ND-v2009 PIf1: Development Program and Site Type

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    Post your questions on this credit in the forum, and see the credit language to review to the LEED requirements.

  • Filling out this PI form

    This project information form gives you a chance to include information on your development program and site type in your LEED documentation. 

    Questions? Post them to our forum!

35 Comments

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Aly Andrews Farr Associates
Jan 14 2016
LEEDuser Member
41 Thumbs Up

Calculating Buildable Land (PIf1-2)

Project Location: United States

How should we be calculating buildable landThe portion of the site where construction can occur, including land voluntarily set aside and not constructed on.. When used in density calculations, the calculation for buildable land excludes: public streets and other public rights of way, and land excluded from development by law or other prerequisites of LEED for Neighborhood Development. (PIf1-2) by acre if there are a mix of building use types on the same, very large parcel? For example, there are some residential only buildings, an office/retail building, and a mixed-use (res/retail) building all on the same parcel.

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Jan 14 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4391 Thumbs Up

Aly, if you have multiple residential, non-residential, and mixed-use buildings on a single platted parcel or tax lot, you can assign shares of that parcel's acreage to the three building categories at your discretion. One method would be assigning acreage shares proportionate to each category's share of total project building floor area. But the final allocation is really up to you, and you may want to adjust acreage shares to help achieve desired densities.
Eliot

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Aly Andrews Farr Associates
Jan 14 2016
LEEDuser Member
41 Thumbs Up

(Optional) tables

Project Location: United States

Could you please clarify why multiple tables are considered (optional) on this form and the scenarios in which they would not need to be completed?

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Jan 14 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4391 Thumbs Up

Aly, unfortunately the use of 'optional' on the tables is a misnomer. If a project contains the elements covered by a table, then the table must be completed. The only time a table isn't completed is when a project doesn't contain the item covered by the table, e.g. a project without existing buildings to be demolished wouldn't complete Table PIf1-3, but a project with them must complete the table.
Eliot

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Fai Leung
Aug 13 2015
Guest
7 Thumbs Up

For PI form 1 Table PIf 1-9

How to count the number of buildings if multiple buildings share the same podium?

For example: One Residential building and one office building are both constructed above the same mulit-floors shopping mall.

Would it be counted as only one mixed-use building; or
one residential building plus two nonresidential buildings?

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant Taitem Engineering
Jul 22 2015
LEEDuser Member
1979 Thumbs Up

New to LEED-ND...submitting for certification

Project Location: United States

Hello,

My first question is, if Stage 3 is the only stage in the process that will garner an actual certification level for the development, then what are the benefits of also registering under Stage 2? I noticed that the certification fee to register an initial stage is $18,000 and then another $10,000 for another stage review. Why do you need more than one stage review? What happens at each of these stages? I am only able to find information about how the development would be eligible to enter at each one of these stages, but I think am very confused on why you would need to register and go through review process for more than on stage? Why not just register under stage 3?

And lastly, do all attempted credits need to be completed before submitting for review? In other words, unlike other ratings systems that separate credits by "design" and "construction" and you have the option to do a split review, do you need to complete all credits before submitting for any review?

Thank you in advance!
Courtney

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Casey Studhalter Project Manager, LEED, USGBC Jul 23 2015 LEEDuser Member 133 Thumbs Up

Courtney,
Thank you for your inquiry and for the chance to better explain the rating system structure. If you would like to set up a time for a quick call to discuss your options over the phone or have any follow-up questions, feel free to email us at neighborhoods@usgbc.org.

The multiple stages of LEED ND certification were created to allow projects at any stage of planning and construction to engage with the rating system, confirm their approaches and reap the benefits of certification. Which stage you are able to pursue is dictated by the land use approvals and construction progress at the time the project submits for certification review, which it sounds like you are familiar with.

Projects can pursue certification under any stage, presuming their approval and construction progress meets the cut off. You do not have to begin at Stage 1 and progress through 2 and then 3. The benefits accrued at each stage are different and targeted for the project's needs.

