Pilot-Credits PC13: Bicycle Network, Storage, and Changing Rooms

  • Evolution of LEED 2009 bicycle credit

    Note: This pilot credit was closed for new registrations as of March 1, 2012.

    This pilot credit is an evolution of the current credit in the LEED 2009 rating systems.  The most notable difference is the new requirement for proximity to a bicycle network, one that is largely taken from LEED for Neighborhood Development with slight modifications for a single-building context.  The Location and Planning Technical Advisory Group (LP TAGLEED Technical Advisory Group (TAG): Subcommittees that consist of industry experts who assist in developing credit interpretations and technical improvements to the LEED system.) believes that only providing bicycle storage and changing rooms does not completely ensure the environmental benefits of reduced automobile use and increased bicycle use.  Building occupants will have greater incentive to take bicycles to and from the project if the project is close to accommodating routes, thus the addition of the bicycle network requirement.  With a higher likelihood of occupant bicycle use comes a higher likelihood of reduced vehicle miles traveled and increased occupant physical activity.

    Within the storage and changing room portion of the credit, the storage requirement thresholds are essentially twice that of the proposed new prerequisite on bicycle storage in the draft LEED 2012 documents.  (Please visit www.usgbc.org to view these documents.) Additionally, the credit now explicitly prohibits the double counting of bicycle storage (instances in which storage in a non-project facility is already allocated to that facility’s occupants).

    Credit Submittals

    General

    1. Register for Pilot Credit(s) here.
    2. Register a username at LEEDuser.com, and participate in online forum
    3. Submit feedback survey; supply PDF of your survey/confirmation of completion with credit documentation

    Credit Specific

    1.    A map with project boundary, bicycle route from the boundary to existing bicycle network, and one of the following:

    a.    A bicycle network of at least 5 miles in length (label each segment of network according to bicycle network definition)

    b.    Existing network routes to school and/or an employment center (label each segment of network according to bicycle network definition)

    c.    Routes to at least 10 diverse uses, including use identification (label each segment of network according to bicycle network definition and show distances to each use).

    2.    For planned and funded bicycle networks, documentation of committed funding from one of the following:

    a.    Metropolitan planning organization improvement program

    b.    Locality capital improvement program (or similar)

    c.    Developer contribution bonded or otherwise secured per local government approval.

    3.    For Case 1:

    a.    Indication of the total number of compliant bicycle racks and/or storage spaces, the peak building users (FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. + Peak Transients), and percent of building users with secure bicycle racks and/or storage spaces

    b.    Indication of the total number of complaint showers and/or changing fa-cilities and FTE (does not include residents).

    4.    For Case 2: Indication of the total covered bicycle storage capacity, total resi-dents, and percent of residents with covered bicycle storage.

    5.    A site plan identifying the location of the bicycle racks and/or storage facilities, and the shower/changing facilities for non-residential spaces.

    Additional Questions

    1. From your perspective as a LEED project team member, does the additional requirement for bicycle network proximity offer more assurance that building occupants will bike to and from the project? Why or why not?
    2. Do you believe that the 200 yard walking distance between the network and the building entrance is appropriate, too strict, or too lenient? Why or why not?

Organizations

LEED Pilot Credit Library

The homepage for the LEED Pilot Credit Library. The LEED Pilot Credit Library is intended to facilitate the introduction of new prerequisites and credits to LEED. This process will allow USGBC to test and refine credits through LEED 2009 project evaluations before they are sent through the balloting process for introduction into LEED.

Articles

Foundations of LEED

Background for the LEED Pilot Credit Library is provided in this foundational document.

35 Comments

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Nicole Koedyker
Apr 06 2013
Guest
13 Thumbs Up

LEED for Multi-Family Homes Bicycle Security

For the bike storage at this location, our intent is to create closets similar that can be locked, which would certainly meet this requirement. However, if we determine that there's not enough room to take this route, another option we discussed was some sort of bike rack under the deck in the parking area. We can certainly meet the "under roof" requirement fairly easily, but I'm concerned that this solution may not meet the "locked" requirement. Certainly we'd provide something for the owners to lock their bikes to (i.e. bike rack), but the area itself wouldn't necessarily be "locked". Technically the entire parking area is locked, as only homeowners have access to it, but I'd like to get clarification on whether or not this would satisfy the requirement. Thanks!

