NC-v4 EQp1: Minimum indoor air quality performance

  • Baseline for outdoor air ventilation

    This prerequisite establishes a baseline for providing a minimum amount of outdoor air to buildings in order to maintain good indoor air quality and keep occupants comfortable and healthy. 

    The referenced standard is ASHRAE 62.1-2010, which is a newer version than that referenced in LEED 2009. ASHRAE 62.1-2010 is often more stringent than local building codes, although it is not likely to entail any added costs.

    The prerequisite has different compliance paths for mechanically ventilated and naturally ventilated spaces, and you may need to follow both paths for the same building on a space-by-space basis. In fact, teams should beware that ASHRAE 62.1-2010 effectively prohibits natural ventilation via operable openings as a stand-alone strategy. This is because the standard requires spaces to be mechanically ventilated whenever the operable windows are closed. Multifamily residential buildings may be most impacted by this type of scenario.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • The prerequisite now references ASHRAE Standard 62.1 version 2010.
    • Window configuration and ceiling height are now considered in ASHRAE 62.1-2010 natural ventilation calculations.
    • Supplementary mechanical ventilation systems for naturally ventilated spaces are required by ASHRAE 62.1-2010 in some cases.
    • USGBC requires project teams to confirm the appropriate use of natural ventilation through the flow chart in CIBSE AM10, Figure 2.8.
    • CEN requirements, instead of ASHRAE 62.1-2010, are now allowed for demonstrating achievement.
    • EQc1: Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring is now included in this prerequisite. Additionally, USGBC distinguishes between variable air volume and constant volume systems in its monitoring requirements.
    • LEED now includes specific requirements for residential projects for this prerequisite, which were largely taken from LEED for Homes EQc2, Combustion Venting.

    FAQs

    A building has fan-assisted ventilation and no mechanical cooling system. Does this qualify as natural ventilation?

    If the building relies on the fans for daily ventilation, it is considered a mechanically ventilated building. 

    What options are available to mechanically ventilated projects outside the U.S. to meet this prerequisite?

    Local codes may be used to meet the prerequisite if you can show equivalency with Sections 4 through 7 of ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2010. Alternatively, international projects can choose to comply with the minimum requirements of Annex B of CEN Standard EN 15251–2007, and meet the requirements of CEN Standard EN 13779–2007 excluding Sections 7.3, 7.6, A.16, and A.17.

  • EQ Prerequisite 1: Minimum indoor air quality performance

    Intent

    To contribute to the comfort and well-being of building occupants by establishing minimum standards for indoor air quality (IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors.).

    Requirements

    Meet the requirements for both ventilation and monitoring.

    Ventilation
    Mechanically ventilated spaces
    Option 1. ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2010

    For mechanically ventilated spaces (and for mixed-mode systems when the mechanical ventilation is activated), determine the minimum outdoor air intake flow for mechanical ventilation systems using the ventilation rate procedure from ASHRAE 62.1–2010 or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.

    Meet the minimum requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2010, Sections 4–7, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (with errata), or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.

    Option 2. CEN Standards EN 15251–2007 and EN 13779–2007

    Projects outside the U.S. may instead meet the minimum outdoor air requirements of Annex B of Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN) Standard EN 15251–2007, Indoor environmental input parameters for design and assessment of energy performance of buildings addressing indoor air quality, thermal environment, lighting and acoustics; and meet the requirements of CEN Standard EN 13779–2007, Ventilation for nonresidential buildings, Performance requirements for ventilation and room conditioning systems, excluding Section 7.3, Thermal environment; 7.6, Acoustic environment; A.16; and A.17.

    Naturally ventilated spaces

    For naturally ventilated spaces (and for mixed-mode systems when the mechanical ventilation is inactivated), determine the minimum outdoor air opening and space configuration requirements using the natural ventilation procedure from ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2010 or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent. Confirm that natural ventilation is an effective strategy for the project by following the flow diagram in the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) Applications Manual AM10, March 2005, Natural Ventilation in Nondomestic Buildings, Figure 2.8, and meet the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2010, Section 4, or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent. [Europe ACP: Arbeitsstaettenrichtlinie ASR 5] [Latin America ACP: Engineered Natural Ventilation Systems]

    All spaces

    The indoor air quality procedure defined in ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2010 may not be used to comply with this prerequisite.

