Schools-EBOM-v4 MRc4: Solid waste management - ongoing

  • Put your policy into practice

    This credit involves implementing the prerequisite policy you developed and demonstrating actual waste diversion achievement over the performance period. Teams must track waste generation and diversion for both ongoing consumables and durable goodsProducts with a useful life of approximately two or more years and that are replaced infrequently. Examples include furniture, office equipment, appliances, external power adapters, televisions, and audiovisual equipment., and achieve the minimum diversion rate for both to earn the credit (50% for ongoing waste, 75% for durable goods waste). 

    Teams should maintain and improve recycling programs for all materials covered by this credit. You may have to develop a new system for managing the data involved – some buildings don’t keep details about their waste stream, and many that do use tracking systems don’t record the specific data points required by LEED. 

    Consider tracking data on a monthly basis to determine whether your program is meeting its goals or if there are additional opportunities to improve recycling rates and reduce the amount of waste sent to landfill.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • This credit combines two LEED 2009 credits: MRc7: Solid Waste Management—Ongoing Consumables and MRc8: Solid Waste Management—Durable Goods. The thresholds for each credit set in LEED 2009 are maintained in v4.
    • The credit now requires 100% recycling of mercury-containing lamps.
    • Furniture and furnishings are now covered under the facility maintenance and renovations credit.
    • The threshold for battery recycling has been raised from 80% to 100%.

    FAQs

    How do we establish a diversion rate for recycled batteries when tracking recycling batteries is easy, but tracking batteries thrown in the trash is extremely difficult?

    There really is no perfect way we know of to accurately track the diversion rate of batteries. In general you are expected to maintain a collection of batteries for recycling, and then recycle 100% of those batteries. Performing regular tenant outreach and training custodial staff on recycling programs can also help you achieve a 100% recycling rate for batteries.

    What about exemplary performance?

    Projects that divert 75% of ongoing consumables and 100% of durable goods can earn exemplary performance. And remember, you can skip the waste audit required by the prerequisite if you divert 75% of ongoing consumables and earn this credit.

  • MR Credit 4: Solid waste management - ongoing

    Intent

    To reduce the waste that is generated by building occupants and hauled to and disposed of in landfills and incinerators.

    Requirements

    Establishment

    None.

    Performance

    Maintain a waste reduction and recycling program that reuses, recycles, or composts the following:

    • at least 50% of the ongoing waste as specified in Materials and Resources Prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (by weight or volume); and
    • at least 75% of the durable goodsProducts with a useful life of approximately two or more years and that are replaced infrequently. Examples include furniture, office equipment, appliances, external power adapters, televisions, and audiovisual equipment. waste as specified in Materials and Resources Prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (by weight, volume or replacement value).

    In addition, safely dispose of the following:

    • all discarded batteries; and
    • all mercury-containing lamps.

    K–12 schools may exclude food waste from the final performance calculations of the total building waste stream by meeting both of the following requirements.

    • Provide documentation that food waste composting services are not available in the region or are not economically feasible, based on the school or district’s operational budget for solid waste management.
    • During the performance period, implement an awareness program that encourages occupants to reduce food waste. Compliant programs should include at least two of the following:
    1. signage in food service and cafeteria areas;
    2. food service employee training on reducing waste in food preparation and selecting menu options to reduce the potential for food waste; and
    3. extracurricular activities or student organizations that promote awareness of the environmental benefits associated with composting food waste.

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Mar 29 2017
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