NC-v4 MPR1: Must be in a permanent location on existing land

  • The evolution of MPRs in LEED

    Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs), which set literal and actual boundaries for how LEED certification should be applied, continue to evolve in LEED v4. Here's a short history so far:

    • Pre-LEED-2009: no MPRs
    • LEED 2009 (LEED v3): MPRs introduced, with 7 in most rating systems. Supplemental guidance introduced and modified over time as MPRs proved confusing.
    • LEED v4: MPRs more integrated into rating system, reduced to 3.

    What to look for in LEED v4

    The requirements conveyed by the LEED 2009 MPRs have not changed in LEED v4.

    However, USGBC has made structural changes to the MPRs in order to maintain alignment with the overall evolution of the rating system. Some MPRs have been relocated to other documents (like a legal form) and some have been incorporated into the rating system as prerequisites. The MPRs that remain more clearly represent the foundational nature of these requirements.

    How LEED 2009 MPRs have transitioned to LEED v4.How LEED 2009 MPRs have transitioned to LEED v4.

    Supplemental guidance embedded in requirements

    If you're looking to interpret specific requirements of an MPR, look in the MPR language itself (see the credit language tab) under "Additional Guidance," where applicable, rather than in lengthy supplemental guidance documents.

    Questions? Post them in the LEEDuser forum below.

  • MPR 1: Must be in a permanent location on existing land

    Intent

    The LEED rating system is designed to evaluate buildings, spaces, and neighborhoods in the context of their surroundings. A significant portion of LEED requirements are dependent on the project’s location, therefore it is important that LEED projects are evaluated as permanent structures. Locating projects on existing land is important to avoid artificial land masses that have the potential to displace and disrupt ecosystems.

    Requirements

    All LEED projects must be constructed and operated on a permanent location on existing land. No project that is designed to move at any point in its lifetime may pursue LEED certification. This requirement applies to all land within the LEED project.

    Additional guidance

    Permanent location
    • Movable buildings are not eligible for LEED. This includes boats and mobile homes.
    • Prefabricated or modular structures and building elements may be certified once permanently installed as part of the LEED project.
    Existing land
    • Buildings located on previously constructed docks, piers, jetties, infill, and other manufactured structures in or above water are permissible, provided that the artificial land is previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development.", such that the land once supported another building or hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. constructed for a purpose other than the LEED project.

18 Comments

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Judhajit Chakraborty Building Performance Specialist WSP Built Ecology
Jan 12 2017
LEEDuser Member
89 Thumbs Up

Elevated Airtrain station

How does this MPR impact elevated station projects?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 15 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Jude, since the station is on permanent, preexisting land, if elevated, I don't see an impact. But correct me if I'm not reading your question correctly.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Aug 15 2016
LEEDuser Member
4390 Thumbs Up

cottages on poles on water

Project Location: Venezuela

We are looking into the possibility to certify a holiday resort located on an island. The main building will be located on the island, but the individual holiday homes will be located on poles in the sea and will be connected with a walkway. (similar to resorts in Bora Bora or the Maldives) Would it be posible to certifiy the individual villas given that they are not located on land. If not, would it be posible to certify only the main building?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 15 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

I doubt it. Doesn't sound like it meets the requirement. The main building would be fine, though.

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Michael Wahjudi ESD Consultant Kaer Pte Ltd
May 19 2015
Guest
238 Thumbs Up

Reclaim land for more than 40 years

Project Location: Singapore

"All LEED projects must be constructed and operated on a permanent location on existing land" from these statement. It is clearly indicate that LEED project at reclaim land is not allowed for certification. We have a project that develop on reclaim land that finished 1970s. More than 40 years, this reclaim land already developed as multi-storey car-park. At the same location, this multi-storey car-park will be demolished and rebuilt for our new development aiming for LEED. Can I consider our location as "permanent location on existing land"?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 16 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, per the LEED language above, the land in your situation is previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development.", and allowed under LEED v4.

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SoYoung Lee LEED AP BD+C Director, HnC
Jan 30 2015
Guest
56 Thumbs Up

Supplemental Guidance to the MPR for LEED v4

It seems to me that the MPR guidance for LEED v4 does not sufficient to comprehend the project specific features.
Is there any supplemental guidance, such as the “Supplemental Guidance to the MPR, rev.2” for the LEED 2009?
If not, can we apply the rules from the LEED 2009 MPR guidance to the rating system ver.4 to some extent?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 16 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

SoYoung, what specific question(s) do you have on applying the LEED v3 MPRs? It would be great to know what you're grappling with.

The LEED 2009 guidance could be used as an indicator of how USGBC sees the v4 MPRs, but I would avoid leaning directly on the 2009 guidance. The MPRs have changed and been simplified in v4, so I would expect some differences.

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Bazeeth Ahamed K M Conserve Green Building and MEP Solutions WLL
Apr 24 2014
LEEDuser Member
106 Thumbs Up

Reclaimed land from sea

"All LEED projects must be constructed and operated on a permanent location on existing land" So reclaimed land from sea(artificial island) would not be eligible for LEED V 4 as they are not existing?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 24 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Bazeeth, that is correct, and this does not represent any change from LEED 2009, for what it's worth.

There are exceptions and special circumstances, so if you have a specific case I would encourage you to share more details, and we can try to give some feedback.

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Bazeeth Ahamed K M Conserve Green Building and MEP Solutions WLL Apr 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 106 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan, My question is not specific to any project. In general in countries like UAE, Bahrain, Qatar. Land reclamation is very common and there are many LEED Certified projects in those reclaimed land(Many of them under NC 2.2)

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 16 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Basically if it is new land it would not qualify. If it is previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development.", it would be okay. It will be interesting to see how many projects this affects.

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Regina Ng Sep 06 2016 LEEDuser Member 1392 Thumbs Up

Would agree much with Tristan, land reclaimable from sea shouldn't be meeting the MPR at all... it is never sustainable to begin with, with the potential damaged to the sea ecosystem.

The only exception according to reference guide:

Building located on previously constructed docks, piers, jetties, infill and other manufactured structures in or above water are permissible, provided that the artificial land is previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development.", such that the land once supported another building or hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. constructed for a purpose other than the LEED project.

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Gina Dederer URS Deutschland GmbH
Mar 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
64 Thumbs Up

Minimum Occupancy

So is the minimum FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
of (1) no longer required, specifically for unmanned, fully-automated warehouses or storage facilities?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 24 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Gina, to be clear, there has never been a mininum of 1 FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
for LEED certification—only for earning points in the IEQ section. So there is still no minimum for LEED certification. I haven't seen any mention of the FTE minimum for IEQ points, so that seems to be gone.

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Eduardo Straub StraubJunquiera
Jan 20 2014
Guest
77 Thumbs Up

MPR

Are there only 3 MPRs for LEED V4? What did happen with the 4 others?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Eduardo, USGBC made a conscious effort to remove MPR requirements that weren't adding a lot of value to the LEED process, while increasing documentation. Some MPRs have been consolidated, turned into credits, or simply removed. I hope to provide a more detailed post on this, but that's the quick story.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 16 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

More explanation of where the MPRs went is now posted above.

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Feb 19 2017
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