NC-v4 EAc1: Enhanced commissioning

  • Go beyond fundamental commissioning

    This credit goes beyond the commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. work required for the prerequisite. Any project can pursue this credit, but teams sometimes choose not to pursue it due to the increased cost and uncertainty around its benefits. 

    However, with the increase in scope of fundamental commissioning in LEED v4, the cost difference between the two has narrowed. This change may make enhanced commissioning more attractive for your project.

    Teams should remember that there are rules around who can act as the commissioning agent (CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.) on a project, and these rules change depending on whether you’re pursuing fundamental or enhanced commissioning. The intent is to hire a CxACommissioning authority: the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. with no conflicts of interest so they can provide clear, objective leadership in executing the commissioning process and ensuring that both the owner’s goals and the design intentA written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. are achieved. See the table in the LEED Reference Guide for details on who can be the CxA for your building.

    No matter who fills the role of CxA on your project, or how they are contracted, they should note all conditions that are not aligned with the owner’s requirements and design intent, and report these findings and any recommendations directly to the owner.

    Building enclosure commissioning (BECx) is now a part of enhanced commissioning. The benefits of envelope commissioning are significant, but the scope and industry is still maturing and developing. The cost for envelope commissioning is very dependent on so many factors, that it is difficult to put even a cost range on the service at this point. We recommend seeking proposals, including recommended scope, from at least two qualified firms, then evaluate the benefits of the proposals. 

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • This credit now includes options for monitoring-based and building envelope commissioning.

    FAQs

    Can non-design consultants on the project provide enhanced commissioning services?

    Yes. Consultants who provide non-design services, such as LEED services or energy modeling, can also be the CxA for the project. However, if those firms have affected the design of the building, they should not be selected as the CxA. 

  • EA Credit 1: Enhanced commissioning

    Intent

    To further support the design, construction, and eventual operation of a project that meets the owner’s project requirements for energy, water, indoor environmental quality, and durability.

    Requirements

    Implement, or have in place a contract to implement, the following commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. process activities in addition to those required under EA Prerequisite Fundamental Commissioning and Verification.

    Commissioning authority

    • The CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. must have documented commissioning process experience on at least two building projects with a similar scope of work. The experience must extend from early design phase through at least 10 months of occupancy;
    • The CxACommissioning authority: the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. may be a qualified employee of the owner, an independent consultant, or a disinterested subcontractor of the design team.
    Option 1. Enhanced systems commissioning (3-4 points)
    Path 1: Enhanced commissioning (3 points)

    Complete the following commissioning process (CxP) activities for mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and renewable energy systems and assemblies in accordance with ASHRAE Guideline 0–2005 and ASHRAE Guideline 1.1–2007 for HVAC&R systems, as they relate to energy, water, indoor environmental quality, and durability.

    The commissioning authority must do the following:

    • Review contractor submittals.
    • Verify inclusion of systems manual requirements in construction documents.
    • Verify inclusion of operator and occupant training requirements in construction documents.
    • Verify systems manual updates and delivery.
    • Verify operator and occupant training delivery and effectiveness.
    • Verify seasonal testing.
    • Review building operations 10 months after substantial completion.
    • Develop an on-going commissioning plan.

    Include all enhanced commissioning tasks in the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. and BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines..

    OR

    Path 2: Enhanced and monitoring-based commissioning (4 points)

    Achieve Path 1.

    AND

    Develop monitoring-based procedures and identify points to be measured and evaluated to assess performance of energy- and water-consuming systems.

    Include the procedures and measurement points in the commissioning plan. Address the following:

    • roles and responsibilities;
    • measurement requirements (meters, points, metering systems, data access);
    • the points to be tracked, with frequency and duration for trend monitoring;
    • the limits of acceptable values for tracked points and metered values (where appropriate, predictive algorithms may be used to compare ideal values with actual values);
    • the elements used to evaluate performance, including conflict between systems, out-of-sequence operation of systems components, and energy and water usage profiles;
    • an action plan for identifying and correcting operational errors and deficiencies;
    • training to prevent errors;
    • planning for repairs needed to maintain performance; and
    • the frequency of analyses in the first year of occupancy (at least quarterly).

