NC-v4 EQc1: Enhanced indoor air quality strategies

  • Several strategies available under one credit

    This credit presents teams with several different strategies for protecting indoor air quality. Teams can pursue Option 1 or Option 2 independently (for one point each), or pursue both options for a total of two points. 

    The IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. strategies outlined in the LEED Reference Guide can be achieved with varying degrees of difficulty (and cost), depending on your project design and other sustainability and performance goals. Be sure to review and understand the requirements of each strategy within the context of your building before committing to a given option.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • Portions of the following LEED 2009 credits have been combined into a single credit: EQc1: Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring, EQc2: Increased Ventilation, and EQc5: Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control.
    • USGBC added additional options for naturally ventilated spaces.
    • There is now additional guidance for warehouses, distribution centers, data centers, health care facilities, and residential projects.
    • USGBC no longer requires calculating the minimum pressure differential to meet the interior cross-contamination prevention requirements. However, the exhaust rates from the ventilation standard in EQp1: Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance ventilation standard must be used. LEED now requires a minimum exhaust rate of 0.5 cubic feet per minute per square foot (2.54 liters per second per square meter), for spaces that do not have a requirement from this ventilation standard.
    • Teams have the option to use filtration media that meet CEN Standard EN 779–2002, Particulate Air Filters for General Ventilation, Determination of the Filtration Performance.

    FAQs

    Do I have to achieve Option 1 if I want to pursue Option 2?

    No, Option 1 and Option 2 are separate. You can pursue either option without earning the other, or both if you like. Achieving both options is worth 2 points total. To earn exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements., you must earn Option 1 and earn Option 2 and incorporate an additional Option 2 strategy. 

    Has the pressure differential requirement of at least 5 pascals for LEED 2009 EQc5: Indoor and Chemical Source Pollutant Control been eliminated from the requirement of this credit?

    Yes, the pressure differential has been eliminated in LEED v4. See above.

  • EQ Credit 1: Enhanced indoor air quality strategies

    Intent

    To promote occupants’ comfort, well-being, and productivity by improving indoor air quality.

    Requirements

    Option 1. Enhanced IAQ strategies (1 point)

    Comply with the following requirements, as applicable.

    Mechanically ventilated spaces:

    A. entryway systems;

    B. interior cross-contamination prevention; and

    C. filtration.




    Naturally ventilated spaces:

    A. entryway systems; and

    D. natural ventilation design calculations.



    Mixed-mode systems:

    A. entryway systems;

    B. interior cross-contamination prevention;

    C. filtration;

    D. natural ventilation design calculations; and

    E. mixed-mode design calculations.




    A. Entryway systems

    Install permanent entryway systems at least 10 feet (3 meters) long in the primary direction of travel to capture dirt and particulates entering the building at regularly used exterior entrances. Acceptable entryway systems include permanently installed grates, grilles, slotted systems that allow for cleaning underneath, rollout mats, and any other materials manufactured as entryway systems with equivalent or better performance. Maintain all on a weekly basis.

    B. Interior cross-contamination prevention

    Sufficiently exhaust each space where hazardous gases or chemicals may be present or used (e.g., garages, housekeeping and laundry areas, copying and printing rooms), using the exhaust rates determined in EQ Prerequisite Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance or a minimum of 0.50 cfm per square foot (2.54 l/s per square meter), to create negative pressure with respect to adjacent spaces when the doors to the room are closed. For each of these spaces, provide self-closing doors and deck-to-deck partitions or a hard-lidLow-impact development: an approach to managing rainwater runoff that emphasizes on-site natural features to protect water quality, by replicating the natural land cover hydrologic regime of watersheds, and addressing runoff close to its source. Examples include better site design principles (e.g., minimizing land disturbance, preserving vegetation, minimizing impervious cover), and design practices (e.g., rain gardens, vegetated swales and buffers, permeable pavement, rainwater harvesting, soil amendments). These are engineered practices that may require specialized design assistance. ceiling.

