NC-v2.2 EQc8.2: Daylight and Views—Views for 90% of Spaces

  • EQc8.2 diagram
  • Easy credit for most buildings

    Buildings that provide views to the outdoors have proven to enhance productivity, testing performance, and overall occupant comfort and well-being. This credit is easy to achieve if you also plan to design for open space planning, placing occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space. near exterior windows with large glazing areas. and design  spaces to use furniture that does not block views from a seated position, such as low or transparent partitions between workstations.  If there is a standard design for every floor or standard spaces that are repeated throughout the design, this credit calculation may be relatively easier as calculations can be duplicated for each floor. Designing for compliance with this credit will likely be complementary with EQc8.1: Daylight and Views—Daylight. Expect some tradeoffs associated with increasing window area, such as heat loss and gain through larger windows, increased glare, and privacy issues with open space planning and low furniture partitions.

    Documentation can be time-consuming

    The documentation for this credit does not involve complicated formulas. You are simply figuring out the floor area that has access to views and comparing it with the floor areas that do not have access to views.   However, the larger the project the more time-consuming the documentation will be, especially if spaces are varied.

    FAQs for EQc8.2

    How does a project achieve Exemplary Performance for a NCv2.2 project?

    The Reference Guide gives little guidance for this and states projects will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. LEED 2009 requirements are more specific, and while not officially applicable, provide some direction.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Analyze building orientation and site selection for opportunities to provide access to views to the outside.


  • Too much glazing, particularly east- and west-facing glazing exposed to low-angle morning and afternoon sun, may cause glare and overheating. Use overhangs, energy-efficient glazing, and daylighting designs that control glare, such as interior shades or lightshelves.


  • High performance glazing and increased glazing area may add additional costs unless they can be offset by integrated design solutions like right sizing of mechanical equipment, or in some cases the elimination of perimeter heating.


  • When selecting windows for maximizing views, consider also using operable windows for natural ventilation. This can contribute to credits EQp1: Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance and EQc2: Increased Ventilation.


  • While LEED does not dictate the quality of the view outside the window, considering this can help a project achieve exemplary performance. Also, occupants will likely prefer view of interesting objects, views with movement (though not too busy), and views of nature. In other words, a view of a brick wall may meet the letter of the LEED requirement, but not the spirit.

Schematic Design

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  • Determine which spaces in a project are “regularly occupied” (per LEED definition) and need to be included in the views calculations.


  • Some spaces can be exempt from being considered “regularly occupied” due to the nature of their use. Previously published CIR’s offer some guidance. Provide a narrative explanation of why a given space should be exempt based on use of the space as views and daylight may negatively affect the use of the space, not the frequency or time that the space is actually used. For example, museum gallery spaces, high security and privacy areas, dark rooms for photo development, and others can all be exempt from the calculation.


  • The calculation of regularly occupied space can be fine-tuned as decisions for “fixed” (attached to a wall) counters with overhead cabinets and equipment are integrated into the design. The square footage where the cabinets and equipment are located is not considered occupiable space, and therefore is not included as part of the view or the daylight calculation. For example, if an office is 500 ft2 in total, but fixed counters and cabinets occupy 100 ft2, the regularly occupied space of the room is only 400 ft2.


  • Ensure that the spaces identified as “regularly occupied” are consistent across credits, especially for EQc8.1: Daylighting and Views—Daylighting.


  • Enter the names of the regularly occupied spaces in the LEED EQc8.1-8.2 Glazing Factor and Views Calculator along with the total floor area for each regularly occupied space.


  • Hold an integrated design meeting with the architect, interior designers, mechanical engineer, lighting designer, contractor, cost estimator and the end user to explore and resolve possible benefits and tradeoffs that increased glazing and access to views strategies could have on daylight, glare, heat gain and loss, furniture design and layout, and other design decisions.


  • Place regularly occupied spaces such as offices, classrooms and conference rooms near exterior glazing and perimeter windows to increase opportunity for access to views and daylight.


  • When considering office space layout and workstations, consider partitions and moveable furniture that are equal to or less than 42 inches high on all sides or incorporate transparent surfaces in upper sections to allow access to views while seated.


  • Window-to-wall ratios may be fixed if your project is pursuing a prescriptive compliance path for EAp2: Minimum Energy Performance and EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance. These fixed ratios will impact access to views and glazing areas. Check the ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guide and the Advanced Buildings Core Performance Guide for required window-to-wall ratios. If a building envelope window-to-wall ratio is over 40% there will be a penalty in the energy model for EAc1. The same is true if skylight-to-roof ratio is more than 5%. These requirements are based on ASHRAE 90.1.

