NC-2009 SSp1: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention

  • NC_Schools_CS_SSp1-Type3-ConstructionPollutionPrev Diagram
  • Generally standard practice, anyway

    In general, complying with this prerequisite is standard practice in most urban and suburban areas, where most or all of the EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. (CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.) requirements have been adopted and implemented at the state or county level. Regulators at those levels often threaten heavy fines for not complying with CGP requirements, so most projects do so without the added incentive of the LEED prerequisite.

    Early on in project planning, compare your local code requirements to the CGP to determine which is more stringent. If your local code is more stringent, then you will meet the prerequisite just by following that. If it is less stringent, follow the CGP to achieve the prerequisite.

    Create an ESC plan

    The CGP extends compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters.) stormwater regulations to construction activities. It has three main categories that need to be addressed as you create an erosion and sedimentation control (ESC) plan:

    • Prevent the loss of topsoil during construction. Proper staging of earth-moving activities and the preservation of mature vegetation can aid in preventing topsoil loss and controlling stormwater pollutant discharge. Stabilization methods such as seeding, mulching, and the use of geo-textiles should also be included in your plan.  
    • Prevent the sedimentation of receiving streams. Your plan should outline the placement of planned structural control measures such as silt fences, drainage swales, and storm drain inlet protection. 
    • Prevent air pollution by particulate matter. Your plan should describe measures to prevent the tracking of soil onto paved surfaces off-site and the generation of dust from construction vehicles—for example, gravel skirts at drive entries and exits, transit ways for heavy vehicles, and wash stations for trucks.

    Simply put, your ESC plan implements good housekeeping on a site-wide basis, minimizing the impact of construction on local environmental resources and surrounding properties. 

    As written, the CGP applies to sites of one acre or larger. However, all projects pursuing LEED certification must meet the requirements of the CGP, regardless of size. 

    Often the civil engineer is responsible for creating the ESC plan, which is then implemented by the general contractor. Smaller projects may find the contractor is the one providing the plan, often one that is standard for their company.

    Documenting your plan

    The ESC plan may be submitted as documentation, in the form of a site plan or a narrative report. 

    Inlet protectionInlet protectionTo demonstrate that your ESC plan was implemented, your projects will also be required to provide one of the following: 

    • An inspection check list―signed, and dated periodically. 
    • Date-stamped photos of the following:  
    • measures to prevent topsoil loss including staging of earth-moving activities and stabilization techniques; 
    • measures to prevent sedimentation of nearby streams including structural controls and inlet protection;  
    • measures to prevent air pollution including tracking control at entrances and exits.
    • Description of corrective actions taken in response to problems with the performance of ESC measures.

    Zero lot lines

    Many urban projects have zero lot lines and, therefore, no associated “site.” If your project is like this, you are not exept from developing and implementing an ESC plan. However, strategies and BMPs will differ from those implemented on projects with site area. Inlet protection will still be required, even if storm drains are not immediately on site and within your LEED boundary. Tenting work areas and using temporary enclosures can prevent dust and airborne particulatesTotal suspended particulate matter found in the atmosphere as solid particles or liquid droplets. Chemical composition of particulates varies widely, depending on location and time of year. Sources of airborne particulates include: dust, emissions from industrial processes, combustion products from the burning of wood and coal, combustion products associated with motor vehicle or non-road engine exhausts, and reactions to gases in the atmosphere. (EPA) from leaving the project site. Vehicle tracking and concrete washout will also need to be addressed, and washout will likely have to be managed onsite somehow. Don't forget to include staging areas.

    Concrete washoutConcrete washoutDocument the plan with a narrative report explaining which CGP requirements don’t apply to your project conditions, which do, and how you plan to implement them.

    FAQs for SSp1

    Am I exempt from this prerequisite if I have a zero-lot-line building? What if the site work is minimal due to the scope? What about a renovation? What if the excavation and foundation work is minimal due to the construction materials I am using?

    No. You must always do an ESC plan according to the credit requirements. We have yet to hear of a project that didn't have some issues to address. See the above section titled "Zero lot lines."

    What are BMPs for steep slopes?

    BMPs for steep slopes should address soil retention, but not water retention. These could include silt fencing and straw wattles, hydro seeding and stabilized mulching, geotextiles and mats, and most importantly, preservation of natural vegetation.

    I have a technical question about a specific control measure and whether LEED requires it. What guidance is available?

    LEED does not offer specific requirements on ESC control measures, beyond the standards that it references, and the documentation requirements. LEEDuser recommends working with a civil engineer who understands the LEED and EPA requirements, and relying on the professional judgment of the engineer for specific technical questions. LEEDuser has not heard that LEED reviewers are deeply scrutinizing ESC plans and coming back with highly technical questions.

    Is there a preferred method for documentation?

    This prerequisite offers several options for documentation, including date-stamped photographs, a narrative describing the ESC plan implementation, or a builder declaration of periodic inspection and documentation of ESC implementation. You can rely on project specifics to choose the best option for you—LEED has no preference.

    What suffices as far as a date-stamped photo?

    Ideally, use your cameras to imprint a visible date on a corner of the image. Most cameras offer this option. Digital files also typically encode a date when the file was created, or encode that date in the file name, and while these methods aren't ideal, some project teams have reported success submitting this type of documentation.

    Can I still earn the prerequisite if the project started considering LEED after work began?

    As long as the project has been actively implementing an ESC plan during the current development of the project site, you should be okay. If that's not the case, then the outcome will depend on project specifics, and you will likely need official guidance from GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)..

    LEEDuser has advised teams that in multi-phase projects, it's okay to focus documentation of the ESC plan only on the current phase, when LEED became part of the project scope. In general, if there is some question about whether controls were in place during the LEED project, you may not be able to earn the prerequisite.

    How do I know if my local code is more or less stringent than the EPA CGP?

