NC-v4 EQc6: Interior lighting

  • Light gets the weight it deserves

    Confluence at the Community College of Denver

    Interior Lighting in LEED v4 is much more holistic than its rough equivalent in prior versions of the rating system. This credit aims to bring visual comfort in LEED-certified buildings up to the same standards applied to other aspects of the interior environment, such as thermal comfort and indoor air quality. That’s because occupants in spaces with high-quality lighting tend to be more satisfied with the overall indoor environment, more alert and productive during the day, and healthier over time.

    On the surface, it looks like there’s a lot in this credit to take in, but its mix-and-match approach ultimately provides flexibility.

    Note that this credit covers only electrical lighting; a separate but complementary credit, EQc7, deals with natural daylighting.

    We’ll start by going through the metrics and terminology, and then think about when and how to actually apply all this.

    Not In the LEED Reference Guide

    Check the credit language and the LEED Reference Guide for more technical detail on this credit appropriate for lighting designers. Here we’ll provide less-technical background and context.

    Option 1: Lighting control for occupants

    Have you ever been in a situation where you couldn’t see a presentation, only to have the speaker dim the lights so much that you couldn’t take notes? Option 1 of the credit aims to resolve everyday problems like this one, where different occupants in a shared space might have different lighting needs at the same time.

    To this end, both individual task lights and multi-occupant space lights must now have a dimmer or a mid-level setting in addition to turning “on” and “off.” This allows different users to get a higher level of lighting for focused tasks without needing to over-light the entire room—improving lighting quality while also saving energy.Additionally, the credit closes a major loophole from v2009 by ruling out controls that aren’t actually controllable by occupants. The new language makes it clear that users need to be able to watch the lighting respond while flipping the switches in order for the lighting system to qualify for the credit. This rules out limited-access schemes in open offices, large event spaces, etc. where occupants had to request lighting changes through the building operations staff.

    Option 2: Selecting fixtures for better light quality

    The first four “lighting quality” choices (A through D) have to do with the specifications of individual fixtures. Lighting designers can take care of these requirements when developing the fixture schedules. To document the credit requirements, include the number of fixtures, space type, and connected load per fixture in the schedule for each fixture type.

    Direct vs Indirect Lighting (Strategies A and D)

    Strategy A specifies fixtures with limited light output above the horizontal, while Strategy D favors the use of indirect fixtures. Any fixtures that meet Strategy D are excluded from the requirements of Strategy A. So what’s the actual impact of choosing to pursue both of these, and what should be emphasized?

    In reality, although these seem like contradictory goals, they’re both just trying to keep people from looking directly at bright lights. Strategy A is really only concerned with fixtures that you can see from above, like pendant lamps in an atrium. If you don’t have a situation like this in your project, you should have no problems here.

    The majority of spaces will fall into the requirements for Strategy D. Indirect lighting is a common strategy to evenly distribute high lighting levels by bouncing light off surfaces. This can reduce perceived contrast and make a room look brighter overall. Recessed troffer fixtures and can lights are still allowed for Strategy D as long as they don’t represent more than 25% of the lighting load. If recessed troffers are the primary lighting system in your project, you can always meet Strategy A without meeting Strategy D.

    Common Characteristics for Lamp Types

    CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. (Strategy B): CRI, or Color Rendering Index, is a measurement of the ability of a light source to accurately re-create colors when compared with sunlight. This in turn depends on the fullness of the light spectrum. While low-CRI sources tend to provide a desaturated or even greenish light (think old tube fluorescents), high-CRI sources provide a true color. CRI has become an important index for measuring LED lighting quality, which varies greatly, and the 80 CRI target in the credit requirements aligns with the Energy Star specification for LED lighting.

    Many fluorescent fixtures also meet these requirements, and it’s worth the effort to find them for any spaces where visual tasks are important. However, it’s much harder to find high-intensity lighting that meets the CRI requirements. Because Option B requires 100% of project lighting to meet the target CRI value, this option may be difficult for projects with a large amount of outdoor, garage, or back-of-house lighting.