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Alice Sung Principal Greenbank Associates
Dec 20 2012
LEEDuser Member
241 Thumbs Up

LEED Pilot Credit 13-comment

I appreciated Michael Smithing's clarificationof the defintion of a bicycle "network, " as inclusive of : " residential streets designed for a target speed of 25 mph (40 km/hr) or slower and commercial or mixed-use streets designed for a target speed of 30 mph (48 km/hr) or slower. "
I'd like to suggest this be included in any credit language or at least in the Reference guide credit language.
Many pre-published "bike paths' only focus on the big regional or longer distance bike routes, but if this definition holds, many urban city streets could be considered part of the 'bike network." It would be great if all municipalities actually had the resources/capacity to create pre-published bike path-route-network maps-- it would make documentation easier. The Benicia project I have been working on did not have one for the City streets, even though many are marked with either dedicated bike lanes, signage, and the bike route symbol stamped into roads.
Someone shoud start a national bike path-route-network-- or at least state by state?--mapping effort online. is there such a thing?

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Chris Marshall Manager, LEED Technical Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jan 02 2013 LEEDuser Member 1599 Thumbs Up

Hi Alice. To my knowledge, there is not a national compilation of local bike routes. The closest thing is the bicycle route layer you can toggle on and off in Google Maps. Many, many communities have this layer, and the underlying information is often supplied by local agencies.

Another thing to keep an eye on is the U.S. Bicycle Route System: http://www.adventurecycling.org/routes/nbrn/usbikewaysystem.cfm. It's an up-and-coming effort that might get to what you're seeking.

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Saliha AIT LEED AP BD+C OGER INTERNATIONAL
Oct 17 2012
Guest
251 Thumbs Up

Bicycle network

I'm a team member of several LEED projects outside of U.S., in Africa & Middle-Est.
My opinion of this aditional criteria is that it will force LEED team members to not try to satisfy the requirement of this credit because in major region of the world there are no bicycle networks. So it will be harder to convince owner that even if he gets no point in LEED certification it is a good thing to provide bike racks and changing rooms. Actually instead of providing a chance to use bikes instead of cars, there will be no alternative in those projects.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Oct 17 2012 LEEDuser Member 1972 Thumbs Up

The "key" is in the definition of a bicycle network. I just checked the 5th draft (CI) and didn't find the glossary that was in the 2nd draft. That definition included residential streets designed for a target speed of 25 mph (40 km/hr) or slower and commercial or mixed-use streets designed for a target speed of 30 mph (48 km/hr) or slower.

If they interpret 30 mph to be equal to 50 km/hr, then you might find this easier to comply with than you think.

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Saliha AIT LEED AP BD+C, OGER INTERNATIONAL Oct 18 2012 Guest 251 Thumbs Up

Michael ,
thank you for the specification. It would be more sensible with this definition of a bicycle network.

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Ann Lubbers Nov 26 2013 Guest 2 Thumbs Up

Does anyone know if the definition of bicycle network adopted in v4 includes residential streets designed for a target speed of 25 mph or slower and commercial or mixed-use streets designed for a target speed of 30 mph or slower?

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Tapio Peltonen Sr. Mechanical Engineer Granlund Oy
Jun 15 2012
Guest
529 Thumbs Up

Pilot Credit 13

This question applies to Project ID 1000019331 with Pilot Credit 13:
Bicycle Network,Storage, and Shower Rooms.
Case 1. Requires secure, enclosed bicycle storage space.
Does a gated property area meet this requirement?
Another question: Does the enclosure without a roof meet the requirement?

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Chris Marshall Manager, LEED Technical Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jun 18 2012 LEEDuser Member 1599 Thumbs Up

Hi Tapio. Gates around the entire property do not meet the requirement of secure, enclosed storage. Acceptable forms of secure, enclosed storage are portions of the property that are individually gated. And, because we didn't explicitly require covered storage in the pilot credit, the enclosure does not need to be in order to earn the credit. But please note that we very much recommend it and - in the LEEDv4 credit shown in the 4th public comment - we require it via the definition of "long-term bicycle storage."

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Tapio Peltonen Sr. Mechanical Engineer, Granlund Oy Jun 20 2012 Guest 529 Thumbs Up

Thanks Chris, the bicycle storage in our project area is covered and we are ready for LEEDv4, too.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory Colliers International
Mar 27 2012
LEEDuser Member
1972 Thumbs Up

Shower calculation

We have 330 FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. and 2 showers. The credit requirement is 1 shower for the first 100 FTE and 1 for each subsequent 200 FTE. Would we need an additional shower for the 30 FTE we are over or as this is only 15% of the next shower requirement can we round down?

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Samantha Harrell LEED Project Reviewer certificate holder Mar 27 2012 Guest 2504 Thumbs Up

Hi Michael, yes you will need an additional shower for the extra 30 FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories..

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Kelly Duepner LEED BD+C Christner Inc.
Mar 22 2012
LEEDuser Member
149 Thumbs Up

PC13 Closed?

I was hoping to take part in this pilot credit and see that it has closed. Is it possible to submit similar documentation for an ID credit?

