NC-v2.2 EQc6.1: Controllability of Systems—Lighting

  • NC_v2-2_EQc6-1_TypeX_LightingControlability Diagram
  • Optimized lighting leads to optimal performance

    This credit promotes efficient, high-performance lighting systems through increased controllability for building occupants. Allowing individuals control over the lighting levels in their workspaces can enhance their comfort, productivity, satisfaction, and overall wellbeing.

    Better lighting controls can also increase the energy efficiency of a lighting system by encouraging occupants to use task lighting focused on their activities and work area rather than increasing the general ambient lightingLighting in a space that provides for general wayfinding and visual comfort, in contrast to task lighting, which illuminates a defined area to facilitate specific visual work. level. Appropriate controls not only reduce the electricity use for lighting, but also reduce the cooling load by allowing occupants to turn off lights when leaving their space or when daylight is sufficient.

    Straightforward requirements

    The credit requires the design provides for individual lighting controls for a minimum of 90% of building occupants, and that all shared, multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. be equipped with lighting controls.

    In most buildings, the majority of these requirements can be satisfied simply by providing an on-off switch for each multi-occupant space and task lighting in individual workspaces—but be aware that standard lighting system design may not allow for adjustments to lighting levels to meet specific, task-related needs.

    Optimize your design

    It’s strongly recommended that you optimize the lighting system design. This could mean a combination of dimmers, occupancy and daylight sensors for multi-occupant spaces, and adjustable task lighting for individually occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space.. Take note, however, that dimmers, occupancy sensors and daylight sensors alone do not meet the credit requirements unless they have an override switch.

    Low-cost approaches vary by building type

    This credit is fairly low-cost and is generally easy for any project type to earn. Different projects will need to use different strategies to earn the credit. For example, residential and hotel projects can earn the individual lighting controls portion of the credit simply by providing switches in each room.

    People at a deskTask lighting combined with ambient lighting is a common and easy way to achieve this credit.Most office projects can meet these requirements by providing either multi-circuit lighting or daylight harvesting with a manual override switch and some ability to control glare (like blinds or light shelves).

    Other unique programming considerations

    • For buildings with unique programming, like hospitals, make an extra effort to ensure that the appropriate number of controls is provided for each space type. In a hospital reception area, for example, this includes controls for the reception and waiting area and for each reception area workstation. 
    • Consider the applicability of providing lighting controls customized for the project's programming. For example, lighting controls for 90% of occupants in individual workspaces and all multi-use spaces might not be conducive in detention centers, museums, or other unique programming types. Consult with GBCI and refer to published exceptions and appropriate alternative compliance paths. 
    • Effective coordination of ambient lighting systems and individual lighting controls is critical to both good lighting system design and energy system performance. 
    • Consider the difference between providing lighting controls and lighting controllability. Lighting controls often operate occupancy and daylight sensors, which do not necessarily meet credit requirements (unless they are paired with override switch). Lighting controllability, however, provides occupants the ability to control their own lighting needs.

    When in doubt about how to treat a specific space in your project relative to occupancy type, consult the IEQ Space Matrix, a guidance document from USGBC (see Resources). This spreadsheet lists dozens of specific building and space types, and how to treat them for individual credits.

    How this credit is addressed in specific building types

    Office – Provide a switch in each multi-occupant space and task lighting at each workstation. Meeting rooms and conference rooms are considered multi-occupant spaces, while private offices and cubicles are considered individual work spaces.  

    Multifamily – Provide a switch in each room or separate space. Bedrooms, kitchens, dining rooms, family rooms, dens, etc. all require individual controllability. Switches will also need to be provided in each multi-occupant space, such as laundry facility, shared kitchen, or lounge area.

    Hotel - Provide a switch in each room or separate space, and task lighting at reception and other office workstations. Switches are also needed in each multi-occupant space, such as laundry facilities or lounge areas.

    Warehouse – Warehouse space, loading areas, break and meeting rooms are all considered multi-occupant spaces and require appropriate controls. Workstations within a warehouse require individual lighting controls.

    Hospital - Waiting and reception areas, cafeterias, and conference rooms are considered multi-occupant spaces and require appropriate controls, while private exam and recovery rooms are considered individual-use areas.    

    Manufacturing – Manufacturing and warehouse spaces, loading areas, break and meeting rooms are all multi-occupant spaces and require appropriate controls. Workstations within a manufacturing space likely require individual lighting controls.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Establish occupant-use types for each space (individual or multi-occupant), and identify the lighting needs for each space. Review space programming and the requirements to provide lighting controls for both individual and multi-occupant spaces.  


  • Establish lighting control goals and include them in the Basis of Design for EAp1: Fundamental Commissioning.


  • Providing controllability for occupants does not have to involve a complex lighting system―you can simply provide plug-in task lighting in individual spaces and on-off switches in multi-occupant spaces.


  • The inclusion of occupancy and daylight sensors can provide a more efficient lighting system, but it does not provide occupants with more controllability. Rather than limiting your project to merely meeting the credit requirements, a combination of lighting controls and lighting controllability is ideal.  