Design Development

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  • Explore a combination of strategies that increase views such as low-partition furniture, space-planning techniques, and interior glazing.


  • Identify available products and furniture that combine glazing and building elements for optimum access to views while maintaining privacy—for example, workstations with low partition heights and interior perimeter glazing.


  • By increasing glazing and designing for natural light, projects can reduce the number of ambient light fixtures or the frequency with which they are used, reducing the cost of electric lighting both upfront and for ongoing operations.


  • Ensure that glare controls are factored into the design of daylighting and views.

Construction Documents

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  • Plan View Direct Line of Sight to Perimeter Glazing Calculations:


  • Calculate the floor area with direct-line-of-sight to perimeter vision glazing for each regularly occupied space. Moveable partitions must be included in your calculations.


  • Direct-line-of-sight is determined by visibility between the vision glazing (between 2’6” and 7’6” inches above the floor) without obstructions such as full-height partitions or solid doorways. 


  • Direct-line-of-sight can pass through two interior glazing surfaces before reaching exterior glazing, but not through solid doors, walls, or partitions taller than 42”. 


  • Create a floor plan showing areas with access to views as distinct from areas with no access to views.


  • Include more than one sight line if necessary to demonstrate how the lines of sight were determined for spaces.


  • Private offices where more than 75% of the floor area has a direct-line-of-sight to views can include the entire square footage in the calculations.


  • Total the square footage with access to views and enter this value in the corresponding regularly occupied space entry in the LEED EQc8.1-8.2 Glazing Factor and Views Calculator.


  • Section View Direct Line of Sight Height Confirmation:


  • Create a representative building section for each type of area included in the calculation.


  • For each section, draw a line originating from 42” above the floor (typical eye height) to the perimeter glazing demonstrating access to vision glazing and views to the outside.


  • Show typical furniture heights in the sections if applicable.


  • Total the areas of regularly occupied spaces that have both direct-line-of-sight to perimeter glazing and access to views while seated (at 42”). Divide this value by the total area of regularly occupied spaces to confirm if the design provides greater than 90% of regularly occupied areas with access to views. This is done in the LEED Submittal Template. Upload plans and all required supporting documentation to LEED Online.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED for New Construction and Major Renovations Version 2.2

    EQ Credit 8.2: Daylight and views - views for 90% of spaces

    1 Point

    Intent

    Provide for the building occupants a connection between indoor spaces and the outdoors through the introduction of daylight and views into the regularly occupied areas of the building.

    Requirements

    Achieve direct line of sight to the outdoor environment via vision glazing between 2’6” and 7’6” above finish floor for building occupants in 90% of all regularly occupied areas. Determine the area with direct line of sight by totaling the regularly occupied square footage that meets the following criteria:

    • In plan view, the area is within sight lines drawn from perimeter vision glazing.
    • In section view, a direct sight line can be drawn from the area to perimeter vision glazing.
    • Line of sight may be drawn through interior glazing. For private offices, the entire square footage of the office can be counted if 75% or more of the area has direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazingThe approach used to determine the calculated area of regularly occupied areas with direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing. The area determination includes full height partitions and other fixed construction prior to installation of furniture.. For multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations., the actual square footage with direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing is counted.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Design the space to maximize daylighting and view opportunities. Strategies to consider include lower partition heights, interior shading devices, interior glazing, and automatic photocell-based controls.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Publications

The Biophilia Hypothesis (Stephen R. Kellert, ed.)

This collection of papers on elements of biophilia includes consideration of daylighting's effects on people.

Articles

New York City Audubon

This Audubon chapter takes a leadership role in reducing bird collisions with buildings.  The chapter publishes Bird-Safe Building Guidelines, conducts monitoring, and, through its Project Safe Flight, promotes bird-friendly design.

Organizations

Fatal Light Awareness Program

Initiated the Bird-Friendly Building Development Program for the City of Toronto, FLAP monitors and promotes bird-friendly design.

Web Tools

Sight Line Simulator

Technologists at LMN architects have created a tool to calculate sightlines and views in a performing arts theater.

LEED Online Supporting Calculator – EQc8

 

This "Glazing FactorThe ratio of interior illuminance at a given point on a given plane (usually the work plane) to the exterior illuminance under known overcast sky conditions. LEED uses a simplified approach for its credit compliance calculations. The variables used to determine the daylight factor include the floor area, window area, window geometry, visible transmittance (Tvis) and window height. and Access to Views Calculator" can be used in support of EQc8.1 and EQc8.2 documentation. This calculator is a flattened, public version of a dynamic template for EQc8 that is used within LEED-Online v2 by registered project teams. This and other public versions of LEED credit templates come from the USGBC website, and are posted on LEEDuser with USGBC's permission.