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Samantha Harrell LEED Project Reviewer certificate holder Mar 22 2012 Guest 2504 Thumbs Up

Hi Kelly, if the rating system you are submitting under already has a bicycle storage credit, submitting this pilot credit as an ID strategy may not be accepted by the reviewer. Non-pilot ID credit strategies that contribute to existing LEED credits in the same rating system are not considered innovative. My recommendation would be to incorporate the strategy as part of a comprehensive transportation management strategy.

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Anne-Maria Vierinen Environmental Specialist, M.Sc (Tech.), LEED AP Vahanen Oy
Jan 31 2012
Guest
64 Thumbs Up

Counting FTE from future developments?

We have a master plan campus project for which we are trying to acheive several credits which, once achieved, can then be easily shared and applied for in the 3 individual projects which will eventually be on the site.

So far only 1 of the 3 buildings is ready for LEED documentaiton and it has 260 FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.. However we have estimated that the total project wil have 960 FTE when completed.

What is the best way to comply with the 5% or more of all building users rule with regards to bicycle storage for Pilot Credit 13?

I presume that we should comply with the estimated 960 FTE figure, but if there are no confirmed building plans yet for the the other 2 future buildings it's quite difficult to show the storage location on a plan, presuming we can't fit it all on the site for the first building.

Any suggestions welcome! Thanks

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Chris Marshall Manager, LEED Technical Development, U.S. Green Building Council Feb 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 1599 Thumbs Up

To comply with the credit, you'll have to calculate the needed bicycle storage based on the first building's expected occupancy (the number of all building users measured at peak period, presumably more than FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.). You'll notice that the credit actually prohibits double-counting of storage between the project pursuing the credit and other buildings. While - for efficiency's sake - you can consolidate the bicycle storage location, be careful to ensure that that consolidated storage has enough spaces for all buildings that share the area. I hope this helps.

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Chris Marshall Manager, LEED Technical Development U.S. Green Building Council
Jan 05 2012
LEEDuser Member
1599 Thumbs Up

Upcoming Pilot Credit Webinar

USGBC will be hosting a webinar on location- and transportation-related pilot credits on Thursday, March 22, 1:00 - 2:30 ETEvapotranspiration (ET) is the loss of water by evaporation from the soil and by transpiration from plants. It is expressed in millimeters per unit of time..

For more information visit: http://usgbc.peachnewmedia.com/store/seminar/seminar.php?seminar=10516

The webinar will be registered for 1.5 hours of LEED Specific (BD+C, ID+C, O+M, HOMES, ND) GBCI hours as well as 1.5 AIA/CES LU/HSW/SD hours.

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Kimberly Frith Sustainability Consultant Alto Sustainability, LLC
Sep 16 2011
LEEDuser Expert
3541 Thumbs Up

Residential Bike Storage in Apartments?

The construction requirements for the bicycle storage seem to suggest centralized bicycle parking. Would individual ceiling-mounted hanging racks within apartment units comply with the credit requirements?

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Chris Marshall Manager, LEED Technical Development, U.S. Green Building Council Nov 30 2011 LEEDuser Member 1599 Thumbs Up

For the current iteration of this pilot credit, individual ceiling-mounted hanging racks within the units would not comply with the requirements. The current, implied intent is to remove obligation from multiunit residents from taking their bikes up to their apartments or condos. To be sure, the aggregated bike storage doesn't need to be centralized into one area. If it's easier for the project, there could be separate storage areas, so long as each are within the distance requirement.

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Carrie Johansen Interior Designer Boulder Associates Architects
Jun 30 2011
Guest
67 Thumbs Up

Construction dates of bicycle networks

It seems like this information may not be readily available for many bicycle networks. Has anyone else had difficulty finding information regarding bicycle network construction dates? Any helpful search locations?

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Matthew Fortin Nov 07 2011 Guest 177 Thumbs Up

I would anticipate it would be difficult in many areas. Cities may be a little easier, for example Boston has available maps of all roads with dedicated bike lanes and bike paths.

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Christine Teichert
Jun 07 2011
Guest
296 Thumbs Up

safe, all-weather route??

what exactly constitutes a safe, all-weather route between the building entry and the network? We submitted this credit in our design review and for our clarifications we were asked to "provide documentation that clearly shows the project boundary, and a safe, all-weather route that
exists between the bicycle network and the project`s bicycle storage and/or main entrance." Can anyone clarify this?

