and now does not include BMP4a - Storm Water Inlets as they are now outside the site boundary. Do we need to revise and resubmit the entire ESCP, or can the client/site engineer/LEED consultant all 'sign off' BMP4a from the report - saying effectively that its ok that the BMP is 'decommissioned' from the ESCP as it is no longer required? Many Thanks in advance for any advice.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 03 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Richard, I would not overthink this. I think that having the engineer or appropriate person sign off on it with a note that it is no longer required would be fine from LEED's perspective.

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H.K.C.B. Heendeniya Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
Nov 27 2013
Guest
82 Thumbs Up

SSp1 ESC plan implementation narrative

Dear community,

I'm struggling with writing the narrative for implementation of ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan. My main problem is that I'm not sure what level of details are expected. I think it will be very helpful if one of you guys who has submitted this narrative before can share with me what are the main topics (headings and sub headings) that you covered in the narrative and what specific details, diagrams and/ or calculations that you provided.

I'm not even sure if we have to provide calculations in the narrative. If it is not a problem with you please share a sample narrative (my email: buddih09@live.com).

Thanks a lot!

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Nov 27 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

A proper Erosion and Sedimentation Control Plan protects the site from accelerated erosion, and protects the receiving watershed from pollution resulting from construction activities.

An appropriate plan should/could include design and calculations for all E&S BMPs: sed basins, traps, diversion swales, seeding, sequence of construction, etc.

This isn't something that you just "wing."

I recommend that you consult with a CE or CPESC with experience in preparing the plan and narrative.

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Jhoan Montano QC Manager, Enviro-Q, llc Nov 28 2013 Guest 60 Thumbs Up

LEED requires that you “Create and implement an erosion and sedimentation control plan…The plan must conform to the erosion and sedimentation requirements of the 2003 EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. OR local standards and codes, whichever is more stringent”.
This means that, at a minimum, you must develop a ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation, a "SWPPP", per EPA’s NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. General Permit. SWPPP contents are listed in Part 5. See the link below:

http://www.epa.gov/npdes/pubs/cgp2003_entirepermit.pdf

You must check the State requirements, since many States have been granted the authority to issue individual permits (e.g. New York’s “SPDES” General Permit – an NPDES approved state program). Depending on the jurisdiction, the SPDES could be “more stringent” and therefore, take precedence when preparing the SWPPP.

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant Taitem Engineering
Nov 25 2013
LEEDuser Member
900 Thumbs Up

Drawings

Is it acceptable to just upload a drawing with the erosion and sedimentation control measures or is it required to have an actual ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan as well?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Nov 25 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13682 Thumbs Up

In my experience they also want to see a written ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan that the contractor is following.

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FABIO VIERO Head of Sustainability Manens-Tifs s.p.a.
Oct 23 2013
LEEDuser Member
403 Thumbs Up

Archaeological finds

We are looking for other LEED experiences regarding an unexpected discovered archaeological finds during the excavation inside the and how we can treat this argument for SSP1.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 23 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Fabio, I would suggest that this is not an issue that LEED has any specific guidance on. LEED requires you to follow an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan, which addresses erosion issues, but not cultural factors. As long as you are following laws or codes in the relevant jurisdiction, I don't think it's a factor in LEED.

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John Covello LEED and Sustainability Manager Development Management Group
Oct 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
339 Thumbs Up

Excessive storm rainwater runoff

Hello,

I have a question regarding silt and run off. Our project is located in Phuket Thailand. Our project is planning to have a series of retention ponds and bioswales to collect rain water runoff.
The project is located on a beach on the Andaman Sea. We have a monsoon season for 6 months of the year. The storms though have occasionally hit with great intensity in the last few years. We are looking at a system design for a 10 year and 50 year storm. It is possible though the system may be overwhelmed by the rain and some silt may run into the sea. Does that disqualify us for this credit? How does the prerequisite address an occurrence such as this?

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Oct 11 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

The primary component of an erosion and sediment control plan is providing a means to prevent the discharge of pollution from construction activities.

