NC-v4 EQc2: Low emitting materials

  • Let's break down this bundle of requirements

    LEED v4 has bundled what had previously been several separate low-emitting materials credit into one exceedingly complicated credit. On an individual materials basis, most of the updates to thresholds and standards are fairly minor, but taken as a whole, and combined with the complexity of some of the referenced standards, it's a lot to wrap you head around.

    We'll break things down category by category, and then answer some FAQs. If your question isn't answered here, please review the forum below and then post any additional questions there.

    Requirement for: Inherently nonemitting sources

    What this covers: Stone, ceramic, powder-coated metals, plated or anodized metal, glass, concrete, clay brick, unfinished or untreated solid wood flooring

    Testing methods used: No VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. emissions testing necessary if products do not include integral organic-based surface coatings, binders, or sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid.

    Requirements for: General Emissions Evaluation

    What this covers: Interior paints and coatings applied on site; interior adhesives and sealants applied on site (including flooring  adhesive); flooring; and ceilings, walls, thermal, and acoustic insulation

    Testing methods used: CDPH Standard Method V1.1-2010, applicable exposure scenario. The default scenario is the private office scenario. 

    Special notes: Manufacturer's or third-party certification must state the exposure scenario used to determine compliance, and must also state the range of total VOCs after 14 days (336 hours), measured as specified in the CDPH Standard Method V1.1. Claims of compliance for wet-applied products must state the amount applied in mass per surface area.

    Requirements for: Interior paints and coatings applied on site

    Testing methods used: Applicable VOC limits of the California Air Resources Board (CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it.) 2007, Suggested Control Measure (SCM) for Architectural Coatings, or the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.) Rule 1113, effective June 3, 2011

    Special notes: If the applicable regulation requires subtraction of exempt compounds, any content of intentionally added exempt compounds larger than 1% weight by mass (total exempt compounds) must be disclosed. If a product cannot be reasonable tested as specifed, testing of VOC content must comply with ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services D2369-10; ISO 11890, part 1; ASTM D6886-03; or ISO 11890-2. For projects in North America, methylene chloride and perchloroethylene may not be intentionally added in paints or coatings.

    Requirements for: Interior adhesives and sealants applied on site (including flooring  adhesive)

    Testing methods used: Applicable chemical content requirements of SCAQMD Rule 1168, July 1, 2005, Adhesive and Sealant Applications, as analyzed by the methods specified in Rule 1168.

    Special notes: If the applicable regulation requires subtraction of exempt compounds, any content of intentionally added exempt compounds larger than 1% weight by mass (total exempt compounds) must be disclosed. If a product cannot be reasonable tested as specifed, testing of VOC content must comply with ASTM D2369-10; ISO 11890, part 1; ASTM D6886-03; or ISO 11890-2. For projects in North America, methylene chloride and perchloroethylene may not be intentionally added in adhesives or sealants.

    Requirements for: Composite wood

    Testing methods used: Must be documented to have low formaldehyde1. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring VOC found in small amounts in animals and plants but is carcinogenic and an irritant to most people when present in high concentrations, causing headaches, dizziness, mental impairment, and other symptoms. When present in the air at levels above 0.1 ppm, it can cause watery eyes; burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat; nausea; coughing; chest tightness; wheezing; skin rashes; and asthmatic and allergic reactions. 2. A known carcinogen with no known safe exposure level. Formaldehyde occurs naturally, but appears in unnaturally high concentra­tions in many buildings because it is an ingredient in binders used in many building materials and furnishings. emissions that meet the California Air Resources Board ATCM for formaldehyde requirements for ultra-low-emitting formaldehyde (ULEE) resins or no added formaldehyde resins.

    Special notes: Salvaged and reused architectural millwork more than one year old at the time of occupancy is considered compliant, provided it meets the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.

    Requirements for: Furniture

    Testing methods used: Must be tested in accordance with ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1-2011; comply with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 and 7.6.2, using either the concentration modeling approach or the emissions factor approach; and model the test results using the open plan, private office, or seating scenario in ANSI/BIFMA M7.1, as appropriate.

    Special notes: USGBC-approved equivalent testing methodologies and contaminant thresholds are also acceptable. For classroom furniture, use the standard school classroom model in CDPH Standard Method V1.1. Documentation submitted for furniture must indicate the modeling scenario used to determine compliance. Salvaged and reused furniture more than one year old at the time of occupancy is considered compliant, provided it meets the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.

    Requirements for: Exterior applied products for (Healthcare and School Projects only)

    Testing methods used: Adhesives, sealants, coatings, roofing, and waterproofing materials applied on site must meet the VOC limits of California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007 Suggested control Measure (SCM) for Architectural Coatings, and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule 1168, effective July 1, 2005.

    Understanding the key CA emissions rulesSpecial notes: Small containers of adhesives and sealants subject to state or federal consumer product VOC regulations are exempt. Two materials are prohibited and do not count toward total percentage compliance: hot-mopped asphalt for roofing, and coal tar sealants for parking lots and other paved surfaces.

    FAQs for Low-Emitting Materials

    I'm looking for a certification that tells me if a given product will meet the LEED v4 requirements, but I don't see one in a given product area. Am I missing something?

    Unfortunately, third-party certifications are not available in all cases. Some certifications that have been allowed in previous LEED versions may not be allowed in LEED v4. Keep reading here for more detail. We expect that new certifications will become available, existing certifications will become updated, and that USGBC may approve of new certifications. We will keep this page updated as those developments occur.

    When products claim that they meet California Section 01350, does the product also meet LEED v4 requirements for low-emitting materials?

    Not necessarily.

    In order to meet LEED v4 requirements for low-emitting materials, a product must be tested and determined compliant in accordance with CDPH Standard Method V1.1-2010.

    There are many products that were certified in accordance with previous California Section 01350 methodologies. Those products may have met Section 01350 in the past, but don’t comply with the latest testing methodology that is referenced by LEED v4. It is important to check which method they comply with.

    And that’s not all.

    Additional requirements must be met for LEED, depending on the type of product. Wet-applied products must meet additional VOC content requirements; composite wood products must also be documented to have low formaldehyde emissions that meet the California Air Resources Board ATCM for formaldehyde requirements for ultra-low-emitting formaldehyde (ULEF) resins or no added formaldehyde resins; and new furniture and furnishing items must be tested in accordance with ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1–2011 and comply with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 and 7.6.2.

    How do I know if a product complies with LEED v4 or if it was tested under an older non-compliant standard?

    Where LEED requires CDPH Standard Method compliance, it is easiest to rely on third-party certifications. Check product literature to determine whether the current version of the testing method (Standard Method v1-2010) was used to test the product. Don’t rely on the year the product was tested—check for the method.