    Monitoring
    Mechanically ventilated spaces

    For mechanically ventilated spaces (and for mixed-mode systems when the mechanical ventilation is activated), monitor outdoor air intake flow as follows:

    • For variable air volume systems, provide a direct outdoor airflow measurement device capable of measuring the minimum outdoor air intake flow. This device must measure the minimum outdoor air intake flow with an accuracy of +/–10% of the design minimum outdoor airflow rate, as defined by the ventilation requirements above. An alarm must indicate when the outdoor airflow value varies by 15% or more from the outdoor airflow setpoint.
    • For constant-volume systems, balance outdoor airflow to the design minimum outdoor airflow rate defined by ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2010 (with errata), or higher. Install a current transducer on the supply fan, an airflow switch, or similar monitoring device.
    Naturally ventilated spaces

    For naturally ventilated spaces (and for mixed-mode systems when the mechanical ventilation is inactivated), comply with at least one of the following strategies.

    • Provide a direct exhaust airflow measurement device capable of measuring the exhaust airflow. This device must measure the exhaust airflow with an accuracy of +/–10% of the design minimum exhaust airflow rate. An alarm must indicate when airflow values vary by 15% or more from the exhaust airflow setpoint.
    • Provide automatic indication devices on all natural ventilation openings intended to meet the minimum opening requirements. An alarm must indicate when any one of the openings is closed during occupied hours.
    • Monitor carbon dioxide (CO2Carbon dioxide) concentrations within each thermal zone. CO2 monitors must be between 3 and 6 feet (900 and 1 800 millimeters) above the floor and within the thermal zone. CO2 monitors must have an audible or visual indicator or alert the building automation system if the sensed CO2 concentration exceeds the setpoint by more than 10%. Calculate appropriate CO2 setpointsSetpoints are normal operating ranges for building systems and indoor environmental quality. When the building systems are outside of their normal operating range, action is taken by the building operator or automation system. using the methods in ASHRAE 62.1–2010, Appendix C.
    Residential only

    In addition to the requirements above, if the project building contains residential units, each dwelling unit must meet all of the following requirements.

    • Unvented combustion appliances (e.g., decorative logs) are not allowed.
    • Carbon monoxide monitors must be installed on each floor of each unit.
    • All indoor fireplaces and woodstoves must have solid glass enclosures or doors that seal when closed.
    • Any indoor fireplaces and woodstoves that are not closed combustion or power-vented must pass a backdraft potential test to ensure that depressurization of the combustion appliance zone is less than 5 Pa.
    • Space- and water-heating equipment that involves combustion must be designed and installed with closed combustion (i.e., sealed supply air and exhaust ducting) or with power-vented exhaust, or located in a detached utility building or open-air facility.
    • For projects in high-risk areas for radon, EPA Radon Zone 1 (or local equivalent for project outside the U.S.), design and construct any dwelling unit on levels one through four above grade with radon-resistant construction techniques. Follow the techniques prescribed in EPA Building Radon Out; NFPA 5000, Chapter 49; International Residential Code, Appendix F; CABO, Appendix F; ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services E1465; or a local equivalent, whichever is most stringent [Canada ACP].
      • Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

        Canada ACP - Radon

        Cities in Canada that have been proven to have an average radon concentration of 4 pCi/L (150 Bq/m3) or less through testing in accordance with the Health Canada Guide for Radon Measurements in Dwellings (with a minimum of 50 tests) are considered equivalent to EPA Radon Zone 2, and therefore are exempted from the radon requirements of this prerequisite.

        Europe ACP: Arbeitsstaettenrichtlinie ASR 5

        Projects in Europe may use Arbeitsstaettenrichtlinie ASR 5 as a local equivalent to ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2010, natural ventilation procedure.

        Latin America ACP: Engineered Natural Ventilation Systems

        Projects in Latin America may follow the Verification Protocol for Engineered Natural Ventilation Systems in Equitorial Climates and receive a design review and approval from the Colombian Professional Association of Air-conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration (ACAIRE).

Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance Calculator

The Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance Calculator can be used for projects using ASHRAE 62.1 to comply with LEED BD+C, ID+C and O+M EQ Prerequisite Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance, EQ Credit Increased Ventilation, and EQ Credit Enhanced Indoor Air Quality Strategies, Option 2, Strategy B: Increased Ventilation, as well as LEED Homes and Multifamily Midrise EQ Prerequisite Ventilation. The calculator accommodates all ventilation types (multiple zone, single-zone, 100% outside air) in one spreadsheet. Assumptions for occupancy categories are from ASHRAE 62.1-2010 (for LEED v4 projects) and ASHRAE 62.1-2007 (for LEED 2009 projects).

