ND-v2009 SLLc3: Locations with reduced automobile dependence

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  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Neighborhood Development

    SLL Credit 3: Locations with reduced automobile dependence

    Intent

    To encourage development in locations shown to have multimodal transportation choices or otherwise reduced motor vehicle use, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, and other adverse environmental and public health effects associated with motor vehicle use.

    Requirements

    Option 1. Transit-served location

    Locate the project on a site with existing transit service such that at least 50% of dwelling units and nonresidential building entrances (inclusive of existing buildings) are within a 1/4-mile (400 meters) walk distance of bus or streetcar stops, or within a 1/2-mile (800 meters) walk distance of bus rapid transit stops, light or heavy rail stations, or ferry terminals, and the transit service at those stops in aggregate meets the minimums listed in Tables 1 and 2. Both weekday and weekend trip minimums must be met to earn points at a particular threshold.

    Projects larger than 125 acres (50.5 hectares) can meet the requirements by locating on a site with existing transit service such that at least 40% of dwelling units and nonresidential building entrances (inclusive of existing buildings) are within a 1/4-mile (400 meters) walk distance of bus or streetcar stops, or within a 1/2-mile (800 meters)walk distance of bus rapid transit stops, light or heavy rail stations, or ferry terminals, and the transit service at those stops in aggregate meets the minimums listed in Tables 1 and 2 (both weekday and weekend trip minimums must be met to earn points at a particular threshold), as long as the 40% complies with NPD Prerequisite 2 and any portion of the project beyond the 1/4-mile (400 meters) and/or 1/2-mile (800 meters) walk distances meets SLL Prerequisite 1, Option 3-compliant planned transit service.

    Projects greater than 500 acres (200 hectares) can meet the requirements by locating on a site with existing transit service such that at least 30% of dwelling units and nonresidential building entrances (inclusive of existing buildings) are within a 1/4-mile (400 meters) walk distance of bus or streetcar stops, or within a 1/2-mile (800 meters) walk distance of bus rapid transit stops, light or heavy rail stations, or ferry terminals, and the transit service at those stops in aggregate meets the minimums listed in Tables 1 and 2 (both weekday and weekend trip minimums must be met to earn points at a particular threshold), as long as the 30% complies with NPD Prerequisite 2 and any portion of the project beyond the 1/4-mile (400 meters) and/or 1/2-mile (800 meters) walk distances meets SLL Prerequisite 1, Option 3-compliant planned transit service.

    Projects must meet the requirements for both weekday and weekend trips and provide service every day. Commuter rail must serve more than one metropolitan statistical area (MSA) and/or the area surrounding the core of an MSA (or a local equivalent for projects outside of the U.S.)

    Table 1. Minimum daily transit service for projects with multiple transit types (bus, streetcar, rail, or ferry


    Weekday trips Weekend trips Points
    60 40 1
    76 50 2
    100 65 3
    132 85 4
    180 130 5
    246 150 6
    320 200 7



    Table 2. Minimum daily transit service for projects with commuter rail or ferry service only


    Weekday trips Weekend trips Points
    24 6 1
    40 8 2
    60 12 3



    Projects served by two or more transit routes such that no one route provides more than 60% of the prescribed levels may earn 1 bonus point, up to the maximum 7 points.

    Projects where existing transit service is temporarily rerouted outside the required distances for less than 2 years may meet the requirements if the local transit agency has committed to restoring the compliant routes with service at or above the prior level.

    OR

    Option 2. Metropolitan planning organization location with low VMT

    Locate the project within a region served by a metropolitan planning organization (MPO) (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) and within a transportation analysis zone (TAZ) (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.), where either (a) the current annual home-based vehicle distance traveled per capita (if TAZ, or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S., is 100% residential) or (b) the annual nonhome-based vehicle distance traveled per employee (if TAZ, or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S., is 100% non-residential) does not exceed 90% of the average of the equivalent metropolitan region value. The research must be derived from household or employment transportation surveys conducted by the MPO (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) within ten years of the date of submission for LEED for Neighborhood Development certification. Additional credit may be awarded for increasing levels of performance, as indicated in Table 3. Mixed-use TAZs (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) must use whichever TAZ (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) vehicle distance traveled is greater, either residential per capita or nonresidential per employee.

    Table 3. Points for low vehicle distance traveled location


    Percentage of average regional vehicle distance traveled per capita Points
    81–90% 1
    71–80% 2
    61–70% 3
    51–60% 4
    41–50% 5
    31–40% 6
    30 or less 7
    vehicle distance traveled.



    Points earned under Options 1 and 2 may not be combined.

18 Comments

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Vita Shklovsky
Feb 18 2014
Guest
3 Thumbs Up

Calculating Walking Distances

What are some common methods of measuring walking distances? My work group at the FHLB of Boston receives and scores funding applications for affordable housing development projects, and one of the Smart Growth scoring criteria is the proximity of the project to public transit - whether it is a bus stop, train stop, or other public transit service.

We are looking for simple measures of calculating the walking distance from a housing address to the nearest bus stop. One method is to search Google (or Mapquest) directions from Point A (housing address) to Point B (address or intersection of bus stop). However, how can we verify that point B is indeed the bus stop? Is there a way that Google or some other map or online source can confirm that location of the bus stop?

We are considering moving away from maps and using WalkScore, but it is not terribly scientific.

I appreciate all your help!