    USGBC has not identified specific standards for judging this, or defined certain codes as compliant with the credit, or not. The stringency of other codes relative to EPA's Construction General Permit is judged on a case-by-case basis.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Review pages B-1 through B-4 of the EPA Construction General Permit (CGP) (see Resources) to determine if your state administers the CGP requirements for all projects. 


  • In regions where the EPA CGP is not standard practice, compare the local code with the CGP and make adjustments, if necessary, to include all the CGP requirements.


  • Meeting the requirements of this prerequisite is standard practice in many regions and, therefore, no- or low-cost for LEED. 


  • The materials cost to implement these measures is minimal and can potentially save money by preserving the vegetation and topsoil on-site. 


  • Conduct a site evaluation to assess opportunities for minimizing the alteration of the natural stormwater runoff patterns of your site and the disruption of mature vegetation, especially trees. This will save money and time in terms of earth-moving and replanting vegetation. 


  • Ask your civil engineer about soil types and what type of drainage you will have once the topsoil and vegetation are disturbed.

Schematic Design

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  • Establish who will create your ESC and stormwater pollution prevention plans. Usually, the civil engineer creates them, and the contractor is responsible for their onsite implementation. 


  • It is best to include your ESC plan in both project drawings and project specifications so that the intention of the plan is clearly communicated to the project team, especially contractors and subcontractors. 


  • Determine whether the 2003 EPA CGP or local erosion and sedimentation control standards are more stringent―and follow the more stringent standards. Often the state department of environmental protection or equivalent will have a written ruling on the comparison of the CGP standards and the local standards.  


  • A good first step to determine which is more stringent is to review your local code to be sure it contains at minimum the general categories contained in the CGP. If not, you’ll know that you need to follow the CGP. If so, you’ll need to review your local code in detail to be sure that all of the requirements are included. The general categories are as follows: 

    • allowable stormwater discharges
    • allowable non-stormwater discharges
    • limitations on coverage
    • a stormwater pollution prevention plan
    • releases in excess of reportable quantities
    • treatment of spills.

  • If local standards are equal to or more stringent than the CGP,you'll need to provide a narrative report detailing this. Write the narrative when you do the comparison, so that it's fresh in your mind.  

Design Development

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  • Create a draft ESC plan drawing or a narrative report that outlines how your project will comply with the requirements of the CGP or the local standard. See the Documentation Toolkit for samples.


  • Make sure that you use the same LEED project boundary as all other LEED credits your project is attempting (this is particularly relevant with other Sustainable Sites credits).


  • A project drawing should include anticipated stormwater flows and indicate the location and type of any planned ESC measures. 


  • All written ESC plans must include the following:

    • an introduction describing the standard being followed, existing site conditions, and responsible parties
    • a list of the temporary and permanent control measures that will prevent loss of topsoil, sedimentation of receiving streams and storm sewers, and air pollution by particulate matter
    • details of the plan for implementation and ongoing maintenance to prove implementation, including one of the following measures: 
      • A checklist or inspection report demonstrating implementation of your ESC plan and providing sample dates, inspection frequency, at least three equally spaced inspections over the project timeline, and a description of any corrective actions taken. (For LEED documentation, you need to upload this document and have the builder or general contractor sign the LEED Online credit form.)
      • Date-stamped photos of implementation and corrective actions, as applicable, including at least three photos from three different monthly inspections equally spaced over your project site's work timeline. (For LEED documentation, you need to upload these images, but there is no specific required signatory for this option.)
      • A narrative outlining the implementation and corrective action taken to effectively implement your ESC plan. (For LEED documentation, you provide the narrative itself; there is no required signatory for this option.) 

  • Determine which path your project will follow to demonstrate implementation compliance: inspection report, photos, or narrative report. 


  • Photos are likely the easiest way to demonstrate compliance, unless an inspection report has already been completed. 


  • Develop a site-wide, earth-moving schedule to minimize the impact on established vegetation and to stockpile topsoil and protect it from erosion. This can also complement your strategy to achieve SSc5.1: Site Development—Protect or Restore Habitat, by limiting site disturbance and maintaining native vegetation.  


  • Proper scheduling and staging of earth-moving activities can lower the costs associated with sediment and erosion controls.


  • Retain as much of the existing vegetation as possible, not only to lower costs for replacements, but also to decrease the cost of structural controls.


  • Careful implementation of the stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) by the contractor should inform the design and installation of stormwater management systems onsite. This will enable those systems to be integrated to the greatest extent possible during construction, preventing unexpected stormwater discharges into receiving waterways.  


  • If attempting one or both of the stormwater management credits SSc6.1 and SSc6.2 confirm with the contractor that the SWPPP accurately represents the hydrologic characteristics of the site and is performing as anticipated. Check on assumed infiltration rates, suspected rate and quantity of run-off to receiving streams, and discuss potential storage options. Make changes to the stormwater management system accordingly to improve its effectiveness and ensure that the credit calculations are accurate.

Construction Documents

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  • Review your ESC and stormwater pollution prevention plans to ensure adequate measures will be implemented to meet the CGP, or local requirements. A discussion between the contractor and the civil engineer on the schedule and implementation of planned measures should be part of this review. 


  • Finalize your ESC plan drawings or narrative report. Verify that your plan is in compliance with the CGP or local standards. 

Construction

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  • Review all ESC project drawings and construction specifications prior to construction activities. 


  • Verify that all ESC measures are in place before any construction activities begin. 


  • The general contractor implements the ESC plan until construction is completed and all disturbed areas have been stabilized. 


  • Have a representative from the general contractor’s office onsite daily to monitor and implement necessary measures laid out in your ESC plan.


  • The civil engineer, contractor, or a third party should inspect your ESC plan measures on a weekly basis (bi-weekly if inspections are also conducted after any weather event involving more than 0.5 inches of rain), and submit status reports on ESC plan implementation. These reports should include labeled and dated photographs, an inspection log, or a narrative report describing the performance of the measures implemented. 