91 Comments

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R2M Solution Srl R2M Solution Srl
Jul 18 2017
LEEDuser Member
252 Thumbs Up

EN 13779–2007

Project Location: Italy

We are deciding between the use of EN 15251 and the use of ASHRAE 62.1. Do you have experience in applying EN 13779–2007? I've started to read that and I'm wondering whether there are aspects that are particularly critical.
Best Regards

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Amal Venugopal Project Manager
Jul 04 2017
LEEDuser Member

Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance Calculation

Project Location: United Arab Emirates

My Project has one FAHU on roof which is supply treated Fresh air to all AHU"s, And each AHU further supplies the mixture of outdoor air and Recirculated air to various zone via VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. (no reheating, no recirculating fan) unit and this air (deducting Extract) is returning back to same AHU after serving to room load, so what would be my zone secondary recirculation fraction and what would be my zone primary air flow whether it would be same as zone discharge air flow or I need to consider the primary air flow value as (0.3*Vdz) as my minimum VAV flow setpoint is 30% in case of no load.
In calculator, Vpz is mentioned as lowest primary airflow value expected at the designed condition, What is mean by these?

If I am considering Vpz as a 0.3*Vdz my overall ventilation efficiency is coming around 17% which is very much lower.

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Jens Apel
Jun 26 2017
LEEDuser Member
1469 Thumbs Up

Extent of European ACP application

Project Location: Germany

I am not quite sure on the wording regarding natural ventilation and the Europe ACP.
The online Ref.Guide states
"Projects in Europe may use Arbeitsstaettenrichtlinie ASR 5 as a local equivalent to ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2010, natural ventilation procedure."
The requirements regarding natural ventilation call (besides others) to meet the requirements of ASHRAE 62.1 section 4 or a local equivalent. As the ASR 5 is a replacement for section 6.4 in ASHRAE 62.1, does this mean it is replacing section 4 as well?

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erdem özkan Leed Sertifikası Semtrio AŞ
Jun 21 2017
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

How can I develop leed certificate service in my country?

Project Location: Turkey

We provide Leed certificate and green building service but how are we developing this process in Turkey?

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Mario S.
Jun 21 2017
LEEDuser Member
819 Thumbs Up

Monitoring Requirements - Naturally Ventilated Residential Units

We are working on a residential building where split AC units are provided in every room for each unit with no mechanical ventilation. The ventilation strategy is relying on natural ventilation through operable windows.
Regarding the natural ventilation monitoring requirements in LEED v4, none of the options seem feasible in our case, since exhaust fans are only installed for toilets and kitchen hood.
Does anyone have experience with similar projects that can share what is the best strategy for ventilation monitoring in naturally ventilated residential buildings?

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James Keohane, PE LEED BD+C CxA CPMP Sustainability and Commissioning Consultant Sustainable Engineering Concepts, LLC
Jun 15 2017
LEEDuser Member
1080 Thumbs Up

Indoor Air Quality Procedure

Project Location: United States

I understand that the credit language requires the use of the Ventilation Rate Procedure(VRP) from ASHRAE 62.1-2010. I am working with a project team that is considering using an air scrubber technology coupled with the Indoor Air Quality procedure(IAQP). The focus and goal is to reduce OA and energy associated with conditioning OA. Project is located in south Florida so this is a significant element of the building energy use profile. I understand that there is a pilot credit EQ pc68 to enable teams to utilize IAQP.
Is the EQpc68 still available as an option for LEED v4 projects?
Does anyone have any experience/success with this approach? I would welcome any insight and wisdom you may have to offer.

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Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores
May 24 2017
LEEDuser Member
1628 Thumbs Up

Natural ventilation openings' control

According to ASHRAE 62.1 - 2010 User's Manual, example 6-AF, the requirement associated with controls that guarantee that the openeings remain open during occupancy can be met with an administrative policy. Does this mean that the provision of ASHRAE 62.1 -2010 (section 6.4 exception b.1), "controls that prevent the openings from being closed during periods of expected occupancy", can be complied with a mandatory administrative procedure / policy ?

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Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Jun 13 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9257 Thumbs Up

No.

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Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability, Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores Jul 03 2017 LEEDuser Member 1628 Thumbs Up

Can you please clarify why not?

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training Revitaliza Consultores
May 17 2017
Guest
2423 Thumbs Up

MERV 11

Project Location: Mexico

Hallo,

In an office building located in Mexico City (a location with a high PM2.5 and ozone levels), the floors are served by AHU’s equipped with MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 8 filters. ASHRAE 62.1-2010 requires to have MERV 11, which is not feasible because the fans cannot overcome the increase of friction losses. Has anyone faced this problem? Can we somehow skip the requirement of MERV11 filters?

