Retail–CI-v2009 WEc1: Water use reduction

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  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Retail: Commercial Interiors

    WE Credit 1: Water use reduction

    Intent

    To further increase water efficiency within tenant spaces to reduce the burden on municipal water supply and wastewater systems.

    Requirements

    Employ strategies that in aggregate use less water than the water use baseline calculated for the tenant spaces (not including irrigation). The minimum water savings percentage for each point threshold is as follows:

    Building Use Reduction Process Use Reduction Points
    30% AND 30% 6
    35% AND 35% 8
    40% AND 40% 11



    Building water use

    Calculate the baseline according to the commercial baselines outlined below. Calculations are based on estimated occupant usage. Include only the following fixtures and fixture fittings (as applicable): water closets, urinals, lavatory faucets, showers, kitchen sink faucets, and pre-rinse spray valves. [Europe ACP: Water Use Baseline]

    Fixtures, Fittings, and Appliances Current Baseline (Imperial Units) Current Baseline (Metric Units)
    Commercial Toilets 1.6 gallons per flush (gpf)*

    Except blow-out fixtures: 3.5 (gpf)
    6 liters per flush (lpf)

    Except blow-out fixtures: 13.5 lpf
    Commercial Urinals 1.0 (gpf) 4.0 lpf
    Commercial Lavatory (restroom) Faucets 2.2 gallons per minute (gpm) at 60 pounds per square inch (psi),private applications only (hotel or motel guest rooms, hospital patient rooms)

    0.5 (gpm) at 60 (psi)**all others except private applications

    0.25 gallons per cycle for metering faucets

    8.5 liters per minute (lpm) at 4 bar (58 psi), private applications only (hotel or motel guest rooms, hospital patient rooms)

    2.0 lpm at 4 bar (58 psi), all others except private applications

    1 liter per cycle for metering faucets

    Shower 2.5 (gpm) at 80 (psi) per shower stall 9.5 lpm  at 5.5 bar (80 psi) per shower stall
    Kitchen Faucet 2.2 (gpm) at 60 (psi) 8.5 lpm at 4 bar (58 psi)
    Commercial Pre-rinse Spray Valves

    (for food service applications)
    Flow rate ≤ 1.6 (gpm)

    (no pressure specified; no performance requirement)
    Flow rate ≤ 6 lpm (no pressure specified; no performance requirement)
    *    EPAct 1992 standard for toilets applies to both commercial and residential models.

    **  In addition to EPAct requirements, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers standard for public lavatory faucets is 0.5 gpm at 60 psi (2.0 lpm at 4 bar (58 psi)) (ASME A112.18.1–2005).

    This maximum has been incorporated into the national Uniform Plumbing Code and the International Plumbing Code.




    AND

    Commercial process water use

    Employ strategies that in aggregate use less water than the water use baseline calculated for commercial equipment performance requirements as listed in the following table. Base the calculations on estimated occupant usage. Include only the following fixtures (as applicable): clothes washers, dishwashers, ice machines, food steamers, and combination ovens.

    Exemptions from calculations:

    • Appliances and equipment that use water for human consumption may be excluded. Examples: bread misters, produce misters, soda machines, coffee-making machines, and fixtures used to fill sinks for washing produce.
    • Equipment, appliances, fixtures, and fittings that are not covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct 1992), do not contribute toward the retail process, and are not commercially rated may be excluded. Example: a residential dishwasher in an employee break room.
    • Fixtures whose flow rates are regulated by health codes may be excluded. Example: fixtures used for filling dishwashing sinks in which water must be maintained at a certain temperature.