    Rated Life (Strategy C): Choosing lamps with a long rated life is good for the environment and good for the wallet, but how does it contribute to lighting quality? As anyone who’s documented the Reduced Mercury in Lamps credit from LEED v2009 knows, the light output of a fixture actually changes over time. Lamps with longer rated lifespans are better able to maintain design lighting levels. A rated life of 24,000 hours is a reasonable benchmark for a high-quality fluorescent lamp, while a good LED lamp should have a rated life of about 50,000 hours. This strategy makes sense to pursue on any project interested in reducing long-term operational costs.

    Option 2: Strategies for maximizing light in a space

    The second four “lighting quality” choices (E through H) focus on strategies for optimizing lighting through choice of interior surfaces. You can have as many great lighting fixtures as you’d like, but once light leaves the fixture, it’s down to the interior design of the space to create a visually comfortable environment.

    Surface Reflectance (Strategies E and F): These two strategies are about selecting high-reflectance architectural and furniture surfaces in order to create even light levels. Request Light Reflectance Values (LRV) from finish (Strategy E) and furniture (Strategy F) manufacturers or find them on specification sheets. As a rule of thumb, LR values are higher for surfaces with lighter colors or glossier finishes, and lower for matte and darker surfaces. Finishes with higher LR values will bounce more light and appear brighter than those with lower LR values.

    Both of these strategies are great for spaces with lower lighting levels and are relatively easy to pursue. But if your project is over-lit through too much electric lighting or daylight, adding more reflective finishes may actually increase glare and cause problems for visual comfort. This is a consideration that should be assessed in tandem with the intended aesthetic, use, and lighting strategy of the space.

    Illuminance Ratios (Strategies F and G): Having a high difference in illuminance on surfaces in the same view can cause glare and eye strain. Imagine a glowing screen in a dark room compared to a glowing screen in a bright room: the screen is still giving off the same light, but it looks way too bright when you’re in the dark. Strategies F (for walls) and G (for ceilings) are based on illuminance ratios, a way of comparing illuminance levels from different surfaces to predict this type of eyestrain.Example LR values for paints

    These are the most intensive strategies included in this credit because they require detailed lighting measurements or simulation to determine the illuminance ratios in regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space.. However, they are also the most rigorous ways of determining whether or not lighting schemes will actually provide even, high-quality lighting. Just like with an energy or daylight model, pursuing the calculations for either of these two strategies will be more valuable if adopted early in the design process.

    FAQs for IEQc6

    Where do I find the CRI of a lamp?

    Look on the manufacturer’s specification sheet. It’s a separate measurement from color temperature and light intensity.

    Do task lights need to meet all the lighting quality requirements?

    Adjustable lights are excluded from the requirements for direct vs. indirect lighting but do need to be included for CRI and lamp life.

    How limiting are the reflectance values in the finish requirements?

    The requirements aren’t too unreasonable and can be achieved by balancing out darker colors with glossier textures (or vice versa). In fact, the reflectance values in this credit are on par with those listed as “default” finishes for evaluating daylighting in Core & Shell buildings. Because the thresholds are based on an area-weighted calculation, there’s also some flexibility in selecting accent materials and providing variety that way.

    Daylight is an important strategy in my project. How do I meet this credit as well as the daylighting credit?

    The controls, lamp specifications, and surface reflectance strategies are all appropriate for spaces that incorporate daylighting and will even help with your daylighting strategy.

    A high level of controllability provides an opportunity for energy savings when there is enough daylight to meet occupant needs, and high surface reflectance values will likely increase the reach of existing daylight. High-CRI lights will blend in well with high-CRI daylight. The illuminance ratios in Strategies F and G may be more complicated to pursue, but if the daylight model indicates that glare is a big concern, it might be a good idea for your design to take a closer look at illuminance levels in the occupants’ fields of view.

    Do operable shades count as lighting controls?