    In the case of VOC emissions from wet-applied products, self-declared compliance to the relevant standard, such as South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule 1113, is widespread and considered sufficient.

    In past versions of LEED, it was easy to specify VOC limits. Is the specification process the same for LEED v4?

    Rather than specifying specific VOC limits such as 50 g/L for flat paints, most project teams will specify either “LEED v4 compliant” or “tested against Standard Method v1.1-2010”, or another specific referenced standard. Specifying a product that is “CDHP 01350” is insufficient for reasons discussed earlier.

    Is there a VOC budget method for this credit?

    Yes. However, the VOC budget method can be laborious to document, so if you have just one non-compliant product, there is a shortcut: you can balance it out with just one really good, low-VOC product, as long as all your other products meet the requirement.

    What are the limits on the VOC budget method?

    At least 50% of an assembly must be compliant to contribute to credit compliance: if less than 50% of the assembly is compliant, it counts as 0%; if 90% of the assembly meets the criteria, it counts as 100% compliant. 

    Do products applied to the weather barrier need to comply with VOC thresholds? 

    Products applied to the building exterior need to comply with VOC thresholds (at least 90%, by volume) only if the building is a healthcare facility or school.

    What are the adhesives and sealants to be included in the documentation?

    All adhesives and sealants used on site within the weather barrier (including flooring adhesive) need to be included. 

    If one part of my multicomponent wall system is not compliant, can I still get full credit?

    No. If the wall system is comprised of more than one component, all components identified in the spreadsheet matrix must be compliant for the system to qualify for full credit. Examples of multicomponent wall systems are drywall panel and acoustic panel applied with adhesive, drywall panel with primer and finish paint coats, and movable wall system with wood frame, wood door, and fabric-covered acoustic panels.

    However, you may be able to do a VOC budget for partial credit.

    Our building is atypical, and the walls and ceilings are not clearly defined. How should we classify these components? 

    When it is unclear what is wall versus ceiling, project teams may classify elements either way, as they deem appropriate.

    Are throw rugs subject to the credit requirements?

    While low-emitting throw rugs are a good idea, they would not be considered permanently installed and so would not be subject to credit requirements.

    If a ceramic tile receives a top coat after it is manufactured, is it exempt from the credit requirements?

    While products that are inherently non-emitting sources of VOCs (stone, ceramic, powder-coated metals, plated or anodized metal, glass, concrete, clay brick, and unfinished or untreated solid wood flooring) are considered fully compliant without any VOC emissions testing, a tile or similar product that is coated after being manufactured must meet the credit requirements for flooring product certification.

    The credit requirements are allowed to exempt unfinished wood flooring, but wood flooring is almost always finished. This is confusing!

    Yes, it is odd. All the same, unfinished flooring is exempt and considered fully compliant because it is an inherently non-emitting source of VOCs, while finished flooring, whether the finished is applied onsite or off-site, must meet relevant requirements.

     
  • EQ Credit 2: Low-emitting materials

    Intent

    To reduce concentrations of chemical contaminants that can damage air quality, human health, productivity, and the environment.

    Requirements

    This credit includes requirements for product manufacturing as well as project teams. It covers volatile organic compound (VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.) emissions in the indoor air and the VOC content of materials, as well as the testing methods by which indoor VOC emissions are determined. Different materials must meet different requirements to be considered compliant for this credit. The building interior and exterior are organized in seven categories, each with different thresholds of compliance. The building interior is defined as everything within the waterproofing membrane. The building exterior is defined as everything outside and inclusive of the primary and secondary weatherproofing system, such as waterproofing membranes and air- and water-resistive barrier materials.

    Option 1. Product Category Calculations

    Achieve the threshold level of compliance with emissions and content standards for the number of product categories listed in Table 2.

    Table 1. Thresholds of compliance with emissions and content standards for 7 categories of materials

    Category Threshold Emissions and content  requirements
    Interior paints and coatings applied on site At least 90%, by volume, for emissions; 100% for VOC content
    • General Emissions Evaluation for paints and coatings applied to walls, floors, and ceilings
    • VOC content requirements for wet applied products
    Interior adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. applied on site (including flooring adhesive) At least 90%, by volume, for emissions; 100% for VOC content
    • General Emissions Evaluation
    • VOC content requirements for wet applied products
    Flooring 100% General Emissions Evaluation
    Composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard. 100% not covered by other categories Composite Wood Evaluation
    Ceilings, walls, thermal, and acoustic insulation 100%
    • General Emissions Evaluation
    • Healthcare, Schools only

      Additional insulation requirements
    Furniture (include in calculations if part of scope of work) At least 90%, by cost Furniture Evaluation
    Healthcare and Schools Projects only: Exterior applied products At least 90%, by volume Exterior Applied Products



    Table 2. Points for number of compliant categories of products

    Compliant categories Points
    NC, CS, NC Retail, DC, WDC, NC Hos projects without furniture
    2 1
    4 2
    5 3
    NC, CS, NC Retail, DC, WDC, NC Hos projects with furniture, CI, CI Retail, CI Hos
    3 1
    5 2
    6 3
    Schools, HC without furniture
    3 1  
    5 2
    6 3
    Schools, HC with furniture
    4 1
    6 2
    7 3



    Option 2. Budget Calculation Method

    If some products in a category do not meet the criteria, project teams may use the budget calculation method (Table 3).

    Table 3. Points for percentage compliance, under budget calculation method

    Percentage of total Points
    ≥ 50% and < 70% 1
    ≥ 70% and < 90% 2
    ≥ 90% 3



    The budget method organizes the building interior into five assemblies:

    • flooring;
    • ceilings;
    • walls;
    • thermal and acoustic insulation;
    • furniture

    Include furniture in the calculations if it is part of the scope of work. Walls, ceilings, and flooring are defined as building interior products; each layer of the assembly, including paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants, must be evaluated for compliance. Insulation is tracked separately.

    Determine the total percentage of compliant materials according to Equation 1.

    Equation 1. Total percentage compliance

    Total % compliant for projects without furniture = (% compliant walls + % compliant ceilings + % compliant flooring + % compliant insulation)
    4
    Total % compliant for projects with furniture = (% compliant walls + % compliant ceilings + % compliant flooring + % compliant insulation) + (% compliant furniture)
    5



    Equation 2. System percentage compliant

    Flooring, walls, ceilings, insulation % compliant = (compliant surface area of layer 1 + compliant surface area of layer 2 + compliant surface area of layer 3 + …) X 100
    total surface area of layer 1 + total surface area of layer 2 + total surface area of layer 3 + …)



    Equation 3. Furniture systems compliant, using ANSI/BIFMA evaluation


    % compliant for furniture = 0.5 x cost compliant with §7.6.1 of ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 + cost compliant with §7.6.2 of ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 X 100
    total furniture cost



    Calculate surface area of assembly layers based on the manufacturer’s documentation for application.