    C. Filtration

    Each ventilation system that supplies outdoor air to occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. must have particle filters or air-cleaning devices that meet one of the following filtration media requirements:

    • minimum efficiency reporting value (MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. ) of 13 or higher, in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 52.2–2007; or
    • Class F7 or higher as defined by CEN Standard EN 779–2002, Particulate Air Filters for General Ventilation, Determination of the Filtration Performance.
  • [East Asia ACP: Filtration Media]
  • Replace all air filtration media after completion of construction and before occupancy.

    D. Natural ventilation design calculations

    Demonstrate that the system design for occupied spaces employs the appropriate strategies in Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) Applications Manual AM10, March 2005, Natural Ventilation in Non-Domestic Buildings, Section 2.4. [Latin America ACP: Engineered Natural Ventilation Systems]

    E. Mixed-mode design calculations

    Demonstrate that the system design for occupied spaces complies with CIBSE Applications Manual 13–2000, Mixed Mode Ventilation.

    Option 2. Additional enhanced IAQ strategies (1 point)

    Comply with the following requirements, as applicable.

    Mechanically ventilated spaces (select one):

    A. exterior contamination prevention;

    B. increased ventilation;

    C. carbon dioxide monitoring; or

    D. additional source control and monitoring.



    Naturally ventilated spaces (select one):

    A. exterior contamination prevention;

    D. additional source control and monitoring; or

    E. natural ventilation room by room calculations.


    Mixed-mode systems (select one):

    A. exterior contamination prevention;

    B. increased ventilation;

    D. additional source control and monitoring; or

    E. natural ventilation room-by-room calculations.



    A. Exterior contamination prevention

    Design the project to minimize and control the entry of pollutants into the building. Ensure through the results of computational fluid dynamics modeling, Gaussian dispersion analyses, wind tunnel modeling, or tracer gas modeling that outdoor air contaminant concentrations at outdoor air intakes are below the thresholds listed in Table 1 (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S., whichever is more stringent).

    Table 1. Maximum concentrations of pollutants at outdoor air intakes

    Pollutants Maximum concentration Standard
    Those regulated by National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Allowable annual average

    OR

    8-hour or 24-hour average where an annual standard does not exist

    OR

    Rolling 3-month average



    National Ambient Air Quality StandardsThe level of pollutants prescribed by regulations that are not to be exceeded during a given time in a defined area. (EPA) (NAAQS)



    B. Increased ventilation

    Increase breathing zoneThe breathing zone is the region within an occupied space between 3 and 6 feet above the floor and more than 2 feet from walls or fixed air-conditioning equipment. (AHSRAE 62.1–2007) outdoor air ventilation rates to all occupied spaces by at least 30% above the minimum rates as determined in EQ Prerequisite Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance.

    C. Carbon dioxide monitoring

    Monitor CO2 concentrations within all densely occupied spacesAreas with a design occupant density of 25 people or more per 1,000 square feet (40 square feet or less per person).. CO2 monitors must be between 3 and 6 feet (900 and 1 800 millimeters) above the floor. CO2 monitors must have an audible or visual indicator or alert the building automation system if the sensed CO2 concentration exceeds the setpoint by more than 10%. Calculate appropriate CO2 setpointsSetpoints are normal operating ranges for building systems and indoor environmental quality. When the building systems are outside of their normal operating range, action is taken by the building operator or automation system. using methods in ASHRAE 62.1–2010, Appendix C.

    D. Additional source control and monitoring

    For spaces where air contaminants are likely, evaluate potential sources of additional air contaminants besides CO2. Develop and implement a materials-handling plan to reduce the likelihood of contaminant release. Install monitoring systems with sensors designed to detect the specific contaminants. An alarm must indicate any unusual or unsafe conditions.

