LEED Minimum Program Requirements

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No BoatsIt may be green, but a boat can't be certified under LEED 2009's new Minimum Program Requirements. Solar Sailor

Update: LEEDuser's MPR forums and guidance

Since this page was posted, LEEDuser has launched pages with resources on each of the MPRs, and forums where you can post specific questions. We're hoping to phase out use of this forum, and redirect users to pages on the individual MPRs:

Understanding the MPRs

In addition to the familiar prerequisites and credits, LEED 2009 has introduced a new element: Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs). The MPRs fall under seven headings that are the same for the five LEED 2009 rating systems (except for LEED-ND, which doesn't have them), but the details vary slightly for each system.

Boats need not apply

USGBC introduced MPRs primarily to filter out projects that are not a good fit for the LEED certification process because they are simply too wacky. Some of them illustrate just how far some people have gone in trying to apply LEED in unconventional ways. MPR #2, for example, says that the project “must be a building” and it must have a fixed location—boats and airplanes need not apply.

Access to energy data

For a normal building on a typical site, the main thing to worry about with the MPRs is the energy reporting requirement. All registered projects must now allow USGBC access to whole-building energy and water usage data for five years from the date of certification, according to MPR #6. Make sure the building owner is aware of and on board with that commitment.

Technical Guides

Minimum Program Requirements

The official page about MPRs from USGBC, links to a document that lists the requirements for all LEED 2009 rating systems; and another one that provides supplemental guidance on how those requirements are to be implemented in practice. The MPRs themselves are locked in until the next version of LEED comes out, but the Supplemental Guidance doc will be updated periodically--share your feedback and suggestions in the Forum below!


LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development

MPRs for Core and Shell appear after the Introduction within the downloadable v3 rating system PDF.


LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

MPRs for NC appear after the Introduction within the downloadable v3 rating system PDF.


LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance

MPRs for EBOM appear after the Introduction within the downloadable v3 rating system PDF.


LEED 2009 for Schools New Construction and Major Renovations

MPRs for Schools appear after the Introduction within the downloadable v3 rating system PDF.


LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

MPRs for Commercial Interiors appear after the Introduction within the downloadable v3 rating system PDF.


Reduced Occupancy Guidance for LEED 2009 Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance and LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance v2008

Downloadable PDF describing exactly how the more lenient 50% occupancy level for EBOM projects should be interpreted for different building types and how it affects certain credit calculations.

442 Comments

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Sep 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
2642 Thumbs Up

LPD in future spaces for Energy Model

Project Location: United States

Is kind of confusing what LPDLighting power density (LPD) is the amount of electric lighting, usually measured in watts per square foot, being used to illuminate a given space. should be used for future spaces both in proposed and baseline for the energy model. Can somebody elaborate on this? Somewhere I read you can use 0.3 W/SF (storage) and somewhere else I saw 0.9 w/sf (office), which on is correct? Thanks

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

Those spaces should be based on the ASHRAE 90.1 minimum LPDLighting power density (LPD) is the amount of electric lighting, usually measured in watts per square foot, being used to illuminate a given space. for the expected use of the space. If the expected use of the space is not known then you use office (1.1 W/sf).

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Kimberlyn Caoagas
Mar 04 2014
LEEDuser Member
51 Thumbs Up

LEED Project Boundary for a Transit Station

BACKGROUND INFO:
- Attempting LEED EB: O&M Certification for a historical train/transit station
- The first floor of the station has an opening/threshold (no enclosures) that connects to an underground tunnel that lead to the railway terminals/portals.
- The first floor of the station has a separate MEP system from that of the connecting tunnel

QUESTION:
- Even though the station and tunnel are technically connected, can the LEED Project Boundary exclude the tunnel since it's only purpose is for circulation and the MEP systems are separate?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Kimberlyn, this would be a good post for our MPR3 forum—please see the link above.

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K KRAFT
Nov 20 2013
LEEDuser Member
217 Thumbs Up

LEED Interpretation #10102 Letter of Commitment from Owner

Hello. Does anyone have an example of an Owner Letter of Commitment per LI#10102 for a CS application? Thank you.

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K KRAFT
Nov 20 2013
LEEDuser Member
217 Thumbs Up

general question on reviewing policies

Rating System: LEED CS
I am wondering if anyone out there knows if the LEED project reviewers continue to reference the original application forms even if they have since been revised, replaced and uploaded to the project in LEEDOnline.com. I am asking because in response to questions submitted via GBCI.org, the reviewers continue to reference and get hung up on portions of our original project narrative which were incorrect, despite the narrative having since been revised and uploaded. Any insight is appreciated. K

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 25 2013 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

Sounds like they may be confused by conflicting information in the documentation and a explanation would help them. Tell then that the original document has been replaced by a new one and indicated the names of the files.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Nov 03 2013
LEEDuser Moderator

see MPR-specific forums

As a reminder to anyone who comes across this page, please reviews the excellent historic discussion here, but then post new comments to our MPR-specific forums—see above for links.

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Jeff Russell AIA, LEED AP BD+C
Aug 26 2013
Guest
62 Thumbs Up

LEED CI - Single Department - Multiple Bid Packages

I have a 40,000 sf interior renovation in a hospital that will consist of 4 separate bid packages (potentially 4 different General Contractors). Initially this was one project, however due to annual funding limitations, it will be split. As individual packages, none would independently qualify for LEED Certification. When combined, the project should qualify for LEED Silver Commercial Interiors. My questions are:
1. Is it possible to certify the entire project, across multiple bid packages, under one LEED Certification process?
2. Is there precedent for this?
3. The construction for the project may span 4-5 years, which means the current LEED version may sunset. Is it possible to gain an exemption for the sunset given the duration and funding limitation of the client?

Any feedback would be most appreciated.

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Amy Rider Sustainability Manager, KEMA Services Sep 25 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1870 Thumbs Up

Hi Jeff,

In response to your questions:
1. Yes. Based on your description this is possible.
2. Yes. Any long term construction of a LEED project, although having different GCs is highly unusual. We are working on multiple hospital sites (NC projects) that have multiple design packages with similar and longer build out times.
3. No sunset exemption should be needed if you are registered under a current system. NC 2.1 was ~9 years old before it was shut down.

The big concern I would have is tracking documentation between 4 different packages and 4 different teams over that period of time. Having a consistent owner's rep or construction manager throughout seems highly advisable.

Good luck!

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Catherine Blakemore Architect, LEED AP BC+D, HOLT Architects Sep 25 2013 LEEDuser Member 1408 Thumbs Up

Yes. I agree with Amy. I am working on a multiphase project as well. The Owner hired a construction manager...which has helped immensely. I would also recommend using Submittal Exchange (SX) to faciliate and track CA documentation. Using SX can be a bit costly, but it will save the entire construction and design teams huge amounts of time. Also consider hiring a site rep...this can be someone from Architect's office...perhaps someone that is not the designer, but typically does CA for the office. We are doing this for a non-LEED project and it has saved my office significant CA time and also allowed us to turn-around RFI's, ASI, etc. much more quickly and be able to provide immediate answers GC questions while onsite. Cosider discussing the idea with your project Owner. If the site rep is LEED savvy...all the better.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Coordinator Opsis Architecture
Aug 19 2013
LEEDuser Member
689 Thumbs Up

Minimum Occupancy Rates in LEED v4

The MPR for Minimum Occupancy Rates (BD+C) seems to have disappeared from LEED v4. Does anybody know if the requirements have been relocated somewhere else? Or are occupancy rates no longer a factor for BD+C?

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Eric Anderson Technical Customer Service Specialist, GBCI Aug 21 2013 Guest 1383 Thumbs Up

Hi Heather, MPR 4 is not a make-it-or-break-it type of requirement for the v3/2009 D+C rating systems. A D+C project that has less than one FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. can still pursue certification, but it cannot capture any points in the IEQ credit category. To help remove some of the confusion about the requirements of this MPR, it was decided to remove them from the MPR category and factor them into the IEQ credit category's overall eligibility guidance/requirements in LEED v4.