    If 90% of an assembly meets the criteria, the system counts as 100% compliant. If less than 50% of an assembly meets the criteria, the assembly counts as 0% compliant.

    Manufacturers’ claims. Both first-party and third-party statements of product compliance must follow the guidelines in CDPH SM V1.1–2010, Section 8. Organizations that certify manufacturers’ claims must be accredited under ISO Guide 65.

    Laboratory requirements. Laboratories that conduct the tests specified in this credit must be accredited under ISO/IEC 17025 for the test methods they use.

    Emissions and Content Requirements

    To demonstrate compliance, a product or layer must meet all of the following requirements, as applicable.

    Inherently nonemitting sources. Products that are inherently nonemitting sources of VOCs (stone, ceramic, powder-coated metals, plated or anodized metal, glass, concrete, clay brick, and unfinished or untreated solid wood flooring) are considered fully compliant without any VOC emissions testing if they do not include integral organic-based surface coatings, binders, or sealants.

    General emissions evaluation. Building products must be tested and determined compliant in accordance with California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method v1.1–2010, using the applicable exposure scenario. The default scenario is the private office scenario. The manufacturer’s or third-party certification must state the exposure scenario used to determine compliance. Claims of compliance for wet-applied products must state the amount applied in mass per surface area.

    Manufacturers’ claims of compliance with the above requirements must also state the range of total VOCs after 14 days (336 hours), measured as specified in the CDPH Standard Method v1.1:

    • 0.5 mg/m3 or less;
    • between 0.5 and 5.0 mg/m3; or
    • 5.0 mg/m3 or more.

    Projects outside the U.S. may use products tested and deemed compliant in accordance with either (1) the CDPH standard method (2010) or (2) the German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010). Test products either with (1) the CDPH Standard Method (2010), (2) the German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010), (3) ISO 16000-3: 2010, ISO 16000-6: 2011, ISO 16000-9: 2006, ISO 16000-11:2006 either in conjunction with AgBB, or with French legislation on VOC emission class labeling, or (4) the DIBt testing method (2010). If the applied testing method does not specify testing details for a product group for which the CDPH standard method does provide details, use the specifications in the CDPH standard method. U.S. projects must follow the CDPH standard method.

    Additional VOC content requirements for wet-applied products. In addition to meeting the general requirements for VOC emissions (above), on-site wet-applied products must not contain excessive levels of VOCs, for the health of the installers and other tradesworkers who are exposed to these products. To demonstrate compliance, a product or layer must meet the following requirements, as applicable. Disclosure of VOC content must be made by the manufacturer. Any testing must follow the test method specified in the applicable regulation.

    • All paints and coatings wet-applied on site must meet the applicable VOC limits of the California Air Resources Board (CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it.) 2007, Suggested Control Measure (SCM) for Architectural Coatings, or the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.) Rule 1113, effective June 3, 2011.
    • All adhesives and sealants wet-applied on site must meet the applicable chemical content requirements of SCAQMD Rule 1168, July 1, 2005, Adhesive and Sealant Applications, as analyzed by the methods specified in Rule 1168. The provisions of SCAQMD Rule 1168 do not apply to adhesives and sealants subject to state or federal consumer product VOC regulations.
    • For projects outside the U.S., all paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants wet-applied on site must either meet the technical requirements of the above regulations, or comply with applicable national VOC control regulations, such as the European Decopaint Directive (2004/42/EC), the Canadian VOC Concentration Limits for Architectural Coatings, or the Hong Kong Air Pollution Control (VOC) Regulation.
    • If the applicable regulation requires subtraction of exempt compounds, any content of intentionally added exempt compounds larger than 1% weight by mass (total exempt compounds) must be disclosed.
    • If a product cannot reasonably be tested as specified above, testing of VOC content must comply with ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services D2369-10; ISO 11890, part 1; ASTM D6886-03; or ISO 11890-2.
    • For projects in North America, methylene chloride and perchloroethylene may not be intentionally added in paints, coatings, adhesives, or sealants.

    Composite Wood Evaluation. Composite wood, as defined by the California Air Resources Board, Airborne Toxic Measure to Reduce Formaldehyde1. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring VOC found in small amounts in animals and plants but is carcinogenic and an irritant to most people when present in high concentrations, causing headaches, dizziness, mental impairment, and other symptoms. When present in the air at levels above 0.1 ppm, it can cause watery eyes; burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat; nausea; coughing; chest tightness; wheezing; skin rashes; and asthmatic and allergic reactions. 2. A known carcinogen with no known safe exposure level. Formaldehyde occurs naturally, but appears in unnaturally high concentra­tions in many buildings because it is an ingredient in binders used in many building materials and furnishings. Emissions from Composite Wood Products Regulation, must be documented to have low formaldehyde emissions that meet the California Air Resources Board ATCM for formaldehyde requirements for ultra-low-emitting formaldehyde (ULEF) resins or no added formaldehyde resins. For projects outside the U.S., composite wood must be documented not to exceed a concentration limit of 0.05 ppmParts per million. of formaldehyde (0.06 mg/m2-h when expressed as emission rate) as tested following either EN-717-1:2004, following ISO 16000-3: 2010, ISO 16000-6: 2011, ISO 16000-9: 2006, ISO 16000-11:2006, or following CEN/TS 16516: 2013 either in conjunction with AgBB or with Belgian or French legislation on VOC emission class labeling.

    Salvaged and reused architectural millwork more than one year old at the time of occupancy is considered compliant, provided it meets the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.

    Furniture evaluation. New furniture and furnishing items must be tested in accordance with ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1–2011. Comply with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 (for half credit, by cost) OR 7.6.2 (for full credit, by cost), using either the concentration modeling approach or the emissions factor approach. Model the test results using the open plan, private office, or seating scenario in ANSI/BIFMA M7.1, as appropriate. USGBC-approved equivalent testing methodologies and contaminant thresholds are also acceptable. For classroom furniture, use the standard school classroom model in CDPH Standard Method v1.1. Documentation submitted for furniture must indicate the modeling scenario used to determine compliance.

