Retail–NC-v2009 WEp1: Water use reduction

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  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Retail: New Construction and Major Renovations

    WE Prerequisite 1: Water use reduction

    Intent

    To increase water efficiency within buildings to reduce the burden on municipal water supply and wastewater systems.

    Requirements

    Employ strategies that in aggregate use 20% less water than the water use baseline calculated for the building (not including irrigation).

    BUILDING WATER USE

    Calculate the baseline according to the commercial baselines outlined below.1 Calculations are based on estimated occupant usage. Include only the following fixtures and fixture fittings (as applicable to the project scope): water closets, urinals, lavatory faucets, showers, kitchen sink faucets and pre-rinse spray valves.

    Fixtures, Fittings, and Appliances Current Baseline (Imperial Units) Current Baseline (Metric Units)
    Commercial Toilets 1.6 gallons per flush (gpf)*

    Except blow-out fixtures: 3.5 (gpf)
    6 liters per flush (lpf)

    Except blow-out fixtures: 13.5 lpf
    Commercial Urinals 1.0 (gpf) 4.0 lpf
    Commercial Lavatory (restroom) Faucets 2.2 gallons per minute (gpm) at 60 pounds per square inch (psi),private applications only (hotel or motel guest rooms, hospital patient rooms)

    0.5 (gpm) at 60 (psi)**all others except private applications

    0.25 gallons per cycle for metering faucets

    8.5 liters per minute (lpm) at 4 bar (58 psi), private applications only (hotel or motel guest rooms, hospital patient rooms)

    2.0 lpm at 4 bar (58 psi), all others except private applications

    1 liter per cycle for metering faucets

    Shower 2.5 (gpm) at 80 (psi) per shower stall 9.5 lpm  at 5.5 bar (80 psi) per shower stall
    Kitchen Faucet 2.2 (gpm) at 60 (psi) 8.5 lpm at 4 bar (58 psi)
    Commercial Pre-rinse Spray Valves

    (for food service applications)
    Flow rate ≤ 1.6 (gpm)

    (no pressure specified; no performance requirement)
    Flow rate ≤ 6 lpm (no pressure specified; no performance requirement)
    *    EPAct 1992 standard for toilets applies to both commercial and residential models.

    **  In addition to EPAct requirements, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers standard for public lavatory faucets is 0.5 gpm at 60 psi (2.0 lpm at 4 bar (58 psi)) (ASME A112.18.1–2005).

    This maximum has been incorporated into the national Uniform Plumbing Code and the International Plumbing Code.



    AND

    COMMERCIAL PROCESS WATERProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. USE

    Employ strategies that in aggregate use 20% less water than the water use baseline calculated performance requirements for commercial equipment as listed in Table 2. Base the calculations on estimated occupant usage. Include only the following fixtures (as applicable): clothes washers, dishwashers, ice machines, food steamers, and combination ovens.(insert table) Exemptions from calculations:

    • Appliances and equipment that use water for human consumption may be excluded. Examples: bread misters, produce misters, soda machines, coffee-making machines, and fixtures used to fill sinks for washing produce.
    • Equipment, appliances, fixtures, and fittings that are not covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct 1992), do not contribute toward the retail process, and are not

      commercially rated may be excluded. Example: a residential dishwasher in an employee break room.
    • Fixtures whose flow rates are regulated by health codes may be excluded. Example: fixtures used for filling dishwashing sinks in which water must be maintained at a certain temperature.