    Update the systems manual with any modifications or new settings, and give the reason for any modifications from the original design.

    AND/OR

    Option 2. Envelope commissioning (2 points)

    Fulfill the requirements in EA Prerequisite Fundamental Commissioning and Verification as they apply to the building’s thermal envelope in addition to mechanical and electrical systems and assemblies.

    Complete the following commissioning process (CxP) activities for the building’s thermal envelope in accordance with ASHRAE Guideline 0–2005 and the National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS) Guideline 3–2012, Exterior Enclosure Technical Requirements for the Commissioning Process, as they relate to energy, water, indoor environmental quality, and durability.

    Commissioning authority must complete the following:

    • Review contractor submittals.
    • Verify inclusion of systems manual requirements in construction documents.
    • Verify inclusion of operator and occupant training requirements in construction documents.
    • Verify systems manual updates and delivery.
    • Verify operator and occupant training delivery and effectiveness.
    • Verify seasonal testing.
    • Review building operations 10 months after substantial completion.
    • Develop an on-going commissioning plan.

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

66 Comments

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Elizabeth Powers Principal O'Brien & Company
Jan 24 2017
LEEDuser Member
540 Thumbs Up

Deadline for hiring CxA

Project Location: United States

Does anyone know if there is a deadline for hiring the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. in the v4 credit? I know I'd recommend no later than DD, as that but am unclear if v4 has a hard deadline. Conceivably, it seems you could still meet all the requirements with a hire in early CDs.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 24 2017 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

Those design phases are fluid anyway so I would think that as long as you are close it would not be hard to justify.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Jan 24 2017 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Just to be clear, the credit language clearly states that the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. shall be hired before the end of DD. In fact, it says "By the end of the design development phase, engage a commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. authority..." So, it is no longer a recommendation, it is a requirement. But I agree with Marcus that the date of moving from DD to CD is very often fluid, and as long as you can be close it should not be a problem. However, the days of engaging a CxACommissioning authority: the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. during bidding or construction are finally over.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Jan 24 2017 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Also, as someone who provided Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. and is its biggest cheerleader, please hire the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. in pre-design. Hire the envelope CxACommissioning authority: the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. in pre-design. Both can help guide the formation of the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. and then review the BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. in more real time instead of only at the design review. The benefit to the project will be huge with only a modest increase in fee to attend a few more meetings.

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Colin Grist Mechanical Project Engineer Ecotope
Dec 12 2016
Guest
2 Thumbs Up

Final Report

Project Location: United States

Hello all,

I am wondering if there are guidelines for what should be included in the eCx final report. Is there a template or list of items that should be included?

Thank you, Colin

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Dec 13 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

There is no template or list. Typically a final report would have an executive summary, the action items (both in design and construction) with resolution, test forms and results, commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. plan, OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project., BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines., list of all commissioning participants, and any outstanding testing that will require seasonal testing.

With so much of the value of envelope commissioning resting on the peer review and submittal review, that part of the report will be extensive. Submittal reviews may be graphic markups, so would be included in large format. Envelope work also tends to use off-site assembly testing or mock-up testing on-site. This can include long reports and lots of photos.

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Hannah Fleck Civil Engineer + Sustainability Specialist Guidon Design
Dec 02 2016
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5 Thumbs Up

Value of Enhanced Commissioning

Project Location: United States

I have a client who is asking what the value of pursuing enhanced commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. versus fundamental. From what I can tell from reading is that the once the building is operating the owner will have more thorough resources like system manuals and operational plans to maintain the building. There is the review that occurs after the building has been operating, but overall, it looks like there is no additional commissioning of systems, but rather the level of support and documentation increases. Is this correct?

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Dec 02 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Hi Hannah! Under v4, now that the review has moved to Fundamental, you are correct with your assessment. There is more documentation of course but you can also pursue the monitoring based option, which is a great way to optimize and improve performance going into the future of the project. This is the v4 version of Measurement & Verification (Lite). Note that this change means that fundamental commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. costs will be higher, but adding enhanced will be less. Scope moved from enhanced under v4.

