ND-v2009 SLLc4: Bicycle network and storage

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  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Neighborhood Development

    SLL Credit 4: Bicycle network and storage

    Intent

    To promote bicycling and transportation efficiency, including reduced vehicle distance traveled. To support public health by encouraging utilitarian and recreational physical activity.

    Requirements

    Bicycle network

    Design and/or locate the project to meet at least one of the three requirements below:

    1. An existing bicycle network of at least 5 continuous miles (8,000 meters) in length is within 1/4-mile (400 meters) bicycling distance of the project boundary.
    2. If the project is 100% residential, an existing bicycle network begins within 1/4-mile (400 meters) bicycling distance of the project boundary and connects to a school or employment center within 3 miles’ (4800 meters) bicycling distance.
    3. An existing bicycle network within 1/4-mile (400 meters) bicycling distance of the project boundary connects to at least ten diverse uses (see Appendix) within 3 miles’ (4800 meters) bicycling distance from the project boundary.

    AND

    Bicycle storage

    Provide bicycle parking and storage capacity to new buildings as follows:

    1. Multiunit residential. Provide at least one secure, enclosed bicycle storage space per occupant for 30% of the planned occupancy but no fewer than one per unit. Provide secure visitor bicycle racks (or equivalent) on-site, with at least one bicycle space per ten dwelling units but no fewer than four spaces per project site.
    2. Retail. Provide at least one secure, enclosed bicycle storage space per new retail worker for 10% of retail worker planned occupancy. Provide visitor or customer bicycle racks (or equivalent) on-site, with at least one bicycle space per 5,000 square feet (465 square meters) of retail space, but no fewer than one bicycle space per business or four bicycle spaces per project site, whichever is greater. Provide at least one on-site shower with changing facility for any development with 100 or more new workers and at least one additional on-site shower with changing facility for every 150 new workers thereafter.
    3. Nonresidential other than retail. Provide at least one secure, enclosed bicycle storage space per new occupant for 10% of planned occupancy. Provide visitor bicycle racks (or equivalent) on-site with at least one bicycle space per 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of new commercial nonretail space but not fewer than four bicycle spaces per building. Provide at least one on-site shower with changing facility for any development with 100 or more new workers and at least one additional on-site shower with changing facility for every 150 new workers thereafter.

    Secure, enclosed bicycle storage areas must be locked or secured and easily accessible to residents and/ or workers. Provide informational signage on using the storage facilities.

    Visitors’ and customers’ bicycle racks must be clearly visible from a main entry, located within 100 feet (30 meters) of the door, served with night lighting, and protected from damage from nearby vehicles. If the building has multiple main entries, bicycle racks must be proportionally dispersed within 100 feet (30 meters) of each. Any alternative to bicycle racks must ensure bikes will be stored safely and access to these bikes must be convenient for visitors and customers.

    Shower and changing facility requirements may be met by providing the equivalent of free access to on-site health club shower facilities, if the health club can be accessed without going outside. Provide informational signage on using the shower facilities.

14 Comments

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting
Dec 28 2015
LEEDuser Member
1122 Thumbs Up

Bike Rack Locations In Parking Garage

Project Location: United States

Hi All,
Our project is an 11 building development with several parking garages underground serving the buildings above. Although there are street side main entries, the parking garages include elevators which take FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
/ Guests up to the main lobby of each building. Our project would like to locate a majority of the bike storage spaces within the parking garage and I am curious how that impacts the credit? These storage spaces may or may not be within 100 feet of the street-level main entries but are certainly within 100 feet of the elevator entries taking users up to the lobby. Are these entries from the parking garage eligible to serve as the main entry for each building?

Thanks!

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Dec 29 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4313 Thumbs Up

Sara, since buildings can have multiple main entries, if you can demonstrate that the parking garage entries will be designed as principal functional entrances, then visitor bike parking near them should qualify. Nothing in the credit explicitly requires that visitor parking be located outside, so it comes down to the "main entry" criterion, which isn't formally defined in ND. If there is exterior signage directing bicyclists into the garages for parking, and a sizable portion of visitors enter the buildings through garage elevator foyers, then I think you could reasonably call them main entrances. The presence of elevator service denotes that. As usual, if it's critical you should consider a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide.
Eliot

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Gwen Corrie Sustainability Strategist Gensler
Sep 16 2015
LEEDuser Member
54 Thumbs Up

SSLc4 bike rack count

Project Location: United States

We have a newly registered ND project that comprises of an existing, historic hotel (undergoing major renovations), a new retail podium, and two new luxury high rise condo towers. Under ND, we are classifying the hotel as an "existing building", the retail podium as "nonresidential retail", and the condo towers as "multiunit residential". Assuming we have the existing bike paths along local streets to comply, we want to ensure we are calculating the bike racks correctly for this credit (which, as I understand it, are the same requirements for NPDc5 in terms of bike racks and showers only).