    No. The contribution of daylight is excluded from the three lighting level requirements in lighting controls. Lighting systems must be able to meet the controllability requirements separate from any operable shades. This applies to both individual workstations and multi-occupant spacesMulti-occupant spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces..

    Does having multi-circuit lighting count as providing multiple lighting levels?

    Yes, as long as having only one circuit on provides between 30%–70% of the maximum lighting level.

    How do I calculate an illuminance ratio?

    In some spaces with simple geometry, you can actually perform these calculations by hand (see the IESNA handbook for formulae and more details). You can even measure them directly using a photometer. There are also some lighting design and daylighting simulation programs that perform these calculations. Look for a program that runs on a radiosity or ray-tracing engine, will model point source lighting, and will calculate illuminance on any specified plane. 

  • EQ Credit 6: Interior lighting

    Intent

    To promote occupants’ productivity, comfort, and well-being by providing high-quality lighting.

    Requirements

    Select one or both of the following two options.

    Option 1. Lighting control (1 point)

    For at least 90% of individual occupant spacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces., provide individual lighting controls that enable occupants to adjust the lighting to suit their individual tasks and preferences, with at least three lighting levels or scenes (on, off, midlevel). Midlevel is 30% to 70% of the maximum illumination level (not including daylight contributions).

    For all shared multioccupant spaces, meet all of the following requirements.

    • Have in place multizone control systems that enable occupants to adjust the lighting to meet group needs and preferences, with at least three lighting levels or scenes (on, off, midlevel).
    • Lighting for any presentation or projection wall must be separately controlled.
    • Switches or manual controls must be located in the same space as the controlled luminaires. A person operating the controls must have a direct line of sight to the controlled luminaires.

    AND/OR

    Option 2. Lighting quality (1 point)

    Choose four of the following strategies.

    1. For all regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space., use light fixtures with a luminance of less than 2,500 cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir.

      Exceptions include wallwash fixtures properly aimed at walls, as specified by manufacturer’s data, indirect uplighting fixtures, provided there is no view down into these uplights from a regularly occupied space above, and any other specific applications (i.e. adjustable fixtures).
    2. For the entire project, use light sources with a CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. of 80 or higher. Exceptions include lamps or fixtures specifically designed to provide colored lighting for effect, site lighting, or other special use.
    3. For 75% of the total connected lighting load, use light sources that have a rated life (or L70 for LED sources) of at least 24,000 hours (at 3-hour per start, if applicable).
    4. Use direct-only overhead lighting for 25% or less of the total connected lighting load for all regularly occupied spaces.
    5. For 90% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 85% for ceilings, 60% for walls, and 25% for floors.
    6. If furniture is included in the scope of work, select furniture finishes to meet the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 45% for work surfaces, and 50% for movable partitions.
    7. For 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet ratio of average wall surface illuminance The incident luminous flux density on a differential element of surface located at a point and oriented in a particular direction, expressed in lumens per unit area. Since the area involved is differential, it is customary to refer to this as illuminance at a point. The unit name depends on the unit of measurement for area: footcandles if square feet are used for area, and lux if square meters are used. (Adapted from IES) In lay terms, illuminance is a measurement of light striking a surface. It is expressed in footcandles in the U.S. (based on square feet) and in lux in most other countries (based on square meters).(excluding fenestration) to average work plane (or surface, if defined) illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet strategy E, strategy F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of 60% for walls.
    8. For 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet ratio of average ceiling illuminance (excluding fenestration) to work surface illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet strategy E, strategy F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of 85% for ceilings.

Light Reflectance Values

A sample cutsheet shows the kind of data you'll need to document light reflectance values (LRV) for interior products.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

48 Comments

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Jeff Schwane Senior Energy and Sustainability Engineer Arup
May 31 2017
Guest

Option 2 Lighting Quality - Part E

We are trying to specify ceilings with at least 85% surface reflectance. However, there are areas with metal ceilings that have perforations for acoustical and fire requirements. Can these open areas of the ceiling be ignored for the credit? In some cases the open areas are 30+% of the ceiling area, and behind it is a void area where the light would get lost. From a technical standpoint, these holes do not reflect the light back down. However, the physical drop ceiling surface (metal panels) are painted white.

