NC-v4 MPR3: Must comply with project size requirements

  • The evolution of MPRs in LEED

    Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs), which set literal and actual boundaries for how LEED certification should be applied, continue to evolve in LEED v4. Here's a short history so farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters).:

    • Pre-LEED-2009: no MPRs
    • LEED 2009 (LEED v3): MPRs introduced, with 7 in most rating systems. Supplemental guidance introduced and modified over time as MPRs proved confusing.
    • LEED v4: MPRs more integrated into rating system, reduced to 3.

    What to look for in LEED v4

    The requirements conveyed by the LEED 2009 MPRs have not changed in LEED v4.

    However, USGBC has made structural changes to the MPRs in order to maintain alignment with the overall evolution of the rating system. Some MPRs have been relocated to other documents (like a legal form) and some have been incorporated into the rating system as prerequisites. The MPRs that remain more clearly represent the foundational nature of these requirements.

    How LEED 2009 MPRs have transitioned to LEED v4.How LEED 2009 MPRs have transitioned to LEED v4.

    Supplemental guidance embedded in requirements

    If you're looking to interpret specific requirements of an MPR, look in the MPR language itself (see the credit language tab) under "Additional Guidance," where applicable, rather than in lengthy supplemental guidance documents.

    Questions? Post them in the LEEDuser forum below.

  • MPR 3: Must comply with project size requirements

    Intent

    The LEED rating system is designed to evaluate buildings, spaces, or neighborhoods of a certain size. The LEED requirements do not accurately assess the performance of projects outside of these size requirements.

    Requirements

    All LEED projects must meet the size requirements listed below.

    LEED BD+C and EB:O&M Rating Systems

    The LEED project must include a minimum of 1,000 square feet (93 square meters) of gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.).

    LEED ID+C Rating Systems

    The LEED project must include a minimum of 250 square feet (22 square meters) of gross floor area.

    LEED Neighborhood Development Rating Systems

    The LEED project should contain at least two habitable buildings and be no larger than 1500 acres.

    LEED for Homes Rating Systems

    The LEED project must be defined as a “dwelling unit” by all applicable codes. This requirement includes, but is not limited to, the International Residential Code stipulation that a dwelling unit must include “permanent provisions for living, sleeping, eating, cooking, and sanitation.”

18 Comments

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Claire DeCamp Senior Architectural Associate UCD Design and Construction Management
Feb 16 2017
LEEDuser Member
32 Thumbs Up

No FTE

Project Location: United States

We've got a building with no FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
- it houses mostly lab equipment that is managed by a researcher and then left alone. There are no restrooms, offices, etc. v3 was clear in MPR #5 that without an FTE we could not go for LEED certification, with the consolidating of MPRs in v4 the text on pages 16-18 of the reference guide talks about FTE but does not explicitly disqualify anywhere that I can find. Can someone clarify? I don't see how I could do many of the prerequisites anyways without an FTE, but I need to confirm that there is no way this project could go for LEED.

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Ray Nolasco LEED AP BD+C, MZ and Partners Feb 16 2017 Guest 21 Thumbs Up

Under which adaptation will the building be certified? Data centers?

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Claire DeCamp Senior Architectural Associate, UCD Design and Construction Management Feb 16 2017 LEEDuser Member 32 Thumbs Up

I'm not sure I understand your question. It's not a data center. It's a stand alone building that has lab equipment in it.

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deborah lucking associate, fentress architects Feb 16 2017 LEEDuser Member 3261 Thumbs Up

If your project is considered a lab, LEEDv4 has a default occupancy count of 400 SF/person.

Here's the link - http://www.usgbc.org/credits/new-construction-existing-buildings-commerc...

I'm curious how LEED would view your particular project given the default assumptions.

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Ray Nolasco LEED AP BD+C, MZ and Partners Feb 17 2017 Guest 21 Thumbs Up

I think the answers to your questions can be found on page 14 of the v4 reference guide under SPECIAL PROJECT SITUATIONS.

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Claire DeCamp Senior Architectural Associate, UCD Design and Construction Management Feb 16 2017 LEEDuser Member 32 Thumbs Up

Deborah, Thanks this is helpful for other projects. But for this one I wouldn't call it a lab - there are no benches for people to work at. It's essentially one large room full of automated lab chambers that run experiments. The chambers are serviced by personal from other buildings as needed. There is no lengthy observation by people, and hopefully not much in way of maintenance personal in the building either!

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deborah lucking associate fentress architects
Jan 20 2017
LEEDuser Member
3261 Thumbs Up

Where did the PIF forms go?

