Pilot-Credits PC42: Integrated Process

  • Making integrative design measurable

    This pilot credit is currently closed to new registrations.

    The purpose of the new Integrated DesignAn integrated design process (also called "integrative" design by some proponents) relies on a multidisciplinary and collaborative team approach in which members make decisions together based on a shared vision and holistic understanding of the project. Rather than a conventional linear design process in which a design is passed from one professional to another, an integrated process has all key team members talking together through out the design and construction process as they share ideas and use feedback across disciplines to iteratively move toward a high-performing design. credit is to reward project teams for using collaborative method for designing buildings, and taking a holistic approach to solving the challenges and utilizing the opportunities associated with their site. The credits are structured in a way that allows teams to walk through an iterative process where they use a variety of considerations to select their site, learn about their site opportunities and challenges, and design based on this analysis.

    This Pilot Credit 42 supersedes the previous Pilot Credits 5 and 6 which were retired for new registration as of 1/11/11.

    Credit Submittals

    General

    1. Register for Pilot Credit(s) here.
    2. Register a username at LEEDuser.com, and participate in online forum
    3. Submit feedback survey; supply PDF of your survey/confirmation of completion with credit documentation

    Credit Specific

    Submit all documents listed in the submittal requirements box (white boxes) for the option you pursue.

    Additional Questions

    • Which credit option(s) did you pursue for this credit?
    • For the option(s) you pursued, do you have any recommendations on how to make the requirements or submittal requirements clearer or more effective?
    • If you attempted the schematic design pathway, are there other ways you used the energy modeling during schematic design?  If so, what were they, and would you suggest they be alternative paths for that component of the credit?
    • How were the requirements of this credit different from the process/planning you’ve completed on previous projects?
    • Are there other professionals/project team members not listed in the credit who you feel are essential to the integrated planning process?
  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    Pilot Credit 42: Integrated Process

    Intent

    Develop an early understanding of the relationships between technical systems, natural systems and occupants within a building project, its site, its context, and its intended use.  Engage all key project team members for the purpose of making cost- and environmentally-effective integrated decisions throughout the design and construction process.

    Requirements

    BD+C – Building Design and Construction Requirements:  

    NC, CS, Schools, Retail NC, Data Centers, Warehouse & Distribution Centers, Hospitality


     

    Demonstrate that key systems interactions are explored and analyzed in a way that informs basic building massing, envelope, and site-related design and operations decisions before establishing building form.  Demonstrate that the project team uses results of these analyses and continues to identify and consider interactions and synergies among systems and strategies throughout the design and construction process by implementing at least one of the following four options:

    Option 1:

    Discovery:  Iterative Analysis during Conceptual Design:

    Prior to the schematic design phase, perform at least two systems’ analyses that demonstrate systems synergies, and document how these analyses shaped and/or informed the project design:

     

    • Energy Modeling (required) – Perform simple box energy modeling that takes into account at least three options for orientation, window-to-wall-ratios, glazing exposures, and wall/roof insulation values in order to in-form massing decisions before schematic design begins.  The analysis should demonstrate a systemic comparison to a comparable baseline case of modeling runs that use combinations of the three parameters for each of the building elements and aspects identified above. Demonstrate how this iterative analysis helped determine building massing, form, apertures, envelope performance, site layout, landscape features, etc.