  • Providing lighting controllability to 90% of individual-occupant spaces can add some upfront cost to your project if this is not standard practice. However, better lighting controllability can reduce lighting and cooling loads and increase productivity. Additionally, since ambient lighting generally is more energy-intensive and generates more heat than task lighting, emphasis on task-specific lighting can reduce energy costs by reducing the level of ambient lighting needed. 

Schematic Design

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  • Begin to lay out the lighting design, individual controls, and control systems. Typically, ambient lighting does not provide all occupants with adequate control. To provide control, design task lighting in addition to ambient lighting. 


  • At a minimum, provide individual controls for 90% of occupants.


  • Providing individual lighting controllability supports energy efficiency, as the occupants can turn off the lighting system when leaving a space.


  • An open office space counts as individually occupied when each person has an individual desk and a defined space. 


  • Develop a list of individually occupied and shared multi-occupant spaces. A multi-occupant space is for group interactions―classrooms, conference rooms, cafeterias, lobbies, warehouse loading areas, theaters, break rooms, commercial kitchens, retail stores, and exhibit spaces―where large numbers of people are expected to gather. 


  • When designing, consider lighting controllability in combination with your daylighting strategy. For example, if your project has a good design for daylight, you may want to provide task lighting on the interior walls instead of near windows, or daylight sensors in conjunction with an on-off switch for ambient lighting and task lighting for individuals. 


  • Employ a lighting designer to develop and review specialized lighting design considerations, such as glare and special-use lighting in A/V presentation rooms.


  • Review opportunities for daylighting, light shelves, skylights, or light tubes. Along with these strategies, consider occupant controls related to each strategy, such as interior or exterior blinds, or changing the aperture on skylights or light tubes. Also consider assessing building orientation and space allocation. These are best practices, not credit requirements.


  • Although it's not required for credit compliance, providing ambient and individual controls with variable lighting levels is recommended. Also, consider how individual lighting levels could supplement ambient lighting to provide each with variable lighting levels. 


  • Individual control means that there is a switch accessible to each occupant for control over lighting levels at their individual workspace. It can be a task light in an open office scenario, a main-wall sconce in a private office, a ceiling-hung light in living and bedrooms, or a desk light at a reception desk. Keep in mind, though, that in order to count toward the 90% of individually controlled lighting, 90% of occupants must have a dedicated control or task light.


  • Task lighting does not need to be hardwired in order to meet the credit requirements.


  • The credit requirements are based on number of occupants for individually occupied spaces and number of spaces for multi-occupant spaces. Only 90% of total building occupants must have controls in individually occupied spaces, but each of the multi-occupant spaces must have independent controls.


  • Together, the owner and design team should set preliminary lighting goals and incorporate them into the Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) for building commissioning credits EAp1 and EAc3.  

Design Development

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  • For (a minimum of) 90% of individual occupants, provide lighting that can be easily adjusted by the individual. This can include task lighting that is not hardwired, or hardwired lighting with on-off switches that control lighting at an individual workstation. Individual lighting may not be shared if it is to apply to the credit.


  • Confirm that 90% of individual lighting controllability is being provided by performing a basic calculation.


  • For all multi-use spaces, such as conference rooms, adequate controls must be provided to control lighting levels appropriate to programming and space use. 


  • Confirm that 100% of multi-occupant spaces have adequate manual controls.


  • Examine project space allocation to evaluate whether there are any areas that present a challenge for meeting the requirements, or space programming that makes lighting controls inappropriate for the space. 


  • Ideally, when specifying task or ambient lighting, lighting position should be adjustable and have multiple light levels. However, the credit can be satisfied with lights that simply turn on and off.


  • All daylight and occupancy controls must have a manual override to count toward the credit requirements. (This refers only to spaces that are applicable to the relevant space types. Non-regularly-occupied spaces such as bathrooms would not apply.) 


  • Residences can meet this requirement with appropriately located, switch-operated plug receptacles. If no hardwired lighting is provided in a space, floor lamps controlled by a switch will still meet the credit requirements. 

Construction Documents

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  • Include all lighting control locations and specifications in the drawings and bid documents, and develop floor plans indicating the location and type of lighting controls. 


  • Continue to develop your list of occupancy space types and the associated lighting controls. 


  • Include lighting control systems in the commissioning scope of work for the commissioning credits EAp1 and EAc3.


  • Develop LEED documentation concurrently with or immediately following 100% Construction Documents.

Construction

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  • Commission lighting systems to confirm their performance in concert with the commissioning credits EAp1 and EAc3.


  • Document credit achievement through LEED Online. You'll need to provide the following information: 

    • occupancy type for building spaces 
    • number of occupants or spaces (as applicable to space type) 
    • a description of the lighting controls 
    • lighting control types   
    • project drawings showing the different lighting control types and locations.

  • Calibrate occupancy sensors and other lighting control systems (if included) after the installation of all office equipment and furnishings. Installing office equipment and furnishings after calibrating the lighting control systems could cause poor system performance.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Although not required for credit compliance, developing a plan to monitor the performance of lighting control systems is recommended. This may include occupant survey feedback (EQc7.2), ongoing monitoring (EAc5), and a schedule for regular testing of components. 


