NC-v4 SSp1: Construction activity pollution prevention

  • Standard practice generally achieves the prerequisite

    Complying with this prerequisite is standard practice in most urban and suburban areas in the U.S., where most or all of the EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. (CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.) requirements have been adopted and implemented at the state or county level. Regulators at those levels often threaten heavy fines for not complying with CGP requirements, so most projects do so without the added incentive of the LEED prerequisite.

    Compare your local code to the requirements of the CGP early in your project timeline to determine which is more stringent. If your local code is more stringent, then you will meet the prerequisite just by following that. If it is less stringent, follow the CGP to achieve the prerequisite. 

    If your project is located outside of the U.S., it’s possible that the local code requirements are comparable to or more stringent than the EPA CGP. Be sure to compare the two early in your project timeline. Projects outside the U.S. do not have to comply with the permitting aspects of the CGP.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • The EPA CGP referenced version was updated from 2003 to 2012.

    FAQs

    Is there a table that summarizes the changes that were introduced by the 2012 version of the standard, as compared to 2003?

    No, not exactly. Because the CPG 2003 was not an immediate predecessor to 2012, there is no resource available that explicitly compares the two. However, there are resources online that compare the 2008 iteration to the 2012 CPG, including this page from EPA.

    If a project decided to pursue LEED after the completion of demolition but before construction, can we prove ESC measures were implemented through pictures, without having an explicit ESC plan?

    Yes. Simply do your best to demonstrate that ESC measures were undertaken, while acknowledging that an ESC plan was not in place at the time.

    How do I know if my local code is more or less stringent than the EPA CGP?

    USGBC has not identified specific standards for judging this, or defined certain codes as compliant with the credit, or not. The stringency of other codes relative to EPA's Construction General Permit is judged on a case-by-case basis.

  • SS Prerequisite 1: Construction activity pollution prevention

    Intent

    To reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation, and airborne dust.

    Requirements

    Create and implement an erosion and sedimentation control plan for all construction activities associated with the project. The plan must conform to the erosion and sedimentation requirements of the 2012 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. (CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.) or local equivalent, whichever is more stringent. Projects must apply the CGP regardless of size. The plan must describe the measures implemented.

    SITES-LEED Equivalency

    This LEED credit (or a component of this credit) has been established as equivalent to a SITES v2 credit or component. For more information on using the equivalency as a substitution in your LEED or SITES project, see this article and guidance document.

21 Comments

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Irene Carreno LEED Manager Acciona
Aug 17 2017
Guest

Construction Activity pollution prevention inspections

Project Location: Canada

Hello.
I am working in a project that has the Erosion and control plan following the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. 2012(LEED V4) , part of the plan is to have weekly inspections on site to review how the erosion and control follows the specifications.

The CGP says that a qualified professional needs to be in charge of the site inspections. We are not sure of what does mean. Does it need to be a Civil Engineer,an Environmental professional or anyone can do it?

What kind of training needs to happen to be considered a qualified professional?

Now our Environmental manager is doing the inspections but we are worry when she is not available(vacation/sickness) if any other person can do the inspections and it is valid to LEED or LEED doesn't care who does the inspections only that they are done?

Thank you

Irene

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SAMER ALHMDAN
Jul 25 2017
Guest
93 Thumbs Up

Applicability within campus boundary limits

Project Location: United Arab Emirates

Hello,
I have multiple buildings within a campus, do we need to implement this prerequisite within the whole campus boundaries, or only within buildings LEED boundaries, noting that there are some service buildings within the campus that will not pursue LEED certification.

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jul 25 2017 LEEDuser Expert 6065 Thumbs Up

Hi Samer, I think you can do it on a project by project basis. The Reference Guide on page 144 says each LEED project can pursue this prerequisite individually.

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Jennifer Webb CEO JWAC
Feb 17 2017
Guest
16 Thumbs Up

EPA New Version

Project Location: United States

The EPA has issued the 2017 Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. (see web page https://www.epa.gov/npdes/stormwater-discharges-construction-activities-...) that became effective on February 16, 2017. Does LEED automatically update to match the new 2017 requirements or is there a period of review similar prior to implementation into LEED projects? If LEED has a grace period before activation of new requirements, when will the new requirements be implemented?

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G Mar 02 2017 LEEDuser Expert 931 Thumbs Up

Hi Jennifer,
To answer your question, no LEED does not automatically update to match the new 2017 requirements, and this credit currently still uses the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. 2012. Any new updates to the LEED rating system will be published as new Addenda or Interpretations, and will be publicly available. LEED does not have a set time frame to update requirements within the rating systems, but updates can happen periodically. However, if LEED did update to the CGP 2017 from 2012, and you had previously registered your project before the date of the update, you are only required to follow the requirements as they were when the project registered.
I hope this helps!