    Salvaged and reused furniture more than one year old at the time of use is considered compliant, provided it meets the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

336 Comments

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Kristen Magnuson stok
Jun 22 2017
Guest
28 Thumbs Up

CDPH v1.2 (2017)

Project Location: United States

Does the USGBC accept products that have been tested for emissions in accordance with CDPH v1.2 (2017) for compliance with the low-emitting materials credit? This is the newer version of CDPH v1.1, but there is no information readily available online to verify that this is accepted by USGBC.

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Leanne Conrad Project Coordinator, Maple Reinders Constructors Jun 22 2017 Guest 63 Thumbs Up

Kristen,

What are the differences? I would hedge a guess that the newer version would be acceptable if the changes were to more stringent requirements, not relaxing the requirements.

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Jenelle Shapiro Sr. Sustainability Manager Webcor Builders
Jun 15 2017
LEEDuser Member
216 Thumbs Up

IEQ 0 VOC General Emissions Test Needed?

If any wet applied product is shown to have 0 VOCs, does it still need a general emissions evaluation?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 19 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, both emissions and content documentation is required for wet-applied products.

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Lucy Williams Principal Lucy C. Williams, Architect
Jun 15 2017
LEEDuser Member
722 Thumbs Up

Wall Components

Project Location: United States

When reporting for the wall, ceiling category under Option 1, do all of the interior partition components need to be complaint- the gypsum board, the tape, the joint compound, the studs and the paint? If so, has anyone come across a drywall tape that has the TVOCThe sum or total of all volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from a product or measured in a space under certain defined conditions. certificate?

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Alara Matsyk Sustainable Buildings Coordinator Prairie Architects Inc
May 09 2017
Guest

Furniture built with salvaged trees

Project Location: Canada

We have several furniture items that are being built for our new office from salvaged trees around our city that would otherwise be destroyed (dutch elm disease). The diseased bark is removed and the perfectly good wood is then made into a variety of furniture and art pieces. The furniture assemblies are fairly basic (wood boards, metal connectors, shop applied adhesives(maybe), but the company would not likely be testing the furniture to ANSI/BIFMA standards. In a way, the furniture is salvaged but not as a complete assembly. As such, the wood is fairly pure in that it wouldn't be composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard., but would be less than a year old too. Is there any way we can apply this furniture to the Low Emitting Materials credit as salvaged and inherently non-emitting without testing standards? It could be possible that it makes up for only 10% of furniture for the project with the other 90% complying, however we would like to include it if possible. Does anybody have any similar situations with salvaged wood furniture in a v4 project? Thanks.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
May 09 2017
LEEDuser Member
4501 Thumbs Up

Solvent Cement Adhesive for PVC pipes

Project Location: Spain

We are trying to find a specific adhesive for PVC pipes.

It should be a "Medium Bodied Rigid PVC Solvent cement for large diameters and elevated temperatures (>35°C)"

Has anyone found a similar product that complies with LEED v4 for emissions and content? It is a usual adhesive for pipes used in most of the construction sites.

We have already found a CONTENT compliant product, but does not have the EMISSIONS test done.

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects May 09 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4455 Thumbs Up

The major manufacturers have compliant products (Oatey, Masters, IPEX, etc.) - if you cannot find a MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products sheet with test results, contact the companies technical assistance and they will supply the required documentation.

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Leanne Conrad Project Coordinator, Maple Reinders Constructors May 09 2017 Guest 63 Thumbs Up

Emmanuel , look for my post below. When I was searching for the same earlier this year, the manufacturers I spoke to had no interest in completing the emissions testing. We have had to do the alternate calculation for the adhesives & sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. category. That said, if you do find CDPH testing information, please share so that those of us who were also looking can have the data for our projects.

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Scott Steady May 09 2017 Guest 10 Thumbs Up

Almost all adhesive manufacturers will have the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content documentation since this is required for sale in many states to limit outdoor ozone formation. There are also many VOC emissions compliant adhesives listed in the www.UL.com/spot database. You can search by the applicable LEED credit. Note that some categories of adhesive may not be represented on this site but there is a pretty robust list of compliant products available.

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Eric White Sustainability Consultant Mission Green Buildings
May 05 2017
LEEDuser Member
8 Thumbs Up

Translucent Glazing Film

Project Location: Canada

Our project is using a translucent film on several demountable glass office partitions to provide screening and privacy. I understand that the glass partitions must meet the General Emissions Evaluation per the Walls category, but does this film also need to? Would it be considered a "finish wall treatment"?

The questions then become:

1. Do you think it needs to be included in our Low-Emitting Materials tracking table?

2. Is anyone aware of any products that meet the Standard Method v1.1-2010 criteria?

Thanks!
Eric

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Leanne Conrad Project Coordinator, Maple Reinders Constructors May 05 2017 Guest 63 Thumbs Up

Eric - I would assume it needs to be included, especially if it is attached with glue and not just by static cling.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
May 05 2017
LEEDuser Member
4501 Thumbs Up

IBR, Institut für Baubiologie in Rosenheim

Project Location: Spain

Can we consider the IBR (Institut für Baubiologie in Rosenheim) an approved seal which is compliance with LEED v4 requirement for VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. emissions?

Attached you will find information regarding VOC test using ISO 16000:
http://baubiologie-ibr.de/en/content/have-your-indoor-air-analysed

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S May 05 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

Hi, this is not possible directly, because this seal is not on the list of compliant rating systems as issued by US GBC. And it is even not possible indirectly, as the criteria document requires AgBB conformity, but it does not require the low 0.01 mg/m3 limit for formaldehyde1. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring VOC found in small amounts in animals and plants but is carcinogenic and an irritant to most people when present in high concentrations, causing headaches, dizziness, mental impairment, and other symptoms. When present in the air at levels above 0.1 ppm, it can cause watery eyes; burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat; nausea; coughing; chest tightness; wheezing; skin rashes; and asthmatic and allergic reactions. 2. A known carcinogen with no known safe exposure level. Formaldehyde occurs naturally, but appears in unnaturally high concentra­tions in many buildings because it is an ingredient in binders used in many building materials and furnishings. which is required by LEED v4.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. May 18 2017 LEEDuser Member 4501 Thumbs Up

We would like to share an answer from the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).:

"Testing for the IBR Seal is based on AgBB, which is acceptable for the IEQc Low Emitting Materials general emissions evaluation when used in combination with a French A+ VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. label. The project team should upload a test certificate for each project with the IBR seal to verify compliance with the credit requirements, because the Seal of Approval guidelines appears to indicate that some testing is optional."

