ND-v2009 GIBp4: Construction activity pollution prevention

  • Trades Training - v2009

    Register for our free forumAlready a member? Click to login
  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Neighborhood Development

    GIB Prerequisite 4: Construction activity pollution prevention

    Intent

    To reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation, and airborne dust.

    Requirements

    Create and implement an erosion and sedimentation control plan for all new construction activities associated with the project. The plan must incorporate practices such as phasing, seeding, grading, mulching, filter socks, stabilized site entrances, preservation of existing vegetation, and other best management practices (BMPs) to control erosion and sedimentation in runoff from the entire project site during construction. The plan must list the BMPs employed and describe how they accomplish the following objectives:

    1. Prevent loss of soil during construction by stormwater runoff and/or wind erosion, including but not limited to stockpiling of topsoil for reuse.
    2. Prevent sedimentation of any affected stormwater conveyance systems or receiving streams.
    3. Prevent polluting the air with dust and particulate matter.

    The erosion and sedimentation control plan must describe how the project team will do the following:

    1. Preserve vegetation and mark clearing limits.
    2. Establish and delineate construction access.
    3. Control flow rates.
    4. Install sediment controls.
    5. Stabilize soils.
    6. Protect slopes.
    7. Protect drain inlets.
    8. Stabilize channels and outlets.
    9. Control pollutants.
    10. Control dewatering.
    11. Maintain the BMPs.
    12. Manage the erosion and sedimentation control plan.

    Select BMPs that are consistent with Green Infrastructure and Low Impact Development (LIDLow-impact development: an approach to managing rainwater runoff that emphasizes on-site natural features to protect water quality, by replicating the natural land cover hydrologic regime of watersheds, and addressing runoff close to its source. Examples include better site design principles (e.g., minimizing land disturbance, preserving vegetation, minimizing impervious cover), and design practices (e.g., rain gardens, vegetated swales and buffers, permeable pavement, rainwater harvesting, soil amendments). These are engineered practices that may require specialized design assistance.) strategies such as the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Stormwater Management Manual for Western Washington, Volume II, Construction Stormwater Pollution Prevention (2005 edition), or a local equivalent. Choose BMPs that are the most stringent and appropriate to the project site and region. BMPs must comply with all national, state, and local erosion and sedimentation control regulations.

2 Comments

0
0
Amanda Tullos Principal Greenexus Consulting
Mar 27 2013
LEEDuser Member
42 Thumbs Up

ND standard vs the NC standard

Any idea how the 2003 EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. (Phase I and I NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters.) required in LEED-NC compares to the Washing State Department of Ecology's Stormwater Management Manual requirement for this LEED-ND prerequisite? Our location has an equivalent standard to the NPDES.

1
1
0
Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Mar 28 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4387 Thumbs Up

Amanda, I haven't seen a BMPBest Management Practice-specific equivalency assessment of the two, but it would definitely be helpful. One thing to remember when trying to satisfy GIBp4 with an NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. water pollution permit is the prerequisite's requirement in (c) to also prevent air pollution. And note that ND v4 will switch back to EPA BMPs, with Washington State's no longer being applicable.
Eliot

Post a Reply

Start a new comment thread

Jul 24 2017
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2017 – BuildingGreen, Inc.