The replacement of AHU isn't possible because they would need to remove part of the exterior wall of the building in order to be able to remove the equipment and introduce a new one.

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Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Jun 13 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9257 Thumbs Up

What pressure dropPressure drop is a decrease in pressure from one point in a pipe or tube to another point due to a restriction or length or diameter of the pipe or tube (resistance to flow). can you accommodate? I'd shop around for MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. -11 with a lower pressure drop.

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Arpan Bakshi
May 15 2017
Guest

Monitoring requirement for Residential Projects

Question about meeting this prereq in Residential Projects - v4 requires one of three types of monitoring for naturally ventilated projects - exhaust airflow, alarm on openings, or CO2Carbon dioxide with alarm. Has anyone successfully met these requirements for a residential project, given the cost implications and possibility of the alarm going off at night when residents are sleeping? Many thanks.

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Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Jun 13 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9257 Thumbs Up

My experience has been that residential projects are moving toward mechanical ventilation.

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Ganesh Nayak
May 10 2017
LEEDuser Member

Radon mitigation in High-Rise Mixed-Use project

A high-rise mixed-use project with two levels of office and multiple levels of residential is in EPA Zone 1 for radon. All the codes addressing radon mitigation listed in the prerequisite applying to the residential use are for low- to-mid-rise residential only. (For instance, Appendix F of the IRC covers only low-rise residential). The language in the prerequisite also instructs to "design and construct any dwelling unit on levels one through four above grade with radon-resistant construction techniques".
In this project, the first residential level is around 55' above grade, (above the two office levels) while there are some residential uses such as lobby, mail areas, etc on the first floor. The radon mitigation requirements in the stated codes do not seem to apply to this situation. Can an exception be made to this project, since the residential use is not located on grade as in a typical single-family/low-rise residential project?

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Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Jun 13 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9257 Thumbs Up

If you can show you are above what would typically be level four, I think you can argue for an exception.

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Izabela Kwiecinska Gleeds Polska
Apr 28 2017
LEEDuser Member
15 Thumbs Up

IAQ calculator v03

The new calculator (v2009v4_Minimum IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Performance Calculator_v03) from the Resources tab, does not count the ‘Zone Outdoor Airflow’ (column N) and it shows 0,00 no matter what system and values we put into calculator. Is this me or the calculator to make mistake? Or maby we can use the v02 calculator version?

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Rasita Masalskyte Ms, Vesta Consulting Jul 10 2017 LEEDuser Member 45 Thumbs Up

Hi Izabela,

I had the same issue. I solved it simply by typing the Ez values by hand, not from the drop-down list.

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R2M Solution Srl R2M Solution Srl
Apr 14 2017
LEEDuser Member
252 Thumbs Up

Zone Air Distribution Effectiveness

Project Location: Italy

In the office the air (cold in summer, warm in winter) is both wall supplied and ceiling supplied. The air is exhausted from the WCs. From the offices the air passes through the doors and through a corridor. Which value is appropriate for the Zone Air Distribution Effectiveness?
Best Regards

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Apr 14 2017 Guest 2423 Thumbs Up

Buongiorno!
Your worst case scenario is heating mode with warm air supplied from the ceiling. Therefore, your Ez will be 0.8.

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Mark Frey Consultant, Intep May 05 2017 LEEDuser Member 384 Thumbs Up

Hi Gustavo,
in addition to the question of R2M Solution Srl I was wondering if it is appropriate to use Ez = 1,0 if the air is ceiling supplied (heating mode) and will be exhausted / passes through undercuts in the doors to the exhaust AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. in the WCs. My understanding is that the mode 'ceiling supply of warm air and floor return' can be used for this case? Thank you!

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Paula Rantanen Consultant Ramboll Finland Oy
Apr 11 2017
LEEDuser Member
114 Thumbs Up

Airflow monitoring in VAV systems

Indirect measurements such as temperature or current transducers are not allowed for VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. systems, but is it allowable to measure the pressure difference over the fan and calculate outdoor air volume from that which has been approved manner in previous LEED versions? Or does it have to be a separate meter?

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Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Apr 20 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9257 Thumbs Up

VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. systems need a way to measure outdoor airflow under varying load conditions. Typically that is done with an airflow station, directly measuring outdoor airflow. If you have an alternative approach and you can demonstrate it provides the same result it should be acceptable.