  • Provide corrective actions immediately after any rain event.


  • Corrective actions can range from adjusting the placement of silt fencing and removing debris from stormwater catchment basins to replanting areas of temporary seeding and adding material to gravel skirts at entrances and exits.


  • Preserve existing vegetation, especially mature trees, whenever possible. This will decrease costs for temporary stabilization measures and erosion controls. In addition, the vegetation may also be used as part of your landscaping plan. 


  • After completion of all construction activities, document credit compliance in LEED Online by uploading these documents: 

    • A narrative that declares the standard followed (2003 EPA CGP or local). If you used a local standard, write a narrative report detailing how it is equal to or more stringent than the CPG (Phases I and II, NPDES program). 
    • A written ESC plan or project drawings showing the control measures used.
    • Proof of implementation with one of the following: an inspection report with the required signature, nine photos, or a narrative report.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Implement an ongoing stormwater system maintenance plan with the landscape manager. This should include a regular schedule for monitoring the performance of the stormwater management system and guidelines for repairing or modifying site features that are causing problems. These guidelines could include replacing or increasing vegetation, redirecting runoff, and increasing storage.   

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    SS Prerequisite 1: Construction activity pollution prevention

    Required

    Intent

    To reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation, and airborne dust.

    Requirements

    Create and implement an erosion and sedimentation control plan for all construction activities associated with the project. The plan must conform to the erosion and sedimentation requirements of the 2003 EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. OR local standards and codes, whichever is more stringent. [India ACP: E&S Plan]. The plan must describe the measures implemented to accomplish the following objectives:

    • To prevent loss of soil during construction by stormwater runoff and/or wind erosion, including protecting topsoil by stockpiling for reuse.
    • To prevent sedimentation of storm sewers or receiving streams.
    • To prevent pollution of the air with dust and particulate matter.

    The EPA’s construction general permit outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters.) program. While the permit only applies to construction sites greater than 1 acre, the requirements are applied to all projects for the purposes of this prerequisite. Information on the EPA construction general permit is available at http://cfpub.epa.gov/ npdes/stormwater/cgpEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program..cfm.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    India ACP: EPA Construction General Permit Equivalent

    Projects in India may use the National Building Code of India 2005 (NBC 2005) Part 10, Section 1, Chapters 4 & 5 along with Section 3 of the EPA Construction General Permit

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Create an erosion and sedimentation control plan during the design phase of the project. Consider employing strategies such as temporary and permanent seeding, mulching, earthen dikes, silt fencing, sediment traps and sediment basins.

Publications

EPA – Construction General Permit

Referenced Standard.


Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plans for Construction Activities

Resources here include Developing Your Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan: A Guide for Construction Sites, SWPPP Templates, Sample Inspection Form, Example SWPPPs, Key Resources, and Selected State BMPBest Management Practice/Guidance Manuals.


BMP Manual

BMPBest Management Practice Manual.

Organizations

International Erosion Control Association

Connect with worldwide member based erosion and sediment control community.


Certified Professional in Erosion and Sedimentation Control

Provides certification programs a list of qualified professionals. 

Technical Guides

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

A variety of Canadian resources on stormwater management and BMPs.

Photos

Take photos like these to document proper implementation of your ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan.

Erosion and Sedimentation Control Plan Drawings

Posted here are sample drawings for erosion and sedimentation control (ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation) plans from a LEED project.

LEED-NC Platinum Senior Housing Sample Documentation

Samples from this LEED Platinum project demonstrate how to document SSp1. This 8-story, 100-unit public senior housing development will use 50% less energy than a comparable code compliant building. Although on a tight urban site, the project also features innovative stormwater management plans, and a pilot graywaterGraywater is untreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater typically includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washer and laundry tubs, though definitions may vary. Some states and local authorities also allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. reuse system—all on a tight budget under a major urban housing authority.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 SS

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

284 Comments

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Melinda Orova
Apr 14 2016
Guest
21 Thumbs Up

Campus project - joint ESC plan and measures

Hi,
We have a Campus project with 1 existing LEED certified building and 2 new buildings to be constructed on a Mastersite that is owned and operated by one company. The 2 new buildings will be constructed during the same time period by one contractor. Also, there are plans for future projects on the Mastersie.
We plan to implement the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation measures in a way that the existing building and the area outside the Mastersite will be protected from the disturbances of the construction activities. Some ESC measures will be placed outside the site bundaries of the 2 new buildings, but within the mastersite and used for compliance by both projects (tire washing at the mastersite entrance etc.).
In this case we see it reasonable to prepare one joint ESC plan for the whole site, with dedicated sections for the 2 projects. Our problem is that the USGBC guidance for Campus credits doen't allow this credit to be documented togeother.
Does anyone have experience with this type of project? Is it safe to proceeed with the joint ESC plan?

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Apr 14 2016 LEEDuser Member 1983 Thumbs Up

For Campus projects like yours, I personally would approach this prerequisite as having two specific parts: 1) the written ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation Plan; and 2) the ESC Compliance Documentation.

For Part 1 - I agree with you that it sounds reasonable/more comprehensive to develop a single Master ESC Plan that covers the whole campus and both buildings. That just sounds like a better way to comprehensively manage the site in the case where both buildings are being constructed at the same time by the same entity. Additionally, measures may be identical between both projects making two separate written plans redundant. I would make sure that you include a site plan which shows Building A’s LEED Boundary, Building B’s LEED Boundary, and the larger Campus Boundary in relation to ESC measures just for clarity.

For Part 2 – This is where I think you need to document each building individually (and personally this portion is why I think this prerequisite isn’t allowed in the Master Site). If you think about it, there could be an issue with compliance with the ESC Plan that would impact just one building site. For example, a storm washes out some protection along just one edge of Building A. That would obviously impact Building A’s ESC compliance and project, but it might not impact Building B at all if that area is nowhere near that project. In this case, just Building A might need the corrective action to bring the measures back up to the ESC Plan. So you should plan on each building needing to have their own separate inspection logs/photographs/etc. to track each project’s compliance.