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S May 18 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

That is right. Proven AgBB conformity plus low formaldehyde1. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring VOC found in small amounts in animals and plants but is carcinogenic and an irritant to most people when present in high concentrations, causing headaches, dizziness, mental impairment, and other symptoms. When present in the air at levels above 0.1 ppm, it can cause watery eyes; burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat; nausea; coughing; chest tightness; wheezing; skin rashes; and asthmatic and allergic reactions. 2. A known carcinogen with no known safe exposure level. Formaldehyde occurs naturally, but appears in unnaturally high concentra­tions in many buildings because it is an ingredient in binders used in many building materials and furnishings. emissions (which can be proven e.g. by French A+ label) will do.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator Bywater Woodworks, Inc.
Apr 21 2017
Guest
244 Thumbs Up

Do aerosol rust-inhibitor paints fall under LEED guidelines?

Project Location: United States

we have steel doors that will have a very nasty primer put on in the shop that has carbon black, formaldehyde1. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring VOC found in small amounts in animals and plants but is carcinogenic and an irritant to most people when present in high concentrations, causing headaches, dizziness, mental impairment, and other symptoms. When present in the air at levels above 0.1 ppm, it can cause watery eyes; burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat; nausea; coughing; chest tightness; wheezing; skin rashes; and asthmatic and allergic reactions. 2. A known carcinogen with no known safe exposure level. Formaldehyde occurs naturally, but appears in unnaturally high concentra­tions in many buildings because it is an ingredient in binders used in many building materials and furnishings., cobalt based chemical and other nasty stuff. The mfgr provided a (M)SDS for a touch up/ rust inhibitor spray paint that will be used on site that has less nasty ingredients but VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.'s are given as 57% not in x g/l. Even though you say spray paints don't fall under LEED NC v2009, this is a rust inhibitor paint. VOCs are 57% by weight. Do I need to worry about this product for LEED NC v2009? (it's not a school or hospital.) THANKS!

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S Apr 21 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

Do I get it right that the paints are applied at the factory? The VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits only apply to paints applied on-site, not to paints applied at a production site. And as the VOCs evaporate almost 100% before they reach the building there is no further concern.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Apr 21 2017 Guest 244 Thumbs Up

product in question is a spray paint to be used on site as a touch up/ rust inhibitor. This spray paint's VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.'s are given as 57% not in _ g/l. LEED seems to be concerned paints having nasty ingredients, such as these, however this is a spray applied type paint which elsewhere on LEEDuser (think under NC v2009 EQc4.2) someone mentions that spray paints do not fall under LEED discretion. So it seems conflicting especially given the nasty ingredients in this paint. Anyone know from a specific project how LEED reviewers ruled?

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator Bywater Woodworks, Inc.
Apr 12 2017
Guest
244 Thumbs Up

definition of composite wood and tectum panels?

Project Location: United States

We are a GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. on a 2009 NC project. our Sub is installing Tectum finale panels
are made from: mineral wool (rock) and aspen trees. Tectum Finalé Panels
contain no Urea FormaldehydeUrea formaldehyde is a combination of urea and formaldehyde used in some glues and adhesives, particularly in composite wood products. At room temperature, ureaformaldehyde emits formaldehyde, a toxic and possibly carcinogenic gas..

Would LEED consider these tectum panels to be composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard. and thus required to be listed under EQc4.4 in 2009? I assume so but wonder if someone else having used them knows with more certainty.

THANKS!

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Apr 12 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4455 Thumbs Up

Yes, list in under EQc4.4, here is a link to the supporting doc's:

http://www.tectum.com/tectum-leed-contributions.html

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Apr 12 2017 Guest 244 Thumbs Up

Thank you John!
Debra

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Ashley Hu Jr. Sustainable Building Advisor Perkins+Will
Apr 11 2017
Guest
9 Thumbs Up

Non-composite wood with off-site applied coatings

Project Location: Canada

Hello there,

what would the requirements be for non-composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard. with off-site applied coatings, for example a wood screen created with 2x4 stained wood?

Thank you!

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Apr 12 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4455 Thumbs Up

The solid wood would not be required to be reported under this credit, but and adhesives used in the manufacturing, on or off site, must meet the requirements. As well, if there are adhesives used on site for installation or the stain is used on site for touch ups, they must be reported.

The stain, if applied off site, is not required

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Ashley Hu Jr. Sustainable Building Advisor, Perkins+Will Apr 12 2017 Guest 9 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your quick reply John!

Could you please tell me where in the reference guide states the exclusion of solid wood?

Is everything within the waterproofing membrane (except for healthcare and school projects) required to fall under a category and comply with the respective requirements? This excludes off site applied paints, coatings, adhesives, sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid., and office accessories.

The reference guide confuses me when it references interior floor, wall, and ceiling finish in the glossary. I then hear comments on this page asking about compliance requirements for structural members.

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Joshua Chia IEN Consultants
Apr 11 2017
Guest
2 Thumbs Up

General Emissions Evaluation

Project Location: Malaysia

Hi All! Appreciate if someone can help with the following.

The reference guide states that for projects overseas, the products can be tested to either CDPH or AgBB. Unfortunately, finding products that are tested to either of these 2 are like finding a needle in a haystack. However, wet-applied products that meet the additional VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content requirements are readily available.

Is it possible to still meet the credit requirements with documentation of meeting the additional VOC content requirement but without the General Emissions Evaluation?

Cheers

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager Atkins North America
Apr 06 2017
LEEDuser Member
895 Thumbs Up

VOC budget calculation success for partially compliant category?

Project Location: United States

Hi all,

Despite following the instructions tab details, I have been encountering Low-emitting spreadsheet/calculator errors when attempting to generate assembly calculations to overcome several (general emissions) non-compliant/non-tested wall products. The line items just won't appear in Option 2 summary tab....Before I reach out to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). directly, I wanted to check the forum....

In short, has anyone else had success or issues with the USGBC issued calculator? I'd welcome any tips in navigating its data entry quirks.

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Apr 06 2017 LEEDuser Expert 22858 Thumbs Up

delete, wrong forum.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Apr 06 2017 LEEDuser Member 895 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the quick feedback Susan- glad to hear they (GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).) will accept custom alternatives. Given the USGBC's comprehensive low-emitting calculator excel file, I was wondering if that was an option!

Is that correct? I see you just deleted your response?

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Lourdes Salinas THREE Consultoría Medioambiental
Mar 29 2017
LEEDuser Member
532 Thumbs Up

TVOC certificate for a glass fiber tank

Project Location: Mexico

For a project that has a glass fiber water tank inside the weather barrier in a utility space (not a working space), do we need to get a TVOCThe sum or total of all volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from a product or measured in a space under certain defined conditions. certificate for that tank?