Pre-LEED, projects often only monitored damper position to maintain a fixed percentage of outdoor air. The problem with that approach is that if the VAV system was operating at 50% load, you'd also end up reducing ventilation by 50%. So you need to make sure your approach adjusts and is accurate at part load.

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R2M Solution Srl R2M Solution Srl
Apr 06 2017
LEEDuser Member
252 Thumbs Up

Tab 6-1 and 6-4

Project Location: Italy

Art classrooms are considered both in Tab. 6-1 and in Tab. 6-4. If we respect Tab. 6-4, could we avoid the verification of Tab. 6-1 (i.e. could we avoid the outdoor air supply)?

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Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Apr 20 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9257 Thumbs Up

Why you would want to do that?

My reading of 62.1-2010 is that you must meet both requirements. And what goes out must be replaced somehow.

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Maria Matos
Mar 24 2017
Guest
2 Thumbs Up

Exhaustion rates in WC

Project Location: Portugal

Dear all,

I would like to know if it is mandatory to comply with minimum exhaust rates indicated in TTABLE 6-4 Minimum Exhaust Rates from ASHRAE 60.1 -2010.

We think that the exhaust rate for each private toilet room (25 cfm/unit) is excessive for the areas we are considering and may cause discomfort in this area.

Thank you in advance!

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Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Mar 29 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9257 Thumbs Up

You are required to "meet the minimum requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2010, Sections 4–7". That includes the exhaust requirements of Table 6-4.

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Maria Matos Apr 06 2017 Guest 2 Thumbs Up

Thank you Christopher. I am still having trouble to understand what rate to use. We are designing an office building with restrooms having 2 or more WC. So if using exhaustion in a non continuous system operation we would need a 50 cfm rate, considering this is a private usePrivate use applies to plumbing fixtures in residences, apartments, and dormitories, to private (non-public) bathrooms in transient lodging facilities (hotels and motels), and to private bathrooms in hospitals and nursing facilities.. Am I correct? We think this might be to excessive for the volume of the restroom, maybe we might need to adjust the height. Thank you

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Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Apr 20 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9257 Thumbs Up

Public toilets are required to have continuous exhaust (Note E only applies to private toilet rooms). Although ASHRAE 62 does not explicitly define the terms, In an office building I would expect the toilet rooms to be public unless they are part of some individual's private office. A toilet room that serves an entire company, for example, would be "public" even if you couldn't come in off the street to use it.

I can't imagine 50 CFM per fixture being excessive.

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Jennifer Rennick Principal In Balance Green Consulting
Mar 04 2017
LEEDuser Member
52 Thumbs Up

CO Sensors in Multi-Family Highrise

Project Location: United States

For a Multi-Fam Highrise, the corridors will be heated with a ducted roof-top gas furnace split dx system will be installed. No other combustion equipment nor combustion appliances will be located in the corridors or in the Res dwellings. Do the roof-top ducted gas-heat units for the corridors trigger the requirement for CO sensors to be located on each floor and in each Res dwelling?

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Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Mar 29 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9257 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE 62.1-2010 does not address CO sensors, but the LEED BDC Reference Guide does include special language for CO sensors in residential buildings. By my reading of the RG, Carbon Monoxide sensors must be installed on each floor of the residential units regardless of HVAC system type.

This is in line with other building and life safety codes that are concerned about preventing deaths from things like indoor grilling, or indoor use of generators (both surprisingly common).

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Dec 12 2016
LEEDuser Member
3589 Thumbs Up

100% OA constant volume enthalpy heat recovery ventilator

Hi,
Our project is mechanically ventilated by 100% OA constant volume enthalpy heat recovery ventilator. Regarding monitoring, according to LEED reference guide, in our case, monitoring by current transducer on the supply fan, an air flow switch, or similar monitoring device is acceptable. In order to meet the requirement, is it OK to monitor just the ventilation fan is operated or not, or is measurement required? Any comment would be appreciated.

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Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Jan 26 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9257 Thumbs Up

If it is constant volume you should be fine with a balancing report and fan status. You don't need ongoing airflow measurement.

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Dianne Herrin Vice President Practical Energy Solutions
Sep 26 2016
LEEDuser Member
265 Thumbs Up

62.1 vs 170

Project Location: United States

Hello - I am working on a new construction VA Medical Center that has been designed using the ventilation rates in ASHRAE Standard 170-2008 as per the v4 NC-Healthcare. Can we still qualify for this prerequisite under NC BD+C, since we clearly meet the "minimum requirements" of 62.1? The difference is that we did not determine the minimum outdoor air intake flow using the 62.1 ventilation rate procedure. We used 170. We would prefer to use NC BD+C for this project. Thank you.