    E. Natural ventilation room-by-room calculations

    Follow CIBSE AM10, Section 4, Design Calculations, to predict that room-by-room airflows will provide effective natural ventilation. [Latin America ACP: Engineered Natural Ventilation Systems]

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    East Asia ACP: Filtration Media

    Projects in East Asia may use filtration media classified as high efficiency (高中效过滤器) or higher as defined by Chinese standard GB/T 14295-2008 (空气过滤器).

    Latin America ACP: Engineered Natural Ventilation Systems

    Projects in Latin America may follow the Verification Protocol for Engineered Natural Ventilation Systems in Equitorial Climates and receive a design review and approval from the Colombian Professional Association of Air-conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration (ACAIRE).

21 Comments

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Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores
Feb 27 2017
LEEDuser Member
1603 Thumbs Up

Exhaust monitoring

Do monitoring requirements also apply to spaces which only have exhaust requirements as per ASHRAE 62.1 - 2010 (e.g. toilets)? Thanks in advance!

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Edgar Arevalo
Feb 10 2017
Guest
52 Thumbs Up

Can sanitation maintenance garage apply as a warehouse?

Project Location: United States

I ask because according to the LEED v4 reference guide, garage spaces in warehouses and distribution centers are no required to install permanent entryway systems at the doors from the exterior to the garage but must be installed between these spaces and adjacent office areas. Since this building is mostly garage space, and the rest are office spaces, can that criteria apply to this building as well?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 10 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Edgar, this sounds reasonable to me. However, note that the language you're citing is for the Warehouses version of LEED-NC, which is sounds like is not the version you're using. I would suggest either switching to that version if it's a better overall fit, or requesting confirmation from GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). that you can use this strategy.

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Edgar Arevalo Feb 13 2017 Guest 52 Thumbs Up

The thing is I know this garage would not fit the LEED-NC warehouse rating system, if anything it would be classified as "Service: Vehicle Storage/Maintenance", but the profile stated in the warehouse section for permanent entryway systems for warehouses fits extremely well with this garage because it would be possible to design a permanent entryway system between the garage and the conditioned office spaces. Do you think LEED would still allow the garage space to have a permanent entryway system in order to pursue this credit, since both the sanitation garage and a warehouse would have that same transition between garage and office space that can accommodate an entryway system?

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Sara Johansson LEED® AP O+M Sweco Systems
Nov 03 2016
Guest
35 Thumbs Up

Small entryways

Project Location: Sweden

Hello,

What if a project has small retail stores on the bottom floor, less than 3m long, and the ground outside doesn't belong to the property owner but the municipality (and therefor not possible to install exterior systems as grates or mats)?

For instance if a retail store in this building only is 2m long (perhaps a locksmiths shop), is a 2m long mat sufficient enough and the property can earn 1 point in Option 1 (if also pursuing Option 2)?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 17 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Sara, I have never seen LEED provide any latitude in negotiating down the length of the trackoff mat based on project-specific circumstances.

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Renu Rani LEED Green Associate
Jun 29 2016
Guest
3 Thumbs Up

ACP for India

Project Location: India

Is there any ACP available for India?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jun 29 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5915 Thumbs Up

Hi Renu, I could only find India ACPs for LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. v4 (www.usgbc.org/articles/leed-addenda-update-april-2015). I don't believe that any India ACPs have been approved for this BDC v4 credit yet.

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PARKER WILLIAMS LEED AP BD+C
Oct 28 2015
LEEDuser Member
55 Thumbs Up

Checklist states 2 points possible

Are you allowed to do both options for this credit? 2 points possible or 1?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Oct 28 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5915 Thumbs Up

2 points are possible; you're allowed to pursue Option 1 and Option 2.

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BR+A LEED Oct 29 2015 LEEDuser Member 173 Thumbs Up

An innovation point is available if both options are pursued.