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Michelle Reott LEED AP® BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC, a LEED® Proven Provider™ Jun 07 2017 LEEDuser Expert 13902 Thumbs Up

Hi - I was looking for the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. 2012 to work on local equivalency and in light of the 2017 CGP, the URL in the Reference Guide is no longer valid.

Here is the new URL that goes all 2012 documents - https://www.epa.gov/npdes/epas-2012-construction-general-permit-cgp-and-.... (This URL takes you directly to the 2012 document - https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2016-09/documents/cgp2012_fin... and is the first bulleted link on the previous link’s list.)

I have sent this to one of my contacts to USGBC, who said that they will be updating the PDF Reference Guides in July as part of the Quarterly Update (http://www.leeduser.com/strategy/essential-leed-interpretations-addenda-...) and will include this new URL.

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Ana Paula Quiros Architect, LEED AP BD+C Livet Consulting
Oct 25 2016
Guest
170 Thumbs Up

ESC plan

Hello,
There is a hotel that might look certification and has 2 floors already built, then the construction stopped and they want to add now 3 more floors. How does the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation need to me documented / implemented? Will it have to be tailored to project specific conditions?
Thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 17 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Ana, every ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation should be appropriate to the project conditions. This project isn't any different in that regard. Consult with your civil engineer to make sure that the plan is appropriate for the scope of the project.

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant DCarbon
May 27 2016
Guest
1993 Thumbs Up

EPA CGP 2003/2012

Hi all! Is anyone aware of a table summarizing the changes that were introduced by EPA CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. 2012 when compared to the 2003 version?

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G Jun 01 2016 LEEDuser Expert 931 Thumbs Up

Hi Charalampos,

I spent some time digging around for a summary table of the 2012 changes to the EPA CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program., and the EPA has not published a summary of changes. The one resource I found that may be helpful is a summary of changes from the 2008 CGP to the 2012 CGP. You can find these changes by following this link: http://www.goulstonstorrs.com/NewsEvents/Advisories?find=58802
I hope this provides some guidance for you!

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant, DCarbon Jun 02 2016 Guest 1993 Thumbs Up

Thank you Kimberly! This seems great!

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Anaïs P
Feb 09 2016
Guest
58 Thumbs Up

Erosion and Sedimentation Measures during demolition

Project Location: France

During demolition works, should the Erosion and Sedimentation measures be implemented?
The Reference Guide only refers to construction works...

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 09 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Anaïs, you should include ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation measures during construction and demolition. Demolition is basically a kind of construction activity, and is definitely part of the impact of a project on its surrounding environment.

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Anaïs P Feb 22 2016 Guest 58 Thumbs Up

Thank you Tristan for your answer.

If the owner of the project decided to initiate the LEED certification after the completion of demolition but before the construction works, is it possible to proove than ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation measures have been implemented during demolition works with pictures of the measures without wiriting the ESC plan?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 22 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

This is a pretty common situation. Yes, simply do your best to demonstrate in good faith that ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation mesaures were undertaken, while acknowledging that an ESC plan was not in place at that time. I haven't heard of a case like this being rejected.

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sean wang i.d.a.international
Jul 27 2015
Guest
26 Thumbs Up

ESC plan for major renovation of data center

Project Location: China

Here is a major renovation project for data center. Only structure reinforcement is required for major renovation. No controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation required, could you please advise how to meet this prerequisite?

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Karin Miller Senior Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jul 31 2015 Guest 774 Thumbs Up

Sean,

All projects are required to create an erosion and sedimentation control plan, the plan will differ between projects with significant site areas, and those with a zero lot line. There are useful references for the types of strategies you might consider including in the v2009 forum here:
http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/SSp1#bev-tab

Karin

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sean wang i.d.a.international
Jul 27 2015
Guest
26 Thumbs Up

ESC plan for major renovation of data center

Project Location: China

We met a confused case. As it is a major renovation for data center, there is no need for controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation for construction. Only structure reinforce implementation and MEP infrastructure are required for this project. Therefore, this construction will hardly effect outside environment. Could you please give me some suggestion that how to meet this prerequisite?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 09 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Sean, you still need an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan. Simply tailor the plan to the project specifics. 

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UGC/GPRO Office Account Urban Green Council USGBC, New York Chapter
Feb 14 2014
Guest
36 Thumbs Up

CAPP Plan

Hello,

Does anyone have a Construction Activity Pollution Prevention plan example? What does it include? Erosion control, light pollution prevention, stormwater management plan

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Hello, LEEDuser has sample documenation and templates for this under our NC 2009 SSp1 Doc Toolkit.

Are you asking what LEED requires it to include, or what people typically include?

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Aug 18 2017
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