NC-v4 EAc3: Advanced energy metering

  • Keeping a finger on the pulse of your building

    This credit sets up infrastructure for building owners and managers who want to actively monitor energy consumption in their buildings. Advanced energy metering provides a granular level of energy use data, which building operators can use to proactively keep building performance in tune during operations.

    While there are compliance paths that are applicable to smaller and simpler building types, owners of larger and more energy intensive buildings are likely to see the greatest value from the application of this credit.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • This is a new credit.

    FAQs

    We are proposing to metering a new building with a single controller. The controller has the capability to monitor each individual end use (lighting, plug loads, HVAC, water, gas, etc.). Can we meter everything on a distribution board except one specific end-use, such as HVAC, and have the controller programmed to calculate the difference in the main power usage and all the metering loads to determine the remaining loads (HVAC loads) and still obtain the advanced energy metering credit?

    Deriving energy use by subtraction is a viable method for metering by end use.

    Remember that “HVAC" is not an energy end use, as it usually includes space heating, space cooling, fans, pumps, etc. which are the end uses. The credit allows the grouping of packaged units serving similar occupancies and schedules. The key to cost effective metering starts with organizing the panel boards by energy end uses. Trying to create the necessary meters within mixed boards can be very difficult and expensive.

  • EA Credit 3: Advanced energy metering

    Intent

    To support energy management and identify opportunities for additional energy savings by tracking building-level and system-level energy use.

    Requirements

    Install advanced energy metering for the following:

    • all whole-building energy sources used by the building; and
    • any individual energy end uses that represent 10% or more of the total annual consumption of the building.

    The advanced energy metering must have the following characteristics.

    • Meters must be permanently installed, record at intervals of one hour or less, and transmit data to a remote location.
    • Electricity meters must record both consumption and demand. Whole-building electricity meters should record the power factor, if appropriate.
    • The data collection system must use a local area network, building automation system, wireless network, or comparable communication infrastructure.
    • The system must be capable of storing all meter data for at least 36 months.
    • The data must be remotely accessible.
    • All meters in the system must be capable of reporting hourly, daily, monthly, and annual energy use.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

12 Comments

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Vasileios Kalfountzos Mr
Aug 10 2017
Guest
2 Thumbs Up

List of meters

Hello all,

our project is a Data Center that every single part of it will be metered. Each rack will have two meters while also every electrical panel will have each own meter. If we add up all of the meters the yielded sum equals to roughly 1,600 meters for the whole building. Nonetheless, the Data Rooms are being repeated which means that Data Room 3 will have the same number of meters as Data Room 1. Should we still mention all of the meters?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Aug 10 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70525 Thumbs Up

The documentation requirements are containing the the Reference Guide and within the credit form in LEED Online. You can download sample forms here - https://www.usgbc.org/sampleforms?keys=leed+nd

If the form asks for all the meters you should provide it.

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R2M Solution Srl R2M Solution Srl
Jul 18 2017
LEEDuser Member
263 Thumbs Up

consumption and demand

Project Location: Italy

Does "Electricity meters must record both consumption and demand" mean that both kWhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu. and instantaneous kW must be recorded?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jul 18 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70525 Thumbs Up

Yes

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Antonio Macedo Filho Director EcoBuilding Consultoria
May 12 2017
Guest

remote access

Project Location: Brazil

I'd like to know if the BMS collecting the meter data would already meet the requirement of remote access to the data or this data should be avaiable for all ocupants.
"The data must be remotely accessible"

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group May 15 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70525 Thumbs Up

Yes

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Rita Haberman Brightworks
Apr 12 2017
LEEDuser Member
427 Thumbs Up

Residential applications

Hi Marcus,

I'm working on a 200-unit residential building and we are looking at feasibility of this credit. Our total lighting load is over 10% of the energy use so we plan on metering it, but each residential unit is hooked up to its own electrical panel. In order to get the total lighting load, we would need to submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system. each unit's lighting use. If each residential unit's lighting load is less than 10% of the total, does each unit need to be submetered? Not sure if I captured the situation correctly so let me know if more information is needed. Thank you.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Apr 12 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70525 Thumbs Up

The 10% would be for the whole building. Think whole building energy modeling output end uses.

If i were trying to do M&V I would probably make the case that I could do sampling of a certain percentage of units. Not sure if this would fly but it might we worth a try. Implementing this credit in this building type where you monitor everything would be very expensive. Personally I would not even try this credit in that building without knowing the plan for using the data and establishing a methodology for gathering it that made some sense.

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Rita Haberman Brightworks Apr 13 2017 LEEDuser Member 427 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your response. I received a response today from LEED Coach as well stating that there are no special circumstances for residential, unfortunately.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Apr 14 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70525 Thumbs Up

Maybe you could propose the residential alternative compliance path for this credit. You can do that through an interpretation. Maybe it would be some sampling as I suggested. Maybe if each unit is metered you could use that data to meet the credit intent. I do think you would need a really compelling reason for wanting to do this credit beyond the point.

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Maria Matos
Apr 06 2017
Guest
4 Thumbs Up

Building's equipment still uncertain

Project Location: Portugal

Hi Marcus,

We are working on a building which will have the following uses: offices, laboratory (pharmaceutical), showers and changing facilities, canteen and a smaller bar. This building will be located within the premisses of a pharmaceutical industry area and the showers/changing facilities and canteen will be used by 500 employees, in shifts.
For this credit, we still are not really certain of the equipment which is going to be installed, so it is difficult to assess if some will exceed 10% of all energy end uses. Considering this, we are thinking in adopting the following strategy:
- have one meter in the showers/changing facilities that joins all energy uses (DHWDomestic hot water (DHW) is water used for food preparation, cleaning and sanitation and personal hygiene, but not heating., lighting, equipment),
- other in the canteen (including equipment, lighting, DHW),
- others for each floor plane that monitors the electricity use for lighing and equipment and maybe
- one for the centralized HVAC equipment.

With this strategy, do you think we are able to gain this credit?
We have discussed other strategies with the design team but we think that this is the most efficient and feasible one.

Thank you

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Apr 12 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70525 Thumbs Up

You are required to sub-meter the entire building by energy end use. Combining end uses on a single sub-meter makes this considerably more difficult. So don't think of our building by areas, think of it by energy end uses. This will change the way the electrical panels are installed so that you can isolate all the lighting, plug loads, etc. In your case you will probably need to to sub-meter lighting, plug loads, fans, service hot water, heating (depending on climate), cooling, and maybe laboratory process loads.

So I do not think your strategies will meet the criteria for this credit.

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Aug 16 2017
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