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Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Jan 26 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9257 Thumbs Up

Seems logical that you could use 170 as an ACP to 62.1. Might want to submit an inquiry, now, and confirm.

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Nancy Henderson MS ArchEcology, LLC
Aug 18 2016
LEEDuser Member
831 Thumbs Up

High Rise Residential with mixed mode ventilation

Project Location: United States

We have several high rise residential projects that use a several conditioning and ventilation system. Typically the dwelling units are ventilated using whole house exhaust and permanent openings in the windows. The units also have operable windows, but not all of the floor area will comply with natural ventilation requirements. I assume this would be considered a 100% outside air system - but none of the monitoring options seem to apply. What would be an acceptable monitoring method for an exhaust based ventilation system?

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Aug 23 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6452 Thumbs Up

If the exhaust system is drawing in the ventilation air, could you install monitoring per the guidance on the second bullet point for constant volume systems? Install a current transducer on the supply fan, an
airflow switch, or similar monitoring device?

Only in this case, the monitoring device would be installed on the exhaust fan. I haven't seen this type of strategy implemented on a project yet and would be curious to see what others would suggest.

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Nancy Henderson MS, ArchEcology, LLC Aug 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 831 Thumbs Up

I don't see why that would not work, but since it is not a compliance path mentioned under mechanical ventilation, I was wondering if they were deliberately trying to exclude exhaust induced ventilation. ASHRAE 62.1-2010 clearly allows it though.

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Nancy Henderson MS, ArchEcology, LLC Aug 25 2016 LEEDuser Member 831 Thumbs Up

I received clarification yesterday from a LEED reviewer that a monitoring device on the exhaust fan would be acceptable - as required for a CV system. I am not sure how we will do this, since we don't have a central control system for the dwelling unit fans. We are researching some options, but if anyone has any ideas, we would love to hear about it.

Also, the reviewer directed us to LI #10416 that allows the use of ASHRAE 62.1-2013 in lieu of 2010. However, addendum 'a' revises the scope of the standard to exclude non-transient residential occupancies. ASHRAE 62.2-2013 has a corresponding addendum "g" which revises the scope of that standard to ALL residential buildings - including high rise. Base on this ruling and the addenda, ASHRAE 62.2-2013 may be used for v2009 and v4 multifamily high-rise projects for dwelling unit ventilation compliance.

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Gabriela Crespo CxA, LEED AP BD+C, O+M Revitaliza Consultores
Jul 18 2016
Guest
392 Thumbs Up

Ozone treatment

Project Location: Mexico

Dear all,

We are working on a project where the ozone levels exceed the most recent three year average, so we must include air-cleaning devices for ozone. Does anybody have any guidance for this requirement? Should they be integrated in the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork.? Or could they be placed directly in the room?
Thanks!

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Aug 18 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6452 Thumbs Up

Hi Gabriela,

I think that filtration utilizing activated carbon and installed at the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. might be the way to go. Here's a link to a study that supports activated carbon filtration as an effective method to remove ozone. http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1050670/

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Gabriela Crespo CxA, LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Revitaliza Consultores Sep 14 2016 Guest 392 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much Ben! I think I missed the reply notification but this helps so much!

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Helena Garcia Bioconstruction Green Building Management
Jun 20 2016
Guest
28 Thumbs Up

Ventilation Warehouses

Project Location: Spain

We are certifing a project with two buildings, the first is an offices, the second is a warehouses to rent in Spain.
The question is for the warehouse, this warehouse is not conditioned and the spain law (and UE) doesn't require ventilation for this type of buildings.
We don't Know the use, because it is for rent.
The question is:
To meet the crèdit -Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance- and Leed V.4
does warehouses require ventilation? and if the answer is yes, with natural ventilation is it enough? or require mechanical ventilation?

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Jun 20 2016 Guest 2423 Thumbs Up

Yes, for sure the warehouse needs to be ventilated.
The warehouse can be either naturally or mechanically ventilated, it's your call.
If the space is going to be rented and the ventilation is beyond your project's scope of work, you have to demonstrate how this requirement will be enforced, typically by means of a binding clause in the tenant lease agreement.