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Ralph Bicknese Principal Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects
Jan 23 2013
LEEDuser Member
197 Thumbs Up

LEED NC- New Construction project, 11.7% of Building Not Fit-out

Greetings,

This question pertains to meeting MPR #2. MPR 2 states that a project must be a COMPLETE building, which makes us question our situation where a small portion of the building will (for the time-being) not be completely fit-out. The project in question is all new construction and will be occupied by one tenant. We are currently in design phase and the project has been put on hold and started-up several times due to budget issues. While initially, the entire building was to be competely fit-out, this has recently changed due to budgetary constaints. Three rooms, totaling 11.7% of the building, will not be totally fit-out (will have minimal lighting, no finishes). The shell spaces total 2,183 SF with the overall building at 18,615 SF. Everything is designed for these spaces and rough-ins will be done. I vaguely remember reading somewhere that a minimum percentage of the building must be fit-out/ occupied in order to qualify for LEED NC certification, but I cannot remember where this was written. Does our scenario pose any eligibility concerns? If not, how should we note these three rooms in our documentation? Your help is much appreciated.

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Eric Anderson Technical Customer Service Specialist, GBCI Jan 23 2013 Guest 1383 Thumbs Up

Hi Ralph, Please refer to LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. (LI) 10102 (https://www.usgbc.org/leedinterpretations/LISearch.aspx?liaccessid=10102 ) for information on how to address this situation. The maximum limit on incomplete spaces for projects using non-CS rating systems is established as 40% in that LI. It sounds like this project will still be eligible for NC.

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Annalise Reichert LEED Project Coordinator, Environmental Building Strategies Sep 20 2013 LEEDuser Member 65 Thumbs Up

Going off of Ralph's question, I know that if there are incomplete spaces at the time of certification the owner needs to write a letter of commitment indicating the remaining spaces will satisfy LEED requirements. Does this mean we do not need to include the incomplete spaces in our documentation?

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SW LEE Project Manager
Jan 09 2013
LEEDuser Member
377 Thumbs Up

Boundary

Hi,
(I posted an inquiry previously but seem did not appear in the forum. I re write the inquiry again.)

Hi,
i'm new to LEED.
We have a project to construct a office building + production floor. This project share the same land title but build separately. These building are physically separated (2m) away and has individual energy +water meter. The building will act as core business administration office. Our company would like to get the office building LEED certified. Can we certify only the office building with LEED NC tool?
Please advice.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 16 2013 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

Probably but why would you do that. Sounds like both buildings will function as a single facility even if they are physically separated. If you are trying to demonstrate your commitment to these issues getting one certified and not the other basically demonstrates that you are only half committed.

Read the MPRs to see if the office alone would qualify.

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SW LEE Project Manager Jan 16 2013 LEEDuser Member 377 Thumbs Up

Hi Marcus, thanks.

I thought LEED is for office building only, therefore, it set our intent to certified the office administration building. The production building is more like a testing facilities with natural ventilation. Are we suppose to certified the production floor as well? or we can certified either one? Please help.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 16 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

LEED-NC can be applied to many building types. You can certify this building as one facility.

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Aron Weis Energy Manager Architect of the Capitol - OSP
Jan 08 2013
Guest
283 Thumbs Up

How to handle non-certifiable building inside site boundary

We have an enclosed kennel building that is conditioned and has a split system using R-22. While not connected to building being certified it is inside the boundary and on the same electrical meter. What are the options for this? Is it to be included in all credits and MPR's?

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Kevin Flynn President, AIA, LEED FELLOW (LEED AP BD&C), EcoDEEP Feb 21 2013 LEEDuser Member 207 Thumbs Up

Aron - My understanding is that the kennel could be excluded from certification (especially if it does not meet the MPR requirements for min. size and occupancy) but it would be included in all site and material calculations. It would be best to provide a separate meter for the kennel in order to more accurately report energy usage.

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Emily Clark Project Coordinator Chapman Construction/Design
Dec 06 2012
Guest
81 Thumbs Up

MPR6 - C&S and CI

We are currently working on a Core & Shell project where a single tenant will be occupying the entire building. That tenant is also going for LEED under Commercial Interiors. Their lease is structured so the tenant will pay for the entire building energy and water use. The C&S owner will not receive any of the bills. We would like to claim an exemption for Minimum Program Requirement 6: Whole Building Energy and Water Usage Data based on the fact that all of this information will be submitted by the tenant under their CI certification.

Has anyone had any experience on this type of approach?

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Bill Monster
Dec 04 2012
Guest
99 Thumbs Up

Intervening in a LEED application

Can you tell me how I can intervene in my building's application for LEED certification?

I have been trying for more than two years to get a reasonable temperature in my office. Our building management "opens a ticket," supposedly to fix it, but then two days later closes the ticket without addressing the problem. It is routinely between 76 and 80 degrees in my office. It seems that the primary problem is that the HVAC was designed for cubicles, which some time in the past were replaced with enclosed offices.

Last year I came back to my office outside of regular business hours and overheard the workmen saying that they had no intention of fixing it.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 04 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Bill, do you know which LEED rating system the building is pursuing, and what the status is of the application? Do you know who is adminstering the LEED project internally? Perhaps it would be helpful to raise the point directly with them—unless of course, they are the same people who have been closing your ticket.

You can contact GBCI, which handles LEED certifications, and raise the issue with them.

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Bill Monster Dec 04 2012 Guest 99 Thumbs Up

I am not sure how the application process here is working, but thanks for the contact information.

I will look into it.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Nov 23 2012
LEEDuser Moderator

please use our specific MPR forums

Since this broad MPR forum was started, LEEDuser now has specific forums for each of the MPRs, with guidance on those pages. Please go to those forums to post your questions—see the links at the top of the page.

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Kimberly Frith Sustainability Consultant Alto Sustainability, LLC
Nov 06 2012
LEEDuser Expert
3687 Thumbs Up

Lease Agreements OK for LEED-CS but not LEED-NC?

LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #10102 requires us to model any unfinished spaces as energy-neutral and water-neutral, to provide an owner letter of commitment that those spaces will comply with our other LEED strategies when completed by the owner, and to provide tenant design & construction guidelines if the spaces are intended for a tenant fit-out. There seems to be somewhat of a gap between what is allowed in LEED-NC and LEED-CS for unfinished spaces here, particularly with regards to energy and water savings strategies. A LEED-CS project can claim energy and water savings for tenant improvements if a binding lease agreement is created (for example, specifying a maximum lighting power density for tenant areas). However, a LEED-NC project with future tenant spaces still has to model those spaces as energy-neutral.

Has anyone had success claiming energy/water savings in a tenant space for a LEED-NC project using a binding lease agreement? It would seem this is an acceptable approach, since it's OK under LEED-CS. Any ideas?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 06 2012 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

There is a significant amount of precedent for allowing savings in tenant spaces within NC projects. If you read the ruling closely it does not explicitly say that future savings cannot be claimed based on a tenant lease agreement. The same general guidance is included in CS and Appendix G for modeling these spaces as identical. The ruling is silent on whether lease agreements can be used to show future savings.

I think there is a contradiction between the conclusion you are reaching based on this interpretation and some of the older ones in the database. Interpretation #2395 is rather general but supports the notion of counting savings in an NC project with a large shell space as long as it is in the lease agreement. Interpretations #5139, #5072, and #1930 address this issue directly. These are not 2009 specific but in my opinion would certainly carry over and apply.

I have pointed this out to some of the folks at USGBC so we will see if it gets fixed.

I agree that if it is allowed in CS, it should be allowed in NC - if for no other reason than consistency.

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Hernando Miranda Owner, Soltierra LLC Nov 06 2012 Guest 7686 Thumbs Up

Having gone though this situation this is what was decided by the GBCI in regards to unfinished future TI spaces. This is a summary for one project, so it may change, or what the reviewers demand might be different.

