Pilot-Credits PC22: Lighting – Lighting Quality Only

  • Address quality of lighting

    This pilot credit is proposed to expand on the current lighting requirements, in order to address the quality of the lighting in a space.  Quality criteria focus on illuminance and reflectance to attempt to maximize occupant comfort and productivity.

    Credit Submittals

    General

    1. Register for Pilot Credit(s) here.
    2. Register a username at LEEDuser.com, and participate in online forum
    3. Submit feedback survey; supply PDF of your survey/confirmation of completion with credit documentation

    Credit Specific

    1. For suspended, wall-mounted, freestanding or partition mounted direct/indirect ambient lightingLighting in a space that provides for general wayfinding and visual comfort, in contrast to task lighting, which illuminates a defined area to facilitate specific visual work. provide manufacturer’s product information and cutsheet.
    2. For task-ambient lighting solutions that achieve recommended IESNA illu-minance levels with the combination of both systems provide manufac-turer’s product information and cutsheet.
    3. To demonstrate an efficiency of greater than 50% for all luminaires provide manufacturer’s product information and cutsheet.
    4. To demonstrate sources with more than 50 lumens / Watt for 95% of the demand power, provide a comparison to IESNA/ASHRAE and manufac-turer’s product information ad cutsheet.
    5. To demonstrate a surface brightness of less than 10,000cd/m^2 for all lu-minaires with luminous parts within an 11-degree field of view from 4 feet above finished floor, provide on-site measurements or product data for fin-ishes
    6. To demonstrate an average wall-surface-to-work-surface illuminance ratio that does not exceed 3:1, provide on-site measurements or product data for finishes
    7. To demonstrate a ceiling-surface-to-work-surface illuminance ratio that does not exceed 10:1, provide on-site measurements or product data for finishes
    8. To demonstrate that dimmable fixtures are used for 90% of the luminaires, provide cutsheets and lighting schedule
    9. To demonstrate a CRI of 80 or higher for 100% of lamps, provide cutsheet
    10. To demonstrate automated shade controls provide electrical switching plans or an electric schedule
    11. To demonstrate automated or fixed shade control for top-lighting daylight systems provide electrical switching plans or an electric schedule.

    Additional Questions

    1. Do the criteria associated with quality interior lighting align with your project’s and occupants comfort and productivity needs?
    2. How difficult was it to document this credit?
  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    IEQ Pilot Credit 22: Interior lighting - quality

    Intent

    Pilot Credit Closed

    This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

    Provide for occupant comfort by establishing quality criteria for interior lighting within a space.

    Requirements

    Choose four of the following strategies.

    1. For all regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space., use light fixtures with a luminance of less than 2,500cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir.

      Exceptions include wallwash fixtures properly aimed at walls, as specified by manufacturer’s data, indirect uplighting fixtures, provided there is no view down into these uplights from a regularly occupied space above, and any other specific applications (i.e. adjustable fixtures).
    2. For the entire project, use light sources with a CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. of 80 or higher. Exceptions include lamps or fixtures specifically designed to provide colored lighting for effect, site lighting, or other special use.
    3. For 75% of the total connected lighting load, use light sources that have a rated life (or L70 for LED sources) of at least 24,000 hours (at 3-hour per start, if applicable).
    4. Use direct-only overhead lighting for 25% or less of the total connected lighting load for all regularly occupied spaces.
    5. For 90% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 85% for ceilings, 60% for walls, and 25% for floors.
    6. If furniture is included in the scope of work, select furniture finishes to meet the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 45% for work surfaces, and 50% for movable partitions.
    7. For 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet an average ratio of wall surface illuminance The incident luminous flux density on a differential element of surface located at a point and oriented in a particular direction, expressed in lumens per unit area. Since the area involved is differential, it is customary to refer to this as illuminance at a point. The unit name depends on the unit of measurement for area: footcandles if square feet are used for area, and lux if square meters are used. (Adapted from IES) In lay terms, illuminance is a measurement of light striking a surface. It is expressed in footcandles in the U.S. (based on square feet) and in lux in most other countries (based on square meters).(excluding fenestration) to average work plane (or surface, if defined) illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet strategy E, strategy F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of 60% for walls.
    8. For 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet an average ratio of ceiling illuminance (excluding fenestration) to work surface illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet option E, option F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of 85% for ceilings.