The major change and opportunity with Enhanced, one that I strongly recommend for all projects, is envelope commissioning. As you specifically have heard me say, the envelope design sets the fixed operating costs for the life of the building. The investment in this service will have direct savings (just like systems commissioning) on one of the most expensive parts of the construction project.

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Hannah Fleck Civil Engineer + Sustainability Specialist, Guidon Design Dec 13 2016 Guest 5 Thumbs Up

Thank you Scott. I will pass the suggestion to do envelope commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. on to the owner. Your insight is appreciated.

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Julien Richard Artelia
Nov 22 2016
Guest
119 Thumbs Up

Envelope Cx - whole-building air leakage testing

Is it acceptable if the air leakage testing is done by a subcontractor of the general contractor when all the other aspect of the envelope commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. are done by an independant CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. ?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

I think it is always good practice to have all of the Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. work performed by an independent contractor. Technically the testing contractor should be contracted directly to the owner too but there is a LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. that allows the contract to be held by the contractor in a design-build scenario if certain conditions are met. Not sure if it applies to your situation - http://www.usgbc.org/content/li-10244

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Dec 13 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Sorry, I thought I had answered this...but probably just in my head. Often there are tests that require significant equipment, time, or coordination that go beyond a Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. firms abilities. One part of a commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. plan is determining these kinds of tests and then including them in the construction documents and contract with the builders. If the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. determines the tests that are required, provides a detailed specification on the test, what equipment and calibration is needed, qualifications that may be required of the testing agent or agency, AND then observes the test and reviews the request, then having the testing agency under the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. is fine.

One example would be ductwork pressure and leakage testing. This can be important, but since the ductwork system is still "owned" by the contractors at the time testing would be done, it would raise some difficult liability issues if there is not good contractual protection...ductwork has blown up more than once during these kinds of tests. So, having the test done under the MC contract is a good way to protect the owner from liability and having the CxACommissioning authority: the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. observe the test and review the report gives the confidence in the results.

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Brian Salazar President, LEED AP, WELL AP Entegra Development & Investment, LLC
Nov 14 2016
LEEDuser Member
1234 Thumbs Up

CxA Same for all Paths?

Does the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. need to be the same firm/person for Path 2 and Option 2, as it does for Path 1? Trying to determine a baseline scope and add/alt services for the CxACommissioning authority: the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. proposed on a v4 project to maximize "bang for buck." Thanks!

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 15 2016 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

No there should be a lead Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. Authority but the building envelope CxCommissioning: the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. can be another person that meets the qualifications. The qualification for Cx is spelled out in the Reference Guide.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Nov 17 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

First off, the energy systems CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. and envelope CxACommissioning authority: the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. do not have to be the same company, and in many ways should not be. The expertise for envelope is quite different than for systems.

But I think there is a little more nuance to your questions...perhaps. Option 1 and 2 are distinct. You can pursue both or one of them. You can only do Option 2 if you want. While it is clear that the prerequisite and enhanced commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. for the energy using systems must have a lead Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. Authority. But there is little guidance related to any relationship between the energy systems and envelope firms.

I have gotten to work closely with envelope commissioning, and we always coordinate and assist them (often there are things in the mechanical systems that we need to do to help with testing). But as I have mentioned before in my answers, good envelope commissioning is heavily weighted toward design review, shop drawing review, and installation review. The tests are a final check, but are not the focus. Energy systems have a good portion of value in the peer review, but the maximum value is in the functional testing and action item resolution.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Nov 17 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Sorry, one more comment. Path 2 is really an additional service for the energy systems work of Option 1, Path 1 (the first line of Path 2 is to do Path 1). That should definitely be the same firm as Path 1.

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Brian Salazar President, LEED AP, WELL AP, Entegra Development & Investment, LLC Dec 13 2016 LEEDuser Member 1234 Thumbs Up

Thanks guys!