1) Provide non-binding TI green guidelines.
2) Model energy in the TI spaces as neutral (no savings credit taken).
3) Water savings must match what the NC project is claiming.
4) Construction IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management. TI spaces must be included.
5) All owner installed materials in the TI space must be included.

My comments about some of the items the above:

1) The guidelines only need to be based on the version of LEED the project is registering under. This is a problem the GBCI did not consider when they started making the hardcore demand for TI guidelines. You could be preparing TI guidelines based on an version of LEED CI (the project's NC equivalent) that a tenant cannot use. Also, guidelines might suggest a green feature that is not allowed per current local codes, as was the case for my specific project.

2) Take advantage of new code requirements applicable when TI space when it is built. This is more likely than not. By the time a building get built new codes may be in place. The primary example is lighting LPDLighting power density (LPD) is the amount of electric lighting, usually measured in watts per square foot, being used to illuminate a given space.. The basis for this is a higher LPD cannot be installed by the tenant.

3) Take advantage of water savings if local code requirement are more stringent when the TI space can be built.

NOTE: If you are going to take credit for energy and water savings make sure you tie the date of newer code requirements to the date of substantial completion for the prime building.

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Susanne DesRoches Sustainable Design Manager The Port Authority of NY & NJ
Oct 22 2012
Guest
74 Thumbs Up

Temporary Structures Included? (besides Construction Trailers)

Do temporary structures built to support the final construction of a LEED project need to be included in the materials tracking (MR 2.1, 4.1, 5.1)? These structures require some existing site demolition to be built and then will be fully demolished when the final construction is completed.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 22 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Susanne, the MRc4 credit language stipulates, "Include only materials permanently installed in the project." I believe that is typical for the materials purchasing credits. For construction waste management under MRc2, this stuff should be considered, though.

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Susanne DesRoches Sustainable Design Manager, The Port Authority of NY & NJ Oct 22 2012 Guest 74 Thumbs Up

Tristan,
Thanks for your quick response. For MRc2, should I include the site demo done to construct the temporary structures and then use the demo material from the temporary structures in the final project?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 22 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Susanne, you should count the entire scope of the LEED project under MRc2. That sounds like it would include both the site demo and the final demo.

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Adam Targowski Owner ATsec
Oct 15 2012
Guest
1782 Thumbs Up

Addition to the existing production hall

My client is an owner of an existing production hall. He will build a big addition on the left wing of the existing building which will also be a production hall. Moreover he will build some small additions on the right wing of the building which will serve as storage places. The question is if we can certify the addition on left wing alone as a New Construction and Major Renovation project (without inclusion of the existing building)?
What if the existing building and the addition share cooling installation?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 22 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Adam, this sounds like a question about MPR2. Could you please post your question under our forum devoted to that? Thanks.

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Alex AC
Sep 28 2012
Guest
253 Thumbs Up

Glass type change needed??

Hi everyone,

I hope you all are having a nice day.! I just wanted to share with you the dilemma I´m facing nowadays. I just took over a project due to maternity leave of the arquitect in charge. After a couple of meetings with the design team to get the latest updates on the project, I came to realize that the glass type that has been purchased complies with the U-valueU-value describes how well a building element conducts heat. It measures the rate of heat transfer through a building element over a given area, under standardized conditions. The greater the U-value, the less efficient the building element is as an insulator. The inverse of (1 divided by) the U-value is the R-value. listed in ASHRAE standard 90.1 2007 (table 5.5-2), but does NOT comply with the SHGCSolar heat gain coefficient (SHGC): The fraction of solar gain admitted through a window, expressed as a number between 0 and 1. value listed in the very same table. The actual SHGC value of our glass is 0.26.
So, I wonder if we will lose all the points that we thought we could get for the EAC1 credit becuase we don´t absolutely comply with ASHRAE standards.
Or should I wait to sit down with the energy modeler to get a detailed report that shows that we actually reduced our energy consumption by the desired percentage and submit that report to the LEED reviewers to back up the idea of continuing to use the type of glass that we purchased already??

One last thing, does e-quest require to input SHGC value at all?

Thank you in advance for any replies!

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Oct 01 2012 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

There are prescriptive and mandatory requirements in 90.1. You must comply with the mandatory but not the prescriptive. SHGCSolar heat gain coefficient (SHGC): The fraction of solar gain admitted through a window, expressed as a number between 0 and 1. and the other envelope characteristics are prescriptive.

So talk to your modeler about making sure you meet the minimum overall energy savings required and you should be fine.

Yes eQUEST does require a SHGC input.

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Alex AC Oct 03 2012 Guest 253 Thumbs Up

Thank you Marcus! You are always so helpful!

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Johnathan Woodside Mechanical Engineer Gresham Smith & Partners
Sep 21 2012
LEEDuser Member
174 Thumbs Up

Project phasing; 1 large project or 2 smaller projects?

Hello,

I have a project that is currently registered under LEED NC 2.2. The project is under construction and the client has chosen to move forward with phase 2 of the project prior to actually completing phase 1.

Phase 2 involves adding an additional amount of square footage to phase 1 which will be a single floor, single structure (almost doubling the size of the project). Since phase 1 will not be completed prior to phase 2 construction actually beginning, will phase 2 have to be included with phase 1 and the entire project registerd as one LEED NC project? --Or could phase 1 and 2 be registered each as individual projects seperately?

Thanks guys,

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Donald R. Able Director of Sustainability, BSA LifeStructures Sep 21 2012 Guest 379 Thumbs Up

I'm more familiar with 3.0 so it may not apply to 2.2, but it would make sense to complete both Phases before submitting for reviews. To make each phase a separate project would require you to make 2 separate submissions (and fees and submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system. the second phase). In the end, you would want the entire building to be certified. Combining the 2 phases seems the most efficient process.

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Johnathan Woodside Mechanical Engineer, Gresham Smith & Partners Sep 21 2012 LEEDuser Member 174 Thumbs Up

Agreed, it definitley makes more sense to certify the entire project. My client actually raised the question about certifying only phase 1 and forego certification of phase 2 altogether.

Correction, this project is in fact LEED 2009, not v2.2 -way too many registered projects going on:)

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Chris Miller Chief Mechanical Engineer Design Alaska
Sep 20 2012
LEEDuser Member
935 Thumbs Up

Include low-occupancy storage/lab in LEED boundary? - MPR3&5

For an EB-OM project, this site has an auxiliary building (originally a garage) that is now used for: (1) storage, and (2) a seasonal construction materials testing lab (concrete and aggregate testing). For half of the year, one employee occupies the building for about 4 hrs. per day. For the other half of the year, the space is not occupied at all.
So, this building does not meet the Minimum Occupancy Rate (MPR#5) requirement for EB-OM ("must be in a state of typical physical occupancy, and all building systems must be operating for... at least the 12 continuous months immediately preceding the first submission for a review.").
The very last paragraph of MPR#3 (Reasonable Site boundary) states that a building such as this "MAY be included within the LEED project boundary and excluded from required compliance with MPRs, prerequisites, and credits...". It says "MAY", not "MUST", so:
{1} Can I omit it from the LEED boundary (this is possible because this building is on the perimeter of the site)?
{2} Is my other option to include it in the LEED boundary, but not include it in credit calculations?
{3} If it is inside the LEED boundary, then must it be excluded from ALL prerequisites and credits, or can it be included for some (see the Portfolio Manager question below)?
{4} The storage/lab building is heated by a separate fuel tank, so it may be possible to exclude the heating fuel from Portfolio Manager inputs, but the electricity is not submetered. Is it a problem if we include electrical use for the auxiliary building into Portfolio Manager? Or should we include all energy usage (and gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.)) for this building in PM?
{5} Finally, if I DO exclude the building from the LEED boundary, then how should I handle the energy usage with Portfolio Manager (should I not count the heating fuel, should we submeter the building so electricity can be excluded too…)?