  • Educate the occupants to properly use their controls and to turn them off during hours when the building is unoccupied or the space is not being used. 


  • Ongoing monitoring of system performance will prevent unintended energy use after hours due to faulty sensors and other issues.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED for New Construction and Major Renovations Version 2.2

    EQ Credit 6.1: Controllability of systems - lighting

    1 Point

    Intent

    Provide a high level of lighting system control by individual occupants or by specific groups in multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. (i.e. classrooms or conference areas) to promote the productivity, comfort and well-being of building occupants.

    Requirements

    Provide individual lighting controls for 90% (minimum) of the building occupants to enable adjustments to suit individual task needs and preferences.
    AND

    Provide lighting system controllability for all shared multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. to enable lighting adjustment that meets group needs and preferences.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Design the building with occupant controls for lighting. Strategies to consider include lighting controls and task lighting. Integrate lighting systems controllability into the overall lighting design, providing ambient and task lighting while managing the overall energy use of the building.

Publications

Lighting Controls Association (LCA)

The Lighting Controls Association (LCA), administered by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), is dedicated to educating the professional building design, construction and management communities about the benefits and operation of automatic switching and dimming controls. These benefits include energy savings, flexibility and higher-quality building environments.


Advanced Lighting Guidelines, 2003 edition (New Building Institute, Inc., 2003)

These guidelines are available as a free download or can be purchased as a printed manual of 390 pages. 


IESNA Lighting for Educational Facilities

An resource providing design guidance for educational facilities, available from the IES website.


IESNA Lighting Handbook, Ninth Edition, (IESNA, 2000)

A resource providing general lighting design guidance, available from the IES website.

Organizations

Illuminating and Engineering Society (IES)

The IES seeks to improve the lighted environment by bringing together those with lighting knowledge and by translating that knowledge into actions that benefit the public.


Association of Lighting and Mercury Recyclers

Provides education and resources about recycling mercury containing lamps.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

LEED Online Sample Template – EQc6.1

This template is the flattened, public version of the dynamic template for this credit that is used within LEED-Online v2 by registered project teams. This and other public versions of LEED credit templates come from the USGBC website, and are posted on LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. You'll need to fill out the live version of this template on LEED Online to document this credit.

USGBC

Official LEED Online Forms

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

58 Comments

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Aug 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
2659 Thumbs Up

IEQc6.1 for an auditorium... are Green Rooms workstations?

We have an auditorium that has a couple of green rooms, one catering room, storages, mech/electrical and lobby. Originally we submitted the template for this credit arguing that there were no individual workstations but only one multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. that had the required controls. However the reviewer comment came back requesting to check that all regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. are included on the calculation. Thus looking on so posts here I have concluded that most likely the catering room would be considered a workstation but I'm not sure about the green rooms in the back of the auditorium. Please note, there is no box office due to the building being in a campus with other ticketing locations. Thanks.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Aug 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 496 Thumbs Up

For guidance on “regularly occupied space,” see the EQ Space Matrix:
http://www.usgbc.org/resources/eq-space-type-matrix

In the definition of “regularly occupied space,” the matrix includes the note, “The one hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use.” Therefore, if the catering room and the greenroom will be occupied for more than an hour at a time, they qualify as “regularly occupied.”

The matrix also shows how the various IEQ credits apply to various space types. Your catering area probably falls under “Food Service Facilities” subtypes. There is no “Greenroom” space type, but depending its use, the best matches might be “Locker Room,” Lounge,” “Break Room,” or “Waiting Room.” EQc6 “workstation” requirements vary depending on which area type you choose.

Note: issued in October 2013, this latest matrix made only minor revisions to the previous April 2013 matrix. However, since the original version (November 2011), many “regularly occupied” designation have changed. Depending on your project’s registration date, you may be able to choose which matrix to follow.

On the other hand, since this post is in the v2.2 forum, your project was probably registered well before any of these matrices. If this is the case, just make sure that you assign the "regularly occupied' designation consistently across all EQ Credits. You may still be able to use the newer space matrices to justify your designations.

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oleg petryuchenko lighting designer
Jan 15 2014
Guest
213 Thumbs Up

IEQcr6.1 for hotel

we are working on hotel with 140 gest rooms. in the matrix for 6.1 credit guest rooms shown as allowed exclusion. on another hand, we have controls in guest rooms according to ASHRAE 2010. which direction would be a wise choice?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Oleg, you would be allowed to exclude them per LEED since LEED v2.2 doesn't follow 90.1-2010, but if you are using them per ASHRAE, there is no problem relative to LEED. Hopefully that makes sense.

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Brandon Dean DBP
Nov 01 2013
LEEDuser Member
94 Thumbs Up

Mixed-Use: providing light fixtures for future tenants

I am working on a multi-tenant community center owned by the city it's located in, and managed by an arts organization. The building leases out spaces for use. As of now, about 20% of the square footage is unleased.

These unleased spaces will be provided with shared-occupant controls, with on/off and dimming controls which should be sufficient for "Multi-Occupant" requirements . Its more likely however, that these spaces will be "Individual Occupancy" spaces, in which task lighting is required.