    Commercial Equipment Baseline (Imperial Units) Baseline (Metric Units)
    Commercial clothes washer, less than 80 lbs (36.3 kg) 9 gallons/cf/cycle 1,200 liters/m3/cycle
    Commercial dishwasher
        Under counter, high temperature 1.98 gallons/rack 7.50  liters/rack
        Under counter, low temperature 1.95 gallons/rack 7.38 liters/rack
        Door type, high temperature 1.44 gallons/rack 5.45 liters/rack
        Door type, low temperature 1.85 gallons/rack 7.00 liters/rack
        Single tank rack conveyor, high temperature 1.13 gallons/rack 4.28 liters/rack
        Single tank rack conveyor, low temperature 1.23 gallons/rack 4.66 liters/rack
        Multi- tank rack conveyor, high temperature 1.1 gallons/rack 4.16 liters/rack
        Multi- tank rack conveyor, low temperature 0.99 gallon/rack 3.75 liters/rack
        Flight type 180 gph 681.37 lph
    Commercial ice machines
        Ice machine, IMH (ice-making head) H < 450 lbs/day (<204.11 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
        Ice machine, IMH (ice-making head)  H > 450 lbs/day (>204.11 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
        Ice machine, RCU (no remote compressor) H < 1,000 lbs/day (<453.59 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
        Ice machine, RCU (no remote compressor)  H > 1,000 lbs/day (>453.59 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
        Ice machine, RCU (remote compressor)  H < 934 lbs/day (<423.66 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
        Ice machine, RCU (remote compressor)  H > 934 lbs/day (>423.66 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
        Ice machine, SCU (self-contained unit) < 35 gal/100 lbs ice < 133liters/46 kg ice
        Ice machine, water-cooled Must be on chilled loop Must be on chilled loop
        Ice machine, once-through water-cooled Banned Banned
    Food steamer
        Steam cooker, batch cooking 8 gph/pan 3085.11 lph/pan
        Steam cooker, high production or cook to order 8 gph/pan 317.97 lph/pan
    Combination oven  
        Countertop or stand mounted 40 gph 151.42 lph
        Roll-in 60 gph 227.12 lph
    Other equipment Based on industry standards Based on industry standards
    Notes: gph = gallons per hour; cf = cubic feet; lph = liters per hour; H = ice production.





    For equipment not listed in the above tables, the project team may propose performance baseline requirements, with documentation supporting the proposed benchmark.

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    Europe ACP: Water Use Baseline

    Projects in Europe may use the values defined by European Standards.


14 Comments

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Rita Haberman Brightworks
Feb 13 2017
LEEDuser Member
383 Thumbs Up

Mall Situation

If my retail space within a mall is for FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
only, but the retail customers will have access the mall's core restrooms, must these be included in WEc1 calculations? I know they are not required for the prerequisite but wondering since the retail space bathrooms are for FTE only, if we must also include restrooms the customers are using. Thank you.

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Rita Haberman Brightworks Feb 16 2017 LEEDuser Member 383 Thumbs Up

Nevermind got my question answered - retail customers and the mall core restrooms do need to be included.

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Aswin M Conserve Consultants Private Limited
Oct 17 2015
Guest
151 Thumbs Up

Can a Retail CI Project achieve Water Cr if it has no Rest rooms

Project Location: India

Can a Retail CI 2009 (restaurant) project achieve Water use reduction credit, if there is no Rest room in the (Retail CI) project scope. The (Retail CI) tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. is within a LEED certified base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). which has the rest room for all its occupants/ visitors.

How to calculate the water requirement for the Water closets/urinals when the Rest rooms are under the base builder scope and not under the (Retail CI) tenant scope.

Thank You!..

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Robin Dukelow, LEED AP BD+C Sustainability Consultant; Project Manager Henderson Engineers, Inc.; Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC
Jun 27 2014
LEEDuser Member
175 Thumbs Up

Residential grade dishwasher in breakroom

The WEp1 language reads: ". . . and are not commercially rated MAY also be excluded. Example: a residential dishwasher in an employee break room."

Does this mean they MUST be excluded or does it mean that it is optional to include or exclude a residential dishwasher from the process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. calculations?

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Webly Bowles Associate Principal, Green Building Services Jun 27 2014 Guest 81 Thumbs Up

Robin - you can exclude it from the calculation. If you want to take credit for it, you will have to make a justification for the baseline and the water use.