 

USGBC

Official LEED Online Forms

LEED Online Sample Template – EQc8.2

This template is the flattened, public version of the dynamic template for this credit that is used within LEED-Online v2 by registered project teams. This and other public versions of LEED credit templates come from the USGBC website, and are posted on LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. You'll need to fill out the live version of this template on LEED Online to document this credit.

USGBC

Official LEED Online Forms

Views Documentation

These samples of views documentation demonstrate how to sucessfully document access to views via plan drawing, section drawing, and spreadsheet. Depending on the rating system and version, not all of these may be required. Samples generously provided by LEEDuser guest expert Allison Beer McKenzie.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

65 Comments

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Ahmed Hidayet
Oct 20 2013
Guest
44 Thumbs Up

Views in an operation control center

I am working on a project which has a 15,490 square feet operation control center which is the largest office space in the project. It is included already in the total regularly occupied area since staff will be spending an 8 hour shift in this area. By the owner requirements, the OCC shouldn't have any windows which makes daylight and views calculation below the thresholds required by LEED.

To target credit 8.2, should the OCC area be deducted from the regularly occupied areas? If not, can the credit be achieved without including it its area in the credit 8.2 calculations?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Ahmed, there is some precedent for excluding spaces like theaters where the space programming is inherently contradictory with daylight and views, but I don't think this argument could be made for an office.

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4666 Thumbs Up

I think it would depend on what the owner requirements are and if the review team thinks they are truly prohibitive to daylighting and views. You won't be able to deduct its area without a detailed narrative explaining these requirements. Perhaps if you include them here, we can help you decide if they might be reason enough.

Only you can answer the question regarding if the credit can be achieved without including its area in the 8.2 credit calculations. If you include it in the regularly occupied area and not in the qualifying area and that brings the qualifying area down below 90% of the regularly occupied area total, then you don't qualify for the point.

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Suzanne Allerton Architect W2A Design Group
Aug 01 2013
Guest
852 Thumbs Up

Library stacks

Are library stacks considered furniture - even if they are not
on casters? Please send any Library specific clarifications Thanks Suzy

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Aug 01 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Library stack areas can be excluded from the calcs.

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Suzanne Allerton Architect, W2A Design Group Aug 01 2013 Guest 852 Thumbs Up

Does one not calculate the area in the regularly occupied space or
does one just disregard the library stacks and include the area? Thanks

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Aug 02 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

I disregard the area between the stacks and 2 feet from the outer stacks as not being regularly occupied. This same area is not included in the overall regularly occupied square footage.

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Shristi Bajracharya architect technical interface
Jun 21 2013
Guest
243 Thumbs Up

regularly occupied space??

can someone clarify the definition of regularly occupied space?? I am getting confused whether to put health club and jacuzzi area to regularly occupied space or not? can a coffee shop and its kitchen be under regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building.??

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jun 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Shristi,

Regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building - See more at: http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-v2.2/EQc8.2?page=0#comment-40156

The Regularly Occupied Space Matrix, dated April 2013, http://www.usgbc.org/resources/eq-space-type-matrix is a good place to start to help determine whether a space is considered regularly occupied or not. The past two versions of the space matrix do not specifically list health club or jacuzzi. But the health club would be considered regularly occupied, and the jacuzzi are could fall under natatorium in the space matrix, and that is considered regularly occupied. Both the coffee shop and the kitchen would be considered regularly occupied.

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Shristi Bajracharya architect, technical interface Jun 23 2013 Guest 243 Thumbs Up

sorry for posting this question in this forum inappropriately ....bt do u have any leads to definitions of tradable and non-tradable surfaces?? a bit confused ....

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jun 24 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Shristi,

Go to SSc 8 Light Pollution Credit for help with the definitions. 90.1 does not have an official definition of either, and table 9.4.5 just states what is and is not tradable or non.

Good Luck.

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Shristi Bajracharya architect technical interface
Jun 17 2013
Guest
243 Thumbs Up

an ecotect question, anyone?

