Schools–NC-v4 IPc1: Integrative process

  • It’s all about the process

    Any project can earn this credit, and it’s readily achievable for teams that take an integrated approach from the project onset. The credit requires early analysis of energy and water systems in order to identify synergies within the project design that can optimize energy and water performance. 

    To earn this credit, teams must create a “simple box” energy model and perform a preliminary water budget analysis. The LEED Reference Guide provides additional detail on the potential strategies that must be assessed in these analyses. Teams must then demonstrate how the preliminary analyses were used to optimize the design of the building’s energy- and water-related systems.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • This is a new credit, except for within LEED for Healthcare.

    FAQs

    This is the only credit in the IP credit category. Do all teams have to pursue it?

    This is an optional credit (not a prerequisite) and is therefore not required.

    Do we have to adopt all strategies that improve energy or water performance based on the analysis?

    You are not required to implement any strategies that you examine. However, it’s wise to take the opportunity to holistically examine your design decisions to ensure they are optimized to produce a high-performing building.

  • IP Credit 1: Integrative process

    Intent

    To support high-performance, cost-effective project outcomes through an early analysis of the interrelationships among systems.

    Requirements

    Beginning in pre-design and continuing throughout the design phases, identify and use opportunities to achieve synergies across disciplines and building systems described below. Use the analyses to inform the owner’s project requirements (OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project.), basis of designThe information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. (BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines.), design documents, and construction documents.

    Energy-Related Systems
    Discovery:

    Perform a preliminary “simple box” energy modeling analysis before the completion of schematic design that explores how to reduce energy loads in the building and accomplish related sustainability goals by questioning default assumptions. Assess at least two potential strategies associated with each of the following:

    • Site conditions. Assess shading, exterior lighting, hardscapeThe inanimate elements of the building landscaping. It includes pavement, roadways, stonewalls, wood and synthetic decking, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios., landscaping, and adjacent siteA site having at least 25% of its perimeter bordering sites that has been previously developed. Any fraction of the perimeter that borders waterfront will be excluded from the calculation. For the purposes of this definition, a street or roadway does not constitute previously developed land. conditions.
    • Massing and orientation. Assess massing and orientation affect HVAC sizing, energy consumption, lighting, and renewable energy opportunities.
    • Basic envelope attributes. Assess insulation values, window-to-wall ratios, glazing characteristics, shading, and window operability.
    • Lighting levels. Assess interior surface reflectance values and lighting levels in occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space..
    • Thermal comfort ranges. Assess thermal comfort range options.
    • Plug and process load needs. Assess reducing plug and process loads through programmatic solutions (e.g., equipment and purchasing policies, layout options).
    • Programmatic and operational parameters. Assess multifunctioning spaces, operating schedules, space allotment per person, teleworking, reduction of building area, and anticipated operations and maintenance.
    Implementation:

    Document how the above analysis informed design and building form decisions in the project’s OPROwner's project requirements: a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. and BODBasis of design: the information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. and the eventual design of the project, including the following, as applicable:

    • Building and site program;
    • Building form and geometry;
    • Building envelope and façade treatments on different orientations;
    • Elimination and/or significant downsizing of building systems (e.g., HVAC, lighting, controls, Exterior materials, interior finishes, and functional program elements); and
    • Other systems.

    AND

    Water-Related Systems
    Discovery:

    Perform a preliminary water budget analysis before the completion of schematic design that explores how to reduce potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. loads in the building and accomplish related sustainability goals. Assess and estimate the project’s potential nonpotable waterNonpotable water: does not meet EPA's drinking water quality standards and is not approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction. Water that is unsafe or unpalatable to drink because it contains pollutants, contaminants, minerals, or infective agents. supply sources and water demand volumes, including the following:

    • Indoor water demand. Assess flow and flush fixture design case demand volumes, calculated in accordance with WE Prerequisite Indoor Water-Use Reduction.
    • Outdoor water demand. Assess landscape irrigation design case demand volume calculated in accordance with WE Credit Outdoor Water-Use Reduction.
    • Process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. demand. Assess kitchen, laundry, cooling tower, and other equipment demand volumes, as applicable.
    • Supply sources. Assess all potential nonpotable water supply source volumes, such as on-site rainwater and graywaterUntreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washers and laundry tubs. It must not include waste water from kitchen sinks or dishwashers (Uniform Plumbing Code, Appendix G, Gray Water Systems for Single-Family Dwellings); waste water discharged from lavatories, bathtubs, showers, clothes washers and laundry sinks (International Plumbing Code, Appendix C, Gray Water Recycling Systems). Some states and local authorities allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Other differences can likely be found in state and local codes. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area., municipally supplied nonpotable water, and HVAC equipment condensate.
    Implementation:

    Document how the above analysis informed building and site design decisions in the project’s OPR and BOD. Demonstrate how at least one on-site nonpotable water supply source was analyzed to reduce the burden on municipal supply or wastewater treatment systems by contributing to at least two of the water demand components listed above. Demonstrate how the analysis informed the design of the project, including the following, as applicable:

    • plumbing systems;
    • sewage conveyance and/or on-site treatment systems;
    • rainwater quantity and quality management systems;
    • landscaping, irrigation, and site elements;
    • roofing systems and/or building form and geometry; and
    • other systems.

Publications

The Integrative Design Guide to Green Building: Redefining the Practice of Sustainability

The following review of this book appeared on BuildingGreen in an article written by Nadav Malin:

Seeking to "redesign the design process," as they put it, the authors of this remarkable book share their unquenchable spirit of inquiry. At the core of the book is an expanded and updated presentation of their method of integrative design--"integrative" because the integration is ongoing, never completed as would be implied by the more common term "integrated designAn integrated design process (also called "integrative" design by some proponents) relies on a multidisciplinary and collaborative team approach in which members make decisions together based on a shared vision and holistic understanding of the project. Rather than a conventional linear design process in which a design is passed from one professional to another, an integrated process has all key team members talking together through out the design and construction process as they share ideas and use feedback across disciplines to iteratively move toward a high-performing design.."

In that sense, this book is like a reference guide to the "Whole Systems Integrated Process Guide (WSIP) 2007 for Sustainable Buildings & Communities," an ANSI/MTS standard. But wrapped around that step-by-step, nuts-and-bolts guidance are the big ideas that inform this integrative process. Understanding that buildings, their components, and their context are nested whole systems, the way to solve interconnected problems without creating new ones is to "solve for pattern." This is done by discovering the story of each place, and designing not merely to restore ecological functions but to facilitate the ongoing evolution of a place to higher and better functioning.

Ultimately, the focus of resources, energy, and attention that comes about when designing and building or renovating a facility becomes an opportunity to transform both the place and the participants, helping both initiate a continuing evolution. If this all sounds like pie-in-the-sky idealism, read a few of the many real-world stories to see the potential.


The Integrated Design Process; History and Analysis

This paper provides a partial history and some analysis of the characteristics of IDP.


The Social Network of Integrative Design

This paper seeks to analyze current integrative design process, offer a sharp, new understanding of team integration, and provide clear steps to optimize facilitation of project teams. It also uses social network science to define optimal team structure, why it is critical to the success of IPD, and how to create it.

Technical Guides

Improving Green Building Construction in North America: Guide to Integrated Design and Delivery

This guide, which draws on the 2013 report by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC), Improving Conditions for Green Building Construction in North America: Enhancing Capabilities of the Green Workforce, outlines five main steps for success in implementing an integrated designAn integrated design process (also called "integrative" design by some proponents) relies on a multidisciplinary and collaborative team approach in which members make decisions together based on a shared vision and holistic understanding of the project. Rather than a conventional linear design process in which a design is passed from one professional to another, an integrated process has all key team members talking together through out the design and construction process as they share ideas and use feedback across disciplines to iteratively move toward a high-performing design. and delivery process. Based on current industry approaches, it highlights best practices and tools for 10 workforce sectors, and is supported by seven case studies and more than 50 reference documents. It is intended to introduce building practitioners to tested methods for incorporating deeper levels of integrated design and delivery into their construction projects. 

Prepared by Nadav Malin, Peter Yost, and Candace Pearson of BuildingGreen, Inc.

Understanding Integrative Design in LEED v4

This guide from John Boecker of 7group, who was closely involved in developing the Integrative Process credit in LEED v4, is a useful guide to introduce project teams to key Integrative Process resources and the requirements to earn the credit.

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Apr 23 2017
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