Schools-EBOM-v4 MRp1: Ongoing purchasing and waste policy

  • Watch out for the curveball

    Your team must develop and adopt a compliant ongoing purchasing and waste policy to achieve LEED certification, since this is a prerequisite policy.

    However, you only have to demonstrate actual compliance with the policy if you pursue the related credits. The exception to this (here’s the curveball!) is for ongoing waste diversion. This prerequisite requires you to either divert 75% of ongoing waste (and achieve MRc4: Solid Waste Management – Ongoing), or conduct a waste audit.

    Project teams should definitely use the template created by USGBC as the foundation for the policy (see the Doc Toolkit). Customizing the template is encouraged so that the policy reflects your building’s operational practices. But remember that all prerequisite requirements must be addressed, so take care when removing or adjusting content.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • This prerequisite is a combination of two LEED 2009 prerequisites, MRp1: Sustainable Purchasing Policy and MRp2: Solid Waste Management Policy.
    • Teams must now determine the top five most purchased product categories and address them in the policy.
    • A minimum ongoing waste diversion requirement has been added to this prerequisite. Projects that don’t meet the diversion requirement and achieve MRc4: Solid Waste Management – Ongoing must perform a waste audit.
    • Furniture is now covered by the facility maintenance and renovations prerequisite and credits—it is no longer considered a “durable good”.
    • Minimum recyclable storage requirements have been added to align with the prerequisite criteria in the BD&C v4 rating systems.

    Readiness Review Questions

    • Do you have purchasing data available to help you determine the top five product categories purchased at your building? What sustainability criteria are relevant for each product category?
    • What are the different components of the building waste stream? Which waste streams are within the building and site management’s control? 

    • Who will be responsible for managing and enforcing the various aspects of this policy? How will the responsible parties track, measure and evaluate both purchasing and waste management? 

    • What are the building’s goals for purchasing and waste management? How will targets be assessed? 

    • What actions are necessary for the policy to take effect prior to the start of the performance period?
    • How can you involve your vendors in supporting your goals? 

    • If less than 75% of ongoing waste is diverted, thereby requiring a waste audit, who will perform the audit? Does the project team have the time and resources to conduct the audit? Or does it make more sense for the waste hauler to conduct the audit?
    • Is there a location onsite where waste can be sorted and audited? Does the building have enough space for staff to sort the materials and conduct the audit onsite, or will off-site processing be necessary?

    FAQs

    We already do a waste audit every year. Will this audit count for LEED compliance?

    The prerequisite lays out specific procedures and requirements for the audit. Review the LEED Reference Guide carefully (see the Waste Audit Procedures section) to see if your current audit will work.

     

    I don’t know what my tenants are purchasing, so how do I determine the building’s top five product categories?

    The policy needs to cover products purchased by the building management, at a minimum. This means you can develop the policy based on the purchases you’re responsible for and have data on. The Multitenant Buildings section under Project Type Variations in the LEED Reference Guide includes additional information for buildings with tenants. 

  • MR Prerequisite 1: Ongoing purchasing and waste policy

    Intent

    To reduce the environmental harm from materials purchased, used, and disposed of in the operations within buildings.

    Requirements

    Establishment

    Environmentally preferable purchasing

    Have in place an environmentally preferable purchasing (EPPEnvironmentall preferable products (EPP) are those identified as having a lesser or reduced effect on health and the environment when compared with competing products that serve the same purpose.) policy for products purchased during regular operations of the building. Include at a minimum:

    • Ongoing Purchases

      • The five most purchased product categories based on total annual purchases.
      • Paper, toner cartridges, binders, batteries, and desk accessories.
      • Lamps (indoor and outdoor, hard-wired and portable fixtures)
      • Food (required for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. Schools and Hospitality only)
    • Durable GoodsProducts with a useful life of approximately two or more years and that are replaced infrequently. Examples include furniture, office equipment, appliances, external power adapters, televisions, and audiovisual equipment. Purchases

      • Office equipment, appliances, and audiovisual equipment
      • Electric powered equipment

    The policy should address the criteria in the following credits:

    • Materials and Resources Credit: Purchasing—Ongoing
    • Materials and Resources Credit: Purchasing—Lamps

    The policy must cover at least those product purchases within the building and site management’s control.

    Solid Waste Management

    Establish storage locations for recyclable materials, including mixed paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics, and metals. Establish safe storage areas for batteries and mercury-containing lamps.

    Have in place an environmentally preferable solid waste management policy that addresses reuse, recycling, or composting of products purchased during regular operations of the building. Include at a minimum:

    • Ongoing waste

      • The five most purchased product categories based on total annual purchases.
      • Food (required for EBOM Schools and Hospitality only)
    • Durable goods waste

      • Office equipment, appliances, and audiovisual equipment
      • Electric powered equipment
    • Hazardous Waste
      • Safe disposal of batteries and lamps (indoor and outdoor, hard-wired and portable fixtures)

    The policy must cover at least those product purchases within the building and site management’s control.

    Performance

    Maintain a high-performing solid waste management program by conducting a waste stream audit of ongoing consumables at least once every five years or by diverting 75% of ongoing waste and achieving Materials and Resources Credit Solid Waste Management—Ongoing.

MRp Ongoing Purchasing and Waste policy template

This template meets the requirements of MRp Ongoing Purchasing and Waste policy and may be downloaded by the project team, modified as necessary, and provided as supporting documentation in a LEED application.

Waste Stream Audit Protocol

Project teams can use this protocol to help comply with the LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. credits requiring waste stream audits. It can be useful in any situation where you want to establish a baseline for the types and quantities of waste leaving the building.

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Jun 24 2017
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