Who's responsibility is it then to provide the tasks light? Secondly, what's the best way to document this?

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Nov 01 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Are you pursuing this credit through LEED NC or really LEED CI or LEED CS? There is helpful guidance in the LEED CS Reference Guide around who's responsibility the task lights would fall under.

Basically if you want to get credit for it within your submission it sounds like you will have to either provide the task lights yourself or require the unleased spaces to have the right number of task lights. This requirement would need to be stated in the lease itself in order to count.

I guess I would need more clarity on what your LEED Submission includes because that would also frame the answer. Are you trying to certify the whole building or just the space that is leased?

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Brandon Dean DBP Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Member 94 Thumbs Up

Thanks Lauren, we're submitting the whole building under NC v2.2. Originally, we were going to include a "Tenant Survey" in the submission, which would basically ask future tenants if they desired a task light, and if 90% or more requested a light, the Arts Organization would provide.

However, we'd like to find a way around this if possible, because the Arts Organization lacks the funds and will likely be very reluctant. Any thoughts?

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi there,
If you're submitting the whole building then you need to include all of the spaces and therefore would need to provide lighting for the people in these spaces. Asking tenants if they want task lighting wouldn't work because that's not the intent of the credit. The credit doesn't ask if people want a light it just assumes that everyone does and then the way you get the credit is by ensuring that 90% of those workstations have controls. It sounds like you have information available to you to generally know how many task lights are needed but that you don't have the funds necessary to pursue. Unfortunately, I don't think you can get this credit given that scenario. I'm sorry.

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Brandon Dean DBP Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Member 94 Thumbs Up

Hi Lauren,
The only reason we were going to submit the survey (a method we found in IEQc6.1: Controllability of Systems - Lighting, credit interpretations) is because we don't know who will be occupying the 20% of unleased space. It was our way of not defining the 20% now, and suggesting the Arts Organization purchase lights in the future if need be. But, yes, at this point they likely won't commit for the sake of a LEED credit.
Thanks.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

I see what you're saying. Yes, that's tricky...do you have potential desk layouts or floor plans showing where workstations will most likely go? You would probably need that level of detail to really show how you're providing enough task lights.

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Brandon Dean DBP Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Member 94 Thumbs Up

No desk layouts have been drawn. The remaining 20% are fairly large spaces with many desk configurations. Plus they could be rented by one artist who doesn't require a desk, or it could be leased by a company with 20 employees; hence lots of options.

Other than this 20% dilemma our project seems to meet the credit requirements, so I would hate to miss out simply because its a complicated submission process. Maybe a survey is okay if we can convince the client to agree to providing task lights? Any other ideas?
Thanks

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Dec 23 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi there,

I think you could give it a shot but I think it might be a bit of a long shot...

One idea: You could make a reasonable estimate of the maximum amount of individual occupant spacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces. the un-leased space may have and then add that number to the individual occupant spaces within the leased spaces to see if the leased spaces alone get you to the 50% threshold. Achieving the credit this way will be all about how you make your case to the reviewer.

Another idea: If you can get something in the lease agreement that requires task lighting then that could work too.

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Sep 24 2013
LEEDuser Member
2659 Thumbs Up

Defintion of workstations

Where can I find the definition for workstations?

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Nov 01 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi Victor,

In the IEQ Space Matrix (http://www.usgbc.org/resources/eq-space-type-matrix) there is a "Notes and Definitions" tab. In that tab, there is a definition for Individual Occupant SpacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces. which are essentially Workstations.

"In individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building.. Note: Currently there are no non-regularly occupied spaces that are designated as individual occupant spaces."

Additionally, in the "General Credit Guidance" tab it states: "For individual occupant spaces, the calculation for 'percent of building occupants with individual occupant controls' is based on the number of individual occupant spaces, which is usually a workstation/workspace."

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
May 02 2013
LEEDuser Member
2659 Thumbs Up

Laundry rooms are multi-occupant spaces?

Is there a reference where I can see that laundry rooms are considered multioccupant space for this credit under leed or ashrae, just as described in the bird-eye view?

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google May 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi Victor,

I think you have pointed out a potential inconsistency. The newest IEQ Space Matrix excludes laundry rooms from the credit requirements.

Please see here: http://www.usgbc.org/resources/eq-space-type-matrix and here: http://www.leeduser.com/blogs/leed-ieq-space-matrix-frequently-asked-que....

I will work to coordinate the Birds Eye View with this updated information.

Thanks for pointing this out.
Lauren

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator, JALRW Eng. Group Inc. May 06 2013 LEEDuser Member 2659 Thumbs Up

Lauren,

That is correctly my understanding for v3 version. Is that the same case for v2.2?

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Larissa Oaks Specialist, LEED , USGBC May 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 549 Thumbs Up

Hi Victor,
Yes, laundry rooms are also excluded for v2.2.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Sep 24 2013 Guest 3356 Thumbs Up

There is a discrepancy between the reference guide and the "Project Submittal Tips." The Reference guide states that "specific types or numbers of controls are not listed in the credit requirements."

