ND-v4 NPDc6: Connected circulation network

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  • NPD Credit 6: Connected and Open Community

    Intent

    To promote projects that have high levels of internal connectivity and are well connected to the community at large. To encourage development within existing communities, thereby conserving land and promoting multimodal transportation. To improve public health by encouraging daily physical activity and reducing the negative effects of motor vehicle emissions.

    Requirements

    Locate or design the project such that its internal connectivity falls within one of the ranges listed in Table 1. If the project has no internal circulation network, the connectivity within a ¼-mile (400-meter) distance of the project boundary must be used.

    Table 1. Points for connectivity

    Intersections per square mile Intersections per square kilometer Points
    300–400 116–154 1
    > 400 > 154 2



    All parts of the circulation network that are counted toward the connectivity requirement must be available for general public usePublic or public use applies to all buildings, structures, or uses that are not defined as private or private use. at all times and not gated. No more than 10% of the project area may be gated. Education campuses, health care campuses, and military bases where gates are used for security purposes are exempt from the 10% limit, and intersections within those projects may be counted toward the connectivity requirement.

    AND

    Design or locate the project such that a through-connection (of the circulation network) intersects or terminates at the project boundary at least every 400 feet (122 meters) or at existing abutting intervals and intersections of the circulation network, whichever is the shorter distance. Include a pedestrian or bicycle through-connection in at least 90% of any new culs-de-sac. These requirements do not apply to portions of the boundary where connections cannot be made because of physical obstacles, such as prior platting of property, construction of existing buildings or other barriers, slopes steeper than 15%, wetlands and water bodies, railroad and utility rights-of-way, existing limited-access motor vehicle rights-of-way, and parks and dedicated open space.

14 Comments

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Ana Paula Quiros Architect, LEED AP BD+C Livet Consulting
Apr 06 2017
Guest
169 Thumbs Up

Parking Pen

Hello Eliot!

Does LEED ND prohibit having parking pens on the development main entrances???
The project is located in Mexico and is very common to have parking pens in all big developments due to security reasons. That´s why we are wondering what does LEED ND say about them. It is very probable that the project we are working on will requiere them.

Many thanks!
Ana

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Apr 06 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4369 Thumbs Up

Hi Ana. I'm not familiar with a parking pen. Is it a parking lot with a security fence?
Eliot

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Ana Paula Quiros Architect, LEED AP BD+C, Livet Consulting Apr 12 2017 Guest 169 Thumbs Up

Hi Eliot! By 'parking pen' I meant a vehicular control access system that would be in all main vehicular entrances. Many thanks! Ana

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Apr 13 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4369 Thumbs Up

Ana, there's nothing in NPDc5 or 6 that prohibits or limits the controlling of access to parking facilities for security purposes. The only thing to be watchful of is making sure that circulation network intersections being counted toward connectivity are located outside of the controlled access area, and are therefore not considered gated.
Eliot

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Ana Paula Quiros Architect, LEED AP BD+C, Livet Consulting Apr 20 2017 Guest 169 Thumbs Up

Many thanks :)

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Ana Paula Quiros Architect, LEED AP BD+C, Livet Consulting Apr 24 2017 Guest 169 Thumbs Up

The access control devices woould not be located just in parking facilities, they would also be located in the development main entraces, does it affect credit compliance?

The other thing that we are worried about is if there is a problem having fences in all the project perimeter...I understand that LEED prohibits them, but in Mexico there is no way to have a development with this characteristics...

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Apr 25 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4369 Thumbs Up

Ana, it sounds like you may have an issue with NPDp3 as well as NPDc6. Under NPDp3, at least 90% of internal circulation networks counted toward connectivity must be available for general public usePublic or public use applies to all buildings, structures, or uses that are not defined as private or private use. and not gated. So your situation depends on whether the "access control devices" function as gates and in any way restrict free public movement at any time. Regarding your perimeter fence, such a fence is not prohibited, but the prerequisite also requires a public through-connection at least every 800 ft. on the project boundary. So the fence would need unrestricted public access points at those or shorter intervals. I understand the security issue you describe for projects in Mexico, and you could try a CIR arguing for the security exemption that education and health care campuses have, but I wouldn't be optimistic about that route.
Eliot

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Martine Desbois
Oct 27 2016
LEEDuser Member
344 Thumbs Up

Through Connections

Hello Elliot,
Following up on the last question, the reference guide refers to pedestrian and bicycle connection for culs-de-sac. From your response I assume it applies to all through connections. Am I correct?
As an extension to the previous question, could alleys and plaza count as through connections as they are right-of-ways but not part of the circulation network?
Finally, if plaza can be included and the plaza is very wide at the point of intersection do we have to use the centerline or can we use the end point for the calculation?
Thank you

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Oct 27 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4369 Thumbs Up

Hi Martine. If I understand your first question correctly about through-connections generally, not just for cul-de-sacs, the connections are to the "circulation network," which is defined as carrying any single mode or combination of modes, so any through-connection on the project boundary could be ped-only or bike only.

Your second question about whether alleys or plazas in dedicated rights-of-way can be parts of the circulation network hinges on whether they meet the circulation network definition of "travel ways permanently accessible to the public." If they meet that test, then they're part of the circulation network.

Regarding your third question about where to count an intersection, the point where centerlines intersect has been the standard practice. In the case of a plaza where the local government-sanctioned travel way may not follow a dedicated centerline, it may be necessary to assume a travel way centerline based on the established traffic pattern.
Eliot

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Martine Desbois Oct 27 2016 LEEDuser Member 344 Thumbs Up

Thank you Elliot,
Maybe you can clarify then the last sentence on page 37 of the Reference Guide. Our plaza is located on the edge of the project, provides pedestrian access to the project and does allowed for emergency vehicles only. Is it considered or not as part of the circulation network? Thanks

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Oct 27 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4369 Thumbs Up

Martine, I was just about to qualify my earlier response with the page 37 caveat. I think they key phrase on page 37 is "may occasionally" allow vehicular passage versus the very common urban plaza that functions as a permanent part of a city's circulation system. The page 37 exclusion is aimed at plazas "serving primarily as a public meeting space," and I believe local government documentation of a permanent travel way carrying any mode through a plaza would qualify that travel way to be part of the circulation network. Nonetheless, you've identified an ambiguity that deserves a bit more investigation so I'm going to check with staff.
Eliot

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Nov 04 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4369 Thumbs Up

Martine, I've discussed this with USGBC staff, who can't recall why the plaza exclusion was inserted in the page 37 paragraph, and agree that the vast majority of plazas function as part of local circulation systems. Staff are going to initiate the formal addenda process to correct this, and in the meantime you can treat a plaza providing permanent public access for any travel mode as part of the circulation network.
Eliot

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Martine Desbois
Dec 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
344 Thumbs Up

Through Connections

Could you please clarify if through connection can be pedestrian only. Thank you

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners May 11 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4369 Thumbs Up

Martine, yes, a pedestrian-only through connection is permissible since the requirement is phrased with an "or" between pedestrian and bicycle. Again, apologies for the delay in responding.
Eliot

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May 25 2017
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