This pre-req applies to the construction phase of your project. Not the built environment. If there is a monsoon season, an appropriate E&S plan should take into account the expected stormwater runoff, and a means to capture this during the construction phase that allows the sediment to filter/settle out....you need a sediment basin or sediment trap in your design, then once your site is stabilized, they get converted to the permanant stormwater BMPBest Management Practice.

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Jatuwat Varodompun Dr Green Building Soultion
Sep 16 2013
LEEDuser Member
1087 Thumbs Up

Air with dust particulate matter

If my site provide the truck wheel washing and inspection plan for this activity, will it be qualify as a measure for reducing Air with dust particulate matter?

I just got the comment to provide the clear evidence of prevention of polluting the air with dust and particulate matter. Will this truck wheel wasing comply with this comment?

thanks

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Sep 16 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

Wheel washing does not control dust erosion. You need to come up with a watering shcedule, use tarps over stockpile areas to prevent wind uptake, etc.

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Jatuwat Varodompun Dr, Green Building Soultion Sep 16 2013 LEEDuser Member 1087 Thumbs Up

So, if i have the watering schedule around the site area twice a day, will this be qualified without tarps (too expensive)?

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Sep 16 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

I am not familiar with your climate, as this will dictate the watering schedule.

I would go with some form of language on the plan that states access to/from the site will be through the construction entrance, and the site will be kept free from dust by the use of on-site watering trucks on an as needed basis, or as required by the local conservation district (or similar agency in your jurisdiction).

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KC Rat ESG
Sep 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
399 Thumbs Up

Sign board at construction site entrance

Hi,
We intend to erect a sign board at the construction site entrance. "THIS IS A LEED SITE". Is this against the USGBC guidelines? Some colleagues say since it does not say that this is a LEED certified site, there wouldn't be any issues.

Thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

KC, there are LEED policy documents which address legal and trademark points like this. Without referencing them, I would recommend not using such signage. Although it doesn't say that it is LEED certified, it's not clear what it does intend to say or mean. Someone unfamiliar with LEED (i.e. most of the general public) could easily assume that the site was certified or had some LEED imprimateur, when in fact it is at this point probably no more than registered and pursuing various credits.

Again, I didn't review the LEED policies before posting this, but I would think that language such as "XYZ project is attempting LEED Gold certification" or "A LEED-registered project" or "We're going for LEED—we need your help!" would be more accurate and reflective of a message appropriate for this stage in the work.

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Mallory Schaus Energy Engineer, Primera Engineers Dec 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 13 Thumbs Up

KC,

See the link below for official policy, page 25 covers registered projects:
http://www.usgbc.org/Docs/Archive/General/Docs3885.pdf

You CAN say, for example, "This project is registered under the LEED®
green building certification program." But not "this is a LEED project."

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Josep Escarra Energy consultant ERF, Estudi Ramon Folch i Associats
Sep 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
120 Thumbs Up

ESC plan language

Hello everybody.
Can we submitt in LEED Online our ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation Plan in other language different than English? for example in Spanish?
Thank you!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

There is guidance about this somewhere... I can't remember where. Basically you need to translate to English any documentation that is essential to a reviewer seeing that you've met LEED requirements. In the case of an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan, I'm not sure where that falls. You might contact GBCI for clarification. Let us know what you learn.

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Tim Skinner via Greengrade LEED Management Software
Aug 12 2013
Guest
360 Thumbs Up

Submittal requirements

Once we have this category addressed can we submit this category only or do we have to submit all categories at one time?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 25 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Tim, you can submit all your prerequisites and credits at once ("combined" submittal), or split them into Design and Construction submittals. To know which credits are eligible for the earlier design submittal, we have that information in our Documentation Toolkit.

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Juan Robles Senior Architect, AIA, LEED AP BD+C RoblesArq Architecture and Planning
Jul 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
179 Thumbs Up

Vehicle tracking control dirt road

We are working on a project in Costa Rica where the access road is a dirt road. We are using a vehicle tracking control as part of oue ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan during the construction process, however all internal streets inside the project will be dirt roads. Were are planning to build open grid pavement streets for the project operation. Do we really need to use a vehicle tracking control wile both roads are dirt roads?