When you go to submit the projects for review, I would include the identical written Master ESC Plan in both projects and then each project would have their own ESC compliance documents to show how each building specifically met the prerequisite requirements.

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Gabriela Mesquita LEED AP BD+C ARKÉ
Apr 13 2016
LEEDuser Member
66 Thumbs Up

Sediment trap outside the project boundary

Project Location: Paraguay

It plans to build a building in a very broad field of the same owner. The LEED Boundary was defined based on the area that is planned to disrupt. There is a pond of water accumulation built many years ago, without a specific use to date. This gap is outside the LEED Boundary. My question is if I can make a Control Plan Erosion acceptable to LEED, which consider sending muddy water by gravity to this lagoon which is about 82 feet, to sediment the solids washed away storm runoff.

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Hieu Huynh Environmental Engineer, LEED AP BD+C
Mar 15 2016
Guest
177 Thumbs Up

Is it too late to do SSp1?

Project Location: Vietnam

Hi, My project is a hotel and client just decided to do LEED when Construction of structure is almost done. It is quite late to do LEED because the construction started a year ago and contractor by the time had no idea about LEED SSp1. It is a huge challenge to build the document for things already happened in the past. Is there anyone has the same experience? I appreciate any advice.

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Omar ElRawy Building Engineer, LEED AP BD+C EA Building Consultants
Feb 25 2016
Guest
1094 Thumbs Up

Zero Lot Line

Project Location: Egypt

Dear all,
I have a project with an underground parking within the whole LEED project boundary, and landscape work above the underground parking, all around the above-grade building.

During construction, all soil was removed from all LEED project boundary area, and replaced by one concrete slab (basement floor), since this instance, there was no exposed soil within the LEED project boundary.

My first question is that: does my project count as zero lot line project?

Second: do I need to take any precautions after placing my concrete slab, that covers all LEED project boundary?

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Martin Meehan Principal Meehan Associates
Feb 11 2016
LEEDuser Member
273 Thumbs Up

Perimeter protection

Project Location: Ireland

We have a number of LEED projects in infill locations in Ireland.

Since we don't really have a standard code for site Erosion and Sedimentation we have to stick to the U.S. EPA's CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program..

Most of the requirements (inlet protection, dust prevention, etc.) are standard practice here, but I have never seen perimeter protection of any kind in this type of projects here.

Is the perimeter erosion/sedimentation protection (i.e. silt fences) a must in projects at infill locations in the U.S.?

Thanks very much.

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Feb 11 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

I don't know that I would call it "perimeter protection" as silt fence and filter socks should really only be implemented on the downhill slopes, and parallel to the contours. There are rules of thumb to follow when implementing these practices (slope length, ft/ft) but some form of erosive protection is always required to prevent sediment transport from the site.

We typically use the orange snow fence to mark the limits of disturbance or "perimeter" of a site, regardless of infill or not.

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Martin Meehan Principal, Meehan Associates Feb 11 2016 LEEDuser Member 273 Thumbs Up

Thanks Michael, that was very useful.

So if I understand correctly, in a non-sloping site, vehicle entryway stabilization (i.e. gravel mat) and/or wheel washing will suffice for this purpose?

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Feb 11 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

That's a minimum, yes. You really need to employ engineering judgment here. If it rains will soil run off the site? Even if it doesn't you may have areas subject to rilling that may need to be seeded if construction in these areas isn't expected immediately.

You probably have a topsoil stockpile somewhere, that needs to be controlled from wind and rain erosion (tarps and silt fence).

A flat site such as yours isn't hard, just employ a little common sense engineering and construction practice.

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André Harms Ecolution Consulting
Feb 09 2016
LEEDuser Member
147 Thumbs Up

Commenced construction

Hello there,
We are currently conducting a sustainability study on a hotel development in East Africa. The project is already underway with 2 of the 4 building having half of the floors complete and one third of the brickwork done. The landscaping, hardscapes and remaining work has yet to be commenced. The project includes some land reclamation with fortification and this has commenced also. There is now interest for a sustainable hotel operator to enter the picture, alter the remaining construction and all of the systems, fit-out and equipment to be inline with their holistic approach towards sustainability. A decision will be taken in the next few days and then all requited viable construction alterations, policies and procedures will be implemented. The aim is to pursue a LEED certification but the prerequisite that worries me the most is this one. Can this still be achieved if the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan and best management practices are implemented immediately?

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Feb 11 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

While I am sure there are always exceptions to the rules, but the letter of the law is basically if you start construction without an erosion and sediment control plan in place you aren't getting certified.

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JP Rout
Jan 22 2016
Guest
557 Thumbs Up

Construction Activity and Pollution Prevention

Project Location: India

We have Project intending to be registered under LEED 2009 BD+C for major renovations. This is an existing building which will undergo major renovation work for the interiors, HVAC and a large extent of the external façade (structural systems). Can the Project be considered under LEED NC Major Renovations?

And regarding the credit Construction Activity Pollution Prevention the query is as follows:
The documentation for strategies/activities to reduce pollution from construction activities, should only focus on the renovation areas? Or should it, also encompass the activities implemented earlier, during the construction of the existing building?

Thanks in Advance

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 22 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

JP, yes that sounds like a LEED-NC project in terms of scope.

For SSp1, you would want to include the whole building, because NC is a whole-building rating system. The plan can be customize, of course, to only cover activities that will actualy take place in the scope of work. There is no need to go back in time with a ficitional plan for existing construction.

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JP Rout Jan 25 2016 Guest 557 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan, for the quick response!