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Mar 29 2017 LEEDuser Member 895 Thumbs Up

Lourdes,

No- it does not appear a fiberglass tank (or other systems equipment) would be subject to the TVOCThe sum or total of all volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from a product or measured in a space under certain defined conditions. requirements of this general building materials/interior finishes focused credit.

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S Mar 29 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

Confirmed. The relevant product categories are those for floor, walls, ceilings, insulation, and (for some building types) furniture. Nothing else.

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Ashley Hu Jr. Sustainable Building Advisor Perkins+Will
Mar 27 2017
Guest
9 Thumbs Up

Manufacturers' claims and laboratory requirements.

Hi there,

the credit requires:

Both first-party and third-party statements of product compliance must follow the guidelines in CDPH SM V1.1 -2010, Section 8. Organizations that certify manufacturers' claims must be accredited under ISO Guide 65.

Is this required for all categories, i.e., paints and coatings, composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard., furniture etc., or is it only for categories requiring general emissions evaluation compliance? Also would it be sufficient for a document to state compliance to the above requirements?

Thank you

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Mar 29 2017 LEEDuser Member 895 Thumbs Up

Hi Ashley,

I welcome input from other LEEDUsers on this, but in my opinion there is nothing additional the LEED project team must document to address this Section 8 requirement. It serves as an industry guideline to the Manufacturer and/or testing agency publishing product TVOCThe sum or total of all volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from a product or measured in a space under certain defined conditions. data. Below is an excerpt- refer to this link for full details: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/IAQ/Documents/cdph-iaq_standardmethod_v...

"8 GUIDELINES FOR USE OF STANDARD METHOD AS BASIS FOR A BUILDING PRODUCT CLAIM
In the past, product manufacturers have used test results as the basis for a single-attribute claim regarding one or a group of their products (i.e., a low VOC emissions product claim). Claims certification and verification organizations have also deemed to use these test results as part of their own process for substantiating manufacturers’ claims. Whenever this Standard Method for the Testing and Evaluation of Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions from Indoor Sources Using Environmental Chambers is to be used to make, certify or verify a building product claim, the following guidelines are recommended to ensure the integrity of the process."

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S Mar 29 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

I should support this comment. Any advisor or building engineerA qualified engineering professional with relevant and sufficient expertise who oversees and is responsible for the operation and maintenance of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems in the project building. just and only should request evidence from the submitter of any statement of CDPH conformity that they work in compliance with these requirements. This regulation is meant to prevent from green-washing by just testing once and producing something with different emissions later.
And yes this is related to the general emissions requirements, to my knowledge. You will not find something similar in the market regarding VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content statements.

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Ashley Hu Jr. Sustainable Building Advisor, Perkins+Will Mar 29 2017 Guest 9 Thumbs Up

Thank you Joanna and Reinhard for your responses!

Apologies for my confusion, but Reinhard when you say

"...should request evidence from the submitter of any statement of CDPH conformity that they work in compliance with these requirements,"

do you mean that a statement of compliance to the guidelines in CDPH SM V1.1 -2010, Section 8, and that organizations that certify manufacturers' claims are accredited under ISO Guide 65 is required?

Thank you in advance!

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S Mar 30 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

A manufacturer can state CDPH conformity if this statement complies with the guidelines in CDPH SM V1.1-2010, Section 8. A designer should request evidence from the manufacturer that this is the case (probably given by declaration). This documentation should in best case refer to all chapters within Section 8, but most important are 8.7 and 8.8.

If the manufacturer makes use of an organization that certifies manufacturers' claims then this organization shall show that their statement complies with the guidelines in CDPH SM V1.-2010, Section 8, which on top of the above said, includes that the organization is accredited under ISO Guide 65 (or the successor of that old standard, now in ISO/IEC 17065).

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Mercedes Oviedo LEED Project Manager e4, Inc.
Mar 17 2017
LEEDuser Member
5 Thumbs Up

General Emission Evaluation - Default Scenario

The LEED guide states the following: “Building products must be tested and determined compliant in accordance with California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method v1.1–2010, using the applicable exposure scenario. The default scenario is the private office scenario. The manufacturer’s or third-party certification must state the exposure scenario used to determine compliance.” My question is - does this mean that we can only purchase products that have been tested under the scenario that meets our project type? e.g. if we are certifying a school we can only use products that have been tested under a school scenario?

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Mar 29 2017 LEEDuser Member 895 Thumbs Up

Hi Mercedes,

You are safe using products tested under the private office scenario for any space type, including classrooms. This just means the product was tested under smaller room conditions (equivalent air volume of small space) as a more stringent evaluation of its VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. emissions/IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. impact to occupants. Products meeting this small office scenario would be acceptable /pose no greater IAQ risk for larger spaces. Make sense?

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S Mar 29 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

Yes, this makes sense. Testing under the private office scenario implicates the sharpest requirements. If a product passes under those conditions then it will also pass under the classrooms conditions. It is only the other way around: If a product is used only in classrooms, then it is deemed good enough if it passes the test under those conditions, even if it fails under the most stringent conditions (the private office scenario).

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Ana García Architectural Green Method
Mar 01 2017
LEEDuser Member
23 Thumbs Up

Exterior applied products

Hi all!
I have a question regarding LEED requirementes for exterior applied products for schools and healthcare projects:
Does a roof PVC membrane have to comply with these requirements or those requirements are adressed only to wet applied products?

Thanks for your help!

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Mar 01 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4455 Thumbs Up

See above:

Requirements for: Exterior applied products for (Healthcare and School Projects only)

Testing methods used: Adhesives, sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid., coatings, roofing, and waterproofing materials applied on site must meet the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits of California Air Resources Board (CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it.) 2007 Suggested control Measure (SCM) for Architectural Coatings, and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.) Rule 1168, effective July 1, 2005.