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LaLuce Mitchell Junior Designer Flynn Battaglia Architects
Aug 29 2012
Guest
142 Thumbs Up

Two LEED certifications for one building

Hello all, hoping I can get your friendly technical advice.
We are working on a 200k+/- sf building that we are gut-renovating for a state university in the northeastern US. We're also re-doing the exterior facade and the landscape around the building.

The project is being done in two phases and the second phase may or may not happen due to funding, so we need to LEED certify the first phase separately. Problem is, MPR 2 kind of implies you can't do this ("must be a complete building"), so I was wondering if any of y'all have any experience with this?

The building is divided by a fire wall at the interior, so we could kind of make a case for it being two separate buildings in that sense, but the mechanical systems are common to both parts.

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Donald R. Able Director of Sustainability, BSA LifeStructures Aug 29 2012 Guest 379 Thumbs Up

LaLuce:
Welcome to the world of University funding. I have the same issue only 3 phases! I spoke directly with GBCI and while they were empathetic, they stuck by the rules. We are maintaining the information for all 3 phases and combining them at the end of the 3rd phase. There is a bright side, the university will be hiring us and the CM for all 3 phases as they recognized the complexity involved. Fortunately, the 2nd phase has been funded and we are starting on the design soon. Good Luck! (the same was offered by GBCI, but not much else.)

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Petr Vogel Specialist Consultant EkoWATT CZ
Aug 29 2012
LEEDuser Member
275 Thumbs Up

LEED project line - extension/addition to be certified

Hi, we have a situation of vertically attached factory building to currently existing building on the same campus under the same ownership.

According to the Supplemental Guidance we are able to draw the LEED project line between the existing and the new wing of the building which is intended to be separately LEED certified. The line is drawn at the border between the existing parts and the new intended parts (nevertheless if there will be wall or extension of existing open space).

But there is one complication that we did not clearly find out in the guidance. Intent of the investor is to build new heating plant for the new wing in one of the already existing rooms in the existing wing – that means behind the so far LEED project line. The new plant will be serving the new extension/addition only – only those parts to be LEED certified.

How do we proceed when drawing the LEED project boundary? Do we simply say that the LEED project boundary includes the new extension/addition + one separate heating plant room in the existing part? Don’t we have a problem then with the condition of contiguous area?

Thanks in advance for your help, Petr

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 05 2012 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

Sounds like you should include the whole project to me. The heating plant has to be connected to the addition (piping) so you would still be contiguous.

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Caroline Hedin Architect, studio point253 Oct 03 2012 LEEDuser Member 1085 Thumbs Up

Petr,

We ran into similar questions with one of our project. We had an existing building which was going through major renovations in the office during Phase 2 but relatively none in the warehouse, and very little in Phase 1. We were hoping to cut the LEED Boundary between the warehouse and office and not include the warehouse in the certification process (for various reasons). What we discovered was that if the mechanical system crossed the boundary then that boundary would not be allowed. As we were placing our new mechanical equipment in the warehouse, not the offices, we had to include the whole building. We were certified LEED Silver NC v2009.

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Hernando Miranda Owner, Soltierra LLC Oct 23 2012 Guest 7686 Thumbs Up

Under LEED CI 2009 your are required to include spaces outside of the scope-of-work such that an entire HVAC is included. But, this only applies to energy analysis (EA Credit 1.3 in CI), and by implication ventilation requirements (EQp1).

It seems that the USGBC is imposing the above requirement on all major renovations, and building additions. This makes sense.

There are other considerations:

LEED is a construction scope-of-work system. If you are not doing work in an area, you can exclude it.

LEED is also a building ownership/control system. There are different rules for ownership/control of more than 90% of a building.

LEED is also subject to the 40/60 rule. If a project is >60% of one rating system type a project follows that rating system. But if the building is at least 90% owned/controlled by the same entity the requirement is >40%.

The above are reasons why Caroline Hedin's project needed to be a whole building. The HVAC systems alone crossing "the LEED boundary line" would only trigger that if the HVAC system served the entire building.

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ZEB Tech singapore ESD Consultancy ZEB-Technology Pte Ltd
Aug 13 2012
LEEDuser Member
2243 Thumbs Up

Extension- Horiz Attached to Non LEED Building with Shared M&E

Hi we are working on a factory extension for LEED certification. The extension (Phase2) shall be attached horizontally to an existing factory (Phase 1). There shall be no party wall and the 2 phases shall share M&E services and function as one factory once complete. The existing factory is not LEED certified.
The client wants to only certify the extension under LEED. Kindly advise on the LEED rating to use in this case as the MPR#2 does not clearly state such a situation. The owner/management shall be the same. There shall be no renovation in the existing factory.
If the existing factory has to be included in the project boundary would LEED O&M be applicable as the % GFA of existing vs extension is almost 50:50. I dont think LEED NC shall be applicable here for just the extension too as the factory shall function as one on completion and share M&E services.
Many thanks in advance.
Priya

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Donald R. Able Director of Sustainability, BSA LifeStructures Aug 14 2012 Guest 379 Thumbs Up

LEED is specific when it comes to additions to existing buildings. The best advice is to read the USGBC document entitled, Guidance for Certifying Attached Buildings Separately. It can be found on USGBC website at the link below. The size of the addition compared to the existing building comes into play to determine whether you pursue LEED NC or LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.. You won’t be able to use the existing services unless you can measure utilities separately. It is also important that the addition has a separate identity.

http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=7177

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Diaa Madkour Architect
Aug 07 2012
Guest
611 Thumbs Up

Multi phase building NC certification

Hi, We are working on registering a building for NC2009. The building will be constructed on 2 phases. First floor will be phase 1, and second floor will be phase 2 ( phase 2 will be after occupancy of first floor within few years, based on budget available for 2nd phase construction.). Simply, what shall we do? Register only phase 1 to be certified after the occupancy of phase 1. OR : Registering the 2 phases and wait till the completion of occupancy of the 2 phases ( though phase 2 could be canceled for any circumstances). Please Advise.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 05 2012 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

Sounds like you could do either option.

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Sabrina B Sustainability Manager
Aug 01 2012
Guest
294 Thumbs Up

Energy and Water usage reporting

I just finished a project that achieved LEED Gold. The LEED scope of work and boundary included one building even though there was another “shed” structure on the site. After the project was complete the owner decided to power the shed; however, it was not metered separately and a new meter was installed in place of the existing one. How does this affect the Energy usage reporting? Do they need to go back and add a sub-meter for the shed building?

What happens in regard to the building’s LEED certification if the owner makes minor changes after certification has been awarded?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 05 2012 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

How much energy usage is in the shed? Is the shed on the same meter as the project? If the shed usage is minimal it would have little effect. No sub-meter is required.

Nothing happens to the certification if any changes are made post plaque.

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Diaa Madkour Architect
Jul 22 2012
Guest
611 Thumbs Up

LEED Boundary- 2 buildings on site

Hi,
We have a situation of a small site with 2 buildings, one will be certified (training center-NC 2009) and the other is not (accomodation), there is no distictive separation for the parking and facilities and entrance in order to make a LEED boundary separating the 2 buildings. What shall we do? We are thinking of 2 options: 1) Campus certification, working as one building is certified and the other is not (but still we will need a boundary for the certifying project). 2) Including all the site as LEED boundary for the building to be certified and excluding the non-certified building. in case of option 2, are we excluding the area of the non-certified building from site area? Please advice for all these queries.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 05 2012 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

These issues are impossible to address from a short narrative. The issues can be very complicated and are related to contractual arrangements, limits of disturbance, the affect on individual LEED credits, etc. Either one of your options might work but far more information than can be conveyed in this forum would be needed to say for sure what the best approach might be.