Does this comply with the credit?

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Rita Haberman Brightworks
Apr 19 2017
LEEDuser Member
400 Thumbs Up

Circadian lighting

Does anyone know if there is an alternate strategy for lighting quality that can look at Circadian RhythmThe rhythm of an organism's vital functions with relation to the daily cycle of the natural environment. and designing to that?

Thanks

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Ian Robinson Energy Engineer / Project Manager RDK Engineers
Apr 13 2017
Guest

Option 1: Smart-Phone Control

Project Location: United States

For option 1, is it acceptable for manual controls to be accomplished via a software interface rather than a physical switch? In the vision for this project, users can control lighting in their area from smartphones, tablets, or computers but physical switches will not be present. Does this meet the intent of option 1?

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Mario S.
Apr 11 2017
LEEDuser Member
811 Thumbs Up

Option 1 - Individual occupant spaces 3 level lighting

Project Location: United Arab Emirates

For individual occupant spacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces., if the overhead lighting is controlled by an on/off switch, and each individual space is provided with an on/off task light (desk lamp or bed side light), does this satisfy the 3 level lighting for this credit? or does the task lighting need to have 3 level as well?

Also, if we provide multi-circuit lighting (multiple switches for one space) in private offices, is this acceptable?

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Apr 11 2017 LEEDuser Expert 20061 Thumbs Up

Hi Mario,

Based on the credit requirements description the lighting itself needs to be 3 levels (on, off, midlevel). Midlevel is 30% to 70% of the maximum illumination level (not including daylight contributions). This is true for both individual occupant spacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces. and shared multi-occupant spacesMulti-occupant spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces..

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Inês Marques Architect Greenlab
Apr 04 2017
Guest

Reflectance

Project Location: Portugal

Hi guys,

I'm having troubles getting datasheets with reflectance values for the project I'm working on.
Do you know where to find a good light reflectance index online that would be accepted by LEED?

Thanks in advance!

Inês

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Apr 13 2017 LEEDuser Expert 20061 Thumbs Up

Hi Ines,

Which products are you having trouble finding cutsheets for? Maybe this community can help to find them...

Lauren

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Geoffrey Katz AECOM
Mar 13 2017
LEEDuser Member

Fixtures for Option 2 Lighting Quality, Strategy D.

Project Location: Canada

A recessed LED troffer type fixture may have an indirect light component by way of internal reflectors that reflect upward-directed light within the fixture back down onto the space below. Would internal indirect lighting components within the fixture qualify the fixture as a non-direct-only type? As designers, how do we ensure that a supplier’s products (the fixtures) meet the requirements of the credit? Does the supplier need to have an approval from the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). for their products in order for them to be used under this credit, option, and strategy?

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Gray Bender Arup
Feb 28 2017
Guest
25 Thumbs Up

Light Reflectance for Interior Glazed Walls

Hi All,

We're working on a project that has a number of internal floor-to-ceiling glass walls, some of which are transparent and others are semi-transparent. I'm wondering how those are taken into account with Option 2 Strategy E. For Strategy F, the reference guide specifically says that transparent or partially transparent movable partitions are not a part of this calculation, would that apply for permanent walls in Strategy E? Or would they have an LRV of 0 and have to go toward the 10% floor area that's excluded? Thanks for the help!

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Filipe Boni 2030STUDIO
Feb 23 2017
Guest
103 Thumbs Up

Strategy A - 2500 cd/m2

Project Location: Brazil

I`m trying to understand the Option 2 -Strategy A and having difficulty of finding this illuminance on brazilian cutsheets.

Is this information that I need to look at? Can I get the biggest value and inform this? Any help/examples would be welcome.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/a7avhugye76erp3/Captura%20de%20tela%202017-02-...

Also, I found some .ies files to test. Is this the information I need to get?
https://www.dropbox.com/s/cfpd3d4z0r9wdg9/Captura%20de%20tela%202017-02-...