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Megan Stark Operations Manager, Abel Design Group Jun 07 2011 Guest 118 Thumbs Up

"a route that with reasonable maintenance can be kept open in all weather"

I know - still makes no sense! But I think it boils down to "paved"

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Megan Stark Operations Manager, Abel Design Group Jun 07 2011 Guest 118 Thumbs Up

It appears to be some sort of military classification:

• Type X. Type X is an all-weather route that, with reasonable maintenance, is passable throughout the year to its maximum volume of traffic. This type of route is normally formed of roads having waterproof surfaces, is only minimally affected by precipitation or temperature changes, and is never closed from the effects of weather.

www.theblackvault.com/documents/mpmanual/appi.pdf

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Chris Marshall Manager, LEED Technical Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jun 09 2011 LEEDuser Member 1599 Thumbs Up

Hi all. The definition that Megan provided will suffice in the absence of a USGBC-provided definition. We're aware of the vagueness and will propose one before this credit is finalized in LEED's next version.

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Christine Teichert
Jan 13 2011
Guest
296 Thumbs Up

LEED for Schools - bike storage

Our school is pursuing LEED for Schools 2007 and are looking at going after this pilot credit for an ID credit. We were awarded SSc4.2 in our design review, but weren't sure if we could pursue both this pilot and SSc4.2. Does anyone know if this is an issue?

Also, the pilot credit states that bike storage must be locked and within 100 feet of a building entrance. Currently we have 2 sets of bike racks, one that is 84 feet away and one that is 144 feet away from the entry. Can we not pursue this pilot credit if we don't meet the thresholds?

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Megan Stark Operations Manager, Abel Design Group Jan 18 2011 Guest 118 Thumbs Up

We are also applying for both credits, and I think the increased requirements of this credit allow it to be treated like an exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. for the existing credit.

I do not see the language referring to the storage being 100 feet from the building entrance, only that the network must be no more than 200 yards from the building entrance. But we're using ID+C, so maybe the requirements are different?

The credit should clarify the distances, as the network may be 200 yards from the building, but then the storage facilities may be 200 yards from the building entrance - in the opposite direction!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 19 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Hi, you are allowed to pursue both the regular credit and a Pilot Credit that has similar requirements.

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Christine Teichert Jan 26 2011 Guest 296 Thumbs Up

In regards to the 100 ft requirement, if you look at the document below page 2, you will see it under "BOTH CASES"

http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=8188

"Bicycle storage areas must be locked, located inside or within 100 feet of a building entry, and easily accessible to employees, residents, and/or visitors."

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 26 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Christine, to answer your earlier question, you can't earn a point for a pilot credit if you don't meet the requirements, unless you can make a case that the pilot credit is "broken." There's more detail on this in our pilot credit library guide.

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Carrie Johansen Interior Designer, Boulder Associates Architects Jun 29 2011 Guest 67 Thumbs Up

Has anyone else had difficulty finding information regarding construction dates of bicycle networks?

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Samantha Jaff Architectural Designer, LDa Architects Jan 06 2012 Guest 77 Thumbs Up

We are working on a LEED NC project, and I found that a significant portion of the documentation for Pilot Credit 13 had already been completed for SSc4.2 Alternative Transporation- Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms. The emphasis of SSc4.2 is merely on the existence/ availability of bicycle storage and showering facilities. Pilot Credit 13 takes a much more holistic approach, in that it takes into account that not only does there need to be bicycle storage for the users, but they also need to be able to use their bicycles! It seems that the requirements for Pilot Credit 13 should be integrated into SSc4.2 in LEED 2012, especially because the documentation for the Pilot Credit was completed with relative ease. The process of identifying a bicycle network was slightly difficult because there does not seem to be a simple or standard way of identifying the speed limit of a given street or maps with bicycle lanes indicated. If the USGBC could provide some resources to assist project teams with finding this information, I'm sure it would be very helpful!

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Chris Marshall Manager, LEED Technical Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jan 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 1599 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Samantha, for this feedback. It's very helpful. As with Pilot Credit 12, this credit is precisely what's proposed for LEED 2012. It's a part of a broader strategy to put LEED 2012 credit ideas in the Pilot Credit Library to gain feedback there as well as the traditional public comment periods.

For the identification of qualifying bicycle networks, do recognize that on-street bicycle lanes do not require the street to have a certain speed limit. Only for streets without bicycle lanes will you need to research their speed limits to determine if they qualify to be a part of the counted network.

Regardless, I appreciate the request for adding guidance on this topic. We'll consider including it in our References Guides for LEED 2012.

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Nicholas Swinehart May 06 2013 Guest 24 Thumbs Up

LEEDUser lists this credit as Bicycle Network, Storage, and Changing Rooms. USGBC pilot credit library lists this as Bicycle Network and Storage. The USGBC feedback survey lists this as Alternate Transporation. The listed requirements on LEEDUser and USGBC are different from each other as well. I registered for this credit a while ago and now the requirements have changed. I'll be following the requirements that were listed at the time of registering for this Pilot Credit. I hope that is correct.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Nicholas, that is correct. This credit in particular has been a bit mercurial.

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