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal ecocentric cc
Jul 16 2012
LEEDuser Member
1639 Thumbs Up

LEED boundary - lease wording

on one of our projects, the developer will lease an adjacent land parcel, owned by the local authority, for purposes of stormwater management, running paths (recreational offering) and landscaped areas. The land is directly accessible from the project building and will be fully maintained by the project. hence, we are looking at including the land within the LEED boundary.

is there a particular requirement for the type of lease and the wording that the lease must contain? eg length of lease?

many thanks!

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 05 2012 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

My only thought is that the longer the lease the better. Ideally at least as long as the rated life of the building should satisfy any requirement.

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Jim Park Project Manager EAN Technology
Jul 13 2012
Guest
411 Thumbs Up

Underground mall located in a large campus

Dear all. I thought hard about it and came this far but I really need your expertise.
1. An underground mall located in a large campus will go through renovation and wants to be LEED certified.

2. Since it's a mall, I assume LEED CS is the most appropriate.

3. Configuration
ground floor: multiple existing buildings
B1: mall, movie theatre, parking ramp, "elevators and lobby spaces for the buildings above"
B2: "elevator and lobby spaces for the buildings above," parking space, and other spaces.

4. workscope
ground floor: mall entrance, landscape
B1: mall

5. My presumptions
- Treating ground buildings and underground mall as separate buildings
- Excluding "elevator and lobby spaces for the buildings above" from the boundary
- Credit related to landscape, parking will be evaluated as a master site.

6. Question
- Is it reasonable to exclude movie theatre from the mall's project boundary? Movie theatre isn't included in the workscope and its design wouldn't meet the ASHRE 90.1 Mandatory requirements. Movie theatre's space is leased from the mall management.
- Are my presumptions (#5) logical?

7. Process
- Project CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide about the LEED project boundary?
- What about registering as a master site? (multiple existing buildings, but only 1 building pursuing certification) I would prefer that the project boundary be approved before DP submission.

Thank you

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 05 2012 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

CS makes sense.

Excluding the existing buildings makes sense.

Excluding portions of the project creates as many or more problems than it solves and is generally not allowed. I would recommend that you include all of the spaces and work included in the project's scope of work.

Not sure why you need to treat the site as a master site since it does not sound like a campus situation.

If the movie theater space is not included in the scope I would assume it could be excluded. Will the space be built? If so the space is in the scope even if the fit out is not.

An interpretation may be a good idea but I don't think you can submit any drawings which is really what one would need to see to make this call.

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Tarek Dalati Sustainbility manager CRHI
Jul 12 2012
Guest
1091 Thumbs Up

REsidentiual building (52 floor) -MPR1-6

IF the building consistes of appartments which are going to be sold and will still the current owner has to comply with the sharing data requirements?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 05 2012 LEEDuser Expert 43442 Thumbs Up

I would contact GBCI about this issue.

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Kevin Short
Jun 30 2012
Guest
221 Thumbs Up

Design Build Project

Our project is very design/build and I am curious to know if this will cause any major problems with the LEED process. It seems like LEED is very much designed for traditional owner-architect-contractor design-bid-build projects and ours is quite different and moving very fast.

I am the architect, working for the developer. We purchased an old historic building and are doing major renovation work. We have permitted the demo, base building work, and mech and plumbing work and have already begun demolition of the interiors. We will eventually create a construction documents set but it will be very minimal. So design and construction are happening simutaneously.

Basically, I am wondering if there is anything I should especially be aware since the lines between design and construction are very blurred in our case. All documentation will have to be submitted at the end of construction (estimated to be complete in 4-5 months). Also, since we are beginning the LEED process now, are there any credits that should be given special attention since we are already moving along with construction (I know hiring a commissioning agent needs to happen ASAP).

Thanks.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 01 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Kevin, is this your first LEED project? Does anyone on the project team have a couple LEED projects under their belts?

If not, it may be worth hiring someone who does, if only in a limited way to provide some key input on your question. I think it's a fairly broad question that gets to the heart of successful LEED project documentation and implementation. Although there have been plenty of projects completely on fast timeframes, it does allow less room for error.

Sorry to not directly answer your question, but I almost wouldn't know where to begin, and I hope my answer speaks to the broad issues.

I take it for granted, of course, that you should study the resources here on LEEDuser related to credits you're pursuing, particularly looking for our tips on pitfalls to avoid.

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Kevin Short Jul 01 2012 Guest 221 Thumbs Up

Tristan- I appreciate your response. In fact, that was exactly the answer I was looking for. While going through the LEED checklist initially and determining our project's feasibility to achieve a LEED certification, I have come to the conclusion that we need to hire a consultant to hold our hand in some capacity.

I am LEED AP and have worked on LEED projects in the past, but to a limited degree. I have never actually taken a project through the entirety of the process. And I have by far the most experience in the office.

Any recommendations on finding a good consultant? We are located in San Francisco.

Thanks.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 01 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Kevin, glad to hear I answered your question!

LEEDuser's team of guest experts is a good start in terms of finding a great LEED consultant.

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lauri strauss
Jun 25 2012
Guest
48 Thumbs Up

LEED and Parking Garages

I am trying to interpret the May and Sept 2011 MPR revisions regarding Parking Garages. I am working on a rental car facility project that has 22,000 s.f of Customer Service Area (CSA) on a portion of one floor, five levels of parking, for the public as well as the rental car storage, equal to about 630,000 s.f., and five levels (another 400,000 s.f.) of QTA facility (quick turn around: which is where the car companies stack the returned cars, run them thru fueling and washing, then restack them in the "clean" area, basically two more levels of parking). The QTA and the CSA are not contiguous. Speed ramps separate the parking side of the garage from the QTA side. I was thinking I might be able to certify the QTA separate from the parking under LEED BD&C (as an industrial use), and then could maybe certify the CSA under LEED CI. I'd like to be able to certify the whole thing under LEED BD&C but by my interpretation of the MPR it appears I cannot include the parking except maybe as part of the LEED boundary for the QTA. I hate to go thru two concurrent certifications just to include the very small CSA area. To top it off, the city requires submitting a LEED checklist for the entire building whether or not it is allowed to be certified by USGBC. Has anyone registered or certified a project with a large area of parking since this new MPR came out? I'd like to hear if there are other ways to interpret this that I may be missing.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 01 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Lauri, I don't interpret the MPRs that way. I don't think USGBC expects buildings not to include parking in their LEED boundaries. I understand it as meaning that 1) a building that is just a parking garage cannot be certified, and 2) don't count parking garage space in your GFA. I would include the parking in your LEED boundary, and certify.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Jun 20 2012
LEEDuser Member
2244 Thumbs Up

Minimum Program Requirement for Residential Buildings for NC

Can a residential buiding with 3 stories above ground and 1 story below ground be considered a "4 story"-building in order to apply the LEED v3.0 New Construction rating system? The story below ground is used as common space for laundry and storage and different communal recreation spaces. There is no parking in the story below ground.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 01 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Emmanuel, with such a specific question/case, I could probably check with GBCI for a definite answer. However, I would say that it would work since it sounds like you have a 4-story building with one story below grade—not a 3-story building plus basement.

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Udana Ratnayake
May 15 2012
Guest
1005 Thumbs Up

LEED certification for Multiple Building project

We are working on a resort project and there are about 25 chalets widespread on a land of approx 8 acres. as per the MPR for multiple buildings we have 2 options.

1) Register project as a campus and certify each building separately
2) Go for multiple building certification and assure compliance of each chalet with LEED requirements to reach expected certification level.

Since the multiple building certification option hasn't been made available yet we are forced to go with the first option. but the project team is of the view that this option is not viable for this type of a project.

Since this is a single resort project there is no point of getting LEED certification for a single chalet or a few more. the whole project has to be certified as a single entity.

as per the present regulation, in order to get LEED certification for the whole project we will have to register each chalet as a separate project. means 25 registered projects. that would be very costly and doesn't seem like the way to proceed.

under these circumstances please advice us on the best way to move forward with LEED certification for our project. Thanks in advance.