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PARKER WILLIAMS LEED AP BD+C Oct 29 2015 LEEDuser Member 55 Thumbs Up

Can we do both options for 2 points? On the checklist it lists 2 "out of" points?
Innovation credit is a good option to know about, but hopefully we can save those for other things.

thanks,

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Oct 29 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5915 Thumbs Up

Yes, you can do both options and earn 2 points.

To earn exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements., you must earn Option 1 and earn Option 2 AND incorporate an additional Option 2 strategy. See page 656 of the Reference Guide for the exemplary performance requirement.

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BR+A LEED
Jul 21 2015
LEEDuser Member
173 Thumbs Up

Enhanced IAQ Strategies - Hazardous Gases/Chemicals

Project Location: United States

Has the pressure differential requirement of at least 5 pascals for LEED v2009 IEQc5 Indoor and Chemical Source Pollutant Control been eliminated from the requirement of this credit?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Aug 17 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5915 Thumbs Up

Yes, the pressure differential has been eliminated in v4. See the "Changes from LEED 2009" section in the reference guide for some additional info.

Post a Reply
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Mark Zoeteman Sr. Mech Engr FTC&H, Inc.
Apr 02 2015
LEEDuser Member
147 Thumbs Up

Enhanced IAQ Strategies - Hazardous Gases/Chemicals

Project Location: United States

Option 1, Enhanced IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Strategies, paragraph B states spaces are to be exhausted where hazardous gases or chemicals may be present or used. What is definition of hazardous gases or chemicals?

Two options are available, Options 1 and 2. Can a project achieve Option 2 only without pursuing Option 1?

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Apr 03 2015 LEEDuser Expert 22592 Thumbs Up

As farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). as I know, the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). has not defined hazardous gases or chemicals and leaves this up to the design team to identify with the owner. It tends to be the gray areas that cause the most grief. One source you can use is OSHA. https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/hazardoustoxicsubstances/index.html

If the project is in California, you can use the Prop 65 list for carcinogens.

Or you can try posting the specific chemical here and see what people think.

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Vince Briones Sustainable Design Manager Atkins
Feb 18 2015
Guest
313 Thumbs Up

Exterior walk-off mats permitted?

Project Location: United States

Hi- has anyone gotten verification on whether exterior walk off mats are permitted under v4? The reference guide and current addenda are silent on that detail. Prior to 2009/v3 they were allowed, then v3 emphasized use of interior mats, although case by case exceptions could be made if sufficiently justified that interior mats weren't feasible. We have a small project in schematic design where interior mats may be difficult, but not impossible, to accommodate. It'd be great to know if using an exterior mat will pose a risk to credit compliance!

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Ashwini Arun Sustainability Manager, YR&G Apr 22 2015 LEEDuser Expert 212 Thumbs Up

Vince,

I would imagine exterior mats should be allowed in LEEDv4 projects. As per LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #10098, ""The intent for the entryway system (grilles, grates, walk-off mats) is to capture dirt and dust. An exception to the 10 foot length and/or indoor location is acceptable provided your alternative solution meets this intent and is thoroughly justified." I don't see why this interpretation won't be applicable to LEEDv4 projects as well. So as long as the intent is met, you should be good with exterior mats. Rollout mats or other similar products should be acceptable, as long as they are weather protected and cleaned on a weekly basis.

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Phillip Cook WGE
Mar 26 2014
LEEDuser Member
308 Thumbs Up

Not Regularly occupied

In LEED v2009, if a project has less than 1 annualized FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
occupancy it was not possible to achieve any of the IEQ points. I am working on a data centre that does not have any regular staff (security and control provided from a neighbouring building).

Does this still apply for v4? I cannot see any mention of it and the MPR has been removed. I guess it does still apply, as it does not make much sense to be increasing outside air rates for a bunch of computers - but I would like some confirmation if possible to take to the client.

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Aug 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 9620 Thumbs Up

Phillip - there is an entire new LEED adaptation for data centers in v4

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Mar 29 2017
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