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Meghan Ward Architectural Technologist, Sustainable Design Consultant Aurecon South Africa
Nov 05 2015
LEEDuser Member
138 Thumbs Up

ESC gap between the excavation phase and construction phase

I am working on a 2-building campus project where an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan was implemented during excavations phase (bulk earthworks) of the whole campus. The first buildings construction will start now with a new contractor implementing the ESC measures for the site only surrounding this First building. Construction of the 2nd building is intended to only start at a much later stage, therefore there will be a large gap between the excavation phase and construction phase (a predication of possibly 1/2 years). Once a different contractor starts on the 2nd site he will implement the ESC measures during construction phase for the portion of that 2nd site.
Would the ESC plan measures have to be continually implemented during 2nd sites stand still? Who would be expected to implement that? And how would we submit that for LEED?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Meghan, it sounds to me like construction has essentially begun for the second building, and ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation mreasures are highly relevant during this period. I would think that the owner would want ESC measures to be continually implemented, and could put someone in charge of it. When the project is ready to begin construction and LEED documentation in earnest, relevant plans and documents can be handed off to the new contractor. Make sense?

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Meghan Ward Architectural Technologist, Sustainable Design Consultant, Aurecon South Africa Nov 30 2015 LEEDuser Member 138 Thumbs Up

Yes, this does makes sense. The excavation is the beginning of construction. We will advise the client it would be best that someone is put in charge of managing and ensuring the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation measures are continually implemented on all sections of the site. Thank you for your response Tristan.

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FABIO VIERO Head of Sustainability Manens-Tifs s.p.a.
Sep 21 2015
LEEDuser Member
1187 Thumbs Up

Appropriate Dust and Stockpiling Measures for Middle East

Most of the LEED projects currently constructed in the Middle East are facing serious challenges complying with EPA requirements with regards to dust suppression, stockpiling and crushing activities.
Large volumes of water is being wasted for dust suppression with little effect on actual site conditions. Once the trafficable routes have been sprayed with water, it takes less than half an hour to dry up. Water tankers are spraying water around the clock to comply with the requirements of CAPP prerequisite. Considering how scarce water is in countries like Qatar, UAE, and KSA, we are not sure this is the best option.
Another challenge is stockpiling on site. It is a standard practice to cover stockpiles with green mesh/tarpaulins or spray them with water. Some of these projects are massive with enormous amounts of stockpiles and hence impractical to cover them. They are currently being sprayed with water – very large amounts of water.
As far as rock crushing activities is concerned, large amounts of water are also being used for dust suppression.
Would it be possible to implement other measures to reduce the amount of water used for dust suppression?

Thank you in advance

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 20 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Fabio, USGBC has worked to make LEED more suited to region-specific challenges like those in the Middle East, so I think they would be receptive to addressing this challenge. That said, I'm not aware of any specific measures that have been proposed on this issue. Anyone else?

Are there any alternative measures that have been recommended?

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Sep 09 2015
LEEDuser Member
2912 Thumbs Up

"Rain event" definition

Hello.

Would someone please define "rain event"?
Is it the total rain since the beginning to the stop of a rain?

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Karin Miller Sustainability Manager, YR&G Sep 11 2015 LEEDuser Member 451 Thumbs Up

Hi Noriko,

Rainfall event within LEED usually refers to a percentile rainfall event which can be calculated using daily rainfall data (obtained from any number of sources for the past five years) and the methodology in the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Technical Guidance on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for Federal Projects under Section 438 of the Energy Independence and Security Act.

Hope that helps!
Karin

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Annalise Reichert Project Manager stok
Aug 17 2015
LEEDuser Member
348 Thumbs Up

ESC plan for Existing Building Minimal Sitework

I am working on a project that encompasses the major renovation of an existing classroom/warehouse building. The renovation primarily consists of HVAC and lighting system upgrades, a new PV system, and roof repairs. There will not be any sitework or excavation during construction.

I understand there are three overall goals of the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan- prevent loss of soil, prevent sedimentation from entering storm drains, and prevent pollution of air with particulates. However, due to minimal sitework, loss of soil and air pollution will likely not be an issue with this scope. The city where the project is located informed the team they were exempt from these requirements.

Has anyone successfully pursued an alternate compliance approach for a project in a similar situation?

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Aug 17 2015 LEEDuser Expert 20372 Thumbs Up

I've had a similar project and still had a lot of the same standard ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan items in there. Our contractor still needed lay down spaces and trailer spaces. We still had to protect storm drains, dust mitigation, etc. It was just on a smaller scale. Tailor your ESC requirements to the site you have but remember to include the construction impact.

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Marie-France Duthilleul Engineer exp Services Inc.
Jun 03 2015
Guest
33 Thumbs Up

Credit Interpretation Request to support SS p1.

Project Location: Canada

When comparing your proposed ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation PLan

Is there standard text language / narrative that clearly describs the requirements of Phase 1 and Phase II of the NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. program.

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS. INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ
Apr 08 2015
LEEDuser Member
953 Thumbs Up

Sediment Basin dimensioning

Project Location: Uruguay

Hi, this may be a silly question. When dimensioning a temporary sediment basin, the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. says to use either the calculations for the 24 hs- 2 year desing storm or 3600 cubic feet x acre drained. If using the 24hs-2year desing storm, we should be using the figures for the post-development situation, not the pre-development situation, am I right? Particularly when the site more than 50% pervious in the pre-development situation. Sorry, but this is not common practice here. Thanks!

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Apr 08 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

It is not a silly question. If you want to be ultra-conservative, you could use the post-development runoff condition for sed basin design. This can be a moving target as drainage patterns may change as the site is graded. Cover types will definitely change.

I typically just use the 3600 cf/ac, but if this becomes and issue, and you need a smaller basin, you may have to put some thought into the sequencing, drainage areas, etc.