      Commercial Equipment Baseline (Imperial Units) Baseline (Metric Units)
      Commercial clothes washer, less than 80 lbs (36.3 kg) 9 gallons/cf/cycle 1,200 liters/m3/cycle
      Commercial dishwasher
          Under counter, high temperature 1.98 gallons/rack 7.50  liters/rack
          Under counter, low temperature 1.95 gallons/rack 7.38 liters/rack
          Door type, high temperature 1.44 gallons/rack 5.45 liters/rack
          Door type, low temperature 1.85 gallons/rack 7.00 liters/rack
          Single tank rack conveyor, high temperature 1.13 gallons/rack 4.28 liters/rack
          Single tank rack conveyor, low temperature 1.23 gallons/rack 4.66 liters/rack
          Multi- tank rack conveyor, high temperature 1.1 gallons/rack 4.16 liters/rack
          Multi- tank rack conveyor, low temperature 0.99 gallon/rack 3.75 liters/rack
          Flight type 180 gph 681.37 lph
      Commercial ice machines
          Ice machine, IMH (ice-making head) H < 450 lbs/day (<204.11 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
          Ice machine, IMH (ice-making head)  H > 450 lbs/day (>204.11 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
          Ice machine, RCU (no remote compressor) H < 1,000 lbs/day (<453.59 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
          Ice machine, RCU (no remote compressor)  H > 1,000 lbs/day (>453.59 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
          Ice machine, RCU (remote compressor)  H < 934 lbs/day (<423.66 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
          Ice machine, RCU (remote compressor)  H > 934 lbs/day (>423.66 kg/day) < 25 gal/100 lbs ice < 95 liters/46 kg ice
          Ice machine, SCU (self-contained unit) < 35 gal/100 lbs ice < 133liters/46 kg ice
          Ice machine, water-cooled Must be on chilled loop Must be on chilled loop
          Ice machine, once-through water-cooled Banned Banned
      Food steamer
          Steam cooker, batch cooking 8 gph/pan 3085.11 lph/pan
          Steam cooker, high production or cook to order 8 gph/pan 317.97 lph/pan
      Combination oven  
          Countertop or stand mounted 40 gph 151.42 lph
          Roll-in 60 gph 227.12 lph
      Other equipment Based on industry standards Based on industry standards
      Notes: gph = gallons per hour; cf = cubic feet; lph = liters per hour; H = ice production.


      For equipment not listed in in the above tables, the project team may propose performance baseline requirements, with documentation supporting the proposed benchmark.

5 Comments

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Chinthaka Jagodaarachchi
Jan 17 2013
Guest
102 Thumbs Up

Metering faucet for Ktchen sink

How to calculate the water saving if we use metering faucets for kitchen sink?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 21 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Have you reviewed the guidance on this that's contained in the Water Use Reduction Additional Guidance document from USGBC? (You can find this through Google, or on the Resources section of the USGBC site.)

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Chinthaka Jagodaarachchi Jan 22 2013 Guest 102 Thumbs Up

Hi Tristan,
Yes, I checked the document, but it talks about the lavatory faucets, not about kitchen sinks. Does this means that we can follow the same procedure for the kitchen sink faucets as well.
Further, In the template, metering faucet option is available only for the public lavatories not for the kitchen sinks. so, should I select the "Other" under fixture type and specify as "Metering" ?

Thank you.!!

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Richard Manning Principal, Green Building Services Feb 05 2013 LEEDuser Member 89 Thumbs Up

I suggest documenting the credit as an alternative compliance path and following the Water Use Reduction Additional Guidance document by applying the same logic used for metered lavs to metered kitchen sinks. Table 1 of the document shows the design case duration for the kitchen sink. Be sure that the plumbing schedule states the fixture model, flow rate, and duration. Having the product cutsheet will also help clarify the issue with the review team and note if the default duration will be used. Also, clearly explain the conditions around why the faucet is metered and show your calculations.

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Richard Manning Principal, Green Building Services Aug 13 2013 LEEDuser Member 89 Thumbs Up

It's important to let the reviewer know if the kitchen hand‐washing faucets are regulated for health codes (they likely will be in a restaurant). If it is NOT regulated by health codes, then it must be included as a lavatory faucet. If they are regulated by health codes, then they may be included as a kitchen sink and use the higher allowable flow rate as the baseline.

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