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Ciaran McCabe METEC Consulting Engineers
Nov 08 2016
LEEDuser Member
713 Thumbs Up

OPTION 2. ENVELOPE COMMISSIONING (2 POINTS)

Can anyone identify the range of Building Envelope seasonal tests that are required to satisfy Option 2. Is there a typical list of activities outlined by LEED. Who would normally carry out these tasks ? What is meant by "Review building operations 10 months after substantial completion". Has anyone worked on a project where these tests were carried out.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 10 2016 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

The list would probably vary depending on the envelop construction. There are a variety of commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. and building science firms who would carry out these tests. The 10 month review has been a requirement of enhanced Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. for quite a while. Basically the CxCommissioning: the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. needs to revisit the project near end of warranty to ensure that everything is still working correctly. This review is not as thorough as the initial Cx but should provide a significant degree of assurance that the systems continue to function properly.

The Reference Guide does not contain much but does reference the NIBS Guideline 3–2006 2012 Building Enclosure Commissioning Process BECx which is a free download that seems to provide some guidance.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Nov 10 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Envelope CommissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. is a very specialized service, and I will work to find a colleague that could monitor and help with these kinds of questions.

Seasonal testing in a general commissioning meaning relates to tests which are best done in an intended season. I think in the case of envelopes, it would be when can tests be done in a most meaningful and impactful time. For example, doing a thermal image in spring and fall will not tell you much. You need larger temperature differences to see actual performance.

The 10-month review is just that. Discussing the performance of the envelope systems at 10 months and to assist the owner in determining if there are follow-up testing required or other intervention or warranty work by the contractors. There is no specific requirement to DO more tests at 10 months.

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André Harms Ecolution Consulting
Sep 02 2016
LEEDuser Member
212 Thumbs Up

Enhanced Cx - Submittal reviews - HVAC&R only?

In reference to the V4 LEED Reference Guide for Building Design and Construction, Enhanced CommissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. section:

In the Step-by-Step guidance, “Step 4. Review contractor’s submittals” on page 391, it explicitly and exclusively refers to the HVAC&R submittals, which creates the impression that submittal reviews are only applicable to HVAC&R systems.

Below is the extract, what is your interpretation of this?

"Step 4. Review contractor’s submittals
Ensure ongoing compliance with the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project., BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines., and Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. requirements by reviewing the HVAC &R contractor’s submittals.
·· Conduct a submittal review by the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. concurrently with the design team’s review or, at the latest, before final acceptance by the engineer or architect of record.
·· The CxACommissioning authority: the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. must document all issues discovered during the review process in a log, to be distributed to the project’s design and construction teams (see Further Explanation, Examples, Table 4).
·· The CxA must also confirm that all issues recorded in the log are addressed or resolved by the owner, design, or construction teams.
·· Establish the submittal review process at the commissioning kickoff meeting included in the fundamental commissioning steps. "

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 02 2016 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

The credit language is clear and takes precedence over anything in the Reference Guide. All applicable submittals must be reviewed.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Sep 02 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Right Marcus. One other point however. Now that fundamental commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. requires the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. and BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. to have information on the envelope systems, and some design review is required, review of submittals for the envelope would only be required if you are pursuing that part of enhanced commissioning.

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Amrit Kaur Association for Energy Affordability
Sep 01 2016
LEEDuser Member
11 Thumbs Up

ASHREA 0-2005

Project Location: United States

Any one knows where I can get the referenced 0-2005 standard? officially its no longer available from ASHREA and superseded by 0-2013. Any idea how different they may be?

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Dan Forino, PE, CCP, LEED AP BD+C Engineering Manager, Horizon Engineering Associates Sep 01 2016 LEEDuser Member 493 Thumbs Up

http://www.techstreet.com/standards/guideline-0-2005-the-commissioning-p...

The Building Commissioning Association would be a good reference for the differences between the documents and they maintain presentations from their conferences which outlines the history of commissioning codes.

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Amrit Kaur Association for Energy Affordability Sep 02 2016 LEEDuser Member 11 Thumbs Up

Thanks Dan!