Thank you!

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Apr 13 2017 LEEDuser Expert 20061 Thumbs Up

Hi Filipe,

The documentation toolkit has a sample cutsheet. Have you had a chance to check that out?

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Edgar Arevalo
Jan 18 2017
Guest
62 Thumbs Up

Break rooms and/or locker rooms

Project Location: United States

I have a Sanitation Maintenance Garage project going for LEED, they have no meeting rooms or classrooms but they do have break rooms and lockers rooms. Based off the reference guide, since shared multi-occupant spacesMulti-occupant spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces. are either "a place of congregation OR where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks", can I consider the break rooms and locker rooms as shared multi-occupant spaces? And if not, then I have to ask: is it necessary that the project building have both individual occupant spacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces. and multi-occupant spaces?

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Jan 18 2017 LEEDuser Expert 20061 Thumbs Up

Hi Edgar,

I think it's OK for your building to not have any individual occupant spacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces.. According to the IEQ Space Matrix, locker rooms and break rooms can be excluded from EQc6.1 or EQc6.2. So then I am lead to a question in my mind around wondering if you have any applicable spaces to include (multi or individual) that could apply for the credit. Can you review the IEQ Space Matrix to see if any of those spaces might apply for your garage space?

Lauren

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Edgar Arevalo Jan 18 2017 Guest 62 Thumbs Up

Well my second question was more if it's ok to not have any shared multi-occupant spacesMulti-occupant spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces.

Does the IEQ Space Matrix apply to LEED v4 rating system?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 18 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Edgar, in place of the IEQ space matrix, for v4 refer to the EQ Overview in the LEED Reference Guide.

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Edgar Arevalo Jan 18 2017 Guest 62 Thumbs Up

Thank you Tristan. I took a look at the overview and determined that break rooms or locker rooms do not comply. So my next questions is can I still proceed with the Controls section of the credit inputting only individual occupant spacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces. and no shared multi-occupant spacesMulti-occupant spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces.?

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Jan 18 2017 LEEDuser Expert 20061 Thumbs Up

Hi Edgar,

Sorry I misunderstood your question initially. Yes, you can just include individual occupant spacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces. if that is all you have. I don't think it would hurt to mention to your reviewer that you've considered all spaces and reviewed it with the EQ Overview in the LEED Reference Guide to make that determination.

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C ThemaVerde, France
Nov 15 2016
LEEDuser Member
1103 Thumbs Up

Interior Lighting requirements for plant growth and maintenance

Hello,

We have a project that is considering to install an olive tree in the atrium of the building. To sustain the tree, artificial lighting is required daily, for several hours. We have been reading the requirements for the credit “Interior Lighting” and nothing specific is said about lighting requirements or exceptions for plants. We are pursuing option 2 of this credit and we wanted to know if lighting for plant growth or maintenance counts as an exception for this credit.

If not, does interior lighting for a tree count as “Any other specific application” for the exceptions mentioned on strategies “A” and “B”? Are there special requirements to follow for the other strategies?

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Matt Latchford, PE, IALD, MIES, LC, LEED AP BD+C Associate Principal, Lam Partners Nov 15 2016 Guest 9 Thumbs Up

Technically speaking, I don't think there is anything in the Interior Lighting credit language that would keep you from illuminating plant life. It would more likely have an effect on the lighting energy usage of the building, but that's a separate issue.

That being said, it doesn't seem to be in the spirit of LEED to use electricity to keep a tree alive in space that doesn't have enough natural light to do so. Using a little bit of electric light to enhance the visual quality of the space at night sounds reasonable but ramping it up to the levels necessary for replacing daylight (think grow-house) will likely draw a lot of energy.

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Kera Lagios Associate Principal Integral Group
Jul 15 2016
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

LEED v4 Interior Lighting Quality Option 2, Strategy A

Strategy A states: "For all regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space., use light fxtures with a luminance of less than 2,500 cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir."