    AND

    • Perform at least one additional analysis from the list below: 
      • Habitat Health and Water Quality – Perform a preliminary analysis of water quality and habitat (plant and animal) interactions that identifies opportunities for mutually beneficial water and nutrient exchange.  The analysis should identify potential synergies between roads, hardscapeThe inanimate elements of the building landscaping. It includes pavement, roadways, stonewalls, wood and synthetic decking, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios., stormwater management, waste treatment, landscape design, plant species selection, human activities, building form and location, etc. 
      • Water Balancing/ Budgeting – Perform a preliminary analysis that quantifies all water input and output to and from the building and site.  The analysis should identify potential strategies for water use that maintain quantities of water use no greater than the site’s annual rainfall budget by capturing, treating, recharging, and maintaining all water flow from the building and site on the site, with the goal of minimizing ground-sourced and off-site sourced water.
      • Materials Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) – Perform a preliminary LCA analysis of core and shell (structure and envelope) options that compare life cycle impacts of at least two optional structural systems and two optional envelope assemblies. The analysis should demonstrate a systemic comparison of quantified life cycle impacts of alternate structure and envelope system combinations that can be used to inform design decisions. 
      • Daylight Modeling – Perform a preliminary daylighting analysis including shading studies, quantitative analysis (possible metrics may include daylight factorThe ratio of exterior illumination to interior illumination, expressed as a percentage. The variables used to determine the daylight factor include the floor area, window area, window geometry, visible transmittance (Tvis), and window height., illuminance levels, luminance factors, etc.), qualitative analysis, and observational recommendations. The analysis should demonstrate a systemic comparison of optional elements and features that optimize effective daylighting strategies for primary space types. 

    Option 1 Submittal Requirements:

    • Energy Modeling – Provide summary output results from simple box energy simulations for at least three different parametric modeled op-tions relative to a baseline case that include combinations of various alternatives for the following parameters: orientation, window-to-wall-ratios, glazing exposures, and wall/roof insulation values. Include a one-page narrative description of how this analysis informed the project design, such as building massing, form, apertures, envelope performance, site layout, landscaping, etc.

    AND

    • Provide the results of at least one additional analysis from the list below, along with a one-page narrative describing how the analysis of this addi-tional system shaped and/or informed the project design - what was learned, what new ideas, interrelationships, and synergies were discovered between elements of the project and the disciplines engaged in the project? 
      • Habitat Health and Water Quality – include summary report describing interrelationships analysis
      • Water Balancing/ Budgeting – include water balancing analysis quantifying all supply and demand quantities
      • Materials Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) – include LCA report for at least two options for at least two different materials assemblies
      • Daylight Modeling – include daylight simulations for at least two major spaces indicating comparisons of optional daylighting strategies and/or features and including results for shading, quantitative factors, qualitative analysis, and resultant recommendations.

    Option 2: 

    Concept Design Integrated Workshop: 

    Prior to the schematic design phase, conduct at least one full-day (or two half-day) integrated designAn integrated design process (also called "integrative" design by some proponents) relies on a multidisciplinary and collaborative team approach in which members make decisions together based on a shared vision and holistic understanding of the project. Rather than a conventional linear design process in which a design is passed from one professional to another, an integrated process has all key team members talking together through out the design and construction process as they share ideas and use feedback across disciplines to iteratively move toward a high-performing design. workshop(s) with the project team for the purpose of integrating green strategies across all aspects of the building and site design, drawing on the expertise of all key participants. The purpose of this workshop is to identify syner-gies between building elements/systems and align project team members around integrated design strategies. Expertise of attendees at the workshop must include at least four of the following skill sets, along with at least one key Owner’s repre-sentative:

    • Architecture 
    • Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing (MEP) engineering
    • Energy analysis
    • Green building or sustainable design
    • Civil engineering, landscape architecture, habitat restoration, or land-use planning
    • Building operations and maintenance
    • Building construction

    Tasks and activities during this workshop should include:

    • Introduce participants to the fundamentals of integrated design and sys-tems thinking.
    • Align project team around project purpose and goals.
    • Establish initial metrics, benchmarks, and performance targets for the LEED credits being pursued.
    • Generate potential strategies for achieving identified LEED performance targets.
    • Develop a Process Road Map that identifies initial responsibilities, deliver-ables, and dates for managing the project scope by defining: what, when, and by whom outputs need to be produced.
    • Initiate documentation of the Owner’s Project Requirements (OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project.) for CommissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements..

    Outcomes should include a demonstration of how initial project design decisions were informed by preliminary analyses. An Initial Commissioning Owner’s Project Requirements (OPROwner's project requirements: a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project.) narrative can be utilized to demonstrate the development of the project’s performance targets and potential solutions as the design progresses.