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS., INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ Apr 08 2015 LEEDuser Member 953 Thumbs Up

Thank you Michael! The fact is that the 3600 qft/acre is much larger than the actual post development runoff conditions, as it is a mostly flat site with a large pervious landscape, which makes the post-development conditions better than the 3600 cft/acre. We sequencing the project so as not to disturb all the site at once, in fact, most of the site will remain undisturbed until the final phases of the project. So I could be safe using the calculations made for the retention ponds in the post-development conditions for the temporary sediment basin?

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS. INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ
Apr 07 2015
LEEDuser Member
953 Thumbs Up

Semi-permanent streams

Project Location: Uruguay

Our project has a very small semi-permanent stream runing through it (i.e., the streams forms only in heavy rainfalls). . The water from such semi-permanent stream will be directed to a temporary sediment basin during construction and later it will be channelized underground thorugh the project and a permanent retention pond will be constructed. Now, I have not found guidance in CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. 2003 on semi-permanent streams. Are we doing the right thing? thanks

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Apr 07 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

I have no problem for this provided it its really only a drainage swale. If this is an actual intermittent stream, capable of supporting aquatic life, you can't detain the flow. Ultimately this decision is up to your civil engineer or hydrologist to determine the aquatic function.

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS., INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ Apr 07 2015 LEEDuser Member 953 Thumbs Up

Thank you Michael, the stream is very small when it forms and uncapable of supporting aqcuatic life. Only plants used to the variation of dry-wet soil grow there and it is not even topographically noticeable in the surveys we have. I think the thing is it's naming, you just made me realize that it, in fact, is a drainage swale, but the nobody is familiar with the term around here, so the call it a semi-permanent stream :) So, I believe it is only a linguistic problem! Thanks again for your quick reply! Very much appreciated!!

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SOHA YAMANI
Mar 08 2015
Guest
607 Thumbs Up

LEED Boundaries & Construction Boundaries

Project Location: Egypt

ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation Plan and Project LEED Boundary in Campus project

we are working on a campus LEED project that have four different contractors working on four different buildings that will be registered for LEED as individual projects under campus project
now some of the construction activities are outside the LEED project boundaries such as steel and wood workshops and large cranes and equipments, however each contractor will be following the ESC plan for the whole construction site which is bigger than the project LEED Boundary
my question here, will we be able to achieve this credit if some of the construction works are outside the LEED Project boundaries , knowing that all the ESC measures will be followed for the whole construction area ?

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Aug 04 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

As long as your ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan is established per NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. and is followed, you are good.

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SOHA YAMANI
Mar 05 2015
Guest
607 Thumbs Up

ESC Plan and Project LEED Boundary in Campus project

we are working on a campus LEED project that have four different contractors working on four different buildings that will be registered for LEED as individual projects under campus project

now some of the construction activities are outside the LEED project boundaries such as steel and wood workshops and large cranes and equipments, however each contractor will be following the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan for the whole construction site which is bigger than the project LEED Boundary

my question here, will we be able to achieve this credit if some of the construction works are outside the LEED Project boundaries , knowing that all the ESC measures will be followed for the whole construction area ?

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ESRA OZKONUKSEVER MA. Architect ILTAY MIMARLIK
Jan 23 2015
Guest
83 Thumbs Up

International Project Epa CGP

Project Location: Turkey

Hi Y'all,
we re working on a project in Turkey and creating an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation and a SWPPP plan. but as an international project do we have to apply for CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. submitting a NOI and everything or do we only need to apply the restirictions of EPA in our project
Thanks!'

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Jan 23 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

No, you're not actually applying for a permit because you are outside of the regulatory authority of the United States. However, design your E&S as if you were applying for the permit.

Clear as mud?

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Erika Duran Sustainability Consultant Dagher Engineering
Jan 20 2015
LEEDuser Member
1765 Thumbs Up

What does LEED consider as Sitework?

Project Location: United States

Project sitework and stabalization techniques were implemented during the beginning stages of the project and followed our ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan as well as local jurisdiction requirements. We submitted our documentation for this project however the comment that was returned states that there needs to be record of this work from the dates we stated in PIf4 as beginning of construction and substantial completion of construction. Does anyone know if LEED defines "site work" for this credit? It is confusing because sitework to the contractor means a different thing than site work as in "work being done on the site through the life of the project" Can someone clarify this?

Thanks.

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Jan 23 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

Site work, as it pertains to erosion and sediment control, is earth disturbance...unstabilized earth....earth that is not permanently stabilized with 70% perennial growth. Locally, an area of 1,00 sf -5,000 sf is typically applied before this is classified as qualifying site disturbance. However, for LEED, there is no such area requirement, as this applies to all projects

What does your contractor think "site work" is??

You'll see the requirements for this Pre-Req state that the plan must be in place for "all construction activities associated with the project."

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Aly Adel
Jan 06 2015
Guest
21 Thumbs Up

Cnstrctn began with no LEED intent nw thy wnt rsume seeking LEED

Project Location: Egypt

Hello!
We have a project that started construction some time ago, and stopped 1 yr ago, leaving only phase 1 (concrete slabs only). At this time, they were not considering LEED as an objective.
They want to reactivate construction, and they are truly interested in pursuing LEED Certification and addressing environmental impact of their construction.
The question is, if they start implementing the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation Plan as soon as the construction process reactivates and through the rest of construction, is it acceptable to earn the prerrequisite, even though on the previous "phase" they didn't implement it??
Thanks!!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 26 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Aly, that should work, yes. I have heard of this situation several times and as long as the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan is implemented upon start of construction, even with accounting for a lapse like this, I haven't seen GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). have a problem with it. I would note the situation in your narrative.

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Michael Johnson Architect Chenevert Architects
Dec 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
1422 Thumbs Up

LEED Boundary / Silt Fencing

Project Location: United States

Currently working on a project that is a large site with an existing building currently on the site. The new LEED building is away from this current building creating a smaller LEED Boundary than that of the entire site. We plan to locate a silt fence around the entire site and not around the LEED Boundary of the building. Is this an acceptable way to maintain the SS Pre-Req. or do we need to have silt fencing encompassing the LEED Boundary as well? Essentially double fencing?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 31 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, the silt fencing should be located in a logical way relative to meeting the objectives of the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan. It has no relation to the LEED boundary.