    General Pilot Documentation Requirements

    Register for the pilot credit

    Credits 1-14

    Credits 15-27

    Credits 28-42

    Credits 43-56

    Credits 57-67

    Credits 68-82

    Credits 83-103

    Credit specific

    Note: the below submittals are suggestions, alternative forms of documentation or calculation strategies will be accepted.

    1. For strategy A, a list of all light fixtures used in the regularly occupied spaces. For each fixture, provide a description, manufacturer name, and indicate whether the fixture has a luminance of less than 2,500cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir. Also indicate whether there are any fixtures excluded and whether they are an approved exception.
    2. For strategy B, a list of all light sources included in the interior spaces of the project. For each light source, provide a description, light source type, manufacturer or vendor name, and CRI value. Also indicate whether there are any light sources excluded and whether they are an approved exception.
    3. For strategy C,
      1. A list of all light sources included in the project. For each light source, provide a description, light source type, manufacturer or vendor name, total connected lighting load, and rated life value.
      2. Calculation for the percent of connected lighting load that meets rated life criteria.
    4. For strategy D,
      1. A list of all light fixtures used in the regularly occupied spaces. For each fixture, provide a description, manufacturer name, total connected lighting load, and indicate whether the fixture is direct-only overhead lighting.
      2. Calculation for the percent of connected lighting load that is associated with direct-only overhead lighting.
    5. For strategy E,
      1. Indicate whether any regularly occupied spaces are being excluded from the credit requirements and the associated floor area.
      2. A list of all surfaces in the regularly occupied spaces that are being included in the credit requirements. For each surface, provide a description, manufacturer or vendor name, reflectance value and the percent of the overall ceiling area, wall area, or floor area that uses the surface.
      3. Calculation for average surface reflectance for ceiling area, wall area, and floor area. The calculation should be area- weighted, based on the percentages provided in the surface list. Only 1 calculation for each surface type is needed, the calculations do not need to be performed on a space-by-space basis.
      4. Description of methods used to determine reflectance values.
    6. For strategy F,
      1. A list of all work surfaces and moveable partitions in the project.
      2. For each surface, provide a description, manufacturer or vendor name, reflectance value and the percent of the overall work surface area, or overall moveable partition surface area that is attributed to the surface.
      3. Calculation for average surface reflectance for work surfaces, or moveable partitions. The calculation should be area- weighted, based on the percentages provided in the surface list. Only 1 calculation for each surface type is needed, the calculations do not need to be performed on a space-by-space basis.
      4. Description of methods used to determine reflectance values.
    7. For strategy G,
      1. A list that includes representative areas for all regularly occupied spaces in the project. For each area, include an area description, area location(s), work plane description, work plane illuminance value, wall surface illuminance value, and a calculation for work plane illuminance to wall surface illuminance (in the format of 1: X).
      2. Calculation for the average ratio.
      3. Demonstration that the project also meets strategy E, strategy F, or has area-weighted surface reflectance of 60% for walls.
      4. Description of methods used to determine illuminance values.
    8. For strategy H,
      1. A list that includes representative areas for all regularly occupied spaces in the project. For each area, include an area description, area location(s), work plane description, work plane illuminance value, wall surface illuminance value, and a calculation for work plane illuminance to ceiling surface illuminance (in the format of 1: X).
      2. Calculation for the average ratio.
      3. Demonstration that the project also meets strategy E, strategy F, or has area-weighted surface reflectance of 85% for ceilings.
      4. Description of methods used to determine illuminance values.
    Additional questions:
    1. Do the criteria associated with quality interior lighting align with your project’s and occupants comfort and productivity needs?
    2. How difficult was it to document this credit? Is there anything that could be changed to make it easier to document?
    Changes
    • Changes made for 2nd Public Comment (08/01/2011):

      Added energy efficiency requirement

      Broke out bullet points into hardware and design categories

      Clarified equations


    • Changes made for 3rd Public Comment (03/01/2012):

      Copyedited language

      Added EB: O+M path to the Pilot Library

    • Changes made for 5th Public Comment (01/15/2013):

      Updated with LEED v4 5th Public Comment changes
    • Changes made (04/15/2013):

      Submittals updated to align with v4 language revisions

Organizations

LEED Pilot Credit Library

The homepage for the LEED Pilot Credit Library. The LEED Pilot Credit Library is intended to facilitate the introduction of new prerequisites and credits to LEED. This process will allow USGBC to test and refine credits through LEED 2009 project evaluations before they are sent through the balloting process for introduction into LEED.

Articles

Foundations of LEED

Background for the LEED Pilot Credit Library is provided in this foundational document.