    Option 2 Submittal Requirements – Provide the following:

    • Workshop agenda, including date and location
    • Workshop attendee list, including role/discipline for each attendee
    • Summary report of workshop activities and results, including a clear statement of the project’s purpose and goals around which the team has aligned
    • An integration process schedule (“roadmap”) that identifies initial responsibilities, deliverables, and dates for managing the project scope by defining: what, when, and by whom outputs need to be produced through Schematic Design.
    • Initial OPR document, including highlighted input from the work-shop

    Option 3:

    Design Phase Integrated Workshop(s): 

    In addition to the Conceptual Design Integrated Workshop above, conduct at least one full-day (or two half-day) integrated design workshop(s) with the project team no later than the end of the schematic design phase, for the purpose of identifying increasing opportunities for synergies between green strategies and systems across all aspects of the building and site design, drawing on the expertise of all participants. Expertise of attendees at the workshop must include at least four of the following skill sets, along with at least one key Owner’s representative:

    • Architecture 
    • Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing (MEP) engineering
    • Energy analysis
    • Green building or sustainable design
    • Civil engineering, landscape architecture, habitat restoration, or land-use planning
    • Building operations and maintenance
    • Building construction

    Tasks and activities during this workshop should include:

    • Present conceptual design analyses and subsequent research findings 
    • Identify and assess opportunities for synergies between all key systems based upon the above research and analysis.
    • Identify additional analysis tasks that are needed to improve and refine systems performance and synergies.
    • Confirm metrics, benchmarks, and performance targets for the LEED credits being pursued.
    • Review and adjust the Process Road Map that identifies responsibilities, deliverables, and dates for managing the next stages of the project design by defining: what, when, and by whom outputs need to be produced. 
    • Review and adjust the Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) for Commissioning.

    Outcomes should include:

    • Integrated Cost Estimating (showing how total building cost was informed by bundling interrelated systems costs).
    • Demonstration of how the project design improvements were based on preliminary analyses.
    • Updated Commissioning Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) narrative that continues to document the development of the project’s performance targets and potential solutions as the design progresses.

    Option 3 Submittal Requirements – Provide the following:

    • Workshop agenda, including date and location
    • Workshop attendee list, including role/discipline for each attendee
    • Summary report of workshop activities and results
    • A one or two page narrative from a representative of each the four required disciplines identifying how the systems under their design control will function and are integrated with other systems in the project, in layman’s language, in order to clearly communicate the performance and integration of their system with other disciplines.  Include a description of how costs were affected by bundling interrelated systems costs. 
    • Updated version of the project’s OPR document, including high-lighted input from the Workshop 

    Option 4:

    Construction & Operations: Trades and Building Operations Team Training:
    During the initial stage of the Construction Administration phase, but prior to work commencing by construction trades on site, conduct training with critical trades related to the LEED credits being pursued.  This training should focus on the green and LEED aspects of the project, including all relevant LEED-related specifications, credit and prerequisite requirements, contractors’ roles, and documentation neces-sary to ensure achievement of targeted LEED credits. 
    Include at least the following trades:
    • Plumbing Systems
    • Mechanical Systems
    • Electrical and Lighting Systems
    • Building Controls Systems
    • Building Envelope
    • Landscape and Civil infrastructure
    • Building Operations & Maintenance Staff
    Option 4 Submittal Requirements – Provide the following:
    • Training agenda, including date and location
    • Training attendee list, including role/trade for each attendee
    • Summary report of training activities, including a clear statement of documentation responsibilities for each targeted LEED construction credit; include minutes of the LEED-related issues covered, questions raised, and answers given. 

     

    ID+C – Interior Design and Construction Requirements:

    CI, Retail, Hospitality

     


    Demonstrate that key building and site conditions and systems interactions are ex-plored and analyzed in a way that informs and ensures alignment with interior de-sign, construction and operations decisions that improve the human condition in interior spaces by implementing the following:

    Discovery:  Iterative Analysis during Conceptual Design (x point)

    OPTION 1: Pre-site selection – Analyze and compare potential project sites (x point)

    (Available to projects that initiate this process prior to site selection)