- The Stage 1 Conditional Approval letter is intended to provide third party support for projects seeking land use entitlements or variances, looking to garner public support or to bolster early funding applications. Engaging with ND early on also helps to ensure that planning and design are in line with the LEED ND principles.

- Stage 2's Pre-Certified Plan certificate is meat to support developers seeking funding, marketing to potential tenants and proving to the public the project's sustainable merits by conferring the benefits of certification without having to wait until full build out on what can often be a long development timeline.

- Stage 3 is considered the full certification and entitles projects to a LEED ND plaque. Because the project is completed, full documentation of each prerequisite and credit can be expected to prove compliance. In some instances, earlier stage projects cannot be expected to know these details and are allowed to submit binding commitments instead.

Depending on your approval and construction status, you may have limited choices for which stage to pursue. If you have multiple options, the choice is yours to decide what benefits of certification are most useful to the project and when you would like to take advantage of them. Waiting until Stage 3 is certainly an option, but it may be worth engaging earlier.

Because Stage 1 and 2 are considered preliminary and don't require full documentation for all prereqs and credits, they have expiration dates to encourage projects to return for further verification. These details are available in the Certification Policy Manual.

LEED ND does not offer a split review process, however there is the option to have the prerequisites from the Smart Location and Linkages category reviewed first for an additional $2,250 if that is something you want to double check before progressing further. Otherwise, all desired prereqs and credits must be completed before review can begin.

It is worth mentioning that the Stage 1, 2, and 3 structure only applies to LEED ND v2009 and that LEED ND v4 utilizes a slightly different structure (LEED ND: Plan and LEED ND: Built Project). The specifics are very similar however slightly simplified.

Best,
Casey Studhalter

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant, Taitem Engineering Jul 23 2015 LEEDuser Member 1979 Thumbs Up

Thank you so much for the quick response, Casey.

I think a call might be a great option for me! I did read in the certification manual that a project goes through the review process at all three stages. However, it seems from the explanation above, that you are only submitting all of the prereqs and credits under stage 3, is this correct? I did read about the SLL option, but I am thinking in terms of full credit documentation.

Say the project enters at Stage 2, what are the deliverable for the project to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).? Should the project have all of the prereq/credits complete and then submit for review? That is way there is a fee, right? And then, in order to go for certification and get a plaque, do you resubmit the credits under Stage 3? I am still really confused. I really dont understand what the project needs to be doing at the stages, if you finish the review at say stage 2, you need to go through stage 3 to get a certification rating, but wasn't the credit review already completed under stage 2?

I am about to propose on a very large LEED-ND development and do not want to be mis-leading in my fee numbers!

Thanks again!
Courtney

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant, Taitem Engineering Jul 23 2015 LEEDuser Member 1979 Thumbs Up

Oh, I reread part of your response, so under Stage 1 and 2, the project does not not require full documentation for all prereqs and credits. Does this mean you can submit some of the prereqs and credits and continue with the review process, and the rest at a subsequent stage?

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Casey Studhalter Project Manager, LEED, USGBC Jul 23 2015 LEEDuser Member 133 Thumbs Up

It might be best to set up a call. Email neighborhoods@usgbc.org with your info and some suggested times and we can set something up.

In some instances the forms for Stage 1 and Stage 2 allow projects to upload a commitment letter for the details that can't be expected to know at this point. They would still need to provide that and any required documentation or details per the form for every prerequisite and all of the desired credits. Sample forms are available on usgbc.org/sampleforms and provide the official documentation requirements in each instance.

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Gwen Corrie Sustainability Strategist, Gensler Jul 29 2016 LEEDuser Member 55 Thumbs Up

To Casey: I'm sorry, but I don't understand your comment above, "Because Stage 1 and 2 are considered preliminary and don't require full documentation for all prereqs and credits, they have expiration dates to encourage projects to return for further verification. These details are available in the Certification Policy Manual."