As i tried to import a .dxf file to ecotect, it said ....
ERROR: Selected model file does not match the selected data format or is corrupt.
Why does it say dat when the data format is correct as far as I can tell?
I am new to ecotect hence can not figure out what to do.
The drawing of the project that I am trying to import is rather small in area. Could this be any problem??
I have done tons of work in ecotect for the drawing dat i imported the last time. no such problem was encountered.... now I can not move forward cos i cant even import the file.
Should I import a .3ds file to work on the daylight and views credit-daylight... bt ecotect only takes thermal zones, i.e simple forms with simple planes as far as possible, right? while my 3d is rather complex ... and importing such a 3d is a time consuming task in itself plus working on it to get a daylight result would be difficult n not to mention impossible ... please can anyone help me out??

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jun 17 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Shristi,

Your question would be more appropriately resolved in one of Autodesk's user's forums rather than here in the LEED daylight forum.
http://forums.autodesk.com/t5/Autodesk-Ecotect-Analysis/bd-p/356

There can be a multitude of issues as to why you are getting that error, base program in which the model was created. How it was created in the base program. Surfaces are better method rather than extrusions when using the dxf format and importation.

Depending on whether the client has Revit model, sketchup model, or just 2D CAD drawings, depends on the method i use to get into Ecotect. Typically i just use surfaces in CAD and export to Ecotect. The minimal amount of information within that file, the less likely to have errors or have to spend time in Ecotect to get the model correct. The more surfaces and complexity also create long simualtion runs when exporting to Radiance and Daysim. Those complexities can also cause errors and results that are not accurate.

If you still unable to find your answer in the Autodesk forum, here is a link that should help: http://sustainabilityworkshop.autodesk.com/buildings/daysim-daylighting-...

Also read the DAYSIM tutorial by Rinehart which walks you through an Ecotect importation.

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Jonathan Internicola Aug 01 2013 Guest 5 Thumbs Up

Hi,

Perhaps someone can help redirect me appropriately. I am working on 8.2 for a monastery and have been referencing the aforementioned spread sheet. According to that sheet some spaces would not need to be declared a regularly occupied space for 8.2 but they would be for 8.1... How do I separate these in the supplemental daylight and views calculation sheet?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Aug 02 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

I make my own spreadsheet that allows me to separate the two. Since the overall regularly occupied space is connected for each group and you cannot modify the calculations, you may need to submit one for 8.1 and then another for 8.2. If you go this route, provide a narrative explaining your methodology letting the reviewer know why there are two different ones.

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Shristi Bajracharya architect technical interface
May 31 2013
Guest
243 Thumbs Up

view lines?

Please can someone assist me with the instructions to how to calculate the regularly occupied space with horizontal viewThe approach used to confirm that the direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing remains available from a seated position. It uses section drawings that include the installed furniture to make the determination. at 42" ... I understand that the regularly occupied space needs the horizontal view at 42" and all ... but what I have failed to understand is calculating the regularly occupied area with the direct line of sight to perimeter glazing. From the LEED V3 reference book pg 570 fig3.view lines, I gather that the lines indicating direct line of sight to exterior is marked by criss crossing the edges of the interior line and the exterior lining of the external wall.... considering that the walls look thicker, how am i supposed to draw the direct line of sight in a curtain wall with bigger glazing units .... please someone tell me if i have or have not misunderstood the figure.... thanx

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group May 31 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Your understanding of the graphic is correct.

For curtain walls it depend on the thickness/depth of the structural elements. A typical one story system may only have the elements 3-4 inches. There i would draw my lines of sight from the edge of the curtain wall system where it meets a typical wall construction. If the elements get close to 6 inches or greater, they the lines of sight would be from element to element.

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Shristi Bajracharya architect, technical interface Jun 09 2013 Guest 243 Thumbs Up

thank you for the reply ... my understanding is clear now and I have already finished the supporting documents for the credit.
I also wanted to ask about the exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. of the views ... our project hit a 97% regularly occupied space with horizontal views at 42" .... however, the guide says this credit needs to meet 2 of the following 4 diff measures ....
1) 90% or more of regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. have multiple lines of sight to vision glazing in different directions at least 90 degrees apart
2) 90% or more of regularly occupied spaces have views that include views of at least2 of the following 3 options:
a) vegetation
b) human activity
c) objects at least 70 feet from the exterior of the glazing
3. 90% or more of regularly occupied spaces have access to unobstructed views located within the distance of 3 times the head height of the vision glazing.
4. 90% or more of regularly occupied spaces have access to views with a view factor of 3 or greater.
can you clearly explain no. 1 3 and 4.
When it says "unobstructed views located within the distance of 3 times the head height of the vision glazing" in no. 3, does it mean the distance within the regularly occupied space or outside the glazing area??