Vita

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Feb 19 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2335 Thumbs Up

Vita, you may be able to accomplish this with the "new" Google Map (as opposed to the older "classic" version). The steps are:
1. Enter the address of the affordable housing project.
2. Use the "Save" button to place a star icon on the project location.
3. Enter a new search for transit stops in the community. Google now has this data for most transit systems. Depending on the community you may need to do separate searches using the terms "bus stops," "train stops," "subway stops," or "transit stops."
4. When the stops are displayed with the project location icon, you can visually determine which stop appears to be closest to the project. Click on that stop, then on Directions, and select the project address from the pull-down that appears. This will display the route and distance between the project and the stop. You can repeat this for other stops in the vicinity if you're unsure which is the closest. Note that the Google route doesn't always follow public rights-of-way, and those that do may not necessarily have sidewalks.
Hope this helps.
Eliot

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Vita Shklovsky Feb 19 2014 Guest 3 Thumbs Up

Eliot,

Thanks for your response. Would you mind taking this conversation offline? I'd like to email you for further clarification. I followed your instructions, but I'm not sure whether I'm using this "new" Google Map, because I don't see a simple "Save" button, a star, or a drop-down option.

Thanks,
Vita

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 19 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

My two cents -- please keep the conversation here on the forum, where the instructions benefit us all. Thanks Eliot!

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Feb 19 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2335 Thumbs Up

Vita, the "new" Google Maps can be accessed at https://support.google.com/maps/answer/3092426, and you need to create a Google account in order to access all the functionality like saving. If you're still having difficulty I'm at eliot@crit.com.
Eliot

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Vita Shklovsky Feb 19 2014 Guest 3 Thumbs Up

Thanks Eliot, this is helpful. I'll try poking at it some more, and might follow up with you later.

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Colin Day Sustainable Building Associate, LEED GA The Institute for the Built Environment
Sep 27 2013
LEEDuser Member
196 Thumbs Up

City transit schedule limitations

Hello Eliot,

Our local transit system does not supply bus service at all on Sundays. Besides that point, the project meets all other requiremnts exhibited in the credit language. Would USGBC/GBCI potentially permit points in this credit category since the service is not available on Sunday whatsoever, or does that inherently prevent any points from being earned.

Thanks in advance!

Colin Day

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Sep 27 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2335 Thumbs Up

Colin, transit service is required 7 days/week per the fourth paragraph in Option 1: "For all projects, weekend daily service must include service on both Saturday and Sunday."
Eliot

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Amanda Tullos Principal Greenexus Consulting
Mar 26 2013
LEEDuser Member
24 Thumbs Up

Existing Transit

Can someone please clarify, for infill projects under 125 acres with existing transit, does the project require access to multiple transit types? The credit language seems to request this.

"Project has have access to combination of bus, streetcar, rail and/or ferry
transit types."

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Mar 27 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2335 Thumbs Up

Amanda, no, it's not necessary to have multiple types of transit. If you're referring to the title of Table 1, the wording does suggest multiple types, but it really means projects with any single type or combination of types.
Eliot

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Martine Desbois
Mar 21 2013
LEEDuser Member
163 Thumbs Up

Multiple bus stops

Eliot is it correct that a bus that has multiple stops within 1/4 mile can on be counted once? Or rather once inbound and once outbound?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Mar 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2335 Thumbs Up

Martine, bus stops within 1/4 mile of any project origin point (a dwelling unit or non-residential building entrance) can qualify for trip counting regardless of the number or direction of bus routes serving those stops. As noted in the Reference Guide SLLc3 implementation section, "Each point at which a vehicle stops to receive or discharge passengers is considered a separate stop; this includes stops facing each other on opposite sides of a street."
Eliot

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Martine Desbois Mar 21 2013 LEEDuser Member 163 Thumbs Up

Thank you Eliot, I guess my question had to do with a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide that was posted for LEED 2009. The question was: "A bus has multiple stops within 1/4 mile radius. Can I count each of those?" The response was: "No, as this doesn't increase service to the LEED project. (depending on project specifics, you could try to make a case, however.) I was wondering if that ruling applied to LEED ND.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 21 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Martine, if you check the appliability in the LEED Interpretations database it will tell you if it applies to ND. Without knowing the number you are referring to, it would be difficult for me to comment.

But I think you may be referring to an FAQ posted on LEEDuser, not a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Mar 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2335 Thumbs Up

Martine, I'd have to know exactly what CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide you're referring to in order to judge its relevance to ND, but I'm not seeing any issued for SLLc3. If your question is whether one bus stopping at multiple qualifying stops can have all of those stops counted, yes that's correct for ND. I believe other LEED rating systems may not score transit that way because they only have a single origin point.
Eliot

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Martine Desbois Mar 21 2013 LEEDuser Member 163 Thumbs Up

Thank you Eliot and Tristan. You are right it is a FAQ. I took it out of the new LEED 2009: The Missing Manual page 15 and assume it was a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide. Sorry about the confusion. I believe that the last response from Eliot answers my question. Thank you.
Martine

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Aria Amadi
Oct 28 2012
Guest
10 Thumbs Up

Locations with Reduced Automobile Dependence leed-nd

To calculate the transit service from a station, do we need to calculate the sum of both inbound and outbound trains?
Thanks

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Nov 23 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2335 Thumbs Up

Aria, each platform at a train station can be considered a separate transit stop, and the number of train trips at each platform, regardless of direction, can be summed for the total number of transit trips used to determine credit points. Note that it's important to confirm that pedestrians can reach both platforms within the maximum walk distance from dwellings and non-residential uses.
Eliot

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