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Isabel Santos ECOCHOICE SA
Aug 25 2016
Guest
108 Thumbs Up

Enhanced and Fundamental Comissioning

Dear all,

Regarding the CommissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. Authority, if aiming to do Enhanced Commissioning, can the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. be part of the LEED Consultant team, considering that the team has been involved in providing consultancy to the design team? Also, we understand that there can be a team involved in the commissioning process since we have one person that coordinates all commissioning work, but does this Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. coordinator needs to have all commissioning expertise or can it be split between the team? I mean: can the CxCommissioning: the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. coordinator be an expert in HVAC commissioning but not, for instance, have 10 month experience in commissioning in occupied buildings, in envelope commissioning or any other systems, considering that together the Cx team responds to all commissioning requirements?

Thank you in advance.

All the best

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Aug 25 2016 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

Yes they can be part of the LEED consulting team.

Yes it can be a team. They do not need to have all the expertise but one person does need to oversee the Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. work.

The envelop CxCommissioning: the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. can be another party and the Cx coordinator does not need to have that expertise.

These issues are thoroughly spelled out in the Reference Guide.

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Isabel Santos ECOCHOICE SA Aug 26 2016 Guest 108 Thumbs Up

Thank you Marcus, that was what we thought.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Aug 29 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

It is the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. who is the one to manage the expertise needed for each aspect of the project. When we had a larger team, we used the term Commissioning Authority to designate what in design would be a Project Manager. Then we had several CommissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. Agents assigned for various aspects of the technical work. Much like in the design world, we had younger engineers acting as Agents until they gained enough experience to become Authorities!

We also used sub-consultants as needed if expertise was not in-house. There are times when very specialized knowledge is needed to do the right job, such as envelope or other unique systems. This should all be spelled out in the commissioning plan.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training Revitaliza Consultores
Mar 25 2016
Guest
2357 Thumbs Up

Non potable water systems

Does anyone know if non-potable systems are included in the scope of this credit? I am referring to gray water, stormwater, water treatment plant and irrigation systems.
Thanks

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 26 2016 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

Yes they are. the exception may be stormwater depending on how that is treated there may be some system components that would require Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included..

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Mar 27 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Marcus is correct, of course. LEED does not try to provide an exhaustive list of systems, which would never be complete. They refer to commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. of systems "as they relate to energy, water, indoor environmental quality, and durability." That is right out of the Reference Guide for v4 by the way. There is a short list of systems that also mentions plumbing.

In general, I feel a broad list of systems is more value to the client, so I spend more time thinking of what needs to be tested to ensure proper operation. So a complex stormwater sump pump system might not strictly fit the LEED definition, but really bad things happen if that system does not work! Now a sump pump for a foundation drain may not be as important, but if feeding into a stormwater flushing system, it is key to providing a significant amount of water into that system.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 28 2016 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

Yep, yep. Don't do just the minimum, do what makes sense for your project!

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Apr 05 2016 Guest 2357 Thumbs Up

Thank you Marcus and Scott!

What about gas supply and fire protection?

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Apr 05 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Fire protection is not part of the LEED standard, and most AHJs require pretty complete testing. Therefore it is rare if I include FP in the commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. scope, but if there is a complex smoke control system or the fire pump is integrated into an emergency generator system, then some portion should be tested.

You will have to clarify what you mean by gas supply before I can comment on that. Medical or laboratory gases are again outside the scope of LEED, but in an integrated system, commissioning alarms and other safety devices is certainly of value to the owner.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Apr 05 2016 Guest 2357 Thumbs Up

Thanks Scott!
I was referring to natural gas supply for boilers. This system also requires plumbing.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Apr 09 2016 Guest 2357 Thumbs Up

I have just received response from the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)..
-Non-potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. systems need to be commissioned.
-The fire protection is not required to be commissioned.
-Any gas control values need to be commissioned.
-Any energy usage equipment and controls associated with the diesel need to be commissioned.