Since our hotel has guest rooms (for visitors) as well as condo units for residents, do we classify the hotel also as a "multiunit residential" or as a "nonresidential other than retail" building? (We are prepared to make this classification consistent across all credits once we know.)

So, in terms of bike racks: 1) do we count 30% bike racks for planned occupancy (residents) in the condo towers and hotel (condo residents only) plus 10% of hotel condo residents, or 2) count 30% for the condo towers (residents) only and then add 10% of hotel condo residents?
-Gwen

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Sep 18 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4313 Thumbs Up

Gwen, first, a Feb 2, 2011 addenda defines major renovation or gut rehab as new construction, so the hotel may be in that category throughout the rating system, not just bike parking. Second, the definition of 'dwelling unit' specifically excludes hotel rooms, so the hotel portion of the building is also nonresidential-other-than-retail, which means its parking obligation is 10% of the hotel workforce plus one space per 10,000 sq ft of hotel floor area. Then for the condo/multi-unit res portion of the building, add one space per occupant for 30% of the total planned condo occupancy.
Eliot

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Gwen Corrie Sustainability Strategist, Gensler Sep 30 2015 LEEDuser Member 54 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Eliot. That was very helpful!

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Regina Ng
Dec 12 2013
LEEDuser Member
1392 Thumbs Up

Existing bicycle network

Our project is a masterplan development of 500+ acres, and there's no existing bicycle network beyond the 500+ acre land. Does this mean that we cannot achieve this credit as there is no existing bicycle network? Please note that we plan to create a bicycle network by providing a very good bicycle network within the development. This will allow the residents to bicycle within the development and up to the boundary of the development which we hope that other new development will link in the future. Will LEED make an exemption and accept this approach to comply to this credit requirement which the main intent is to reduce vehicle miles traveled and support public health.

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Dec 12 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4313 Thumbs Up

Regina, SLLc4 is really aimed at existing bike networks that are available to connect a project site with the surrounding community from the very outset of project occupancy, so this credit may not be a good fit. Interestingly, the rating system has credits that reward pedestrian and transit facilities, but not new internal bike networks of the type you describe for your project. Since new bike network design isn't covered by the rating system, you could try for an innovation (IDP) credit for that feature of your project, instead of SLLc4. As with any innovation proposal, it's always a good idea to run it by staff before pursuing it.
Eliot

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Regina Ng Dec 13 2013 LEEDuser Member 1392 Thumbs Up

Hi Eliot, thanks for your suggestion in looking into innovation for the new cycle network.

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Dec 13 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4313 Thumbs Up

Regina, I need to correct myself about NPD not addressing new internal bike networks. I had forgotten that NPDc1 has a subsection entitled Design Speeds for Safe Pedestrian & Bicycle Travel, which includes speed limits for streets that are shared with bicyclists. So my idea of a possible innovation credit on the basis of bike networks not being addressed was mistaken, sorry for the oversight. That said, NPDc1 only concerns itself with street speeds impacting bicyclists, so maybe there's still innovation potential in the extent and character of the physical improvements that constitute the new internal bike network. Even more so now, you should run this by staff before you commit to pursuing it.
Eliot

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Regina Ng Jan 09 2014 LEEDuser Member 1392 Thumbs Up

Hi Eliot, I have been wondering myself that LEED ND does not have any credit specific to bicycle network within the development, e.g. lanes provided for a certain % of the street length and width of the cycle lanes required. NPDc1 only addresses vehicular design speeds for the safety of pedestrian and cyclists. I still see a potential for innovation. We will just submit and see what USGBC will say:)

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Gaston Viau GEBCO International
Dec 03 2012
Guest
586 Thumbs Up

NC Comercial Building into a LEED ND Neighborhood (Stage 1)

Our project is located into a LEED Neighborhood Development which obtained Stage 1 certification. The Neighborhood Project is going to be developed in phases and this building is the first of 26 different buildings to be built.

Question: Since this NC is going to be located into a LEED ND (Stage 1 Certified), the whole Certification process is the same that would be held if the project was located somewhere else? Does it exist a simplification or a credit heritage for those credits which have been involved in the ND Certification (for example SSc4)?

Thanks in advance for the assistance!

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Dec 03 2012 Guest 1088 Thumbs Up

Hi Gaston,
If you are completing an NC 2009 project within a LEED-ND project, there isn't a direct way to automatically earn a credit in NC if a similar credit was pursued in LEED-ND. The scales are different, so for example, the NC certification ensure that there is bicycle storage at your particular buildings, whereas that might not be the case for the ND certification. However, the requirements are aligned wherever possible, so you may be able to use some of the certification materials from the ND submission for your NC building.

Best,
Meghan

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Nader NAKIB
Nov 28 2012
Guest
136 Thumbs Up

SLL c4

Can offstreet trails be part of a sidewalk?

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Nov 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 4313 Thumbs Up

Nader, it would be ok if the off-street trail is wide enough to meet the minimum width requirements for both bicycles and sidewalks, e.g. 8 ft for bikes and 4 ft for sidewalks would require a total trail width of 12 ft.
Eliot

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