Referring to the luminance tables on cut sheets/.ies files, to determine the luminance of the luminaire, should you add the luminance values for each horizontal angle together, take the maximum of all the values, or take the average of all the values to compare to the 2,500 cd/m2?

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Kera Lagios Associate Principal, Integral Group Jul 22 2016 Guest 8 Thumbs Up

We did further research into this issue, contacting lighting professionals who were involved in developing the credit. They told us that for Strategy A, the maximum luminance value for the angles between 45 and 90, inclusive, should be used.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Apr 13 2017 LEEDuser Expert 20061 Thumbs Up

Thanks for following up and sharing this information, Kera.

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Erica Baranik May 03 2017 LEEDuser Member

I have a follow-up question to the one above, provided to me by our project's Lighting Design Lead:

Should the measurement be “Zonal lumens” and not “candelas/sm”? Zonal lumens are published as a standard piece of information in a photometric report. They are reported referenced to the angle from nadir. Candelas per sm are an output result if you create a calculation using a photometric report and are reported in a flat plane not in angles from nadir. Could you provide some guidance on what the desired measurement is?

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Simon Lai
May 09 2016
Guest
5 Thumbs Up

Option 2, A

Project Location: United States

In the open office, I'm providing direct/indirect fluorescent up-light, does it meet the exception of the Option 2A?

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Melissa Kelly Sustainability Manager, YR&G May 10 2016 LEEDuser Expert 753 Thumbs Up

Hi Simon,

Based on Example 2 in the reference guide, I think you can exclude a direct/indirect light as long as there's no view down into the top of the light from another space above.

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April Wang
May 05 2016
Guest
17 Thumbs Up

Interior Lighting Quality

Regarding EQc6 option 2.
I'm working towards satisfying strategies G and H. As part of the requirement, each space is to also meet the corresponding strategies E and F. I'm wondering when analyzing each specific room, what happens when part of the internal wall is open to an internal corridor, which is not included as a "regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use.". The lighting from the corridor could very well enter into the space in question, and the void openings between the corridor and the space would have no reflective values.
I'm wondering if I could get some assistance as respect to this. Thank you.

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Matt Latchford, PE, IALD, MIES, LC, LEED AP BD+C Associate Principal, Lam Partners Jul 28 2016 Guest 9 Thumbs Up

It seems reasonable to use the walls of the corridor as the walls of the occupied space - otherwise you have a 0 reflectance.

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Jae Yong Park General Engineer Ecolead Co., Ltd
Aug 10 2015
Guest
90 Thumbs Up

EQ credit 6. Interior Lighting Question.

Project Location: Korea, Republic of

Hi all,
I'm currently working on a research center which is located in South Korea.

EQ credit 6. Interior Lighting
Option 1. Lighting Control

All shared multi-occupant spacesMulti-occupant spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces., at least three lighting levels or scenes (on/off/midlevel)

Question,
If there is a multi-occupant space like conference room, does it need to have ONE lighting control that has three levels or scenes for EACH ONE space?
Some spaces can have SEVERAL switches for ONE space.
So I'd like to make sure whether ALL of lighting controls in ONE multioccupant space have three levels or not.

Thanks.

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Melissa Kelly Sustainability Manager, YR&G Dec 01 2015 LEEDuser Expert 753 Thumbs Up

Hi Jae Yong,

Yes, there needs to be at least three levels/scenes for each multi-occupant space. This could be accomplished with multi-circuit controls in each room (several switches for one space) or dimmable controls for each room (one switch that provides multiple options for lighting levels). The requirement for three levels/scenes per multi-occupant space must be met for every multi-occupant space in the project in order to earn Option 1. For conference rooms, the lighting for presentation/projection walls must also be on its own control circuit to meet the requirements.

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Boggarm Setty President Setty & Associates, Ltd.
Aug 04 2015
LEEDuser Member
7 Thumbs Up

Document Upload

Project Location: United States

For V4, is there no requirement anymore to upload supporting documents?
I don't see any upload buttons on the form itself.