1. I can't find anything in the Certification Policy Manual referencing this. Can you please provide a link to the latest policay manual that would apply to a LEED ND v2009 project?
2. Is there a way to find out in advance what documentation exactly is not required under Stage 2?
3. Is the LEED ND v2009 scorecard the same for Stage 2 as Stage 3 or are there certain pre-requisites and credits left out under Stage 2?
4. If we were to certify under Stage 2, why would we have to "return for further verification"?

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Casey Studhalter Project Manager, LEED, USGBC Aug 01 2016 LEEDuser Member 133 Thumbs Up

Gwen, sorry for the confusion. I hope this helps but know that you can reach our customer service team at http://www.usgbc.org/contactus if you still have questions that you would like to talk through.

1. The most recent version of the Certification Policy Manual that governs a LEED ND v2009 project is available in LEED Online and also at http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-certification-policy-manual. It is dated January 1, 2012. The LEED ND specific appendix begins on page 61.

2. To see exactly what documentation is required for each prereq or credit, at each stage of certification I would encourage you to download the PDF forms. These are the final word on the required documentation. The documentation required for some prereqs/credits changes between Stage 1, 2 or 3 because projects aren't expected to know certain details in the early planning phases. Because of this, you will see that each Stage has a different form. The forms are all available in LEED Online, but can also be downloaded at http://www.usgbc.org/sampleforms/v3. You will need to filter for "LEED ND: Plan" or "LEED ND: Built Project" - both will display the same full set of forms.

3. The scorecard is the same across all 3 stages of certification. Projects can earn all possible points at any stage and area also subject to all of the prerequisites and credits. Documentation requested may differ, but they're still there.

4. Projects certified under Stage 1 or 2 are not required to return for Stage 3. Some projects find it valuable to return once completed to demonstrate that the project was built as designed and to earn the right to display a LEED ND plaque, as only Stage 3 projects are eligible for the physical plaque. The award for Stage 2 is a certificate and Stage 1 is a letter of support.

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Gwen Corrie Sustainability Strategist, Gensler Aug 03 2016 LEEDuser Member 55 Thumbs Up

Once again, very helpful! Thank you very much, Casey.

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Carole Frising LEED AP BD + C Foster + Partners
May 19 2014
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

Changes in development program form

I just started working on a LEED ND project for which the Masterplan has evolved after the SLL prerequisite submission. The main item that changes in the development program besides shuffling around uses and areas is that two of three existing buildings are now supposed to be demolished, which changes the area of existing buildings to remain and existing buildings to demolish. Does this need to be pointed out somewhere specifically or is it just that the numbers in the development program form submitted for the stage review will have changed compared to those in the prerequisite submission?

Many thanks for clarifying,
Carole

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners May 19 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4391 Thumbs Up

Carole, it sounds like the building demolition changes don't affect the earlier prereq compliance determination, so you'll be ok by just submitting that latest data.
Eliot

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Jin Yang LEED GA ECADI
Mar 11 2014
Guest
83 Thumbs Up

Qualification for LEED CS vs. NC

Hi Eliot,

The master planning project consists of two parcels with three highrise buildings. All the buildings are designed as highend office towers located on the waterfront of Shanghai business disctrict. The developer will have property ownership up till final completion of the project, then the property ownership of each building will be transferred to a landlord or multiple landlords respectively upon certificate of occupancy. From that point, all the building spaces will be leased and occupied by various individual tenants, but none of the tenants will have property ownership of any project buildings. I want to inquire if these three buildings should pursue LEED NC or LEED CS ?

A secondary question in relation to the above question is that I'm confused about the term "occupied" addressed in LEED, such that a project can be qualified for LEED CS when the owner (in this case would be the developer not the landlord, correct?)"occupies" 50% or less of the building's leasable square footage. Is the term "Occupy" equivalent to Property Ownership ? If this is the case, then a project with an owner(regardless of developer or landlord) who owns the entire property of the project building, but doesn't physically occupy any portion of the building space, should pursue LEED NC since 100% ownership = 100% occupancy, correct?

