ND-v4 GIBc2: Optimize building energy performance

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    Post your questions on this credit in the forum, and see the credit language to review to the LEED requirements.

  • GIB Credit 2: Optimize building energy performance

    Intent

    To encourage the design and construction of energy-efficient buildings that reduce air, water, and land pollution and adverse environmental effects from energy production and consumption.

    Requirements

    The requirements apply to 90% of the total building floor area (rounded up to the next whole building) of all nonresidential buildings, mixed-use buildings, and multiunit residential buildings four stories or more constructed as part of the project or undergoing major renovations as part of the project.

    Each counted building must comply with one of the following efficiency options.

    Option 1. Whole-building energy simulation (1–2 points)

    New buildings must demonstrate an average percentage improvement of 12% (1 point) or 20% (2 points) over ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2010, with errata. Buildings undergoing major renovations as part of the project must demonstrate an average percentage improvement of 10% (1 point) or 18% (2 points). Core and shell buildings must demonstrate an average percentage improvement of 11% (1 point) or 15% (2 points). To determine percentage improvement, follow the method outlined in GIB Prerequisite Minimum Building Energy Performance.

    OR

    Option 2. Prescriptive compliance: ASHRAE 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide (2 points)

    To be eligible for Option 2, project must comply with all of requirements of Option 2 in GIB Prerequisite Minimum Building Energy Performance.

    AND

    Comply with the applicable recommendations and standards in Chapter 4, Design Strategies and Recommendations by Climate ZoneOne of five climatically distinct areas, defined by long-term weather conditions which affect the heating and cooling loads in buildings. The zones were determined according to the 45-year average (1931-1975) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days (base 65 degrees Fahrenheit). An individual building was assigned to a climate zone according to the 45-year average annual degree-days for its National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Division., for the appropriate ASHRAE 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide and climate zone. For projects outside the U.S., consult ASHRAE/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2010, Appendixes B and D, to determine the appropriate climate zone.

    ASHRAE 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small to Medium Office Buildings

    • Building envelope, opaque: roofs, walls, floors, slabs, doors, and continuous air barriers
    • Building envelope, glazing: vertical fenestration
    • Interior lighting, including daylighting and interior finishes
    • Exterior lighting
    • Plug loads, including equipment and controls

    ASHRAE 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Large Box Retail Buildings

    • Building envelope, opaque: roofs, walls, floors, slabs, doors, and vestibules
    • Building envelope, glazing: fenestration - all orientations
    • Interior lighting, excluding lighting power density for sales floor
    • Additional interior lighting for sales floor
    • Exterior lighting
    • Plug loads, including equipment choices and controls

    ASHRAE 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for K–12 School Buildings

    • Building envelope, opaque: roofs, walls, floors, slabs, and doors
    • Building envelope, glazing: vertical fenestration
    • Interior lighting, including daylighting and interior finishes
    • Exterior lighting
    • Plug loads, including equipment choices, controls, and kitchen equipment

    ASHRAE 50% Advanced Design Guide for Large Hospitals

    • Building envelope, opaque: roofs, walls, floors, slabs, doors, vestibules, and continuous air barriers
    • Building envelope, glazing: vertical fenestration
    • Interior lighting, including daylighting (form or nonform driven) and interior finishes
    • Exterior lighting
    • Plug loads, including equipment choices, controls, and kitchen equipment

    For new single-family residential buildings and new multiunit residential buildings three stories or fewer, 90% of the buildings must reduce absolute estimated annual energy usage by 20% compared with the LEED index target for each building. Follow the method outlined in LEED v4 for Homes, EA Credit Annual Energy Use.