24 Comments

0
0
Laurel Swan
Feb 15 2017
Guest

Pilot Credit Closed

Project Location: United States

This Pilot Credit is now listed as closed to new registrations and I do not see it in the Innovation Catalog. Does that mean that this is no longer an option for an Innovation in Design credit?

1
1
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Feb 16 2017 LEEDuser Member 4648 Thumbs Up

Yes, but...
Much of this credit has been incorporated into the LEED v4 credit. You may be able to pursue this as an innovation credit from another rating system depending on the rating system you are working in. If your v3 rating system allows this as a credit substitution then this approach will NOT work, but if it is not possible to pursue under your rating system then it will work.

Post a Reply
0
0
Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Jan 31 2014
LEEDuser Member
4519 Thumbs Up

understanding pilot credit

What exactly is meant by "Use direct-only overhead lighting for 25% or less of the total connected lighting load for all regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space.". We have difficulty understanding what is required here

1
6
0
Larissa Oaks Specialist, LEED , USGBC Jan 31 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1526 Thumbs Up

Hi Emmanuel,
Strategy D encourages the project to balance direct lighting with indirect, indirect-direct, and other types of lighting. This helps minimize glare, reduces the perceived brightness of the direct luminaires, and reduces contrast between ceiling and luminaire.

To meet this requirement, you must determine the total connected lighting load associated with all regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. and determine what percentage of that load is from direct-only overhead lighting. If this is 25% or less of the total connected lighting load then the requirements are met.

2
6
0
Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Feb 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 3590 Thumbs Up

Hi Larissa,

Do we have to add task lights to the total connected lighting load? Do we follow the rule of hard-wired/ plug-in rule where hard wired task lights are added to the total connected lighting load, plug-in task lights are not added to the total connected lighting load?

Thanks in advance,

Update - Step by step guidance on LEED BDC says that plug-in lights are included.

3
6
0
Geert Kroon Nov 01 2016 Guest 3 Thumbs Up

Dear Larissa,
Can you be more specific about what exactly are direct-only lighting fixtures? Do for example luminescent fixtures with reflectors count as direct only? Or is this indirect light because of the (aluminium, transluscent or opaque) reflextors?

4
6
0
Jonathan Weiss Nov 02 2016 LEEDuser Member 2639 Thumbs Up

Lighting manufacturers classify fixtures as direct, direct-indirect, or indirect, based on what percentage of the light is emitted from which side of the fixture - the top or the bottom (or all sides). Downlights with a diffuser are still considered direct. Pendant fixtures can have a portion of their light output directed up to reflect off the ceiling. Autodesk has a simple diagram at http://sustainabilityworkshop.autodesk.com/buildings/light-fixtures-and-...
to illustrate this. It's an interesting requirement because the more direct lighting fixtures you use, the higher percentage of the lumens are in the space, so it is more energy efficient. I believe this requirement is an attempt to recognize that sometimes the most energy efficient solution is not the highest lighting quality solution - having a high percentage of direct downlight, if not done carefully, can lead to glare.

5
6
0
Geert Kroon Nov 02 2016 Guest 3 Thumbs Up

Hi Jonathan,
Thanx for the quick and clear reply!

6
6
0
Todd Baack Electrical Engineer, West Plains Engineering May 04 2017 Guest

Would a recessed LED Troffer with the LED lamping directed up into the reflector of the fixture or a recessed edge-lit fixture both be consider direct-only lighting?

Post a Reply
0
0
William Kelly
Nov 08 2013
Guest
136 Thumbs Up

Surfaces

We are appling for PC22 Lighting Quality. Regarding the requirements of Strategy E and Strategy F, what are the surfaces that are to be documented? We are looking at using the work surface to wall illumination requirement and I am not sure what or how to document what these strategies are directing. thank you for your assistance and direction.

1
1
0
Larissa Oaks Specialist, LEED , USGBC Nov 20 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1526 Thumbs Up

Hi William,
For strategy E, the surfaces that must be documented are all ceilings, floors and wall surfaces for the regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. in the project.
For strategy F, consider the furniture and wall partitions within the project scope of work. All furniture used as a work surface and all wall partitions must be considered.

Post a Reply
0
0
Jennifer Preston BKSK Architects
Jul 09 2013
LEEDuser Member
1191 Thumbs Up

Reflectance values

If all of our surfaces meet the minimum thresholds for reflectance - as documented by manufacturer-provided cut sheets - do we need to include calculations for a weighted average of surface reflectances? OR how have others documented requirements 5 & 6?