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Jin Yang LEED GA ECADI
Feb 16 2014
Guest
83 Thumbs Up

Inquiry on MPR for LEED 2009 ND

Currently I'm working on a LEED ND project in Wuhan, China. I'd like to find out if a project must apply for LEED NC certification in order to be certified for LEED ND as part of the Minimum Project Requirements ?

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Feb 16 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4391 Thumbs Up

Jin, for a project to be certified under LEED-ND, GIBp1 requires at least one certified green building, but it can be certified under any LEED program, not just NC. LEED-ND 2009 technically doesn't have Minimum Program Requirements, just recommended guidelines.
Eliot

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Jin Yang LEED GA ECADI
Feb 15 2014
Guest
83 Thumbs Up

MPR for LEED 2009 ND

Hi Eliot,

Currently I'm working on a LEED ND project in Wuhan, China. I'd like to find out if a project must apply for LEED NC certification in order to be certified for LEED ND as part of the Minimum Project Requirements ?

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Rodrigo Gomez Junco LEED AP BD+C SINERGI Integrated Building Sciences, LLC
Nov 06 2013
Guest
107 Thumbs Up

Industrial Park / Campus Program

We have a client who is planning on building an industrial park. Initially our idea was to approach the certification through the Campus Program. However, he wants to include the site in the Neighborhood Development rating system and eventually try and pursue the Campus Program. Is this even possible? Is Neighborhood Development the appropriate choice for an industrial park?

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Nov 07 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4391 Thumbs Up

Rodrigo, it's possible for a 100% non-residential project to go through ND, including industrial parks. However, many ND credits reward residential, retail, and mixed-use designs, so an industrial park would be somewhat disadvantaged in terms of achievable credits. That said, a strong argument could be made for industrial areas striving for the same sustainable urbanism promoted in other community districts, and ND could be a strong tool for accomplishing that goal. Once an area is ND certified, it's still possible to process buildings through other LEED programs, and beginning with v4 there's an LT credit for locating buildings in an ND neighborhood.

In terms of the pros and cons when choosing a LEED program, if you haven't already seen them, two useful USGBC references are: LEED Application Guide for Multiple Buildings & On-Campus Building Projects, and LEED-ND on Campuses (the latter is university-oriented, but still possibly helpful).
Eliot

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Rodrigo Gomez Junco LEED AP BD+C, SINERGI Integrated Building Sciences, LLC Nov 07 2013 Guest 107 Thumbs Up

Eliot, thanks for your response – that clears things up.

I went through the LEED Application Guide for Multiple Buildings & On-Campus Building Projects and thought that could work fine. I guess I’ll prepare a pros and cons list for both options and let the client decide.

Thanks for your help.

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Jos Schild Royal HaskoningDHV
May 21 2013
LEEDuser Member
94 Thumbs Up

Examples of PI F1, F2 and F3

Due to the development of BREEAMBuilding Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method, the first widely used green building rating system, developed in the U.K. in the early 1990s, currently used primarily in the U.K. and in Hong Kong. Neighbourhood Development, I'm looking for the PI forms to see whether we can use them or not for the writing and working of the certification system in The Netherlands. Where can I find them?

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners May 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4391 Thumbs Up

Jos, LEED sample forms are at www.usgbc.org/sampleforms, except for ND forms which should be there soon. In the interim, ND forms are available at www.leedonline.com; after logging in there's a link in the top right to sample forms.
Eliot

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory Colliers International
Mar 21 2013
LEEDuser Member
4661 Thumbs Up

Project Owner/MPR

We are planning on pursuing ND certification of a large site which is has multiple owners (single purpose vehicles all under common control.) The client's is pursuing certification to qualify for tax incentives.