Yet the "tips" document states that "on/off switches are not sufficient for shared multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations.", i.e. more than 1 lighting level is required. For some small rooms that have just one task occurring in them, one lighting level is sufficient to suit the activities within. But we are concerned this will be rejected.

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Larissa Oaks Specialist, LEED , USGBC Sep 30 2013 LEEDuser Expert 549 Thumbs Up

Hi Kathryn,
As stated in the rating system language, the lighting controls in shared multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. need to enable adjustments that meet group needs and preferences.

For many multi-occupant spaces, such as larger spaces, many conference rooms, and multimedia rooms, a single on/off switch will not provide this sufficient level of control.

A single on/off switch may be appropriate for smaller shared multi-occupant spaces. In this case, include an explanation of how the space is used and how the controls are sufficient for this use.

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
May 01 2013
LEEDuser Member
2659 Thumbs Up

Template forces to have workstations

Our building is an auditorium that does not have workstations, but it does have a big auditorium, that has controll devices for the general lighting. When I put this information the template does not award me with the credit documented. It seems that you have to put some type of workstation in order to achieve the credit. Is that correct?

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google May 01 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi Victor,

Does your auditorium have workstations in other parts of the building, such as the ticket collection area?

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator, JALRW Eng. Group Inc. May 02 2013 LEEDuser Member 2659 Thumbs Up

no it does not, it is more like a community learning auditorium.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google May 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi Victor,

If you're completely sure you don't have any individual workstations in the project I would just provide the reviewer with a narrative explaining that this is the case and that you've simply accounted for the multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. in your project.

Just make sure that there aren't any spaces like this: "In individual occupant spacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces., occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building.. Note: Currently there are no non-regularly occupied spaces that are designated as individual occupant spaces."

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator, JALRW Eng. Group Inc. May 06 2013 LEEDuser Member 2659 Thumbs Up

Correct. There are not any but the template just does not allow me to document the credit. I did the narrative and everything but the template will seem as not completed.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google May 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Victor,
Often I will have credits that are shown as not complete on the Template but I will provide a narrative explaining why the Template is wrongly not giving me credit and then the reviewer will understand.

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Larissa Oaks Specialist, LEED , USGBC May 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 549 Thumbs Up

Hi Victor,
Lauren is correct, if you are having problems getting the template to show complete, an explanation to the reviewer will be acceptable.
You can earn this credit with only multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations., but the template might not fully accommodate this scenario.

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Apr 12 2013
LEEDuser Member
2659 Thumbs Up

Residential Dwellings in a multifamily building.

In the template should we put residential dwellings as individual workstations or should each room within the unit be considered as individual? I previously read that the same "individual workstations" that you put on IEQc6.1 should be the same as IEQc6.2, but in the case of 6.2 a residential unit is considered an individual space as in the description of the "bird's eye view". Therefore Im its not clear the correct way to document this.

Thanks

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Apr 18 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi Victor,

Please see here: http://www.leeduser.com/blogs/leed-ieq-space-matrix-frequently-asked-que... and let me know if you still have questions.

"I am working on a residential project. How many lighting controls do I need?

Per the IEQ Space Matrix, for all individual and multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations., each space must have one lighting control to be counted towards the credit. For IEQc6.2, each unit must have its own thermal control to be counted towards the credit."

Thanks!

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Peggy White White + GreenSpec
Oct 11 2012
LEEDuser Member
1874 Thumbs Up

v2.2, Credit 6.1 - Library Occupant Count

In a public building such as a city library, it really is not an option to allow the general public, including children, access to the controls for lighting. If all library staff have access to lighting controls, but not the general public, is that sufficient to meet the intent of this Credit?

Thanks in advance for your input.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Oct 11 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi Peggy,

When was your project registered? My guidance gets a bit tricky if your project was registered after the IEQ Space Matrix document came out. If it was registered before, I think it's fairly clear that only your full time occupants need individual controls and not the public. However, project teams are required to provide multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. that have lighting controls to suit the needs of that group. So it might make sense to allow for some controllability of shared spaces (task lights for little desks, overhead dimming that could be controlled by one library staff person but could receive suggetions from visitors for changes).

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Peggy White White + GreenSpec Oct 11 2012 LEEDuser Member 1874 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the response! We registered it in early 2008. Does that put us before or after the IEQ Space Matrix?

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Oct 11 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Please see this post regarding the IEQ Space Matrix: http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/IEQc6.1#comment-28768

Here is the document: http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=10539 It was originally issued last year and then updated this last summer so I think you're OK.

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Oct 11 2012 LEEDuser Expert 3443 Thumbs Up

Hi Peggy,

There are some credit interpretations regarding libraries (#5071 specifically). Basically, they seem to indicate that lighting controls for the employees only is not a sufficient approach. You can exclude lobbies, circulation and stacks but any reading/work areas must be classified like an open office plan (i.e. task lighting). This particular CIR was issued in 2007 but it seems a reasonable assumption that the ruling would be the same now even if you were registered before the space matrix.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Oct 11 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Thanks for clarifying Ellen. I guess it's been noted before on LEEDuser but it's worth repeating again that the reviewers approach to these issues is not always consistent.