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Michael Johnson Architect, Chenevert Architects Jan 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 1422 Thumbs Up

rad. thanks Tristan

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Hrvoje Kvasnicka
Dec 17 2014
Guest
152 Thumbs Up

Checking ESC plan at design stage?

Hi All
Since this is a prerequisite which forms part of construction stage submittal, I was wondering if it there is a way to have the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan reviewed by GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). at design stage. This way we could be sure not to lose this prerequisite and make the project ineligible for certification at a stage where nothing can be done about it anymore.
Thanks in advance

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Dec 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

Is your project located in the United States. I ask this because if it is, your plan needs to be reviewed by the local conservation district or environmental protection agency, and the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). submission is more a formality.

I'm not sure that GBCI actually has staff qualified to review the actual ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan and design calculations, short of you demonstrating that it is in place through photos, checklists, etc outlined above.

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Hrvoje Kvasnicka Dec 17 2014 Guest 152 Thumbs Up

Hi Michael, thanks for your response.
The project is in Croatia so no one will formally review it except for GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)..
What do you think would be a good strategy to make sure we don't lose this prerequisite? We are planning to prepare and implement the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan and follow the LEED requirements as best as we can but I don't want to risk that GBCI comes back to us at the end and says "you haven't done this or that" and therefore you are ineligible for certification...

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Civil Engineer Dec 17 2014 Guest 56 Thumbs Up

I find the original reply to this query troubling.

The credit language for SS Prereq 1 states "Create and implement an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan ..."
The local conservation district or environmental agency can certainly verify if an ESC plan has been "created" that meets their standards, however the legal obligation to "implement" the plan rests with the owner. Periodic inspection by the local conservation district or environmental agency does not guarantee implementation. Conservation districts are typically understaffed and underfunded and have little real enforcement ability. I know of one LEED building owner whose interpretation of "implement" is very clearly "do not get caught." I am sure there are others.

How does GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). verify implementation?

Also to the best of my knowledge, in my state the ESC plan is not required to include measures to prevent air pollution from particulate matter. So this requirement would not be captured in the local approval and should be separately verified by GBCI.

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Yodi Danusastro Dec 17 2014 Guest 131 Thumbs Up

Just follow the EPA CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. and you'll be safe.

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Hrvoje Kvasnicka Dec 31 2014 Guest 152 Thumbs Up

Thanks all for your help!

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SoYoung Lee LEED AP BD+C Director, HnC
Dec 15 2014
Guest
40 Thumbs Up

Previously developed or graded land

We are planning to pursue LEED certification for the official buildings. The site areas are being developed for those municipal buildings relocation and as part of the urban redevelopment (or, reorganization) plan executed by the municipal regulations, which include adjacent large residential complex construction.
The site area is located in the urban area surrounded by the mountains and already been cleared for the use of the municipal agencies.
The question is if this site would be classified as “previously developed”, or “graded” sites.
From the credit language, “previously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiate and those that have been graded or modified by human activity” seems to assume the site as ‘previously developed’. But from the second part of the credit language, “Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land” seems to consider the site to be ‘undeveloped land’.
The last part of language is also confusing. It is saying that, “The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development.”

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Yodi Danusastro
Dec 12 2014
Guest
131 Thumbs Up

Job Specific Environment Analysis

Project Location: Indonesia

Does anyone has the template of JSEA? I've been ask to create ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation with inclusion of JSEA template. Where an I find this template?

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FABIO VIERO Head of Sustainability Manens-Tifs s.p.a.
Dec 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
1187 Thumbs Up

SSp1 and EPA in KSA

Project Location: Saudi Arabia

We are working on two projects located in Saudi Arabia under LEED 2009 certification.

We are looking for finding the appropriate measures to be applied, as per EPA’s Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. and NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. requirements, to match the intent of the SS Prerequisite 1.

We are aware about LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. n.5114 (http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=5114) which basically recognized minimal stormwater erosion concerns in case of desert area (“arid areas” as per EPA’s definition means an average annual rainfall of 0 -10 inches, Jeddah=2,1, Riyadh=4) and actually allows to avoid mitigation measures due to stormwater; so inspection could be conducted once a month, as per paragraph 3.10 of the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. Fact sheet(http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/npdes/stormwater/upload/cgp2003_fs.pdf), instead of on weekly basis.

Regarding other items addressed within SSp1 we are wondering the following:

1) best way to manage the loss of soil due to wind, since sandstorm are very common for that climate, which actually make itself loss of soil other than fust.

2) best way to manage the air pollution from dust, considering that water availability could be an issue for that climate and therefore mitigation measure such as sprinkling would not be appropriate.

Do you have any advice/recommendation about those items, based on previous LEED certified projects located in KSA or similar climate?

Thank you.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International
Nov 20 2014
LEEDuser Member
2668 Thumbs Up

No exposed soil - how to comply with ESC?

Project Location: Mexico

We have a small project that consists af an existing one level building that will have an major renovation. No exposed soil is present nor there is a garden or landscape therefor during the major renovation no exposed soil will be present.

We would like to have an advice on how to comply with a ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan where no exposed soil will be present. Dust generation will be present an mitigated, however typical issues of a project where a big amount of soil will be disturbed is not our case.

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy
Oct 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
2456 Thumbs Up

Reactivating construction with ESC Plan, no ESC Plan before

Project Location: Mexico

Hello!
We have a project that started construction some time ago, and stopped 1 yr ago, leaving only the foundation. At this time, they were not considering LEED as an objective.
Now, the project has changed (scope and the proposed building itself), there are different investors (same owner, though) and they have a different commercial focus.
They want to reactivate construction, and they are truly interested in pursuing LEED Certification and addressing environmental impact of their construction.
The question is, if they start implementing the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation Plan as soon as the construction process reactivates and through the rest of construction, is it acceptable to earn the prerrequisite, even though on the previous "phase" (foundation) they didn't implement it??