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant, DCarbon Aug 04 2015 Guest 1944 Thumbs Up

There are no upload buttons within the forms but you are able to select the upload section of each credit right below each credit title in LEED Online and upload your supporting documents there.

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant DCarbon
Jun 30 2015
Guest
1944 Thumbs Up

Option 2 Documentation

When it comes to option 2 it is request to describe the method for determining reflectance values. Would a prescriptive descriptive apporach be accepted i.e. based on colour selection? For example a white paint obviously has a reflectence of 85%.

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Melissa Kelly Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jul 07 2015 LEEDuser Expert 753 Thumbs Up

Hi Charalampos,

In the Step-by-Step Guidance section of the Reference Guide, there's a list of three different acceptable sources for reflectance values: cutsheets from the manufacturer, values from industry standard charts, or actual measurements of finish samples. Common finishes should be included in reflectance charts and it sounds like it is okay to use those values if manufacturer data cannot be found.

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant, DCarbon Jul 14 2015 Guest 1944 Thumbs Up

Hi Melissa, thanks for the reply. If we use reflectance charts, such as “Lighting Guide 11, Surface Reflectance and Colour” (referenced in Option 2, p. 716), I am wondering whether simple reference to the colour and hue of the work surface and movable partitions would be an acceptable way of proving the (corresponding) reflectance value.

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Jeroen Sap LEED AP BD+C Deerns Nederland B.V.
Dec 08 2014
Guest
75 Thumbs Up

Lighting control in office space

I am working on an office building that has overhead lighting that is controlled based on occupancy sensors. The fixtures are grouped per 3,6 meters and there is no manual override. Additionally we include task lighting on the desks with on/midlevel/off possibilities. Is this sufficient control to meet the credit requirements? Or do we also have to include a manual override for the overhead lighting in addition to the tasklighting to meet the full "off" requirement?

And suppose we include the manual override for the overhead lighting, is it OK if this is grouped per 3,6 meters (possibly including mutiple workstation?In my opinion is does not make sense to have individual on/off switches for the overhead lighting in an open office environment when there are tasklights that provide sufficient individual control.

Thanks!

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Dec 09 2014 LEEDuser Expert 20061 Thumbs Up

Hi Jeroen,

In LEED v4 you need to provide individual lighting controls that enable occupants to adjust the lighting to suit their individual tasks and preferences for 90% of the individual occupants. You also - in LEEDv4 - need to provide at least three lighting levels or scenes (on, off, midlevel). Midlevel is 30-70% of the maximum illumination level.

Just like in LEEDv3 you need to consider the Individual Occupant SpacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces. as distinct spaces from the Multi-occupant spacesMulti-occupant spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces.. The space you have described sounds like a series of individual occupant spaces and so I think you're spot on with the task lights. Just make sure you consider all components of the LEED v4 credit.

Good luck!

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Jeroen Sap LEED AP BD+C, Deerns Nederland B.V. Dec 10 2014 Guest 75 Thumbs Up

thanks Lauren for your quick response. My only concern is with the individual spaces in the open office plan. They have task lights with control but as long as the overhead lighting (base level lighting) is only switched based on occupancy (without manual override), would that be sufficient? When I follow the reference guide by the letter, this does not provide the option to individually switch ALL lighting off. But on the other hand in my opinion it provides a lot of flexibility.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Dec 10 2014 LEEDuser Expert 20061 Thumbs Up

Hi Joroen,

Other users should correct me if I am wrong but - if LEED v4 is handled like LEED v3 was in the case of open offices areas - then you really should see an open office area as a series of individual workstations and - in that case - you just need to worry about the controllability required for a series of individual workstations.

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Michelle Oishi Architect CBT Architects
Jul 24 2014
LEEDuser Member
67 Thumbs Up

1 point or 2?

The description of the credit seems to provide two options each worth 1 point but links them with an "OR". Is the intent that the lighting can earn 2 points by doing both option 1 and option 2?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 24 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Brenda – yes, these two options are linked by AND/OR. You can do either for 1 point or both for 2 points.