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Rebecca Rice Sustainability Consultant, NORESCO Aug 19 2016 LEEDuser Member 35 Thumbs Up

Anyone have any insight into the expanded electrical Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. scope in v4? From the Ref Guide list of systems that need to be commissioned: Electrical, including service, distribution, lighting, and controls, including daylighting controls”. What should be included under electrical service and distribution?
Thanks.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Aug 24 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Rebecca, I know you found my response elsewhere, but for the sake of completeness, here is what I had to say about this from an earlier question.

This particular scope item is not that changed from v2009. However, since v4 brings ASHRAE 90.1-2010 into play, that standard requires commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. of lighting controls, and in my experience, 100% of lighting controls should be performance tested...there are too many different conditions and settings in these systems and devices to use statistical testing...in my opinion of course.

In general, the commissioning scope of LEED has always centered around systems involved in using or controlling energy or water; especially anything related to LEED credits. A simple example is that a sump pump is not typically a required item in a LEED scope, but if coupled to a rainwater capture system, it would be part of the system that is saving potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems..

So, in an electrical "service and distribution" system it would be items that relate to credits or are involved in controlling energy. One example I can think of would be the new Demand Control credit. You can get a point if you are "ready" to shed load if your local utility offers the service. This would mean there are controls in place that upon getting a signal can shed load in a meaningful way. That system would need to be commissioned.

Another would be if advanced metering is being pursued, then all those meters would need to be commissioned.

All of the above is focused on scope as required by LEED, but there are lots of very good reasons to do more extensive Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. for electrical distribution systems, especially in healthcare. But that is not the topic of this reply!

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Annalise Reichert Project Manager stok
Apr 10 2015
LEEDuser Member
528 Thumbs Up

Separate MEP CxA and BECxA

I am working on a project that is pursuing both Monitoring-based CommissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. and Building Envelope Commissioning. Is it required that the same Commissioning Agent that oversees and documents fundamental and monitoring-based commissioning must also oversee and document Building Envelope Commissioning for LEED Online purposes? Or can a separate CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. perform and document Building Envelope Commissioning?

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Apr 11 2015 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

There is a section in the Reference Guide titled "Choosing an Appropriate CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.", and it clearly states that one CxACommissioning authority: the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. should be overseeing all activities, but it also clearly states that not all CxA's are qualified for all activities. They use the envelope commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. as an example, which is absolutely correct.

The activities for envelope are completely different than for HVAC, and I am worried there are HVAC CxCommissioning: the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. providers out there that are selling envelope services, but that is not your question, is it.

Based on what the reference guide says, I would recommend hiring a independent CxA for Fundamental and Monitoring Based, then put a qualified envelope CxA under them contractually to get the best quality commissioning process.

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Annalise Reichert Project Manager, stok Apr 13 2015 LEEDuser Member 528 Thumbs Up

Thank you for the reply Scott. We have a separate Envelope CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. contracted directly by the owner, but they are not directly contracted under the MEP CxACommissioning authority: the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.. Is this still acceptable for the purposes of the LEED Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. process?

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Apr 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

I think it would work, but it would be important to have language in the separate contracts indicating the correct relationship. This is probably something that needs to be addressed by USGBC. In reality, the two types of commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. are quite different, and success comes in different ways.

In my mind, they should be allowed to be separate, or together, depending on the expertise of the provider.

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MM K
Mar 26 2015
Guest
2653 Thumbs Up

LEED AP + Independent CxA

If a team is appointed as LEED AP on a project, can they also act as the independent commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. agent (the team has not design or construction contract)?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 26 2015 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

Yes our company has served both roles on many projects. Same company but not the same person.

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MM K Mar 26 2015 Guest 2653 Thumbs Up

Great thanks Marcus!

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Yes, this was settled a long time ago. Just to be clear however, by LEED AP, you mean the person that is managing the LEED project and then will be submitted for the ID credit. Often the person getting the ID credit is on the architects staff. So if you are the LEED Consultant and CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. with a separate contract with the architect or owner, with no design responsibility at all, then you are good to go!