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Ian Thompson Project Manager John Sisk & Son (Holdings) Ltd
Feb 23 2017
Guest
4 Thumbs Up

Change to Furniture Evaluation Criteria

Project Location: Ireland

There was a rating system correction at the end of January http://www.usgbc.org/node/10611490 which seems to reduce the value of a Furniture Evaluation complying to Section 7.6.1 of ANSI/BIFMA e3 – 2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard. The correction states that Section 7.6.1 is now worth a half credit by cost and that Section 7.6.2 is worth a full credit by cost. We are just about to order furniture for a v4 project in Dublin and we need compliance with this category.
It seems to me that this means that furniture with a cert to Section 7.6.1 is now only worth 50% of the total cost of that piece of furniture. It isn’t clear in the credit language correction if this is what they mean?
The Low-Emitting Materials Calculator doesn’t work this way and is still giving both Section 7.6.1 & 7.6.2 a value of 100%. Should this be updated in the calculator or have I misunderstood the intention of this correction.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Feb 23 2017 LEEDuser Member 895 Thumbs Up

Hi Ian,

For initial consideration, was your project LEED registered prior to 01/27/2017? Technically, all project teams are required to adhere to all Addenda posted BEFORE their registration date. Adherence to Addenda posted AFTER a project registers is optional, but is strongly encouraged. Refer here for that guideline language: http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-addenda-database

That aside, it sounds like you are interpreting the technical criteria correctly. If a product ONLY meets 7.6.1, it would be considered 50% compliant, requiring 50% of the total product's purchase cost to be manually entered into the Low-emitting Calculator. The itemized selection costs entered here would then generate the overall compliance calculation using the TOTAL project furniture costs in the Instruction tab, reporting the overall compliance in the Summary tab.

Summarily, as 90% compliance is required overall, a project's success logistically relies upon nearly ALL of furniture costs to be associated with 7.6.2 compliant & sufficiently documented selections.

Depending on your registration date, this may not be an absolute requirement for this particular project, but still something to strive for.....and something to be aware of for all future LEED projects.

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Ian Thompson Project Manager, John Sisk & Son (Holdings) Ltd Feb 23 2017 Guest 4 Thumbs Up

Joanna,

Thanks for your response. Yes we were registered prior to this Addenda being issued so it looks like we're ok. Finding any furniture in Europe that has undergone any ANSI/BIFMA testing is a challenge without losing half the value of what is tested!

Thanks,
Ian

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Jerimiah Luckett Doty and Miller Architects
Feb 22 2017
Guest
5 Thumbs Up

General Emissions Evaluation Fire Safing & Fire Blanket Ins.

Project Location: United States

Has anyone else come across the issue of finding a CDPH v1.1-2010 compliant Safing Insulation or SAFB Insulation?
The contractor submitted the Owens Corning/Thermafiber SAFB and Safing and according to their new LEED v4 compliance table, neither product meets for Low Emitting Materials.
I performed a general search for both "Safing" and "SAFB" on UL Spot but there are no other compliant products indicated there either. I've also looked into the Johns Manville MinWool Safing that came up on UL Spot but it is only compliant with GreenGuard, not GreenGuard Plus.
I was able to locate what might be a compliant replacement for the SAFB, on UL Spot, the Roxul AFB, but would need to get that approved by the architect as it doesn't meet the spec currently.

After doing quite a bit of research on this topic and then circling back to the possibility that maybe I'm overthinking this since I can't seem to locate even a single compliant Safing. The requirement specifically states that the General Emissions Evaluation is required for "Ceilings, Walls, Thermal and Acoustic Insulation". Is it possible that Fireproofing Insulation is not included in this requirement? The Safing is definitely without a doubt a Fireproofing Insulation. The SAFB may be on the border as it is short for Sound Attenuation Fire Blankets, so that may lean a bit more toward Acoustic...but also provide fire protection. Also since there is the Roxul AFB that might be enough for a GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). reviewer to say, "well, there was a compliant option out there for this product.".

Looking forward to any input or thoughts. Wow is tracking down all of the various information for the Building Product Disclosures and Low Emitting Materials submittals or to even verify the submittals as accurate is a beast with this new LEED v4!!

Thanks
Jerimiah

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Feb 23 2017 LEEDuser Member 895 Thumbs Up

Hi Jerimiah,

I am unfamiliar with any exclusion for fire rating assembly components. I have encountered numerous challenges with specialty products as well...many of those manufacturers don't seem to have the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. testing done yet. It is also possible that the fire resistance properties are achieved by chemicals that won't meet CDPHv1.1-2010?

How would this blanket be used? Ceiling or wall? In either case, sorry to say it sounds like a VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. budget calc would be necessary to pursue the complex LEEDv4 low-emitting credit.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Feb 28 2017 LEEDuser Member 895 Thumbs Up

Jerimiah,

It might be worth asking the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). about this item. Upon reflection, the requirement addresses thermal & acoustic insulation. I would interpret Fire resistant insulation as a specialty outside these two general categories, given its primary UL tested function. Thoughts?

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Jerimiah Luckett Doty and Miller Architects Feb 28 2017 Guest 5 Thumbs Up

Joanna,
After extensively hunting for any compliant fire resistant insulation and coming up empty that is what I'm thinking is my best angle. I've spoken with numerous different insulation company tech reps now and not a single one has been able to provide a compliant option for this "fire containment insulation/safing".
I think I will move forward with the approval for the submittal and will address it in the construction submission and just see how it turns out in the review comments. Due to time constraints, I can't hold off any longer on the submittal.

Thanks
Jerimiah

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Feb 28 2017 LEEDuser Member 895 Thumbs Up

Jerimiah,

Completely understand. Worst case, it may require a VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. budget calc, but worth documenting as exempt from this criteria initially.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager Atkins North America
Feb 20 2017
LEEDuser Member
895 Thumbs Up

LEEDv4 compliant operable partitions?

Has anyone had luck in locating CPHv1.1-2010 tested (or alternately Green Guard Gold certified) operable / folding (CSI Division 10) partitions?

As a general observation, I am concerned numerous specialty product providers are not yet on board with all the LEEDv4 criteria, making the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. budget calculations a necessary exercise in many projects.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager Atkins North America
Feb 17 2017
LEEDuser Member
895 Thumbs Up

Maximum threshold for General VOC emissions compliance?

Project Location: United States

Hi,

I am not finding any info to suggest a maximum VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit allowable under the General Emissions. Does "5.0 mg/m3 or more" really include everything greater than 5.0mg? I am finding some fire sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. are notably above this, but have the CPHv1.1-2010 test results so does that suffice?

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Leanne Conrad Project Coordinator, Maple Reinders Constructors Feb 17 2017 Guest 63 Thumbs Up

From what I have researched and understand, the actual value does not matter, what matters is that the test was done and the results available for project teams to review. Hopefully someone who has submitted a project or CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide can speak up, but that is what I was able to find when I had a similar question earlier this year.

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Björn Schön DAW SE Feb 17 2017 Guest 8 Thumbs Up

That's also my understanding. The products have to be tested according to CPHv1.1-2010 and have to fulfill the requirements of the included list of certain VOCs. But the total VOC is not limited in the emission requirement. But you still have to fulfill the additional VOC content requirements for wet-applied products (CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it., SCM, SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. etc.)

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Feb 17 2017 LEEDuser Member 895 Thumbs Up

Leanne & Bjorn- Thanks for the quick feedback - good to know I wasn't missing anything.