Is it possible to set up the project owner to consist of multiple legal entities in ND? I'm really looking for the way to demonstrate the link between the certified project and the actual owners of the properties within the project.

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Mar 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4391 Thumbs Up

Michael, LEED-ND is very flexible about groups of owners and developers working together on a project, as long as the group collectively has control of over half of the property inside the project boundary. You'll find more info in the Project Team section of the 2009 Reference Guide, and the terms "applicant" and "developer" are in the rating system definitions.
Eliot

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager Google
Dec 17 2012
LEEDuser Expert
20267 Thumbs Up

LEED-ND Costs for large projects

I am assisting on a project that is 8,000 acres. The LEED FAQ sheet suggests that projects greater than 320 acres certify under multiple submissions. If I were to do that I could have as many as 25 submissions. Would the flat rates apply per 320 acre submission or could all submissions fall within that rate?

Thanks for your help.

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Dec 18 2012 LEEDuser Member 1135 Thumbs Up

Hi Lauren,

Fees are per application, since each receives a full review. GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). recently started handling large projects via a more customized process, so in order to determine a fee for an 8,000 acre project, you should contact them directly and discuss your options.

Meghan

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Dec 18 2012 LEEDuser Expert 20267 Thumbs Up

Hi Meghan,

Thanks for your response. I am working on trying to get a more customized quote today if at all possible for a report I need to issue today. Thanks in advance for your help.

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Tyler Baker Urban Designer Urban Strategies
Dec 14 2012
Guest
196 Thumbs Up

Previously developed land

We have a large piece of land which was formerly single family detached housing. We are redeveloping the site, and it is clear that all of the single family lots, and roads are previously developedAltered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Land that is not previously developed and landscapes altered by current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development..

We are however incorporating a small remnant piece of land which was owned by the town, and was part of the road right of way. The were no property lines delineating the parcel from the adjacent rights of way.

Although as farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). as we can tell there was no actual construction on this piece of land, we don't think it should be classified as vacant or not-previously developed as it was part of the right-of way and had been maintained by the town as part of the road.

It doesn't impact our classification of the site as infill, but it causes a problem for GIBc7 as this part of the site is not previously developed and we would be required to preserve a small (20% of this piece of land is about 6,600 sf) as undisturbed.

Thanks for any clarification.

Tyler

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 21 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Tyler, maybe it would be better to post this question under GIBc7. Thanks.

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Mar 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4391 Thumbs Up

I posted a reply under the original question. Any group of owners and developers can do an ND project as long as they collectively control over half of the land in the project boundary. More guidance is in the Project Team section of the Reference Guide, and definitions of "applicant" and "developer" are in the rating system.
Eliot

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Chris Zitelli
Nov 28 2012
Guest
34 Thumbs Up

Stage 2 Pre-Certified LEED-ND Plan

The first sentence in the reference guide describing Stage 2 certification notes that the Building square footage must be "fully entitled." The architect on the job has asked what that term means. Any help here?

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Nov 29 2012 LEEDuser Member 1135 Thumbs Up

Hi Chris,

By "entitlement" we're referring to land use entitlements, not building permits. From the LEED-ND FAQ:
"LEED-ND defines entitlements as 'the existing or granted right to use a property for the specific types and quantities of residential and nonresidential land uses proposed, either by right or through a local government regulatory change process.' A good rule of thumb to determine stage eligibility is to consider whether a project team needs to take their proposed plan or a portion of their proposed plan through the various rounds of land use approvals or whether a project team can build their proposed mix of uses based on their site’s existing zoning and regulatory environment. If yes to the former, a project team’s site is likely most eligible for Stage 1. If yes to the latter, a project team’s site is likely most eligible for Stage 2."

Meghan

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Chris Zitelli Dec 14 2012 Guest 34 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much Meghan. I am sorry for the late response. I did not see it come through prior to today.

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