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Joann Lee Heitman Architects Inc.
Jun 09 2014
LEEDuser Member
769 Thumbs Up

Can you pursue LEED CI without any plumbing work?

If a tenant in our LEED NC Certified building wants to pursue LEED CI but doesn't have any plumbing work due to all bathrooms and process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. included in LEED NC, how to you comply for WEp1?

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Webly Bowles Associate Principal, Green Building Services Jun 10 2014 Guest 81 Thumbs Up

WEp1 calculations only include the fixtures in the tenant scope of work. WEc1 includes all of the fixtures the tenant will use, including those in the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings)..

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Sheela I
Apr 25 2014
Guest
1168 Thumbs Up

Employee only restrooms/ no public restrooms

In a small retail scenario if there is one unisex restroom intended for employee use only how to you deal with the transient visitors to the space in the PI form? In other words, how can you exclude the transient visitors from the WE calculations?

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Webly Bowles Associate Principal, Green Building Services Apr 28 2014 Guest 81 Thumbs Up

WEp1 only includes the fixtures that are within your scope while WEc1 includes all fixtures available to users (these are all the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). fixtures that the LL will not want to change. Yes - this is really difficult for mall situations where there are different flush and flow rates in each restroom in the mall.)
PIFs should include all occupants since they are linked to other LEED Credit Forms. Also, provide a narrative that explains the spaces that the tenant and customer has access. Within WEp1/WEc1 include an additional narrative to explain the circumstances and it may be necessary to provide an external calculator if the LEED Credit Form is linking the incorrect information from the PIFs. When in doubt, provide a narrative - it keep the reviewers happy.

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Ryan McEvoy Owner Gaia Development
Aug 07 2013
Guest
258 Thumbs Up

Calculations for combi ovens

Is there a default way to determine the cycles/day for combi ovens? How do you determine the hours/cycle and gal/hr if they are not indicated on a spec sheet?

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Richard Manning Principal, Green Building Services Aug 14 2013 LEEDuser Member 213 Thumbs Up

Ryan,
If the manufacturer data cannot be provided or if the cycles/day are not provided, it is difficult, or impossible, to achieve savings for this credit because USGBC has not provided the baseline or testing data for the 40 or 60gph. GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). understands that there is a gap in the guidance documentation on how to determine the water use for a combination oven.
There are two paths:
1. Don’t take credit for the combi oven water savings and use the baseline as the design case water use. (Not ideal, I know!)
2. Alternative Compliance Path: Make up your own baseline and design case using the same operating data. GBCI may allow a special case for developing a baseline using industry benchmarks. They will want you to prove how you developed the baseline and design case. Organizations like the Food Service Technology Center may be a resource for assisting your project. Since this path is untested, we don't know how they will rule, but it would make a good LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. if we don't see an update in the next addenda.

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&amp;C Principal, SEESolutions LLC Nov 29 2016 LEEDuser Member 1208 Thumbs Up

Combi's DO have a standard, and for V3, baseline: less than 4 gal. PER PAN; prescriptive: 1.5 gal. per pan. Standard is based on 50% steam mode. I've long advocated for meal-based audits because you have the population anyway, and can base use from participating occupants. You might find this chart handy, which is a portion chart based on pan type.
http://vollrath.com/resources/4861/REF_PortionControl_en_NP_2012-02-01.p...

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Agnes Vorbrodt Principal VvS | Architects & Consultants
Jul 08 2013
Guest
356 Thumbs Up

Can a project achieve points if no process water in scope?

Can a project achieve the 6-11 points available for only building water use within the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space., if no process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. is in the project scope? Thank you.

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Richard Manning Principal, Green Building Services Aug 14 2013 LEEDuser Member 213 Thumbs Up

Yes. If your an apparel or bank retailer, you may not have process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. so the credit can be achieved by demonstrating water savings from water closets, urinals, showers, lavs, kitchen faucets...alone.

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Mar 28 2017
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