Warehouses-EBOM-v4 EAc8: Enhanced refrigerant management

  • Central cooling plants fare the best

    This credit rewards projects that are able to minimize the impact of their refrigerants on the ozone layer and global warming. 

    Generally, the buildings that are most likely to meet this intent are those with non-CFC central cooling systems, such as a chilled water plant, where the refrigerant charge is low and the equipment life is long. These conditions yield a lower value from the credit calculation and offset smaller refrigerant-containing equipment that would otherwise cause the project to fall out of compliance with the credit threshold. If your building is in this category, it may make sense to pursue the credit.

    However, teams should be aware that beyond the question of whether your building may or may not qualify, there is often a significant burden to collect the required information for each piece of refrigerant-containing equipment.

    There is no allowance to exclude supplemental AC units and similar equipment, outside of the general LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. allowance to exclude up to 10% of the building floor area if it is under separate management control. So, multitenant buildings may find this credit particularly onerous, and even buildings that have access to the equipment will still spend a significant amount of time tracking down the data points required to complete the calculations.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • Sector-specific requirements have been added for commercial refrigeration equipment.
    • A default leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). of 2%, rather than a measured leakage rate, is required for the calculations.

    Readiness Review Questions

    • Do you keep records of all refrigerants used in base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). systems?
    • Does any of your HVAC equipment or fire suppression systems use CFCsChlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are a compound of carbon, hydrogen, chlorine and fluorine, once commonly used in refrigeration, that depletes the stratospheric ozone layer., HCFCsHydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are refrigerants that cause significantly less depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer than chlorofluorocarbons. or halonsHalons are substances, used in fire-suppression systems and fire extinguishers, that deplete the stratospheric ozone layer.? 

    • How efficiently does your base building equipment use refrigerants? Do you have a refrigerant management program in place to minimize leakage? 



    FAQs 

    My building uses a variable refrigerant flow system. Do I have to account for refrigerant in the piping runs in the credit calculations?

    Yes, the calculation needs to account for all refrigerants within the building systems, including the pipe funs for a VRF system. For this reason, buildings with VRF systems rarely meet the credit requirements.

    We haven’t experienced any refrigerant leakage in our systems for the past 5 years. Can we use a refrigerant leakage rate of 0% in the calculations?

    The credit prescribes the use of a 2% leakage rate in the calculations regardless of the actual leakage rate in experience over the performance period.

  • EA Credit 8: Enhanced refrigerant management

    Intent

    To reduce ozone depletion and support early compliance with the Montreal Protocol while minimizing direct contributions to climate change1. Climate change refers to any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2008) 2.The increase in global average temperatures being caused by a buildup of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This temperature change is leading to changes in circulation patterns in the air and in the oceans, which are affecting climates differently in different places. Among the predicted effects are a significant cooling in Western Europe due to changes in the jet stream, and rising sea levels due to the melting of polar ice and glaciers..

    Requirements

    Establishment

    Option 1. No refrigerants or low-impact refrigerants (1 point)

    Do not use refrigerants, or use only refrigerants (naturally occurring or synthetic) that have an ozone depletion potential (ODPOzone Depletion Potential (ODP) is a measure of ozone impact a chemical has relative to CFC-11 (trichlorofluoromethane), which has a ODP of 1. ) of zero and a global warming potential (GWPGlobal Warming Potential (GWP) is a measure of substances’ ability to absorb heat and warm the atmosphere relative to carbon dioxide, which has a GWP of 1, over a given time period. ) of less than 50.

    OR

    Option 2. Calculation of refrigerant impact (1 point)

    Select refrigerants that are used in heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) equipment to minimize or eliminate the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and climate change1. Climate change refers to any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2008) 2.The increase in global average temperatures being caused by a buildup of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This temperature change is leading to changes in circulation patterns in the air and in the oceans, which are affecting climates differently in different places. Among the predicted effects are a significant cooling in Western Europe due to changes in the jet stream, and rising sea levels due to the melting of polar ice and glaciers.. The combination of all new and existing base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). and tenant HVAC&R equipment that serve the project must comply with the following formula:

    IP units  

    LCGWP + LCODP x 105 100
    SI units

    LCGWP + LCODP x 105 13
    Calculation definitions for LCGWP + LCODP x 105 ≤ 100

    (IP units)
    Calculation definitions for LCGWP + LCODP x 105 ≤ 13

    (SI units)
    LCODP = [ODPr x (Lr x Life +Mr) x Rc]/Life LCODP = [ODPr x (Lr x Life +Mr) x Rc]/Life
    LCGWP = [GWPr x (Lr x Life +Mr) x Rc]/Life LCGWP = [GWPr x (Lr x Life +Mr) x Rc]/Life
    LCODP: Lifecycle Ozone Depletion Potential

    (lb CFC 11/Ton-Year)
    LCODP: Lifecycle Ozone Depletion Potential

    (kg CFC 11/(kW/year))
    LCGWP: Lifecycle Direct Global Warming Potential

    (lb CO2Carbon dioxide/Ton-Year)
    LCGWP: Lifecycle Direct Global Warming Potential

    (kg CO2/kW-year)
    GWPr: Global Warming Potential of Refrigerant

    (0 to 12,000 lb CO2/lbr)
    GWPr: Global Warming Potential of Refrigerant

    (0 to 12,000 kg CO2/kg r)
    ODPr: Ozone Depletion Potential of Refrigerant

    (0 to 0.2 lb CFC 11/lbr)
    ODPr: Ozone Depletion Potential of Refrigerant

    (0 to 0.2 kg CFC 11/kg r)
    Lr: Refrigerant Leakage RateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608).

    (2.0%)
    Lr: Refrigerant Leakage Rate

    (2.0%)
    Mr: End-of-life Refrigerant Loss

    (10%)
    Mr: End-of-life Refrigerant Loss

    (10%)
    Rc: Refrigerant Charge

    (0.5 to 5.0 lbs of refrigerant per ton of gross AHRI rated cooling capacity)
    Rc: Refrigerant Charge

    (0.065 to 0.65 kg of refrigerant per kW of AHRI rated or Eurovent Certified cooling capacity)
    Life: Equipment Life

    (10 years; default based on equipment type, unless otherwise demonstrated)
    Life: Equipment Life

    (10 years; default based on equipment type, unless otherwise demonstrated)



    For multiple types of equipment, calculate a weighted average of all base building HVAC&R equipment, using the following formula:

    IP units     SI units
    ∑ ( LCGWP + LCODP x 105 ) x Qunit ≤ 100 ∑ ( LCGWP + LCODP x 105 ) x Qunit ≤ 13
    Qtotal Qtotal



    Calculation definitions for

    [ ∑ (LCGWP + LCODP x 105) x Qunit ] / Qtotal ≤ 100

    Calculation definitions for

    [ ∑ (LCGWP + LCODP x 105) x Qunit ] / Qtotal ≤ 13

    (IP units) (SI units)
    Qunit = Gross AHRI rated cooling capacity of an individual HVAC or refrigeration unit (Tons) Qunit = Eurovent Certified cooling capacity of an individual HVAC or refrigeration unit (kW)
    Qtotal = Total gross AHRI rated cooling capacity of all HVAC or refrigeration Qtotal = Total Eurovent Certified cooling capacity of all HVAC or refrigeration (kW)



    Performance

    None.

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Jul 24 2017
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