    Initiate integrated decision-making with interiors expertise and skill sets prior to site selection to test the suitability of potential tenant spaces to ensure that they have in place the characteristics for improving human condition. This analysis must identify and document interactions between 5 key building characteristics and performance benefits relative to occupant performance that facilitate healthier and more produc-tive lives such as ergonomics, privacy, acoustics, toxicology, connectivity to site, indoor air quality, thermal comfort, and lighting satisfaction, and must include:

    • Location Assessment – Complete an assessment of the tenant occupants transportation needs for commuting and business travel. Prepare a comprehensive transportation management plan in alignment with needs that can be used to measure the reduction of transportation impacts. Establish criteria for convenient access to transportation alternatives and local amenities that can be used to de-termine preferred tenant locations. 
    • Building Features – Prioritize preferred building and site characteristics that align with LEED-CI SSc1 criteria to be used in the evaluation of proposed real estate alternatives

    OPTION 2: Post site selection – Conduct analyses to optimize project site (x points)

    Prior to the schematic design phase, perform an energy analysis and at least two systems’ analyses that demonstrate systems synergies, and document how these analyses shaped and/or informed the project design relative to occupant perform-ance spaces that facilitate healthier and more productive lives such as ergonomics, privacy, acoustics, toxicology, desirable, connectivity to site, indoor air quality, thermal comfort, and lighting satisfaction,

    • Energy Evaluation (required) Perform an Initial Energy Evaluation to assess the potential for synergies among daylighting, lighting and con-trols, HVAC systems, and equipment and appliance specifications.
    • Perform at least two additional analysis from the list below: 
      • Indoor Environmental Quality – Complete an assessment of the tenant occupants operational profile and determine alignment of the project’s design with appropriate features such as Daylight and Views, indoor Air Quality, Acoustics, Ergonomics, Health and Wellness amenities, etc.
      • Water Balancing/ Budgeting – Perform a preliminary analysis that quantifies all water input and output as ap-propriate to the scope of the tenant building and space. Analyze the potential to work with building owners to opti-mize interior fixture efficiencies and explore the possibili-ties for collected water reuse for non-potable purposes.
      • Materials Assessment – Perform a preliminary materials analysis of: 
        1. The reuse of materials and products and the re-duction and diversion of construction and occu-pant waste to renewable cycles AND 
        2. Products and materials that have multi-attribute Life Cycle based assessment and rating method-ologies that can be used to inform design deci-sions.
      • Daylight Modeling and Views – Perform a preliminary day-lighting analysis including shading studies, quantitative analysis (possible metrics may include daylight factorThe ratio of exterior illumination to interior illumination, expressed as a percentage. The variables used to determine the daylight factor include the floor area, window area, window geometry, visible transmittance (Tvis), and window height., il-luminance levels, luminance factors, etc.), qualitative analysis, and observational recommendations. The analy-sis should demonstrate a systemic comparison of optional elements and features that optimize effective daylighting strategies for occupant spaces. Assess the location of in-terior enclosures to maximize daylight penetration and views to the outdoors. . 

    Concept Design Integrated Workshop (x points): 

    Prior to the schematic design phase, conduct at least one full-day (or two half-day) integrated designAn integrated design process (also called "integrative" design by some proponents) relies on a multidisciplinary and collaborative team approach in which members make decisions together based on a shared vision and holistic understanding of the project. Rather than a conventional linear design process in which a design is passed from one professional to another, an integrated process has all key team members talking together through out the design and construction process as they share ideas and use feedback across disciplines to iteratively move toward a high-performing design. workshop(s) with the project team for the purpose of integrating green strategies across all aspects of the building and site design, drawing on the expertise of all key participants. The purpose of this workshop is to identify syner-gies between building and interior elements/systems and align project team mem-bers around integrated design strategies. Expertise of attendees at the workshop must include at least four of the following skill sets, along with at least one key Owner/ Client representative:

    • Interior design
    • Architecture 
    • Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing (MEP) engineer-ing
    • Acoustical engineering
    • Energy analysis
    • Green building or sustainable design
    • Operations and Maintenance
    • Construction
    • Occupants
    • Real Estate Leasing agent/broker

    Tasks and activities during this workshop should include:

    • Introduce participants to the fundamentals of integrated design and sys-tems thinking.
    • Align project team around project purpose and goals.
    • Establish initial metrics, benchmarks, and performance targets for the LEED credits being pursued.
    • Generate potential strategies for achieving identified LEED performance targets.
    • Develop a Process Road Map that identifies initial responsibilities, deliver-ables, and dates for managing the project scope by defining: what, when, and by whom outputs need to be produced.
    • Initiate documentation of the Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) for CommissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements..