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Eric Anderson Technical Customer Service Specialist, GBCI May 22 2012 Guest 1383 Thumbs Up

Hello Udana, Although it has not yet been published, there is a pending LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. that will address just this type of project scenario (resorts with multiple, small guest buildings), as well as a couple other limited scenarios for K-12 schools and hospital buildings. While we cannot publish new guidance outside of the designated cycle for LEED Interpretations and Addenda, if you submit an inquiry with a little more information about this project via our Contact form (http://www.gbci.org/org-nav/contact.aspx), we can provide you with additional assistance that should help you streamline your certification process. Feel free to indicate that you would like your inquiry directed to my attention.

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Udana Ratnayake May 23 2012 Guest 1005 Thumbs Up

Thanks a lot Eric. good to know that LEED has addressed this type of scenarios as well. will do as you suggested.

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Maura Adams Environmental Stewardship Manager
May 10 2012
Guest
2302 Thumbs Up

LEED for Schools required?

I just submitted documentation for an academic building on a prep school campus using LEED-NC. It's essentially a college lab building, not at all resembling a K-12 school. I had no idea that any student-used building on K-12 school grounds HAS to submit under LEED for Schools... until I got a clarification request from the review team just now pointing me to page xvi in the 2009 Reference Guide and asking for a narrative explaining why LEED for Schools is inappropriate for us. This is the first I've ever heard of the requirement and I have worked with LEED quite a bit. I'm at a loss for what to do now. I really just didn't know, but I doubt that will be an effective argument. Help!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 01 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Maura, sorry for the slow reply here, but how has this worked out for you?

It sounds like you do have a rationale for Schools being inappropriate, so I would go with that and see what they say.

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Maura Adams Environmental Stewardship Manager Jul 02 2012 Guest 2302 Thumbs Up

They made a one-time exception for us. We can proceed under LEED-NC but have to meet the acoustic performance requirement - which we already had as an NC innovation credit. They waived the Schools Environmental Site Assessment prerequisite as well because we've owned the land for 150+ years and could document its use.

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Udana Ratnayake
May 08 2012
Guest
1005 Thumbs Up

Multiple buildings under one Registered project

We are working on a printing factory project in Sri Lanka which is to be LEED certified. the peroject is undergoin review process at the moment. the project has three main buildings within its LEED project boundary. (Main Factory Building, Storeage building and service building) in a preliminary review the reviewer has mentioned that only one building can be certified per registration. in this case all three buildings support the same working process and all three are under one electricity supply account of the utility. we feel that all three buildings should be certified as a single project under the same registration to meet intent of LEED rating system. please advice.

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Brooks Critchfield Principal, Open Field Designs, Inc. Jul 17 2012 LEEDuser Member 1031 Thumbs Up

Does anyone have anything to add to this question? I have registered multiple buildings under one registration--but using an earlier iteration of LEED (LEED-NC v2.2).

All of my LEED v2009 projects have been single buildings--but I am now faced with the same situation--3 buildings built at one time but registered as one project because they represent one development phase.

Can anyone help?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect Wilmot/Sanz
May 03 2012
LEEDuser Expert
14864 Thumbs Up

MPR 2 'complete building' & LEED HC MRc6 Design for Flexibility

LEED HC allows for the inclusion of 5% of DGSF as shelled space. How does this reconcile with MPR #2 'must be a whole building'? How do you publish LEED HC and not give project teams a work around or acknowledge the inconsistency?

I've read LI #10101 and #10102. Letter of Commitment, check. Account for it in EAp2, check.

Cross posting in LEED HC forum.

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Jessica Hawley Sustainability Consultant EBI Consulting
Apr 30 2012
LEEDuser Member
877 Thumbs Up

PI Form 1, MPR 6, Option 1

PI Form 1 states:
Note: The Data Release Form can be downloaded from the Credit Resources section of LEED Online. The Data Release Form must be on project owner letterhead, signed by the project owner and uploaded to LEED Online during post-certification when the project completes the certification acceptance form.

We just completed a LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. project and completed the certification acceptance form. We have the Data Release form ready to upload, but there was no place to upload the Data Release form. We shared our Energy Star Portfolio Manager site with the USGBC and the project is listed as Certified. Do we just not have to upload this form anymore?

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Andrew Gil Architect, Associate, LEED AP BD+C. USGBC NY Upstate Board of Directors, HOLT Architects, P.C. May 01 2012 Guest 997 Thumbs Up

This does not directly address your question, but is a work-around that I think should be shared with one and all; the GBCI advised when I called to ask a similar question (the Owner did not want to participate in the time-consuming hassles of the LOv3 website and there is no longer a chance to upload documents other than the few identified by the GBCI for upload): IF you select the checkbox at the bottom of a formthat states something like 'not meeting the credit rqmnts as stated', or 'providing an alternate means of compliance', etc., that opens a means for uploading a form that doesn't exist before checking that check box. Good Luck.

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LaLuce Mitchell Junior Designer Flynn Battaglia Architects
Apr 24 2012
Guest
142 Thumbs Up

MPR 2 for a multi-phased project

We are attempting to develop the LEED boundary for renovation of a university fine arts building. It is about 200,000 square feet and will be renovated in two phases. The first phase is occurring now, but the second phase may not happen for 10+ years, due to state funding. Thus, we would like to separately certify the first phase of the construction. Both phases are connected on the interior and use the same mechanical systems. MPR 2 seems to imply that the whole building must be certified at once, but it is not practical in this case. Is there a way to certify only half the building at this time?

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Andrew Gil Architect, Associate, LEED AP BD+C. USGBC NY Upstate Board of Directors, HOLT Architects, P.C. May 01 2012 Guest 997 Thumbs Up

LaLuce, I've have a 'serious discussion' with the senior folkas at GBCI for the past year and a half about a similar issue (a large hospital project consisting of renovating 4 surgery rooms and adding another 4): We've done previous projects at this hospital consisting of large addition+large renovation all under LEED-NC, but (unlike the USGBC) the GBCI refuses any compromise to their MPR2 requirements, regardless of reason, due diligence and so forth. They advised us to submit the addition under NC, and submit the 4-room reno. as a LEED-CI (or drop this half altogether). Not only did we have to tell the Owner (who wanted the entire hospital to be certified) this bad news but, since the resulting 8-room suite is run off a single new HVAC system, AND the entire scope of work is under a State agency grant for implementing an energy efficient design, the Owner has had to pay an awful lot for the modeling engineers to (a) analytically separate the HVAC performance of the addition from the renovation, and then to perform TWO analyses/reports (the half NC project for GBCI and the full project for the State). Having been a real champion for 15 years of the LEED process that promotes efficiency and what I might call a common-sense (i.e. sustainable) approach to design and construction, I find this change to valuing bureaucratic rule making above the purpose for why the actions were created in the first place to be idiotic, ironic and likely a real, serious contribution to a LEED down-slide if not a downfall. I know too many not interested in getting or maintaining LEED AP credentials and too many previous LEED certification recipients now looking at an alternative rating system (which shall remain nameless). What a shame. And, BTW, during the discussions I referred to above, Sarah Alexander (GBCI VP for Certification) expressly told me that the GBCI will only allow a small, incidental part of a building to be excluded from registered renovation project too (which was shy we were told to pursue the 4 renovated rooms under LEED-CI). Perhaps you could solicit the GBCI's opinion on certifying the entire project after the second phase.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz May 01 2012 LEEDuser Expert 14864 Thumbs Up

Andrew,
Can we talk offline? I have a very similar Hospital project and am running into a wall at the GBCI. smw@wilmot.com.
Susan

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LaLuce Mitchell Junior Designer, Flynn Battaglia Architects May 07 2012 Guest 142 Thumbs Up

The problem is that we are bound by state law to LEED-certify the renovated portion of the building. However, the portion of the building that is being renovated is only about 60% of its interior area + the same % of exterior walls and sitework. We are doing no work on the other 40% of the building for now, and that work may never happen give the state's budget right now, so we can't just wait to certify after both phases are complete. Mechanicals are shared between the renovated and un-renovated portions of the building and the wings are connected at the interior. Sadly, the state is not interested in CI or EB, and the exterior and sitework in the project scope excludes us from those options pretty much anyway. We can't just certify the whole building including the unrenovated portion because we are doing no work on the unrenovated portion and it has 50-year old very energy-inefficient mechanicals that would never live up to the LEED standards. MPR2 suggests that certifying half a building is not possible, but that seems to be our only option given our scope of work. I can't imagine that this issue has never come up before, though. There HAS to be a way, right??