Thanks!!

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International Dec 09 2014 LEEDuser Member 2668 Thumbs Up

Did you ever get a response by GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).? I am interested in this case.

Greetings.

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Nadhielly Guzman Dec 29 2014 Guest 19 Thumbs Up

I am interested too.

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Shafqat Hussain LEED Project Manager, SIDEworks May 14 2015 Guest 24 Thumbs Up

I am also interested.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International Jun 16 2015 LEEDuser Member 2668 Thumbs Up

We never got an actual response, however this project with this situation is now certified, reviewers did not have any comment about it. We just demonstrated compliance with all applicable measures (for example tire cleaning was performed however it was only for a small portion of time because mostly all soil was removed by the time the project reactivated).

I gues it is just a matter of demonstrating implementation of whatever is applicable depending on the site conditions.

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Gabriela Mesquita LEED AP BD+C ARKÉ
Oct 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
66 Thumbs Up

Perimeter Controls

Project Location: Paraguay

Good day I want to consult in relation to a project in a lot of 10 hectares (about 25 acres) with a perimeter of 1377 m (about 4500 ft). One of the longer sides of the perimeter has input waters from higher ground. Altimetry due to the other three sides, is output water from the batch of the project. You may meet the requirement of the Plan taking into account the following edge care:
1. compacted earth dike on the side of greater height, to prevent entry of water from other lots,
2. Perimeter Control with silt fence on the other three sides
Or they need to have more perimeter control measures?
I clarify that a third of the property remain undisturbed, so it may not take that edge protection or equal silt fence should be placed? The area where there is no disturbance is 130 feet wide and 240 m long (426 x 787 feet).
Thanks in advance for the help

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Oct 30 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

A site of that size probably needs 1 or more sed basins. But it's really impossible to answer this question without seeing the plan. Your E&S design should be done by a competent civil engineer or CPESC.

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Gabriela Mesquita LEED AP BD+C, ARKÉ Nov 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 66 Thumbs Up

The schematic plan can be found at the following link: https://www.dropbox.com/s/559tjbe2xmjl36h/Planta%20General%20SSp.1%20con....
As you can see there is an area a third of the land that remains unaffected, that is why I consult if possible to ignore perimeter control measures in that area, and that area will not be considered for sizing the sedimentation volume needed. Thanks for the help!

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Alicia Silva CEO, Revitaliza consultores Jan 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 2126 Thumbs Up

Hi Gabriela,

We have a similar case, were you able to ignore the installation of a silt fence in the undisturbed side of the property?

Thanks!

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Jan 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

Sorry for the late reply, I must have missed this. But in the drawing above, you don't need any E&S controls on the undisturbed side, because it is "undisturbed" and presumably permanently stabilized with grass or growy things.

Just put your BMPs on the downhill side of the disturbed area, whether this is silt fence, filter socks, sediment basins/traps, etc.

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Gabriela Mesquita LEED AP BD+C, ARKÉ Jan 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 66 Thumbs Up

Hi Alicia, I still didn´t realize the Plan because the project was delayed in its schedule.
Hi Michael, thank you for your answer, it will be very usefull to me.

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Jan 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

Now keep in mind, this goes for future readers, my reply only pertains to that drawing above, and similar site conditions.

If that site drained east-west, with the undisturbed area draining through the disturbed, you would need to either divert this clean water around the site, or account for it in the calcs for your proposed BMPBest Management Practice

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS. INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ
Oct 16 2014
LEEDuser Member
953 Thumbs Up

Sediment Basin

Project Location: Argentina

Hello again, we are working on a project for which we are installing a sediment basin. According to EPA we could use the calculation of 3600 ft3 / acre drained to size it. Most of the drainage area will remain undisturbed since it will be a preserved area. Diverting the water from undisturbed areas is quite difficult because of topographical constraints. We found in a manual that from undisturbed areas, we could use a runoff value of 500 ft3/acre drained in addition to the 3600ft3/acre drained of disturbed areas. Would doing this be compliant with EPA's regulations? We are outside the US and not very familiar with these regulations. Thanks!

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Oct 16 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

All I have ever seen or used is 3600 cf/ac or 5000 cf/ac for high quality watersheds.

Compost filter socks can be installed in virtually any terrain, and used for diversion. Have you considered these?

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS., INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ Oct 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 953 Thumbs Up

Thanks Michael, here is where we found the reference to the 500 ft3/acre drained from undisturbed areas:
http://www.udfcd.org/downloads/pdf/critmanual/Volume%203%20PDFs/chapter%...
We live in a place where things as compost filter socks are not commercially found, so practically any diversion would have to be made doing earthwork, which we are trying to avoid. The site where the basin would stand is also constrained and almost not enough to divert 3600 ft3/acre from all areas. Do you think we would comply using 500cf/ac in undisturbed areas?

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS. INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ
Oct 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
953 Thumbs Up

Concrete Washout

Hello everyone,

we are working on a project in an estate, part of this estate is the current LEED project, with its own LEED boundary. The estate has many projects going on and the construction company which works exclusively for the project owner, has its own concrete manufacturing plant within the estate, but outside de LEED boundary. The plant has a concrete washout facility that is well documented and that they use for all the projects they are working on. They fill the concrete mixer trucks with water inside the LEED boundary and do the washout when they arrive to the plant, a few miles away. Will this practice be OK with the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation Plan requirements? A concrete washout area for small hand or electric mixers has been provided on site. Thanks

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Michael D. DeVuono Senior Staff Engineer, T&M Associates Oct 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4901 Thumbs Up

I see no problem with this. Just document it in the narrative.

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS., INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ Oct 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 953 Thumbs Up

Thank you Michael!

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May 28 2016
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