Pilot-Credits PC75: Clean Construction

  • A low-emitting construction site

    The first LEED pilot credit to be written not by USGBC but by LEED project teams, Clean Construction provides a framework for projects to develop and implement a plan to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions from nonroad and on-road diesel fueled vehicles, construction equipment, and temporary power generation used during construction projects. Read the credit language for more on how to document the credit.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    SS Pilot Credit 75: Clean construction

    Intent

    This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

    To minimize the health and climate impacts to local communities from diesel engine emissions associated with construction activities.

    Requirements

    Develop and implement a plan to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions from nonroad and on-road diesel fueled vehicles, construction equipment, and temporary power generation used during construction projects.

    The plan should include:

    1. Nonroad Diesel Engines

      For engines used on the jobsite that are 25 horsepower (HP) and greater, meet at least the equivalent of USEPA Tier 2 PM emission standards and the USEPA Tier 4 PM emission standard (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) as listed in the table below for the specified HP rating and during the specified calendar year. The equipment must meet the requirements listed for the current year the equipment is in use on the job site.


       

      Percent of Engines that Must Comply with Tier 4 PM Standard
      Year 25-74hp 75-174hp 175hp and above
      2012-2013 0% 25% 50%
      2014 25% 50% 95%
      2015 50% 95% 95%
      2016-2022 95% 95% 95%





      Compliance may be met with engines certified to meet the applicable USEPA Tier level, and/or equipment that has been retrofitted with technology verified to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the applicable USEPA Tier level. To the extent that retrofits are used to meet this requirement, the diesel retrofit technology used must be listed on the verified technology list for either the USEPA or the California Air Resources Board (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) current as of the time the equipment is first placed on the jobsite and must be installed and operated as designated by that verified list.

      Include measures for proper maintenance of the equipment to ensure continued future compliance with the emission standards.


    2. On-road Diesel Engines

      95% of all diesel engine contractor/ subcontractor vehicles used for the construction project must be:

      1. Vehicles that comply with USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards, or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.
      2. OR

      3. Vehicles with older engines that have been retrofitted with technology verified to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards for particulate matter. To the extent that retrofits are used to meet this requirement, the diesel retrofit technology used must be listed on the verified technology list for either the USEPA or the California Air Resources Board (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) current as of the time the vehicle is first placed on the jobsite and must be installed and operated as designated by that verified list.

      Include measures for proper maintenance of the vehicles to ensure continued future compliance with the emission standards.

    3. Idling Limitations

      Develop a policy to limit unnecessary vehicle and equipment engine idling to no more than 5 minutes, or in compliance with applicable local, state and national laws, whichever is more stringent. Include signage and operator communications/education.

    4. Prevention of Indoor Air Pollution

      Locate equipment, vehicles, and loading/unloading staging areas away from air intakes or operable openings of adjacent buildings.

    5. Equipment Information

      Include the following information for each piece of equipment, annually:

      1. Vehicle type
      2. Engine make
      3. Engine model number
      4. Serial number of engine
      5. Engine family name and model year
      6. Horse power and/or Kilowatts (for nonroad only)
      7. Current Tier level (for nonroad only)
      8. Serial number and VIN of vehicle
      9. Make and model number of USEPA/CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it. verified emission control technology, if applicable (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.)
      10. Type of fuel used
      11. Number of use hours (if available)

    General Pilot Documentation Requirements

    Register for the pilot credit

    Credits 1-14

    Credits 15-27

    Credits 28-42

    Credits 43-56

    Credits 57-67

    Credits 68-82

    Credits 83-103

    Credit specific:
    • Copy of the particulate matter emissions reduction plan
    • Projects outside the U.S.: describe the equivalent standards used

    Nonroad Diesel Engines

    • Horsepower rating, Tier 2 level, Tier 4 level for all equipment
    • Retrofitted equipment: describe the technology and methodologies used to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the applicable USEPA Tier level
    • Describe equipment maintenance measures that will be used, and how they will ensure continued compliance with the emission standards

    On-Road Diesel Engines

    • Estimated number of on-road diesel engine contractor vehicles
    • Specifications for 95% of those vehicles that indicate compliance with USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards, or local equivalent
    • Retrofitted equipment: describe the technology and methodologies used to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards
    • Describe equipment maintenance measures that will be used, and how they will ensure continued compliance with the emission standards

    Idling Limitations

    • Provide the policy that describes idling time limits; applicable local, state, and national laws; idling signage; and operator education plans

    Prevention of Indoor Air Pollution

    • Information (plan or description) on the location of staging areas, air intakes, and operable openings of buildings
    • Information on how the location of the equipment staging areas prevents indoor air pollution

    Equipment Information

    • Product manuals or specifications for the equipment that depict the characteristics listed in the requirements. Projects should maintain an annual inventory of equipment information.
    Additional questions:
    1. The goal of this credit is to minimize particulate matter emissions and impacts from construction equipment. Do you believe that these requirements achieve this intent? Why or why not?
    2. Were there barriers to implementing the strategies used in this credit?
    3. Did you encounter difficulties in gathering the information for the idling plan implementation? If so, in what ways?
    4. For item 2 of the plan, is it feasible to require that on-road trips be tracked rather than on-road vehicles? Would this be difficult to track?
    5. How many pieces of equipment were used for this project? How many were owned by the contractor? How many were leased/rented?
    6. What was the entire project budget?
    7. In order to meet the pilot credit criteria, which actions below were taken above and beyond what would have been taken absent the effort to earn Clean Construction Pilot Credit for LEED?
    8. How many pieces of leased/rented equipment were used in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
    9. How many pieces of your existing equipment were retrofitted with diesel emissions reduction technology in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
    10. How many pieces of new equipment were purchased in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
    11. How many pieces of used equipment were purchased in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
    12. When were these pieces of equipment slated to be retired in the company’s business plan?

4 Comments

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Patricia Lloyd Sustainability Manager Leopardo Companies, Inc.
Jan 21 2016
LEEDuser Member
388 Thumbs Up

PC 75 Clean Construction

Project Location: United States

Has anyone achieved this pilot credit yet? And if so were you able to get all of the requirements? I was hoping to see a % of how many projects that attempted this credit achieved it. Would love some feedback.

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Robyn Dowsey Owner, Eco-Build Strategies LLC Aug 02 2016 LEEDuser Member 163 Thumbs Up

Were completing the pilot credit now and tracking about 56% - It hasn't been reviewed by GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). as of yet but we are confident that it should be accepted. Reach out to me if I can help in anyway.
407-402-5514

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Christoff Adamczyk Principal Surveyor, Thienes Engineering Inc. Sep 02 2016 Guest 3 Thumbs Up

I see that Clean construction is a pilot credit, I have been researching grading site balance as a means to reduce diesel emissions and truck traffic. Our company designs a site based on the soils engineers determinations for shrinkage and subsidence. In the middle of the grading operation when 90% of the grading is complete we topo the site to determine if the site is running long or short on fill material, we adjust the site to make up the difference. The amount of site adjustment and the proposed borrow disposal site location should equate to the trucking and emissions saved.
Can anyone comment I am new to this?

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Abena Darden Project Director Thornton Tomasetti / Sustainability
Apr 29 2014
LEEDuser Member
4642 Thumbs Up

Pest Control During Construction?

I seem to remember coming across a credit similar to the clean construction pilot credit, but geared to specific environmentally benign pest control measures practiced during construction. This would be distinct from the typically-used ID (and EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.-related) credit geared to post-occupancy IPMIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment.. Has anyone run across this before? I now can't locate it. Thanks. (PS wasn't sure where to post this question.)

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Mar 29 2017
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