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Shristi Bajracharya architect, technical interface Jun 09 2013 Guest 243 Thumbs Up

Also can a regularly occupied space with no glazing area be included in the views or daylight at all??

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jun 10 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Shristi,

To answer your first post for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements.; yes, that distance is within the regularly occupied space.

The answer to your second question; regularly occupied space must be included in the total regularly occupied square footage whether it has glazing or not. You have gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. and then regularly occupied square footage. So an office in the interior with no glazing still needs to be included in the calculations, it would just 0 sf as being compliant. You should review the regularly occupied space matrix dated April 2013 for a list all spaces that must be included in the daylight and views calculations.

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Jun 10 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4666 Thumbs Up

Shristi,
Just wanted to make sure we understand your question regarding #3. What I do for this requirement is draw a perimeter around the building that is offset from the exterior walls by 3 times the head height of the view windows. If an occupant has a view to anywhere on this line (if the line is now a vertical plane), the square footage they would be standing on can be counted in the compliant area for this requirement.

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Shristi Bajracharya architect, technical interface Jun 17 2013 Guest 243 Thumbs Up

jill,
from what i can infer from ur answer is .. you are saying that the vertical plane that we need to assume is outside the building perimeter and where the occupant (who has the view access to anywhere on this line) is standing counts as the % of regularly occupied space?? this is what i understand
Offsetting the perimeter inside the building and saying view from that line needs an unobstructed view to the glazing area and the view beyond dat . . does it mean that an occupant's view shouldn't be obstructed by any means such as furniture or cubboards n such ... in dat case, what happens to a rental space where we don't necessarily know what the layout's going to be even if we have a bit of assumption to how the layout would be like.

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Jun 17 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4666 Thumbs Up

Yes, the vertical plane is outside the building. Yes, let's assume a person occupies about on square foot of floor space for the sake of verbally illustrating something which is much easier to understand if we had the opportunity to post drawings on this forum. If I can stand on that one square foot of regularly occupied space (ROS) and see the vertical plane described above, I count that 1 sf in my "qualifying area." If I step to the next square foot of ROS but cannot see this plane, that goes only into my total for ROS and is not qualifying area. Now I have 2 sf of ROS and 1 sf of qualifying area, or 50%. If I move to the next sf of ROS and can see to the vertical plane, I now have 3 sf of ROS and 2 sf of qualifying area, or 66%. I do this for every sf of ROS. There is nothing to adjust or offset on the interior of the space, you just evaluate every sf of ROS.

Views should obviously not be obstructed by cupboards or other permanently installed opaque obstacles. Furniture can be excluded if the occupant would have the ability to move the furniture without having to use tools, etc.

In the case of tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space., submit a copy of the tenant lease that requires the tenants to achieve their portion of the views credit.

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Mike Stopka Director of Sustainability Solomon Cordwell Buenz
Nov 07 2012
LEEDuser Member
185 Thumbs Up

Regularly Occupied Spaces

Hi,

I'm trying to calculate the area of regularly occupied space for a dormitory. The dormitory "suites" enter into a vestibule and off the vestibule is a room that contains a small bathroom. The sink for the bathroom is located just outside the bathroom door and within the vestibule.
I would like to include the area occupied by the sink within the vestibule as non-regularly occupied space because it does not have views to the outdoors and is hurting my views calculation. Even though the sink is not technically located within the restroom can I include it in the restroom area which considered is non-regularly occupied?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Nov 08 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

I would think that the area of the sink is not regularly occupied. The vestibule area is more of a transient space, somewhat similar to what you find in a motel room. I would not include the area as regularly occupied in my calculations.

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tanner white
Jul 31 2012
LEEDuser Member
72 Thumbs Up

regularly occupied spaces

Hi, Im doing an outdoor performance theater, only occupied during the summer. It has a small 9x15', separate mens and womens changing rooms. Would these count as regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building.? Thanks
My reasoning that they wouldnt is because they would be spending most of there time in the green room, which has adequate lighting. The changing room is just for a quick wardrobe change.
Thanks

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jul 31 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Changing rooms would not be considered regularly occupied for this credit because of the privacy issues needed for the performers to change. I do not see any issue with them not being included in the calculations.

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Jul 31 2012 LEEDuser Expert 4666 Thumbs Up

I agree.