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Qiang Zhang professional
Mar 29 2014
Guest
150 Thumbs Up

" no view down into", how to interpret this?

Interior Lighting question.

Option 2. Lighting Quality (1 point)
A. For all regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space., use light fixtures with a luminance of less than 2,500 cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir.

Exceptions include wallwash fixtures properly aimed at walls, as specified by manufacturer’s data, indirect uplighting fixtures, provided there is no view down into these uplights from a regularly occupied space
above, and any other specific applications (i.e. adjustable fixtures).

What is the actual meaning of "provided there is no view down into these uplights from a regularly occupied space above", can not imagine the Scenario, why is " no view down into" not " no view up into"?

Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 20 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Qiang, let's say you have a mezzanine, with fixtures on the first floor using uplighting, with the uplights being visible from the mezzanine. This would create a lot of glare. I think that is the kind of situation this requirement is speaking to—so it is "down" into, not "up" into.

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April Wang May 06 2016 Guest 17 Thumbs Up

Hello. I'm new to assessing the interior lighting part of LEED. For strategy A, I am wondering what specific documentation to use to calculate that the luminance for each fixture is indeed less than 2,500 cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir. The specs sheet for the fixtures give photometric data that show candela values for the angles. I'm a little unsure what area to use to obtain cd/m2.

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Melissa Kelly Sustainability Manager, YR&G May 10 2016 LEEDuser Expert 753 Thumbs Up

Hi April,

It sounds like your spec sheet has candlepower distribution but not luminance, is that correct? If so, the easiest approach is to request a luminance data summary from the manufacturer, since most manufacturers will have this on hand from testing results.

If they don't have a luminance table, they may also be able to provide a photometric (IES) file, and you can use an online viewer to generate the table yourself. I've used this one before but there are a few others out there: https://www.visual-3d.com/software/photometrictool.aspx

Hope this helps!

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April Wang May 10 2016 Guest 17 Thumbs Up

Hi Melissa,

Thanks for your reply. Yes our project is here in Taiwan and not all of the manufacturers will have/can provide photometric (IES) files. They can give us spec sheet, samples I have included in the following link. (I would really appreciate any feedback).

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/s1sptyha3wrof8i/AACqxQSASIMI1huia2T81SENa?dl=0

I'm unsure if this document is sufficient to satisfy strategy A. It does show candlepower distribution and a max cd value (which appears to be at 0°). So would it be correct to translate that cd value at 45 to 90° and hense the illuminance at these angles are less than what is experience at its max at 0°.

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michelle bombeck Project Associate O'Brien & Company
Mar 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
202 Thumbs Up

Juvenile Detention Center - Lighting Control

Hello all - We are working on a juvenile detention center and are trying to find a way to comply with EQc6.2. The project is attempting certification under v4 which requires not only lighting controls but also that they be multi-level (on/off/mid). We are wondering if instead of installing controls in the cell (for safety reasons), the inmates are provided with the option of requesting lighting change from the guard. The guard would have a control panel and be able to adjust the lighting to multiple levels. I know some credits just aren't applicable to all projects but I'm wondering if anyone has an opinion or experience with this sort of situation.

Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Michelle, to me this sounds like a good idea, to provide more humane conditions for the inmates, but does not meet LEED requirements.

A middle ground might be to provide the inmates with the controls, but the guards have an override in case of a need to bring all lights to full power right away.

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Jim Weiner, LEED Fellow, AIA principal, collaborative project consulting Oct 19 2015 LEEDuser Member 460 Thumbs Up

Interesting question! I would consider pursuing this. It seems to me that the intent of the credit would be met - that is, the occupants can control the lighting in their space to "suit their individual tasks and preferences". The particular program considerations associated with this special occupancy require that this control be intermediated by a guard. As long as there is a clearly established protocol to readily facilitate the required level of control at the request of an occupant, I don't see why this should be considered non-compliant. An analogous situation is found with interpreting equivalent facilitation accommodations in ADA for example.

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