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alessandro santuari Feb 17 2017 LEEDuser Member

Is it possible for the same person (independent organization) to be LEED Consultant and Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. Authority/CxCommissioning: the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. Agent even if the project is larger than 20.000 sqft (CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. not part of design team) and considering that the innovation credit of LEED AP wants LEED AP to be a "principal participiant of the project team"?
Thank you very much

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Paul Swierc Commissioning Engineer, YR&G Feb 17 2017 LEEDuser Expert 59 Thumbs Up

I see no reason why the same individual couldn't be both the LEED process consultant and the Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. Authority on a project.

The project may be over 20,000 square feet so long as this individual is independent of the design and construction teams, as defined in the EAp1 credit.

Finally, I think I understand your specific concern about the LEEP AP being a "principal participant of the project team". What that stipulation ideally requires is that the individual be closely involved with the project throughout its duration, providing guidance to the design and construction teams in order for the project to meet the owner's requirements and achieve its sustainability goals. But the individual would never assume "design responsibility" during the process; that would remain with the architect and design engineer. Independence of the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. is preserved.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Feb 17 2017 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Paul is correct, the LEED Consultant (if they have the required experience) can certainly be the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.. They would still have to be independent from the design or construction firm.

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Eleni Tsivitzi Rowell Brokaw Architects, P.C.
Feb 13 2015
Guest
26 Thumbs Up

Envelope Commissioning for a Major Renovation

Does anyone have experience doing envelope commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. for an existing building? The project will be a Major Renovation with fairly extensive HVAC upgrades. There will be some envelope upgrades but they will not be comprehensive. I'm wondering if there is some minimum amount of work that needs to be done on the envelope in order to qualify for this credit.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

The questions should not be what amount of work qualifies for the credit. I do not think that is specified anywhere. You could do it on existing envelops that have not been touched at all.

The question should be does envelop commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. provide value to the project? It will not be cheap to do all the necessary testing, so if you have little to nothing to really test then it becomes a waste of time and money.

Does it provide value to a stakeholder? You should ask this question first about all LEED credits.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Feb 26 2015 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Who a I to disagree with Marcus;) But, I do think there could be great value in doing envelope commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. on an existing building, and if you explain the scope and the benefit, I think you would get credit for the work.

As to value, as with anything, the scope should be designed to bring the value, and in some other work I am doing related to sustainability action planning, the idea that knowing where you are is valuable. For example, doing a blower door testA blower door test gives an overall value for airtightness of a space, and can help identify air leaks. The testing unit consists of a calibrated fan that is sealed onto the unit entrance. The fan creates a continuous flow of pressure into the unit (or out of the unit when using theatrical fog to locate leaks). Devices detect the rate of pressure retention and loss due to possible air leaks in the construction. on the building can provide guidance to the HVAC design related to infiltration rates. Looking at individual window or opening testing to determine specifically where there might be problems can also be valuable in determining envelope upgrades. Perhaps this can inform the upgrades, or give hints to low cost repairs that might improve performance.

All this from someone that does not provide envelope commissioning! I have been involved in too many envelope failures, so am a huge fan of this service, and need to get some kick back from that community! Contact a reputable provider and work with them on a scope that provides value first, THEN formulate a submission strategy for gaining credit. Never do something just to get a point (in which both Marcus and I are in total agreement).

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 26 2015 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

You are certainly entitled to disagree. However, I think we do agree. It comes down to a matter of value. I meant to say that if it does not add value then it is a waste of time and money. I did not mean to imply that envelop commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. if you are not changing anything cannot provide value. I stand corrected, thanks Scott.

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Brett Farbstein Commissioning Engineer CannonDesign
Sep 04 2014
Guest
69 Thumbs Up

BECx on pre-fab steel building

Has anyone had experience with implementing BECx on a pre-fab, steel building?

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Sep 04 2014 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

No, but I know of a horrible messy litigation related to a pre-fabricated steel building and the interface to other construction methods. There is now a highly regarded envelope forensics firm that does commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. as well involved in the fix. For sure commissioning the envelope would have cost much less than what they are going through right now.

I cannot think of a better building type to apply envelope commissioning to!