1
1
0
Larissa Oaks Specialist, LEED , USGBC Jul 10 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1526 Thumbs Up

Hi,
If all of the surfaces meet the minimum reflectance requirements, there is no need to provide weighted average calculations.

Post a Reply
0
0
Fatima Plaza
Jan 21 2013
Guest
62 Thumbs Up

Surface brightness requirement

We are applying for this pilot credit in a building which facade consist of a double skin facade, the exterior layer is opaque with windows (existing facade of the building before project renovation) and the interior layer is completely glazed. Should the average wall brightness be calculated considering only the opaque walls (and therefore the glazed facade would not be included in the calculation)?.
The brightness of the interior glazed surface is 6%, so in case they were incuded in the calculations it would not be possible to fullfill this requirement even with all the opaque surfaces meeting the criteria.

1
1
0
Larissa Oaks Specialist, LEED , USGBC Nov 20 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1526 Thumbs Up

Hi Fatima,
Yes, the average wall brightness should be calculated considering only the opaque walls. Glazing is excluded.

Post a Reply
0
0
Melissa Wackerle Sustainability Manager The Beck Group
Aug 08 2012
Guest
242 Thumbs Up

Surface Reflectance Calculation Template

I'm considering this credit for a project and am curious if anyone has developed a spreadsheet with surface reflectance calculations required in the design portion of credit requirements. I was hoping there would be a LEED Online form developed, but unfortunately that's not included in the process.

1
1
0
Larissa Oaks Specialist, LEED , USGBC Sep 08 2012 LEEDuser Expert 1526 Thumbs Up

Hi Melissa,
USGBC is currently working on resources for the LEED v4 credit. The resources are not final, but the draft may be useful for your project. Please send me an email at loaks@usgbc.org if you are interested in more information.

Post a Reply
0
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory Colliers International
Apr 13 2012
LEEDuser Member
4648 Thumbs Up

Relationship of Credit Requirements to Submittals

I'm struggling with this credit as I don't see the link between the credit requirements and the submittals. As we have to incorporate 4 of 8 features this is pretty critical.

We're installing Philips PowerBalance LED fixtures in the ceiling which I believe covers us for all of the hardware features and also the ceiling/workspace luminance ratio (as there is no indirect lighting.) We could also design for the wall/ceiling/floor brightness percentages.

Can anyone help with the documentation I would need to provide to document these?

1
2
0
Larissa Oaks Specialist, LEED , USGBC Sep 13 2012 LEEDuser Expert 1526 Thumbs Up

Hi Michael,
Good question. There is definitely a disconnect between the current credit requirements and the submittals listed here. We will update the submittals as soon as possible to fix this issue. Also, as I mentioned to Melissa, feel free to email me if you are interested in using the draft resources we are working on for the LEED v4 credit.

2
2
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Sep 14 2012 LEEDuser Member 4648 Thumbs Up

Larissa -

I would really like to see the draft resources. We're using the Powerbalance fixtures on a string of projects and I'd like to get as much experience with this credit as possible.

Post a Reply
0
0
Jonathan Weiss
Sep 16 2011
LEEDuser Member
2639 Thumbs Up

Pilot Credit Content?

The content listed here on this page differs from the current content on the USGBC website - they have a similar but different set of requirements listed. Which one is currect? See http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=8197

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 13 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Jonathan, sorry for the confusion. The USGBC content is more up to date. We had a mix-up in posting the information here that we will fix within the next couple days.

Post a Reply
0
0
Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP Integrated Architecture
Dec 01 2010
LEEDuser Expert
24453 Thumbs Up

questions

2) Is there a percentage of workstations that a task light is required for? What if I can meet recommended light levels without task lights?

3) This seems a little confusing as worded. Also, a fixture efficiency of 50% is quite low. This is the range of most can lights. How about greater than 80% for 95% of the fixtures? How does this relate to LED fixtures which are tested for total lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. output?

4) Is a source the lamp/ballast output or the total fixture output?

5) Every surface or something like 95% again?

6) Not sure how to verify this one.

8) Is this average to average ratio or max ceiling to min work surface ratio?

I see 1, 3, 4, 10 as relativly easy to comply with and document.

1
1
0
Lisa Carter Jan 24 2015 Guest 14 Thumbs Up

How can I be sure that I won't be spammed after the registration? Can someone guarantee that? Because it was something similar at the free xbox live codes website.

Post a Reply

Start a new comment thread

Jul 27 2017
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2017 – BuildingGreen, Inc.