I have submitted libraries before where controls were primarily attributed to the main staff and I have not had trouble with having these approaches passed. Note that the CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide references "regularly occupied" as a methodology for determining what spaces need to be included and what spaces do not need to be included. However, the IEQ Space Matrix clearly states that, for commercial spaces- all individual and multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. *including* regularly and non-regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building., need to be included. I point this out to note the inconsistencies in guidance and to provide an explanation for why there are grey areas in understanding.

I think the key idea is that the credit wants you to consider the needs of everyone in your project space. My way of interpreting this is that it's not practical to have every person from the public entering the building and controlling overhead and main light switches but that some controllability and thoughtfulness around the design of task lights (for reading) or having a system in place to request a lighting change from a library manager from a patron would be things a reviewer would look for to see that you're meeting the credit's intent.

I thought I would cut and paste the CIR Ellen references above because it appears to be a good one:

CIR 5071:
"The CIR is requesting clarification on the definition of building occupants, as pertaining to EQc6.1 & EQc6.2. The determining factor is not WHO uses the space, but HOW the space is being used. It is not sufficient to ignore the needs of transient/visitors to a building and to provide lighting and thermal controls only to full time employees. (The credit requires individual control for occupants, not just FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.'s). Instead, the e expected building use should be analyzed and control systems should be provided to serve all users as appropriate. As a guideline of typical library uses, we can look at the likely classifications of public areas in a library: 1) lobbies and circulation: these areas are defined as not being "regularly occupied" and therefore not required to have individual control 2) book shelf "stacks" areas: depending on use and function, these areas would not typically be classified as "regularly occupied" 3) reading/work areas: these areas are not dissimilar to an open office environment, and depending on use and function, would typically be considered "regularly occupied". System designers should apply reasonable discretion and be prepared to support the decisions they make regarding these classifications of space. In a library setting some of the patrons will likely spend long periods of time inside at specific spaces, and will be performing tasks (reading, writing) that are similar to those of workers or employees. Spaces that serve these functions should meet the requirements of EQc6.1& EQc6.2, regardless of whether they are intended for staff or library visitors. The implementation of these credits is left to the discretion of the designers, though for building types that do not "neatly" fit the credit as written in the reference guide, a description of the individual spaces and their respective functions should accompany the calculations and LEED Submittal Template to support the design decisions. Please note that the quantity of individual workstation and shared multi-occupant spaces must be consistent between the credits."

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Peggy White White + GreenSpec Oct 12 2012 LEEDuser Member 1874 Thumbs Up

Very helpful - gracias to both of you! My approach is to consider the issue from the perspective of sustainability, getting beyond the narrow confines of one Credit. I can't imagine that the USGBC would think that adding a bunch of task lights would be a reasonable solution to public spaces such as libraries, just to get a Credit point and also let users flip switches on and off (or more likely, on but not off). Adding automatic controls to every one of those task lights also does not make sense financially. Having the staff manage lighting that is designed to serve the needs of all of the building users, with the transient user being able to ask for some adjustment if they desire - this makes sense, IMO.

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Mary Pat Crozier Principal Crozier Architecture
Oct 05 2012
Guest
101 Thumbs Up

v2.2: EQ6.1-Definition of individual/multi-occupant worksations

When did the definition of "workspace" and "multi-occupant space" change from the Reference Manual listings under the "Calculations" title to include non-workstation and non-presentation locations? Adjustable Task LIghting: "The total count shall include private offices, reception stations, ticket boths, etc." Maybe a grey area concerning an employee office workstation in a commercial gym (not included in a K-12 classroom). Shared Multi-Occupant SpacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations.: "These spaces incude conference rooms, classrooms, ... used as a place of congreation for functions such as presentation and training." How does a private hotel room fit into this descrition?

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Oct 05 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi Mary,

Yes, there is a lot of confusion because LEED originated around office spaces and so all of the examples were focused on offices. Now that we have more complex applications it gets trickier. I would treat a hotel room like I would a residential application and so I would include a couple individual workstations to suit the needs of your private hotel room.

The LEED NC 2009 RG states on page 522: "In residential applications, switched receptacles are appropriate to provide a variety of lighting options within the space" That's not too helpful I know but I thought I would share...

Interestingly enough, LEED v4 (so not applicable for your LEED project) includes this guidance in its latest draft version: "Hospitality only
Guest rooms are assumed to provide adequate lighting controls and are therefore not included in the credit calculations."

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Reid Middlebrooks Sustainability Director Apollo BBC
Jun 07 2012
LEEDuser Member
387 Thumbs Up

Hotel Multi-Occupant Spaces

We have a hotel in which the fitness center, business center and guest laundry areas are required by the hotel chain to be lighted at all times during operational hours and operable only by staff key, not a switch. This is for guest security reasons. Does this preclude us from pursuing this credit since all multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. must be controllable?

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Jun 20 2012 Guest 7771 Thumbs Up

Tim,

For the fitness center and the guest laundry room I think you could make a case with GBCI about why they do not have controls for occupants. I'm not certain it will be successful, but seems worth a shot.