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Chanyang Shin
Mar 31 2016
LEEDuser Member
15 Thumbs Up

Perimeter induction unit interpretation in 62.1 MZCal

Project Location: United States

A project is provided with perimeter induction units with internal coils for cooling and heating. Central dedicated 100% outdoor air handling unit feeds the induction units with fresh air, and the perimeter units induce own space return. So, for the induction unit, fraction of local recirculation air the is representative of system RA is 0. i.e. Er = 0.
Also, even though the induction unit has own coils for cooling and heating, they are for conditioning space returns only because it intakes fresh air from central DOAS which already conditioned.
If that is the case, do I need to prepare separate 62.1 calculation sheets for each perimeter unit because it has own coils assuming they are as individual ventilation system?
Or, I assume the induction unit coils as separate coils for space return only and does not affect space ventilation. So, how about ignoring the space coils and prepare one calculation sheet from a point of view of central DOAS only because it provides all the fresh air to perimeter units?

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Aug 18 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6452 Thumbs Up

Did you confirm the appropriate approach for this situation?

Normally, the system level is defined to be the point at which outdoor air is mixed with return air. In this case it sounds like that would be at each individual induction unit.

But, maybe if you only considered the primary airflow (outdoor air) at the DOAS and the induction units in the calculation and did not account for the local recirculated air, you might be able to set it up as a single system.

I'd confirm the approach with GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). before finalizing the documentation.

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Chanyang Shin
Mar 30 2016
LEEDuser Member
15 Thumbs Up

Multiple indentical RTUs combined with plenum ducts

Project Location: United States

Multiple identical RTUs combined with plenum ducts serve a whole building.
How can I prepare 62.1 MZcal?
Can I add up cfm of all RTUs and assume it like one system using one sheet?

Or, separate sheet for each RTU is required? But it is unclear how to split spaces per each RTU because combined RTUs feed all spaces together.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Aug 18 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6452 Thumbs Up

In my experience, if the RTUs deliver supply air to a common plenum or duct, they can be considered a single system for this prerequisite.

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R2M Solution Srl R2M Solution Srl
Feb 24 2016
LEEDuser Member
252 Thumbs Up

non-attainment area for PM2.5

Project Location: Italy

In Europe which parameters shall be considered to establish whether the site is non-attainment area for PM2.5?

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R2M Solution Srl R2M Solution Srl Mar 02 2016 LEEDuser Member 252 Thumbs Up

I have found this:
The annual standard for PM2.5 is met whenever the 3 year average of the annual mean PM2.5 concentrations for designated monitoring sites in an area is less than or equal to 15.0 µg/m3. The 24 hour standard for PM2.5 is met whenever the 3 year average of the annual 98th percentile of values at designated monitoring sites in an area is less than or equal to 35 µg/m3.
In addition to air quality data, EPA guidance on the PM2.5 designations process also discusses other important factors, including emissions of pollutants that lead to PM2.5 formation, population, commuting patterns, and expected growth, that states should evaluate in order to determine whether a county is a likely contributor to the area’s air quality problem.
http://www3.epa.gov/airquality/particlepollution/designations/faq.htm#4

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R2M Solution Srl R2M Solution Srl
Feb 24 2016
LEEDuser Member
252 Thumbs Up

Toilets: private or public?

Project Location: Italy

In a office building that is occupied by a private firm how shall be considered the toilets according to Table 6.4 of ASHRAE 62.1-2010?
Private, since the property is private?
Does it depend on the number of WCs? Or on the people who can use the toilets?

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R2M Solution Srl R2M Solution Srl Feb 24 2016 LEEDuser Member 252 Thumbs Up

I have read better the notes in ASHRAE 62.1: I think that if in the room there is more than one WC the toilet shall be considered public.

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R2M Solution Srl R2M Solution Srl
Feb 19 2016
LEEDuser Member
252 Thumbs Up

monitoring

Project Location: Italy

Is the monitoring of mechanical ventilation always mandatory or do exceptions exist?
Regards

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R2M Solution Srl R2M Solution Srl Feb 22 2016 LEEDuser Member 252 Thumbs Up

e.g, is it mandatory also if there is no recirculation (100% outdoor air)?

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 03 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6452 Thumbs Up

Projects do not have to have outdoor airflow monitoring devices installed to earn the prerequisite. The required measurements can be taken once during the performance period with the proper equipment.

