Schools–NC-v4 EQc4: Indoor air quality assessment

  • Provide occupants with good IAQ

    The idea behind this credit is to ensure good indoor air quality (IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors.) for building users. The flush-out of indoor air required under Option 1 is frequently pursued by projects seeking a certain and predictable path. Performing testing under Option 2 leaves open the possibility that despite all other efforts to provide and protect air quality, the building could fail the tests, putting the credit in jeopardy. 

    You might wonder why there would be any chance of failing the IAQ test if a building earns the other IAQ credits. For whatever reason, it happens. This might be due to VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. emissions from materials not covered by the low-emitting materials credit, or from the undetected use of materials not meeting the spec.

    Another reason teams may want to pursue Option 1 is that the cost for IAQ testing is often greater than that of a building flush-out. Testing costs vary depending on the size of the building, the number of samples tested, and the travel and fieldwork the testing agency needs to perform. Additionally, the number of different contaminants that projects must test for has increased from LEED 2009.

    On the other hand, there may not been enough time in your project schedule to conduct the flush-out for Option 1. The tenant may also prefer the solid results of a test. All of these factors can push a project toward Option 2.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • This credit now requires–rather than recommends–the installation of movable furnishings, such as workstations and partitions, before testing or flush-out.
    • Options can no longer be combined.
    • Option 1 now provides an upper interior temperature limit.
    • Testing is now required for an expanded list of contaminants in Option 2.

    FAQs

    Is it possible to combine Options 1 and 2 for different spaces in the same building?

    No, Options 1 and 2 cannot be combined to meet the credit requirements. 

    Should we install furniture and furnishings before IAQ testing or flush-out?

    Yes, all finishes, furniture, and furnishings must be installed before testing or beginning a flush-out.

  • EQ Credit 4: Indoor air quality assessment

    Intent

    To establish better quality indoor air in the building after construction and during occupancy.

    Requirements

    Select one of the following two options, to be implemented after construction ends and the building has been completely cleaned. All interior finishes, such as millwork, doors, paint, carpet, acoustic tiles, and movable furnishings (e.g., workstations, partitions), must be installed, and major VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. punch list items must be finished. The options cannot be combined.

    Option 1. Flush-out (1 point)
    Path 1. Before occupancy

    Install new filtration media and perform a building flush-out by supplying a total air volume of 14,000 cubic feet of outdoor air per square foot (4 267 140 liters of outdoor air per square meter) of gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) while maintaining an internal temperature of at least 60°F (15°C) and no higher than 80°F (27°C) and relative humidity no higher than 60%.

    OR

    Path 2. During occupancy

    If occupancy is desired before the flush-out is completed, the space may be occupied only after delivery of a minimum of 3,500 cubic feet of outdoor air per square foot (1 066 260 liters of outdoor air per square meter) of gross floor area while maintaining an internal temperature of at least 60°F (15°C) and no higher than 80°F (27°C) and relative humidity no higher than 60%.

    Once the space is occupied, it must be ventilated at a minimum rate of 0.30 cubic foot per minute (cfm) per square foot of outdoor air (1.5 liters per second per square meter of outdoor air) or the design minimum outdoor air rate determined in EQ Prerequisite Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance, whichever is greater. During each day of the flush-out period, ventilation must begin at least three hours before occupancy and continue during occupancy. These conditions must be maintained until a total of 14,000 cubic feet per square foot of outdoor air (4 270 liters of outdoor air per square meter) has been delivered to the space.

    OR

    Option 2. Air testing (2 points)

    After construction ends and before occupancy, but under ventilation conditions typical for occupancy, conduct baseline IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. testing using protocols consistent with the methods listed in Table 1 for all occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space.. Use current versions of ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services standard methods, EPA compendium methods, or ISO methods, as indicated. Laboratories that conduct the tests for chemical analysis of formaldehyde1. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring VOC found in small amounts in animals and plants but is carcinogenic and an irritant to most people when present in high concentrations, causing headaches, dizziness, mental impairment, and other symptoms. When present in the air at levels above 0.1 ppm, it can cause watery eyes; burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat; nausea; coughing; chest tightness; wheezing; skin rashes; and asthmatic and allergic reactions. 2. A known carcinogen with no known safe exposure level. Formaldehyde occurs naturally, but appears in unnaturally high concentra­tions in many buildings because it is an ingredient in binders used in many building materials and furnishings. and volatile organic compounds must be accredited under ISO/IEC 17025 for the test methods they use. Retail projects may conduct the testing within 14 days of occupancy.

    Demonstrate that contaminants do not exceed the concentration levels listed in Table 1.

    Table 1. Maximum concentration levels, by contaminant and testing method

    Conduct all measurements before occupancy but during normal occupied hours, with the building ventilation system started at the normal daily start time and operated at the minimum outdoor airflow rate for the occupied mode throughout the test.

    For each sampling point where the concentration exceeds the limit, take corrective action and retest for the noncompliant contaminants at the same sampling points. Repeat until all requirements are met.

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Mar 26 2017
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