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tanner white Aug 01 2012 LEEDuser Member 72 Thumbs Up

Agreed as well. So under "project summary details" do I remove these rooms from regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building.?" Under credit 8.2 I am unable to "exempt" specific rooms from applying towards my total regularly occupied spaces

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Aug 01 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Tanner, it appears that you have a 2009 project and this is for a 2.2 thread, but i can help. So under in PIF3, under regularly occupied space, you need to ensure that square footage for those changing rooms are not included because it is linked to the EQc8.2 credit form.

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Joe Gootee
Jul 16 2012
Guest
157 Thumbs Up

Mini-Mall on an Air Force base

I’m working on a new construction v2.2 project for a Mini-Mall on an Air Force base. There will be a food court, a convenient store, and a military clothing store. Practically one complete side of the building will be windows and/or glass doors. Since the merchandise displays and racks are moveable, I plan to exclude them from my line of sight drawings making most of the area free of obstruction. Does this seem logical and correct thinking? Since the regularly occupied space is occupied by customers and workers that are walking around and not seated, at what height do I use or does it really matter in an open area like this? I feel this is good project to meet the intent of this credit, what do you think?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jul 17 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

You can exclude the moveable partitions. I would use the typical standing height as the basis for your line of sight lines since the customers are standing and walking around. The employees will be standing behind the counter. I do not see an issue based on what you stated with the project earning the credit.

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Ilana Judah Director of Sustainability FXFOWLE
Jun 13 2012
LEEDuser Member
298 Thumbs Up

Views for single-occupant residential spaces

Hello,
I am working on a mixed-use new construction project which is mainly residential.
For private offices, if ≥75% of the room area is within a direct line of site, the entire square footage of the room may be counted in the overall calculations. This is in contrast to multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations.. Can this same method also apply to private bedrooms or other private regularly occupied rooms within a residential dwelling unit?

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Jun 22 2012 Guest 7308 Thumbs Up

I can only answer this question for a LEED 2009 viewpoint. The supplamental document spreadsheet for 2009 is thorough and automatically calculates 100% for office spaces. When you select a residence it does not calculate to 100%, thus my best guess is no, unfortunately.

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Nancy Henderson Managing Partner ArchEcology
Feb 15 2012
LEEDuser Member
624 Thumbs Up

Views through sliding doors in residential bedrooms

I have a question about excluding solid doors in residential units. We have very small units that are technically studios, but have a small sleeping area defined by large sliding doors. The sleeping area is not on an outside wall - but would have access to views when the doors are open. The opening width is about 80% of the width of the room with the doors open. It does not seem reasonable to exclude view access through open solid doors in a private situation where the occupants have complete control of the environment. How is an open solid door different from window blinds?

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Feb 15 2012 LEEDuser Expert 4666 Thumbs Up

Solid doors are different from window blinds in that they cut out noise to a space where blinds don't. So, if that person wants a quiet space, they are forced to give up their view.

I can see an argument for a studio unit to be allowed to use the open door situation though, since the owner would presumably have control over both the door and the sound levels in their units. Not sure how much work your project would take to achieve the credit, but seems like it might be worth a try. Definitely address the issue in the narrative.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Feb 16 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

I agree that you could argue your position. However, as we have been seeing some reviewers are holding it to the letter of the law. So views from interior spaces must be determined with the doors closed.

Your point that what is the difference between that and blinds, well with blinds the views are available to the occupant, they just have to open them. In your case they are no views available with the door closed.

Could this door be considered a moveable partition?

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Nancy Henderson Managing Partner, ArchEcology Feb 16 2012 LEEDuser Member 624 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the responses. The acoustic separation makes sense and I can see that it would be important in an environment where the occupant does not have control over what happens outside the door. I think the door could be considered a moveable partition, but how would that make a difference?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Feb 16 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Furniture and moveable partitions do not have to be included in the line of sight drawings for 2.2. So that is an argument that could be used to include that area. I personally don;t think it will be accepted as a moveable partition.

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Laura Billings Principal Sage Green Development, LLC
Dec 12 2011
LEEDuser Member
201 Thumbs Up

Regularly Occupied - Yoga/Pilates Studio?

Hi there -

I'm working on a project that has office space on the 2nd floor and a yoga/Pilates studio on the ground floor. I'm not sure how a yoga/Pilates studio fits with the new definition of regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. as "areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building."

75% of the classes are 1 hour, 25% of them are 1.5 hours. Are yoga/Pilates considered "focused activities" that require daylight? The students are standing, seated and lying down...The studio is adjacent to a sidewalk, so most of the time teachers draw the blinds down for privacy. My preference is to exclude them, but would like feedback.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Dec 13 2011 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Is this a renovation or all new construction? The space would have to be included in the calculations and i don;t see how you would not want to include daylight into a yoga studio or some type of connection to the exterior. The occupants have the option to pull blinds if needed.