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Adam Stoker Sustability Consultant, University of Calgary Mar 04 2016 Guest 44 Thumbs Up

Ben, you might be a little confused here. There is no performance period in the BD+C rating systems. Also, I believe that the monitoring equipment must be permanently installed. Taking measurements once (e.g. during air balancing) would not meet the intent of the credit.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 04 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6452 Thumbs Up

Your right Adam, I was thinking of existing buildings rather than NC. Thanks for clarifying

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Francesco Passerini engineer
Feb 02 2016
Guest
1587 Thumbs Up

jet fans

Project Location: Italy

Table 6.4 of ASHRAE 60.1-2010 states that parking garages that don't have walls that are at least 50% open to the outside shall have mechanical air extraction (exhaust ventilation). Can jet fans be used instead of a ducted extraction system (ductwork)?
Best Regards

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Feb 02 2016 Guest 2423 Thumbs Up

Hallo Francesco,

Is your parking located in a basement or above grade? If your parking is above grade, what is the percentage open to the outside that you could have?
One more question: where are you planning to locate the jet fans?

If all your walls have no openings and you install jet fans, they will only move the air but they will not introduce outside air. It will not be accepted.

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Francesco Passerini engineer Feb 23 2016 Guest 1587 Thumbs Up

Thank you.
And if the project team will develope a simulation (e.g. CFD) that demonstrates that the ventilation rate is higher than the rate requested by Table 6.4 of ASHRAE 60.1-2010?

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training Revitaliza Consultores
Jan 28 2016
Guest
2423 Thumbs Up

Single supply system

Does anyone know a definition for "single supply system". I've looked it up in ASHRAE 62.1 and ASHRAE's Manual and I wasn't able to find it.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Feb 12 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6452 Thumbs Up

Gustavo, can you provide more context to the question? I'm not sure about a single supply system.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Feb 12 2016 Guest 2423 Thumbs Up

It is not about a specific project. When doing a ventilation calculator I was wondering in which cases I should select this option.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Feb 16 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6452 Thumbs Up

I see. The ASHRAE 62.1 2007 user manual has a definition of sorts. See example 6-I if you have access to that.

Here's a shorthand for how the single zone system is defined there.

A (single) zone requires that each space within the zone have similar occupant and building outdoor air rates, similar occupant density, and similar zone primary airflow rates.

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C ThemaVerde, France
Nov 24 2015
LEEDuser Member
1103 Thumbs Up

Exhaust in Copy Rooms

In one of our projects, the client is willing to have open spaces with high flexibility. In these open spaces, “boxes in the box” for copy rooms will be created. As the location of these boxes is flexible, the mech engineering cannot run any exhaust duct. He is suggesting the use of an active charcoal carbon filter with a fan to exhaust the air from the copy rooms to the open spaces. The contaminants would be filtered before the air is transfered and then exhausted through return ducts in the open spaces.

Has anyone had experience with this? We don’t find anything about this topic in ASHRAE 90.1.
Thanks for your help!

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Dec 09 2015 LEEDuser Expert 9700 Thumbs Up

My suggestion would be that you select "low volume" printers as defined by LEED. This would make it so you don't need exhaust at all. Then as a bonus add the carbon filters anyway to improve air quality.
You could also get creative with a long common header exhaust duct that could be easily tapped into anywhere along a run.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training Revitaliza Consultores
Nov 11 2015
Guest
2423 Thumbs Up

Section 6.4.1.2, crossed ventilation

Project Location: Colombia

I don't know how to interpret the following section of ASHRAE 62.1-2010:

"6.4.1.2. Double side openings. For spaces with operable openings on two opposite sides of the space, the maximum distance from the operable openings is 5H, where H is the ceiling height"

Option 1-the distance between the two walls is 5H, (i.e. the air travels a distance of 5H)

Option 2-the ventilated area is 5H from each opposite wall (i.e. the distance between the two walls can be a maximum of 10H)

Thank you,

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Nov 13 2015 LEEDuser Expert 6452 Thumbs Up

Based on the language in 6.4.1.3 I think it means that the maximum distance between the two sides if 5H. I haven't seen this tested on a project though. Would be interested if others have a different opinion.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Nov 13 2015 Guest 2423 Thumbs Up

Thanks Ben, I agree with you. The project is begining construction phase, so I am afraid I will not have an outcome until late next year.

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Larry Jones Associate Director Atelier Ten
Sep 30 2015
LEEDuser Member
2207 Thumbs Up

Dwelling Units/Residential definition for ventilation

Project Location: United States

Can anyone provide me with a definition or point me towards how LEED v4 defines a dwelling unit? I have a dormitory project and am trying to interpret the Resi Only requirements for v4. As an example, if the residential units where the students have a common room and a bed room but no combustible equipment, it doesn't make sense to install CO monitors.

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Sara Johansson LEED® AP O+M, Sweco Systems Sep 19 2016 Guest 41 Thumbs Up

I am looking for the same answer but for hotel rooms - are these considered residential by LEED v.4?

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