11 Comments

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Martine Desbois
Feb 26 2016
LEEDuser Member
349 Thumbs Up

Modeling Protocol

Are the Modelling protocols the same under LEED NDv4 and LEED BD&C v4? Can we use the same protocol and results to satisfy the requirements of both rating systems? If so are both rating systems have the same protocol as well on how to model DESDistrict energy system: a central energy conversion plant and transmission and distribution system that provides thermal energy to a group of buildings (e.g., a central cooling plant on a university campus). It does not include central energy systems that provide only electricity. and Renewable? And finally can we use Tenant Agreements to satisfy some requirements under Core and Shell for LEED ND as we can do under LEED BD&C? Thank you

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Casey Studhalter Project Manager, LEED, USGBC Mar 01 2016 LEEDuser Member 132 Thumbs Up

Martine,
Yes, the modeling should be the same as both reference ASHRAE 90.1-2010. Modeling for DESDistrict energy system: a central energy conversion plant and transmission and distribution system that provides thermal energy to a group of buildings (e.g., a central cooling plant on a university campus). It does not include central energy systems that provide only electricity. are the same as well. In the ND reference guide, Appendix 4 provides the same guidance on energy modeling as provided in the BD+C ref guide under the EA min energy performance prerequisite. Core and Shell guidelines are also the same as under BD+C.

Casey

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Ian Scott
Sep 18 2015
Guest
27 Thumbs Up

LEED v4 for Homes

Our project is mixed with some building 4 stories plus and some 3 stories and less. I have two questions.

1. For the 3 stories and less buildings (Group 2) is there a pathway to achieve 1 point? The guide is confusing and seems to provide only an option for 2 point threshold.

2. Given 1, but also to be able to apply "any saving from on-site renewable energy systems" can buildings three stories or less use Whole-Building Energy Simulation (Group 1, Option 1 pathway)?

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Sep 18 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4387 Thumbs Up

Ian, your question got routed to ND, but your subject heading says Homes. Which system are you dealing with?
Eliot

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Ian Scott Sep 18 2015 Guest 27 Thumbs Up

Sorry bad subject header. Questions related to LEED ND V4. Under this credit building 3 stories or less are supposed to follow a compliance pathway based on LEED for Homes and I am looking for clarification in that regard or potential alternatives (my second question).

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Casey Studhalter Project Manager, LEED, USGBC Sep 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 132 Thumbs Up

Ian, happy to help out here. The reference guide isn't very clearly structured here.

1. There is only a 2 point threshold for this category of buildings. No 1 point threshold is available for Group 2 buildings.

2. Group 2 buildings are allowed to count savings from renewable energy systems. The "Related Credit Tip" on page 355 of the reference guide states "For Group 2 buildings, including low-rise multifamily buildings or home, use that absolute energy generated for the renewable energy systems."

Casey

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Ian Scott Sep 22 2015 Guest 27 Thumbs Up

Thanks Casey. Do you think you could use the Whole-Building Energy Simulation (Option 1) for a three-storey building, which would give you the 1 point or 2 point compliance possibility?

Ian

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Martine Desbois
Apr 16 2014
LEEDuser Member
349 Thumbs Up

Use of renewable energy in calculation

I just would like to confirm that we can use the renewable energy used in our buildings as part of the calculation for energy saving as is done in LEED NC. Is this correct? and is it correct for both the prerequisite and the credit? Thank you

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners May 12 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4387 Thumbs Up

Martine, under ND v4, neither the building energy prereq nor credit allow renewable energy production to be treated as energy savings. However, the renewable energy creditA tradable commodity representing proof that a unit of electricity was generated from a renewable resource. RECs are sold separately from electricity itself and thus allow the purchase of green power by a user of conventionally generated electricity. does award points for such production.
Eliot

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Martine Desbois Feb 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 349 Thumbs Up

Eliot sorry to be back to this question after so long. Page 354 of the LEED ND Reference Guide (Optimize Energy Credit) talks about Applying Renewable Energy Savings to the calculation. So I am confused with your answer. Does it applies to the Credit but not the prerequisite?

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Feb 26 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4387 Thumbs Up

Good catch Martine, I apologize for not seeing that provision tucked under Further Explanations for the credit. But I'm not finding it in the prerequisite, which may be due to wanting a "true" minimum energy efficiency without benefit of any renewable offsets.
Eliot

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Jul 24 2017
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