To argue that privacy is needed yet the space has windows and is located adjacent to a very public space would not work since the space may change usage at some time in the buildings life, especially if this new construction.

The issue is not if a space requires daylight, it is whether or not daylight is detrimental to the activity of the space. Cannot see how daylight would be detrimental to this space.

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Laura Billings Principal, Sage Green Development, LLC Dec 13 2011 LEEDuser Member 201 Thumbs Up

It's a renovation, the windows along the street were pre-existing. My question isn't whether daylight would help or hinder the activities in the space, but whether the space fits the new definition of "regularly occupied" or not. There are three rooms in the studio. There is one person who sits at a reception desk all day long, so I plan to include the reception area/room. But the actual yoga studio and Pilates studio only have classes about 3-5 times a day for an hour each, and then otherwise sit empty. Are these two spaces "regularly occupied"? It doesn't seem to me that they are.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Dec 13 2011 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Yes they would be, clearly based on the number of times they are used per day and the amount of time that they are used for. Very similar occupancy schedule that a conference room could have in a office, which is considered regularly occupied.

What is your reasoning why they wouldn't be?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Dec 13 2011 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Also, what new definition of regularly occupied are you referencing?

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Laura Billings Principal, Sage Green Development, LLC Dec 13 2011 LEEDuser Member 201 Thumbs Up

The new definition is in the most recent LEED Addenda release, Nov 2011. I quoted it in my initial posting (can also find good discussion on LEEDUser). It describes "regularly occupied" as areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building."

To me, "seated, standing, working, studying, focused activities" imply areas where people are reading, working, studying, looking at something on work surfaces that are improved by daylight (which would include conf rooms). Yoga and Pilates don't seem to quite fit that definition.

Also, how do you interpret "more than one hour per person per day"? If someone is in class for only one hour per day, this does not seem to meet this new definition, which seem to ascribe time parameters to how often the space is used by one person in their day.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Dec 13 2011 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

That is the 2009 addenda, and this thread is for 2.2 projects. But that definition was posted to try and help clarify the never ending question as to what is and is not regularly occupied.

You are reading way to hard into the definition of this. Secondly based on how you are trying to interpret this, gymnasiums would be excluded as regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building., but gymnasium, with sports activities such as yoga, are considered regularly occupied.

The Reference Guide cannot include everything probable type or use of a space, there fore there is always some confusion when it comes to this definition.

I don;t think you have an argument that they are not regularly occupied. You may try an argue that they should be excluded from the views calculations, but with these spaces having windows i don;t think that would work.

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Dec 13 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2396 Thumbs Up

I agree with Todd's guidance/feedback here. The studio space should be considered regularly occupied and class attendees can benefit from having access to both daylight and views.

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Laura Billings Principal, Sage Green Development, LLC Dec 13 2011 LEEDuser Member 201 Thumbs Up

Great - thanks for the feedback - I will treat it as regularly occupied space. (PS - the project IS LEED 2009, didn't notice this was a v2.2 conversation thread.)

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Greg Kight National Director of Sustainable Design Jacobs
May 05 2011
LEEDuser Member
390 Thumbs Up

Regulary Occupied Space for Medical Building

When determining regulary occupied space for a medical building, can first floor exam rooms be excluded due to privacy concerns?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group May 19 2011 LEEDuser Expert 7925 Thumbs Up

Yes they can. Most exam rooms can be excluded for that the reason.

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Eri Spaulding Ashley McGraw Architects
Mar 11 2011
Guest
813 Thumbs Up

School Gymnasium

I see that in the "graphics view sample" you have attached in this web page ( Mt. Healthy Elementary School) that the Gymnasium was excluded from the calculations. Is there a good reason to consider the gym to be a non-regularly occupied space? on the same talken, can we leave it out also from EQ 8.1 calculations?

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Mar 12 2011 LEEDuser Expert 6055 Thumbs Up

Donna- there was a pre-LEED 2009 CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide that allowed us to exclude the gym from the Views calculation only, because there is major concern about low glazing being susceptible to breakage in a space where you have likely projectiles. Other CIRs indicated that gyms could not, however, be excluded from EQ 8.1 calculations for daylight because you can use top lighting strategies or more durable translucent materials to provide daylighting.
These CIRs I am referring to are, of course, not officially precedent-setting for LEED 2009 projects. However, I have been able to write a narrative explaining why I am excluding the gym from the views credit in 2009 projects and still be awarded the credit.