    Outcomes should include:

    Demonstration of how initial project design decisions were informed by preliminary analyses.

    Initial Commissioning Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) narrative that can be utilized to demonstrate the development of the project’s performance targets and potential solutions as the design progresses.

    Design Phase Integrated Workshop(s) (x points): 

    In addition to the Conceptual Design Integrated Workshop above, conduct at least one full-day (or two half-day) integrated design workshop(s) with the project team no later than the end of the schematic design phase, for the purpose of identifying increasing opportunities for synergies between green strategies and systems across all aspects of the building interiors, drawing on the expertise of all partici-pants. Expertise of attendees at the workshop must include at least four of the fol-lowing skill sets, along with at least one key Owner/Client representative:

    (same changes to this list)

    • Interior design
    • Architecture 
    • Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing (MEP) engineering
    • Acoustical engineering
    • Energy analysis
    • Green building or sustainable design
    • Operations and Maintenance
    • Construction
    • Occupants
    • Real Estate Leasing agent

    Tasks and activities during this workshop should include:

    • Present conceptual design analyses and subsequent research findings 
    • Identify and assess opportunities for synergies between all key systems based upon the above research and analysis.
    • Identify additional analysis tasks that are needed to improve and refine systems performance and synergies.
    • Confirm metrics, benchmarks, and performance targets for the LEED cred-its being pursued.
    • Review and adjust the Process Road Map that identifies responsibilities, deliverables, and dates for managing the next stages of the project design by defining: what, when, and by whom outputs need to be produced. 
    • Review and adjust the Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) for Commis-sioning.

    Outcomes should include:

    • Integrated Project Cost Estimating (showing how total project cost was in-formed by bundling interrelated systems costs).
    • Demonstration of how the project design improvements were based on preliminary analyses.
    • Updated Commissioning Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) narrative that continues to document the development of the project’s performance targets and potential solutions as the design progresses.

    Construction & Operations: Trades and Building Operations Team Training (x points):

    During the initial stage of the Construction Administration phase, but prior to work commencing by construction trades on site, conduct training with critical trades re-lated to the LEED credits being pursued.  This training should focus on the green and LEED aspects of the project, including all relevant LEED-related specifications, credit and prerequisite requirements, contractors’ roles, and documentation neces-sary to ensure achievement of targeted LEED credits. Include at least the following trades:

    • Plumbing Systems
    • Mechanical Systems
    • Electrical and Lighting Systems
    • Building Controls Systems
    • Building Envelope
    • Landscape and Civil infrastructure (if appropriate)
    • Building Operations & Maintenance
    • Commissioning 
    • Construction Superintendent and Project Manager

     

    EBOM – Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance Requirements:  

    EBOM for Schools, Retail, Data Centers, Hospitality

     


     

    Demonstrate that key systems interactions are explored and analyzed in a way that informs basic building renovation/reconfiguration, envelope modifications, site-related modifications, technical systems operations, and maintenance decisions while determining EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. credits to pursue, by implementing the following:  

    Option 1:

    Water Synergies: 

    Develop an implementation plan (roadmap) that schedules tasks and activities to identify and analyze cost and performance synergies between systems relative to water use and water quality. This analysis must identify interactions between no less than 5 credits across no less than three credit categories (SS, WE, EA, MR, IEQ). Document projected cost and performance benefits for at least 8 years of future operations relative to the benchmarks established for each of the germane credits.

    AND

    Implement the above Water Synergies Plan over the performance period (no less than 2 years) and document resultant quantified cost and performance benefits by utilizing ongoing performance data and integrated cost bundling to analyze the effectiveness of the plan.