However, I think you'll have a much harder time convincing GBCI that the business center does not need controls. I suppose this depends on the specific configuration to your project. If there is, say, a projector available it would be preferable for occupants to be able to control the lighting. 

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Jun 22 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

I agree with Emily that it would be worth trying to make a case for certain circumstances. However, sometimes it also the case in LEED that certain credits just aren't applicable for your project's application.

I would take a peek at LEED for Retail, just to look at how EQc6 is dealt with a bit differently. I realize you're not technically Retail but the special considerations regarding controllability restraints could be interesting to check out.

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Andrew Pike Opechee Construction Corporation Aug 08 2014 LEEDuser Member

Reid,

I would like to hear if your case was argued successfully. I have run into the same situation on a current hotel project.

A solution I have is to have two switches, one switch for each half of fixtures. One switch would be keyed to maintain the minimum light level specified by the brand, and the other switch would turn the other half of the fixtures on and off. That setup would maintain minimum light levels and allow for some occupant control.

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Terry Schroeder Senior Project Engineer Whitman, Requardt & Associates, LLP
May 22 2012
LEEDuser Member
43 Thumbs Up

Open Office Areas: Multi-Occupant Space?

I was looking at the LEEDUser glossary definition of "multi-occupant space" and the definition states "...Group multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations." But then I look at the section in the Bird's Eye View above titled "How this credit is addressed in specific building types", and under Office, the text states that "open offices are considered multi-occupant spaces." Which is correct? We have two open office areas in our building that do not have override switches on the occupancy sensors controlling the ambient lightingLighting in a space that provides for general wayfinding and visual comfort, in contrast to task lighting, which illuminates a defined area to facilitate specific visual work.. Do the task lights at each workstation in the open offices let us qualify for this credit, or are we not in compliance because we do not have an override on the ambient lighting?

Thanks!

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google May 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi Terry,

Task lights are the number one way that project teams meet the individual controls aspect of this credit. Task Lights would definitely work. Open offices that contain individual workstations such as cubicles are considered desks that need their own controls to meet the 90% threshold requirement.
If you had an open office work area with break out spaces (without cubicles) then that area could be considered multi-occupant potentially. I usually go by desk counts when thinking about this credit. As a reminder, occupancy sensors never suffice for controllabilty issues (but do help with saving energy under other credits!).

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rebecca antle
May 18 2012
Guest
32 Thumbs Up

Athletic Center

I am working on a multi function athletic center that includes offices, conference, meeting rooms, lockers, cafe, exercise rooms, auditorium and many other functions.

My question is do you have to include all spaces in the entire facility? And if so, which category do you put storage rooms and other rooms that are not always occupied.

This would be the same for lockers and cafes for example. They are multi occupant spaces with a control.

This is the first time I have worked with this version of LEED and it is a bit confusing as to where the spaces will need to be included.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google May 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi Rebecca,

I usually leave unoccupied spaces out. Places like circulation space and storage space are excluded from the calculation. Offices would be individual workstations. Conference rooms are multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations.. Exercise rooms are also multi-occupant spaces. In cafes, sometimes I consider certain points of commerce to be individual workstations (such as the check-out counter) but generally a cafe would be multi-occupant. This has been debated on this forum previously. Locker rooms would be multi-occupant.

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy
May 18 2011
LEEDuser Member
1485 Thumbs Up

IEQcr6.1 for Industrial nave

We are working on a Industrial project in Mexico, we are providing to all workstations, administrative offices and shared, multi- occupant spaces the individual light control, BUT, this project includes steel pipe manufacturing and some activities of the personal doesn´t require a permanent workstation or a workstation at all, many workers are just moving materials, etc. Do we have to include anyway this (large) number of people into the calculations? They represent the 30% of employees.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects May 18 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17785 Thumbs Up

You might find a comment I made on March 29, 20011 in the NC-2009 forum for this same credit relevant for your situation:

On a 2.2 project, I've seen this credit accepted when a detailed analysis of all spaces/ uses/ lighting needs/ and lighting controls was provided. The team provided a table listing all spaces within the building (not just rooms, but all spaces with different activities) in rows, and the columns listed the use, the task performed, the occupancy, frequency or duration of use, lighting requirements for that kind of task (such as ambient only, task + ambient, multiple levels of ambient, multiple zones, etc) and then the type of lighting controls provided.
This helps you to be more precise about the level of controls that is appropriate for the specific "needs and preferences" that can vary from space to space. No assurance that this method would be accepted by all reviewers, but hopefully it would be considered a valid and reasonable approach.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google May 20 2011 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

I agree with David. I think a good narrative goes a long way with this credit and the more you can describe to the reviewer the activities going on in your space, the better. The reviewer wants to make sure that the intent of the credit is met. I think you could -- in the case -- argue for the manufacturing floor to be a multi-occupant space and then make sure that the space has controls that meet the needs, collectively, of those in that space.