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Eri Spaulding Ashley McGraw Architects Mar 16 2011 Guest 813 Thumbs Up

Thank you Allison, your explanation makes all the sense why gym is excluded from views but it should be included when calculating daylight. In fact, we do have substantial top lighting strategies in our gym (high clerestories).

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Terry Squyres Principal GWWO Inc./Architects
Feb 08 2011
LEEDuser Member
850 Thumbs Up

Exhibit and library space

For a visitors' center, the project requires wall space for exhibits, and windowless space for a library that stores historical documents. Can these areas be excluded from the calculations? Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 08 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Elizabeth, I think you will find more extensive discussion of this topic on the 2009 forum for this credit. I think the answer to this question is always destined to be "maybe." There is precedent for exclusion of mission-critical spaces, but it's not a shoo-in and you need to make a good case for it.

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Terry Squyres Principal, GWWO Inc./Architects Feb 09 2011 LEEDuser Member 850 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan. I'll look under the 2009 forum. Thanks for your summary.

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Linda Davisson Senior Consultant Sustainable Design Consulting
Oct 07 2010
LEEDuser Member
1963 Thumbs Up

Documenting Identical Buildings

Does anyone have tips for documenting identical buildings? We have a project with two identical residential units with the same room numbers; they are being certified together as one project. I used the supporting calculator to document each room, but doubled the area to account for the second building (instead of creating a new line for each). Is this the best and/or correct way to document?

Thanks.

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Oct 07 2010 LEEDuser Expert 2396 Thumbs Up

While your approach seems reasonable since you are documenting identical buildings, note that the USGBC "LEED-NC Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects" (AGMBC- http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=1097 ) actually requires that each building must independently meet the requirements of EQc8.1 & 8.2.

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Linda Davisson Senior Consultant, Sustainable Design Consulting Oct 08 2010 LEEDuser Member 1963 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the quick response! Each building independently meets the requirements. I will mention that in the narrative.

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Eric Claycamp
Sep 13 2010
LEEDuser Member
139 Thumbs Up

Exemplary Performance

Has anybody been able to achieve the exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. on this credit?

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Sep 13 2010 LEEDuser Expert 2396 Thumbs Up

The LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide states on page 386 that there is not prescribed threshold for determining exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. relative to EQc8.2 and that projects will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.
Depending on the project's building type (I have seen dorm rooms try to achieve, however the design team was likely required by by code to provide windows in all residential rooms) so it is unlikely that exemplary performance could be demonstrated without achieving access to views for 100% of all regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. and perhaps for a number of non-regularly occupied spaces where views could be considered beneficial.

I would also suggest taking a look at the Exemplary Performance requirements outlined for IEQc8.2 in the LEED Reference Guide for Building Design and Construction, 2009 Edition.

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Elicia Ratajczyk
Sep 10 2010
Guest
99 Thumbs Up

RE: Circulation space, lobbies, reception, corridors?

Just wondering if circulation spaces such as reception areas (reg. occupied by the receptionist?), lobbies, corridors, etc. should be included in the calculations?

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Sep 12 2010 LEEDuser Expert 2396 Thumbs Up

Only regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. are to be included in the calculations, defined as "areas where workers are seated or standing as they work inside a building."
Non-regularly occupied spaces (excluded from the calculations) include corridors, hallways, lobbies, break rooms, storage rooms, restrooms, stairwells, etc.
If the reception area includes an employee/receptionist then this area should be included in the calculaitons.

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Elizabeth Powers Principal O'Brien & Company
Jun 24 2010
LEEDuser Member
446 Thumbs Up

Views through always open roll-up doors

We are working on a garbage/recycle station and believe that we can achieve EQc8.2, Access to Views on the tipping floor area using the roll up doors that are never closed during business hours. Does anyone have any experience with this type of situation?

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Jul 02 2010 LEEDuser Expert 2396 Thumbs Up

Typically a solid door, even open, cannot contribute to views (i.e. an office door that could be closed) unless it has glass/sidelight.

However, if you are able to demonstrate via a narrative and/or signed letter from the owner that the roll up doors will defnitely always be open during business hours (i.e. because the space is naturally ventilated) when employees are present then you might be able to include in your calculations.

If the roll up doors are the only means to views then it still may be tough to achieve compliance (unless you can demonstrate that the facility excluded windows due to security reasons). To ensure that you reach your certification level goal I would target the pursuit of other credit points.

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