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Joyce Kelly Consultant Architectural Fusion
Aug 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
427 Thumbs Up

Building Envelope Cx Checklist for LEED Documentation

I am currently developing a Building Envelope Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. Checklist for LEED v3 projects. Does it make sense to incorporate the 8 item list under Option 2 Envelope CommissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. for LEED v4?
May I contribute my list to this forum for feedback to pool our intellectual resources? It includes comments from Scott Bowan, who presented a pretty good list on 1/21/14.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Aug 07 2014 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

I would certainly be willing to review anything you put together Joyce. I do think that using some of the items listed in v4 would help get the ID credit for v2009 that you indicate. You should be able to send me a message through my user profile on this site.

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Brett Farbstein Commissioning Engineer, CannonDesign Sep 04 2014 Guest 69 Thumbs Up

Please contribute your checklist, Joyce. I'm sure it would be helpful to many.

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Joyce Kelly Consultant, Architectural Fusion Sep 04 2014 LEEDuser Member 427 Thumbs Up

Here's a link to my latest draft checklist for Bldg. Envelope Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included..
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/16418893/Bldg%20Envelope%20Cx%20Chec...
This is a work in progress. Please add your notes & comments to help develop a really comprehensive and helpful checklist and save to my public folder with your initials appended to the file name so I can collate and we don't lose anything. Thanks!

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Tom Kennedy Enhanse Nov 04 2014 LEEDuser Member 298 Thumbs Up

The reference guide makes no reference to building thermography. Since they include the 10 month re-visit, the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. will find an opportunity for the right outdoor conditions to provide an accurate total building scan and analysis (in most climates). If the CxACommissioning authority: the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. has a certified thermographer and the equipment, they would lean toward doing this as a way to meet the great majority of what the credit is seeking to achieve. If a team goes this route, and turns that report in, what do you all think a reviewer will say?
The language in the Reference Guide seems to include passive aspects (prevent interior glare, prevent unwanted solar gain). I am not sure how one does this (I assume mostly through design review). Any input on how one does this would also be appreciated.
Thank you

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Nov 05 2014 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

Tom, it will be some time before we have the kind of experience with v4 reviews to know exactly what they will accept or do. Since v4 should expand the use of envelope commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements., a very, very good thing by the way, the scope of work that will be appropriate will develop, just like it did for MEP commissioning. I have seen thermography used with great affect, and would think it is a good tool for this service.

One thing that I have learned from the several project working with some very good envelope Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. people is that the secret sauce is in the design review, submittal reviews, and initial installation tests/checking. If the building fails the final blower door testA blower door test gives an overall value for airtightness of a space, and can help identify air leaks. The testing unit consists of a calibrated fan that is sealed onto the unit entrance. The fan creates a continuous flow of pressure into the unit (or out of the unit when using theatrical fog to locate leaks). Devices detect the rate of pressure retention and loss due to possible air leaks in the construction., the next step is probably litigation, because rarely are fixes going to be easy or cheap.

Maybe I should form a national association of envelope commissioning so I can be the executive director and get paid for all the advertising that I do for this service! Envelope commissioning is a major improvement of v4, and I hope all projects will consider implementing this service, it really works!

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Ciaran McCabe METEC Consulting Engineers Nov 09 2016 LEEDuser Member 713 Thumbs Up

How do we know what tests are most relevant to meet the building envelope seasonal checks that form part of the LEED language.Its seems very vague.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 10 2016 LEEDuser Expert 69130 Thumbs Up

Start with the Reference Guide and the standards it references.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Nov 10 2016 LEEDuser Expert 10978 Thumbs Up

I need to do a longer post on this, but envelope commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. is not like MEP commissioning. There is a shared process and goals of course, but the action and benefits come from different places. Your two questions focus on tests, and good envelope commissioning is all about review and optimization BEFORE something is installed. Testing is then to confirm that the details were followed correctly. If a building fails an envelope test, then there is going to be major problems, angst, and possible litigation, because the fix is much more than replacing a sensor or changing a program.

I strongly recommend you contact a qualified building science-based envelope commissioning firm to assist in your project. I have been doing Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. for a very, very long time and I would never put myself forward as an envelope commissioning agent; I do not have the expertise and training for this work.

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