So, wet (g/L) VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits are enforced/clearly stipulated and CPHv1.1-2010 general emissions (ug/m3) are more about product transparency - at least as farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). as LEEDv4 is currently concerned!

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S Feb 18 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

Caution, please. Maybe this is about wording ... but it was made clear by US GBC that for wet applied products, both VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content limits (in the product) and CDPH VOC emissions limits (in the air after application) will apply. This is valid for LEED v4, not for earlier versions. Total VOC (TVOCThe sum or total of all volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from a product or measured in a space under certain defined conditions.) is another term which shall characterize the sum of all emitted VOC (in the air). Total VOC must not be mixed up with VOC content, even though this also is sort of all (or you could say total) VOC - but in the product, not all VOC or TVOC emitted into air.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Feb 19 2017 LEEDuser Expert 1516 Thumbs Up

To put it all together, there are 3 different requirements for wet applied materials:
1. Meet the general emissions requirements (CDPH standard method 2010)
2. Report the range of TVOCThe sum or total of all volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from a product or measured in a space under certain defined conditions. (for transparency only)
3. Meet the g/L content requirements.

Items 1 and 2 are true for all products eligible for this credit. Item 3 is unique to wet-applied materials.

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Björn Schön DAW SE
Feb 17 2017
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

Clear definition for interior/exterior needed

Project Location: Germany

The Definition of interior/exterior in the LOW-EMITTING MATERIALS credit is a bit confusing for me. What is exaclty defined as a waterproofing membrane or air- and water-resistive barrier materials?

In Europe we usually have walls made of bricks or concrete, where an insulation system is applied on top (outdoor). What kind of products should I count as exterior and interior? Is the brick/concrete wall itself the air- and water -resistive barrier, so everything that is applied on top of the wall is a exterior product, and everything that is faced indoors is considered as a indoor product?

We just need to know this because we have to decide for which of our products we have to make emission test.

Thank you.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Feb 17 2017 LEEDuser Member 895 Thumbs Up

In my past experience, based on LEEDv3 &v2 protocol, the exterior weatherproofing membrane includes all products that are critical to keeping moisture from entering the building or damaging interior wall and floor substrates. Therefore, in addition to the structural and exterior finish materials (brick/concrete), this COULD include waterproofing coatings or plastic sheeting ("vapor barrier") & associated sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid./caulks applied inside the exterior wall cavity to serve as an additional precaution. This may not be as common in mass/solid wall construction - more common in layered/ framed assemblies.

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S Feb 18 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

I remember from my time with EQ TAGLEED Technical Advisory Group (TAG): Subcommittees that consist of industry experts who assist in developing credit interpretations and technical improvements to the LEED system. at US GBC that we used the terms weatherproofing system or waterproofing membrane to identify the limit between the inside and the outside, where we believed that some materials would not influence the emissions into indoor air (such as facades or within-facade thermal insulation), as just described by Joanna. If you have another building structure than you may consider another layer in the wall as the barrier between materials with or without impact on indoor air. Waterproofing membranes used in the inside, in kitchens or in bathrooms etc., surely are considered interior materials.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Feb 19 2017 LEEDuser Expert 1516 Thumbs Up

There are several wall section drawings in the reference guide to help with the distinction. The image for a masonry wall shows the dividing line between the sheathing and the interior batt insulation.

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Björn Schön DAW SE
Feb 15 2017
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

Emission tests for 2-component epoxy flooring systems

Project Location: Germany

According to the LEED v.4 credits, it is possible to use different emission tests outside the US to comply with the requirements.

AgBB and DiBt testing method (2010) are mentioned there.
But according to DiBt testing, it is also possible to test flooring systems with multiple layers (different 2-component epoxy products) as a system. So in the end not every single layer is tested seperately, but the whole system is tested at once to comply with the DiBt requirements.

Question: Is it accepted that we use this system emission test to comply with the LEED requirements in this credit? In this case we would use the emission test for the System, and on top of that the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.-Limits for the individual products in the system.

Thank you

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Feb 15 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4455 Thumbs Up

This seems like a logical path.

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S Feb 15 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

This issue not regulated anywhere within US GBC. But the proposed procedure is meaningful. Just give some explanation of what you did when you announce compliance with this credit.

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Björn Schön DAW SE Feb 17 2017 Guest 8 Thumbs Up

Thank you both for your help!

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Tommy Linstroth CEO Green Badger
Jan 31 2017
LEEDuser Member
578 Thumbs Up

TVOC range for flooring?

I'm trying to figure out where you get the TVOCThe sum or total of all volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from a product or measured in a space under certain defined conditions. range for anything for flooring, namely Floorscore or CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. Green Label Plus? Every single data sheet (or SCS certificate) just says it has the certification. Only products with Greenguard Gold list the actual ranges, as farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). as I can tell. What do you enter into the materials calculator, since you have to show which range it falls under? And how do you substantiate it, or are review teams just letting it go if it has the certification?

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S Feb 01 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

You will need to request evidence from the supplier, or from the certification organism and its testing lab. They should have that information and are the only sources whom you can ask. Hopefully the certificates will include the TVOCThe sum or total of all volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from a product or measured in a space under certain defined conditions. range information in the future, but it is not within the original certification program itself.

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Rick Farrell Architect & Design Consultant Woodwright Hardwood Floor Company
Jan 31 2017
LEEDuser Member
77 Thumbs Up

FloorScore credit on wall applications

Project Location: United States

If a FloorScore certified product, specifically a pre-finished engineered wood floor, is applied to a wall or ceiling application does the product contribute to the EQc2 credit in LEED v.4?

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues, formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S Feb 01 2017 Guest 2631 Thumbs Up

For ceilings: It is compatible and can work. For walls: Not so easy. The difference is: The emission rate (per hour and surface area) will lead to higher emission concentration because the surface area of walls relative to room air volume is higher than for floors. You will need to request evidence of compliance from the supplier, or from the certification organism and its testing lab. They should have that information and are the only sources whom you can ask.

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Rick Farrell Architect & Design Consultant, Woodwright Hardwood Floor Company Feb 01 2017 LEEDuser Member 77 Thumbs Up

Thanks Reinhard, Actually we are the manufacturer/supplier and just received our renewed FloorScore Certificate. I have the testing lab data and everything is LEED v.4 compliant on our custom made engineered flooring.
We have several large projects with our product specified on walls (not all the walls, just accent walls) and want to be sure we can offer the FloorScore attribute as a benefit to the project in that application. I think many designers feel its meant for floors only.

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Jun 23 2017
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