On a related note, any inkling that this phasing issue will be solved in the MPRs for LEED 2012? They seem to be clarifying things quite a bit. We could wait until it comes out and upgrade...

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Prudence Ferreira Principal Integral Impact
Apr 23 2012
Guest
892 Thumbs Up

Detached Offices and Restroom

I am currently working on a winery project that will consist of a 6,630 sf winery production building that has a detached office, break room, lab and restroom located under the roof awning. The office area is going to be constructed out of old shipping containers and won't physically be attached to the winery production building. Can we count the offices as part of the winery building even though it is not technically attached to the winery building? The offices are an intricate part of the building for they house the only restroom in the facility, work spaces, and a lab, they just happen to be directly next to the building instead of being in the same envelope.

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Todd Bundren Director of Sustainabilty - Architectural Project Manager Lawrence Group
Apr 17 2012
LEEDuser Member
1137 Thumbs Up

MPR - Must Provide Energy and Water Data

My project is a high school (8-12) new construction and major renovation. .
Question – Background:
The hot water for the new building (used in domestic water and the HVAC systems) comes from a central plant, which also serves a number of existing non-LEED certified buildings on campus (the boilers are heated by natural gas with electricity used for the pumps). I can sub-meter the electric and domestic water (cold water) that enters the new LEED certified building; however, there is no-feasible way to sub-meter the natural gas and electricity used by the boilers and pumps in the central plant specifically for the new LEED building (as the boilers produce hot water for the entire campus).

Questions:
1. Can I achieve the MPR #6 requirement through the metering of electric and water used specifically for the new building only, excluding the natural gas/electric used for the boilers in the central plant?
2. Can I achieve the MPR #6 requirement by having my client share the electric, gas, and water usage for the entire campus, including the usage in non-LEED certified buildings?
3. Should I pursue an exception/exclusion from this requirement due to the lack of meters (therefore eliminating my chances of the 2 points for EA-5-M&V)?

I am confused about this requirement and want to provide accurate information to my client. Any guidance regarding this issue would be greatly appreciated.

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Samantha Harrell LEED Project Reviewer certificate holder Apr 17 2012 Guest 2604 Thumbs Up

Hi Todd, as stated in the supplemental guidance to the MPRs, owners of LEED project buildings or spaces that do not have meters in place that measure energy and/or water usage for the entire LEED-certified gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) are not expected to supply energy and/or water usage data unless such meters are installed. In PIf1 in LEED Online v3, be sure to detail the reasons why whole project meters are cost-prohibitive or physically impractical to install. Here are the answers your questions:
1. Yes, you can exclude the metering of natural gas/electric used for the boilers, as metering for this is physically impractical/infeasible for your project.
2. The data should be for the LEED project only.
3. When an exemption is claimed to MPR 6, EAc5 may be earned through either Option 1 or Option 2 (IPMVPThe International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP) provides best-practice protocol for measurement and verification of new construction. This standard is referenced in LEED's measurement and verification credits.), but not through Option 3 (Energy and Water Data Release).

All three options are outlined in the EAc5 form (v4).

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Todd Bundren Director of Sustainabilty - Architectural Project Manager, Lawrence Group Apr 17 2012 LEEDuser Member 1137 Thumbs Up

Samantha,
Thank you so much for the information; however, It does lead to a follow-up question/clarification request. In the responses to questions 1 and 2 above, are you indicating that I could comply with the requirement for sharing the whole building energy / water data (MPR 6) while excluding the central plants natural gas / electricity usage and therefore satisfy the EAc5 Option 3? Thanks.

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Samantha Harrell LEED Project Reviewer certificate holder Apr 17 2012 Guest 2604 Thumbs Up

You're welcome. If you claim an exemption to MPR 6 for the central plant utility usage, you'd have to pursue EAc5 Option 1 or 2.

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Anoop Vijay Sustainability Manager NORR Group Consultants Int'l Ltd, Dubai
Apr 17 2012
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100 Thumbs Up

LEED certification for a single building above common podium...

Hi,

I am trying to figure out if GBCI allows certifying a building alone among multiple towers on a single plot.

The target building is a high-rise office tower located above a multi-storey podium that also has other building such as hotel tower, residential tower and small retail buildings. The podium is common for all these towers and that includes retail outlets and parking. The office tower is physically separated from other buildings (from floor 1, above podium) but is connected through the podium.

Can anybody advise if it is possible to certify only the Office tower.?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Apr 18 2012 LEEDuser Expert 17765 Thumbs Up

It may be possible, depending on whether the tower has separate ownership, management, name, and metering of the HVAC and water systems.

You'll want to review the "MPR Supplemental Guidance Revision 2" document from the link under the Resources tab above or by searching the USGBC site. Refer to pages 13 - 27 for the guidance on attached buildings and defining the LEED boundary, especially page 17, "vertically attached buildings."

Feel free to post back here if you still have any questions.

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Julien Daclin Head of Sustainability Deerns France
Apr 11 2012
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Scope of certification

We are currently working on a major renovation and extension of an office building in France. A problem has been raised regarding the inclusion of a ground floor retail space within the LEED project scope. The retail space extends primarily outside the building’s footprint, but a certain part (30 to 40%) is included in the ground floor of the renovated building. The owner of the retail space is the same as the office building. The commercial space has technical facilities completely independent of the renovated building and managed by the tenant. The facilities are located in the basement that has a shared use of parking for the offices and the retail space.

The proposed renovation and extension does not apply to retail space which will remain in operation during construction. Can we therefore exclude this area of the LEED project, according to MPR#2?

If we had to consider the retail space, what would be the involvement regarding LEED credits, in particular EAp2/EAc1, WEp1/WEc3 and IEQp1/IEQc2? Must we take into account all their technical and MEP systems and include this space in the energy model?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Apr 18 2012 LEEDuser Expert 17765 Thumbs Up

If the renovation and extension is extensive enough to definitely meet the definition of "major renovation" under LEED NC then the LEED boundary will usually be the whole building, and the EA, WE and IEQ pre-requisites and credits will be based on the whole building performance. The MPR Supplemental Guidance Revision #2 mentioned above has some exceptions for when you can exclude part of the building area.

If the renovation is not extensive, you might consider if LEED CI might be more appropriate, and define the LEED boundary for just the new. If the addition is small, it might be okay to still use CI, but if the addition is fairly big it will be difficult to know.

To see if a project counts as a major renovation, you can try going thru the beginning steps to register a new project on LEED Online. If you click the links for help selecting a rating system and all the additional links you eventually find some tables that help determine if the project should be CI or NC. (It would be great if these were easier to find.)

It's hard to tell from just the information here if you can exclude the retail or not. It sounds like you might be able to, since there is separate management and separate mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems for the retail space.

It's possible to imagine a situation with a partial building renovation and addition where you can't meet the MPRs #2 and 3 because the renovated area is large but doesn't follow a clear boundary and the overall building systems aren't being improved enough to meet LEED requirements. You may need to contact GBCI Customer Service to get their advice on how to define your project and whether you can pursue LEED.

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Chris Miller Chief Mechanical Engineer Design Alaska
Apr 09 2012
LEEDuser Member
935 Thumbs Up

LEED boundary include resident caretaker's cabin?