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jul 12 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

So the access road to the project site is a dirt road, correct? VTOs are used for construction entrances that intersect with a paved roadway to prohibit sediment from being tracking onto the paved roadway. I see no need to provide a VTO (if I understand your project correctly), but just make sure this is spelled out on your E&S Plan and narrative.

This is not to say that you shouldn't employ other appropriate conservation measures, you will probably dealing with a lot of dust. I would have a decent wet-down schedule in place.

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Rick Alfandre Principal Alfandre Architecture
Jun 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
250 Thumbs Up

Minimize Sediment Track Out question...

We have a construction site with an existing 40 ft asphalt driveway & entry/exit, which we will be using as our only construction entry point. Would an existing asphalt driveway qualify as legitimate sediment tracking solution, or will we need to provide crushed gravel/filter fabric or tracking mats?

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jun 04 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

I've never seen this approach fly, unless you can make the argument that there will never be contact with disturbed soil.

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Sandra Ehle Project Architect BBS Architects, Landscape Architects, Engineer. P.C.
Apr 26 2013
Guest
17 Thumbs Up

Site Boundary, SWPPP and Erosion Control

My firm has built an Athletic Field house for a local school district. SWPPP and ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plans were created and followed accordingly. Now here is where it gets complicated. The whole parcel of land (school building, parking lot and adjacent fields) prior to any demolition or construction was subdivided and all but 3.2 of the 8 acres was sold to the Town. Our LEED site is only our proposed building and a little bit of the surrounding grass areas on the 3.2 acres( this is documented in a separate drawing being uploaded for the credit). The Town has developed the rest of the parcel with athletic fields, a playground, parking (including parking on the school owned portion of the parcel)and a small maintenance building also housing small toilet rooms. The Town funded and built all of this including the parking lot for our LEED building since the parking lot served their portion of the parcel as well. The Town funded the design of the SWPP/ESC for the entire parcel of land including our LEED building. Therefore, all of the SWPPP/ESC plans are for the entire parcel of land not just our LEED site. Since there was an existing building on the Town's portion of the parcel there were several stages of SWPPP/ESC plans designed and implemented to suit which phase of demolition/construction was going on at that point in time. All calculations are also done for the parcel of land as a whole not just our LEED portion. My questions are as follows:

1. Can the SWPPP/ESC plans be submitted as they are with the whole parcel of land on them? Can it be as simple as just highlighting our LEED site area on their SWPPP/ESC plans but, leaving the whole document in tact otherwise?

2. If question #1 if the asnwer is yes they can be submitted as a whole parcel of land then for credit SS6.1 should we be entering water runoff calculations for just our LEED site (which contains no drainage wells etc. since the parking lot is not included in the site) or the site as a whole including the Towns portion?

Note: The Town did not fund any kind of LEED certification for their portion of the site. Only the school district is trying to achieve LEED certification for their building.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jun 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2426 Thumbs Up

I would submit the E&S plan, as approved by your local Conservation District. For question #2, if your stormwater facilities for your project are located on a campus, but not necessarily on your site, submit the campus-wide calcs. This was in a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide at some point, I believe Amy references this in a post on the 6.1 forum.

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Member 1225 Thumbs Up

I got a rejection from the LEED reviewer for a similar problem. Our SWPP plan covered an entire city block with three different construction projects. The LEED Reviewer rejected that plan, saying it did not cover the actual LEED project (although it did show all of the erosion controls required on the LEED project!) We are going back to the Civil Engineer and asking for a drawing that just shows the LEED boundary and all erosion control measures required within that boundary only. It won't require anything different than the drawing the LEED reviewer already saw. I would try to obtain an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation or SWPP plan that just shows the area within your LEED boundary.