Most of the information that used to be required by LEED 2009 for PIFs 1 through 4, are now consolidated into the one single Project Information Form in v4.
LEED 2009 PIF-3 required fairly detailed information relating to space types and GFAs. Is that no longer required, or is it buried somewhere in a credit (to surprise me when I least expect it)?
Thanks!

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 02 2017 LEEDuser Expert 5739 Thumbs Up

Hi Deborah, you can follow what's required on the form. USGBC does post additional calculators etc in the Credit Library (and sometimes doesn't advertise it very well), so I'd double check that no new resources have been posted before you submit your project. For EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. projects I've noticed that the PI Form required next to nothing, but the latest version added additional info requests back in. So you might want to try locating the most updated version of the form on USGBC's website.

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deborah lucking associate, fentress architects Feb 02 2017 LEEDuser Member 3261 Thumbs Up

Trista,
thanks - good to know.

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Adam Stoker Consultant, Sustainability University of Calgary
Nov 28 2016
Guest
28 Thumbs Up

LEED O+M: Multifamily

Project Location: Canada

Where can I go to find information on the project size requirements for LEED O+M: Multifamily projects?

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jan 20 2017 LEEDuser Expert 3308 Thumbs Up

Originally there was a reference to a minimum number of units, whether those were apartments, condos or townhomes it was 20.

Now it looks like the same MPRs apply to EB:OM and BD&C, 1,000 SF minimum. I don't know that from experience but that's what I'm seeing online.

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Pam Lynch
Oct 11 2016
Guest
15 Thumbs Up

LEED certification submittal

Hello, I am currenty studying for the LEED GA exam. I would like to understand besides the scorecard what documentation is required in order for your project to acheive LEED certification (at any level). On the USGBC website I have seen project summaries and scorecards but haven't found the documentation that was submitted (tables, maps, etc). I was hoping I could find a site submittal (mock or real) that includes all of the required LEED documentation. Is this something I could find ? I am a visual learner so this would help me for the exam.

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Ray Nolasco LEED AP BD+C, MZ and Partners Oct 12 2016 Guest 21 Thumbs Up

all of the documentation is submitted through LEED online. You can upload the documentation according to the prerequisites and credits' requirements. Each one has a specific documentation required according to the project type (adaptation).

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Elizabeth Powers Principal O'Brien & Company
Jul 11 2016
LEEDuser Member
538 Thumbs Up

Certifying a light rail station

Project Location: United States

I am exploring the point at which a light rail station becomes eligible for LEED certification under LEEDv4. It was slightly clearer in the MPRs for 2009, but not entirely. Does anyone have thoughts on whether the following are necessary for LEED eligibility now?
- A conditioned space like a bathroom
- A conditioned space that meets the definition of regularly occupied - i.e. beyond a bathroom or staff break room
- Occupancy by at least one staff/employee for an eight hour period. What would happen if occupancy by staff was in less than an hour chunks spread out over 24 hours of operations? What if it totaled .5 FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
?
- No staff occupancy but visitors using conditioned restroom.

I think you get the idea. Is the answer as simple as - as long as you can meet the prereqs and earn enough points? If so, what is your opinion on whether regularly occupied condition space is necessary for energy and ventilation prerequisites?

Thanks for your thoughts.

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Ray Nolasco LEED AP BD+C, MZ and Partners Jul 12 2016 Guest 21 Thumbs Up

LEED V4 has already compressed its minimum program requirements into three. Some of the MPRs in version 2009 are transferred to prerequisites in V4. Regarding the occupancy, space considerations and FTEs, the current version has clearly indicated the necessary approach and proper calculation needed for certain situations in the "getting started" section of the reference guide. For instance, part-time employees will be calculated by adding their working hours and dividing it by 8.

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Elizabeth Powers Principal, O'Brien & Company Jul 12 2016 LEEDuser Member 538 Thumbs Up

Thanks Ray. I have done a good amount of research and don't think my question is actually clearly answered in the materials published by USGBC or LEED User yet. Would love to hear how you interpret things and what you think the answer is. If you have time and want to discuss offline, I'd love to pick your brain.

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Inés Alomar
Jul 10 2014
Guest
203 Thumbs Up

Projects with Several Physically Distinct Structures

We are starting with the process of certifying a project under v4 for BD+C.
It is a hotel with a main building with a main building of 5,000 square meters plus 2 additional small buildings of 1.000 square meters each.
I do not understand in the new guide if this can be a single project according to the chapter describing: Projects with Several Physically Distinct Structures, last sentence?

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Ray Nolasco LEED AP BD+C, MZ and Partners Sep 29 2014 Guest 21 Thumbs Up

I think the main building of the hotel is considered as a separate project because it already exceed 25,000 square feet. Which means that the hotel could register under the campus program.

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Feb 25 2017
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