    Option 1 Submittal Requirements:

    • Provide a Water Synergies Implementation Plan: a roadmap that schedules tasks and activities to identify and analyze cost and performance synergies between no less than 5 credits across no less than three credit categories (SS, WE, EA, MR, IEQ). 
    • Document projected cost and performance benefits for at least 8 years of future operations relative to the benchmarks established for each of the germane credits.
    • Provide an analysis matrix containing data from the performance period, including the dates of performance tracking, quantified cost and performance benefits, and any other relevant data. 

    Option 2:

    Energy Synergies: 

    Develop an implementation plan (roadmap) that schedules tasks and activities to identify and analyze cost and performance synergies between systems relative to energy use. This analysis must identify interactions between no less than 5 credits across no less than three credit categories (SS, WE, EA, MR, IEQ). Document projected cost and performance benefits for at least 8 years of future operations rela-tive to the benchmarks established for each of the germane credits.

    AND

    Implement the above Energy Synergies Plan over the performance period (no less than 2 years) and document resultant quantified cost and performance benefits by utilizing ongoing performance data and integrated cost bundling to analyze the effectiveness of the plan.

    Option 2 Submittal Requirements:

    • Provide an Energy Synergies Implementation Plan: a roadmap that schedules tasks and activities to identify and analyze cost and performance synergies between no less than 5 credits across no less than three credit categories (SS, WE, EA, MR, IEQ). 
    • Document projected cost and performance benefits for at least 8 years of future operations relative to the benchmarks established for each of the germane credits.
    • Provide an analysis matrix containing data from the performance period, including the dates of performance tracking, quantified cost and performance benefits, and any other relevant data. 

     

Articles

Foundations of LEED

Background for the LEED Pilot Credit Library is provided in this foundational document.

Organizations

LEED Pilot Credit Library

The homepage for the LEED Pilot Credit Library. The LEED Pilot Credit Library is intended to facilitate the introduction of new prerequisites and credits to LEED. This process will allow USGBC to test and refine credits through LEED 2009 project evaluations before they are sent through the balloting process for introduction into LEED.

8 Comments

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C. Anthony Menefee
Jun 10 2011
Guest
145 Thumbs Up

PIlot Credit 42

Can you choose to submit for Option 3 (Design Integrated Workshop), but not Option 2 (Concept Design Integrated Workshop)? Is Option 2 a prerequisite for Option 3 similar to the previous Pilot Credits 5 & 6?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 30 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Anthony, based on the credit language, I don't think so. Note the "in addition to..." language at the beginning of Option 3.

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Jennifer Berthelot-Jelovic Director of Sustainability, Shangri-La Construction Feb 07 2012 Guest 728 Thumbs Up

When I went to the USGBC link to register for Pilot Credit 42, it was not an option. Nor were Pilots 5 & 6. Do you know why Pilot 42 is not in the list to register?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 08 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Jennifer, I believe it is closed for registration. USGBC closes pilot credit registrations when they have gotten the feedback and  testing that they were looking for.

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Norma Lehman Director of Sustainability, The Beck Group Feb 20 2012 LEEDuser Member 1849 Thumbs Up

Is it possible to submit IDp1 Integrated Project Planing & Design (LEED for Healthcare) as an ID credit for LEED CIv2009? It is my understanding that you can use other LEED system prerequisites and credits for ID credits. So even though the Pilot credits are closed, is it viable to use LEED for Healthcare prerequisite instead?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 21 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Norma, this sounds like a good approach, but it would be nice to get some official confirmation before you invest a lot of time in it. I don't think there is any official rule allowing this ID approach, even though it is commonly used.

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Jay DeVilbiss Mechanical Engineer, PAE Consulting Engineers Jun 11 2013 Guest 68 Thumbs Up

Hello Norma and Tristan,

Do either of you have any new or updated info regarding the use of IDp1 Integrated Project Planning & Design (LEED for Healthcare) as an ID credit for LEED CS, NC, or CI? Norma, were you successful in your pursuit of this? Thank you for any more info you can provide.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Jay, I don't have any new information. I still think it is a good idea. there is also now the Integrative Process credit in LEED v4 that would be a great innocation candidate.

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