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Janna Nash
Apr 08 2013
LEEDuser Member
523 Thumbs Up

Compressed Natural Gas Excavation Equipment

Can anyone tell me if there is a LEED NC credit that would "reward" a project for using Compressed Natural Gas in excavation and other construction equipment? I can not decide what this might fall under other than this pre-requisite and I'm not sure it even helps here. Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 08 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Janna, I don't think this is relevant in helping you earn SSp1, although it doesn't hurt. I don't see another credit where it's relevant. However, you should check out the new pilot credit on clean construction, which you could use for an innovation point.

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Janna Nash Apr 08 2013 LEEDuser Member 523 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan. PC 75 Clean Construction exactly addresses what the project wants to do. Looks more like requires writing a plan instead of actual tracking, though. It says to submit number of hours used (if available). *(no comments under LEEDuser PC 75 yet, so I may need to start a thread there.)

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BABAR MEHMOOD SAUD CONSULT
Mar 19 2013
Guest
361 Thumbs Up

EPA guidelines applicable to KSA

We are working on a project in city riyadh of Saudi Arabia.There are no local codes available for the site. Further more i checked the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. guide lines its not mention anywhree if i can use the guide line of CGP for KSA. Please guide me which codes do we use.
Also, if we can use the CGP guidelines, for the implementation we only have to comply with the Sec 2 .
Thanks.

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Bazeeth Ahamed K M Green Building Academy Mar 19 2013 Guest 36 Thumbs Up

I came across CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for a project in Giza, Egypt where ruling says it is acceptable to limit the construction pollution prevention plan to best practices in dust control and wind erosion. Any how the precipitation in Doha is almost twice that Giza. So you need to calculate if there are potential runoff from the site and work out of the plan accordingly

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Eyad Haj Husein LEED Green Associate Alhamad Engineering
Feb 25 2013
Guest
22 Thumbs Up

Alternative for ESC plan in hot climate zones (Outside the US)

We're applying for LEED for New Construction in Doha, Qatar.
The question is: where can I find information about the alternative of ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan? since the rain in this zone -hot zone- is not a concern at all.
Is there any alternative path? Any similar cases? any Ideas?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 25 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Eyad, I would recommend starting with LEEDuser's guidance above (you'll need to log in as a paid member to view this content). Your specific question isn't answered, but after reading the guidance there and samples in the Documentation Toolkit, you'll have a deeper understanding of how to earn this prerequisites in non-U.S., non-conventional situations.

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Bazeeth Ahamed K M Green Building Academy Mar 19 2013 Guest 36 Thumbs Up

Dear Babar & Mehmood

I came across CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for a project in Giza, Egypt where ruling says it is acceptable to limit the construction pollution prevention plan to best practices in dust control and wind erosion. Any how the precipitation in Doha is almost twice that Giza. So you need to calculate if there are potential runoff from the site and work out of the plan accordingly

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BABAR MEHMOOD SAUD CONSULT Apr 22 2013 Guest 361 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the info Bazeeth. The averagre rain fall in giza is about 27 or 28mm approx. in August max and min is approx. 2 or 3 mm and all over the year average rain fall is approx. 6 mm (0-25mm) while in Riyadh the average rain fall all over the year goes to 9mm. In Case of Doha, the average rainfall throughout the year is apprxo. 78 mm ( 3mm-78mm). So, the average rain fall is 3 times the Doah's one. This means we dont have to care about the rainfall problem since it's very minimal in riyadh. Only have to do some soil stabilization solutions, i think. Need your advice. And one more thing. We will still use the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. guidelines or we are going to use the CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for this case. Thanks,
Regards,
Babar

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Ameet AA
Feb 13 2013
LEEDuser Member
1126 Thumbs Up

Topsoil

Could anyone please advise, whether the project would fail to achieve the SSp1: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention, if approx. 10,000m3 of topsoil is removed off the site and replaced it by new topsoil (Purchased from other site and more nutrients for plants).

Or any other credit that may have impact due to replacement of topsoil?
I referred to below requirement which highlights on protection of topsoil for reuse but does not give any details in terms of above mentioned strategy.

"Prerequisite 1: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention
To prevent loss of soil during construction by stormwater runoff and/or wind erosion, including protecting topsoil by stockpiling for reuse"
Thanks & Regards

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