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Lisa Starr DLA
Jan 05 2011
Guest
189 Thumbs Up

Lighting Contollability for a Grocery Store

Would anyone have any strategies for attempting this credit for a grocery store? We are working on LEED documentation for a grocery store and are finding it difficult to attempt the credit because of the building type. It's easy to figure out the lighting controls for the offices and meeting rooms, but all other spaces are difficult to categorize. I've read the CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide dated 6/12/2006 that discusses grocery stores and lighting controls, however I'm looking for more information. For example, is task lighting needed at the registers? How would one approach that problem? I'd hate to let this credit slip by just because we're not taking the right approach. If anyone could offer some advice I'd really appreciate it. Thank you

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Jan 10 2011 LEEDuser Expert 15739 Thumbs Up

Hi Lisa,

I am currently working on a coffee shop and have run into similar problems. I am not familiar with the CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide you mention. What are its details? I know that LEED generally encourages areas like Nurse's Stations and Cubicles to be included as Individual Workstations. I've also worked on an Animal Shelter and have included computer stations (that were sporadically used) as workstations with lighting task lights...

EQc6.1 is a great example of a credit that was truly originally designed for an office space and so doesn't work nicely for any other building type.

In the case of my coffee shop, we have added some task lights for patrons to sit and read or work inside the space. We also have an individual light fixture for the interior office space. Aside from these two applications, we are not adding lighting controls for the cash register nor other "stations" in the cafe such as the barista area.

It's a tricky one, and I'm not personally sure that I will gain the credit with this approach. However, every time I work on a project, I try to ensure that my approach is reasonable for the project as a whole as well as trying to align with LEED.

I'd be interested to hear what other folks have to say regarding this credit.

Good luck,
Lauren

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Shevaun Barrie Inland Technical Services
Nov 12 2010
LEEDuser Member
1015 Thumbs Up

LEED Canada EQ 6.1

The NC v1 Reference guide says perimeter areas fall within 5 metres (15 ft) of the perimeter wall, the letter template says within 4.5 metres (14.76 ft), and the addendum does not address this discrepancy. Which one should I use? I am guessing the template.
As well, in open concept kitchens with large openings to the living room area, can that be counted as one large room? The kitchen area does not have a connection to the building exterior. Thank you so much for your help!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 13 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

For the first question, I would go with the template.

For the second question, it sounds like you have some discretion. How does it impact your credit compliance?

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Shevaun Barrie Inland Technical Services Nov 15 2010 LEEDuser Member 1015 Thumbs Up

A credit hinges on it because if the kitchen is it's own room, we do not have the supply ventilation requirements. If it can be counted as one large room, it is ok.

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Mohamed Ravuthar, LEED AP, BD+C LEED Engineer Contrack International Inc
Oct 09 2010
Guest
901 Thumbs Up

IEQc6.1 Controlability of system lighting

I have one question regarding Lighting controls. If the individual workstation space lighting is operating 24 hrs ,still needs to provide individual lighting controls to achieve this credit? or can we provide confirmation letter from the client sayong that the particular area light is operating 24hrs/day. Can anyone help me?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 09 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, you still need to provide controllability. What if there is a time of the day when the light is too bright, too dim, etc.? The intent of the credit is to put adjustments in the hand of the occupant—not to just have a rigid lighting plan. Also, if the program changes at some point, this will enable the lighting to be adjusted appropriately.

What kind of space is it? If it's a warehouse or factory floor, there are ways to still meet the credit. See LEEDuser's guidance above.

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William Weaver Sustainability Practice Lead JLL
May 12 2010
LEEDuser Member
1312 Thumbs Up

EQc6.1 and EQc6.2 Coordination

I'm working on a 136 guest room hotel under LEED NC v2.2. It is my understanding that the guest rooms meet the definition of regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building.. I'm having difficulty, however, deciding if the guest rooms should be treated as individual workstations or if they'd fall into the multi-occupant category for the purposes of completing the template.

We have 8 workstations and/or designated staff work areas and 136 guestrooms in addition to a number of spaces that are easily defined as multi-occupant. For EQc6.1, my electrical engineer has indicated the number of individual workstations as 8, and has placed the 136 guestrooms under the multi-occupant category and explained the localized individual lighting controllability within the guestroom suites within his narrative. However, for EQc6.2, my mechanical engineer has indicated the number of individual workstations as 144 (8 workstations + 136 guestrooms) and has explained the individual thermal controllability for each of the 144 spaces.

Both approaches seem to make sense and I fully understand why each placed the guest rooms in the category that they did. However, the reviewer for the preliminary review has dinged us on both credits, suggesting that the number of work stations has to be consistent between the two credits, although no advice for how to treat the guest rooms was given.

Can anyone please help me determine how the guest rooms should be classified - individual workstation or multi-occupant space - to coordinate the two credits?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects May 12 2010 LEEDuser Expert 17785 Thumbs Up

You may be better off using the "alternative path" check box at the end of the letter template and providing a detailed narrative for both credits that describes the controls for offices and guest rooms, including all the occupancy numbers, numbers of thermostats, number of light controls, etc. We've used this method to document these credits in multi-family projects without trying translate units into the workstation categories.

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