This LEED NC project is a library owned by a non-profit organization. There will also be a cabin built on site as a caretaker's residence (to feed the masonry wood heater and perform maintenance when the building is closed). Can the cabin be included in the LEED project boundary? My concern is that it is a different building type (residential). Excluding the cabin from the LEED boundary is not necessarily a problem, we just want to make sure we are applying the boundary appropriately and staying within LEED NC. Thank you for your comments.

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Samantha Harrell LEED Project Reviewer certificate holder Apr 09 2012 Guest 2604 Thumbs Up

Hi,

When there is another LEED-certifiable building on the same site as the LEED project building, it is not required to certify, but in order to take credit for aspects of the site that are shared between the buildings, refer to the 2010 Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects (AGMBC). The 2010 AGMBC describes the certification process for multiple building situations. It allows for all site attributes to contribute to LEED certification by the use of a Master Site project to document shared Campus Credit strategies (Supplemental Guidance to the MPRs, Rev 2).

The 2010 AGMBC outlines two approaches for certifying multiple buildings, the second (Group Project Certification) of which may or may not be appropriate in this case. Multiple buildings or spaces may be certified as a group within one LEED project registration, where the entire group, with a single LEED project boundary, receives a single rating and certification. However, the AGMBC states that in order to receive group certification, each building or space in the group project must independently qualify for the chosen LEED rating system. Based on the Rating System Selection guidance, the cabin would not qualify for NC. Additionally, LEED Online v3 functionality to support group certification is not yet available, according to USGBC's website.

So after all that, I suggest that you submit a customer service inquiry to determine if you can treat the cabin as a non-LEED-certifiable building. If so, you can include the non-certifying building within the LEED project boundary in all relevant submittals that are allowed and appropriate for each individual credit and prerequisite, essentially treating the non-certifying building as an extension of the certifying building. I hope this helps some.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect Wilmot/Sanz
Apr 02 2012
LEEDuser Expert
14864 Thumbs Up

MPR 2 Incomplete spaces

Does anyone have any experience with the 'Letter of Commitment' referenced in LI 10102? We have 9,000 s.f. of unfinished space in a 215,000 s.f. building scheduled to open in Fall of 2012. We are trying to determine how or if we can certify the 9,000 s.f. when it is completed (now scheduled for 11/2013 which is a significant move up the calendar than we had been working with). There would be no party wall and the project is all owned by one entity. I would love to have the Owner write the Letter of Commitment, build to LEED standards and just be done with it. It would seem like we would have to amend the original building application to demonstrate that we meed the rigor of LEED to the GBCI. Thoughts?

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Catherine Blakemore Architect, LEED AP BC+D, HOLT Architects Apr 10 2013 LEEDuser Member 1408 Thumbs Up

Hi Susan,

How did you fare with the Letter of Commitment? I have a healthcare project for which the Owner needs to compose a Letter of Commitment and am looking for examples or some direction as to content. I'm not having much luck. If you have any suggestions/recommendations, I would be most appreciative. -Cate

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Apr 10 2013 LEEDuser Expert 14864 Thumbs Up

Honestly, we don't know yet. The building opening was pushed back to this winter and I'm finalizing the construction submittal now. The other interesting thing is that the shell space is already built out and was punched last week. Part of my response will be the specs for that project. The sustainable design section deals with the fact that it is in a LEED project. We tracked everything just in case a reviewer gets twitchy.

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Todd Bundren Director of Sustainabilty - Architectural Project Manager, Lawrence Group Apr 10 2013 LEEDuser Member 1137 Thumbs Up

We have the same circumstance and used the CS tenant guidelines document (found on LEEDuser.com) as a starting point. I am curious to see what response you get, please let us know.

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Diana Nezamutinova Consultant Self Employed
Mar 29 2012
LEEDuser Member
432 Thumbs Up

Non-contiguous floors for CI 2009

Can we undergo CI certification of several not contiguous floors in a large office building? The company was able to rent only floors 3,4,6 and 9 in a 12-story building. We are planning to certify all four floors at once. Does this project meet MPR for CI?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Apr 02 2012 LEEDuser Expert 14864 Thumbs Up

I believe that for CI and with one owner that this can be okay but read the MPR 2 guide on the USGBC site (free download).

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Diana Nezamutinova Consultant, Self Employed Apr 03 2012 LEEDuser Member 432 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Susan.

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Aditi Padki Project Architect, LEED AP BD+C
Mar 28 2012
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124 Thumbs Up

MPR #2: Horizontally attached building

I am working on a healthcare project based in Italy. The building is partly existing and partly new and has 5 floors+ basement.
The construction is going to be done in 6 phases, Phase 1 is an new addition to the existing building (existing building is a W shaped bldg and the addition is going to create another wing to make the eventual design 2 over lapped U's).
The addition is a free standing tower from 2nd floor and up and connects to the existing building with just circulation space but the basement, 1st and 2nd floors are attached to the existing building on the full width of the building and share much more than just corridor space.
Electrical and mechanical systems are separate for the phase 1 addition on all floors.
We are thinking of applying for LEED-NC for the phase 1 addition only since the 6 phases might take many years to finish.
My concerns:
1: Can we meet the criteria for MPR#2 even though we have some shared spaces between new and existing on basement, 1st and 2nd levels?
2: The building usage cannot be clearly differentiated between existing and phase 1 addition on the bottom 3 floors, but can we mitigate this issue by creating specific departments in these spaces in the new addition for example: Radiology, Cardiology etc?
Any advice on this is appreciated!

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Mar 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 14864 Thumbs Up

I'm not sure how things work in Italy but in the US, we would have to use LEED Healthcare for this project because this would be a licensed facility and because it is after Jan 2, 2012. You'll want to verify with your version of the USGBC.

You should be able to meet MPR #2 but you'll want to pay close attention to the separation between the new building and the existing building. Your building separation lines on the lower 3 levels will not 'stack' (verify you have a 2 hour floor rating which is common here).

Your last question is more murky and I'm struggling with this one myself. From my understanding of the LEED HC guide and talking with the developers, there are two tests: Fire Wall separation and where something is fed mechanically. However, since US hospitals are built with 'defend in place' strategies, few of our projects have Fire Walls (US terminology alert). I believe that if you provide a 2 hour separation between your building and the new building and do not mechanically heat or cool the new building from the old building then you should be okay. You would then certify the addition only. For those spaces that are straddling both structures, you need to determine which building it is in. Trust me, you and Solomon will have something in common.

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Sara Neff Director, Sustainability Programs Kilroy Realty Corporation
Mar 27 2012
LEEDuser Member
838 Thumbs Up

Tenant Scope in Core & Shell

I have a Core & Shell project that is undergoing some base building renovations on its own, and towards the end of that process a tenant taking up 40% of the building will be moving in. This tenant's build-out will include adding some new cooling units on the roof. Do I have to include the tenant's work in my Core & Shell project? I'm wondering if I need to commission their equipment, hold them to the construction IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. standards, high recycled content, etc, or, since I'm pursuing a Core & Shell certification, I should just pretend that the tenant doesn't exist.

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Sustainability Robinson Director of Sustainability, Vanderweil May 11 2012 LEEDuser Member 80 Thumbs Up

You should check out Appendix 4 in the BD+C Reference Guide. There are three different catagories credits and prereqs fall into which include tenant work as being neutral, excluding tenant work, and including tenant work via a tenant lease or sales agreement.

For fundamental commissioning, just the systems that are part of CS need to be commissioned. This is in the Reference Guide (page 229 in my copy) - the grey box for CS.

For recycled content, just the CS materials are counted. Again, see grey box for CS (page 371 in my copy).

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Joey Jiao
Mar 21 2012
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154 Thumbs Up

MPR 6, if we can check the usage data free?

Hi, everyone , I think the usage data should be really helpful for research. I try to find out them , but I don't get it on the GBCI website.
Could anyone can kindly give a link or any tips about this information?
Any suggestion should be appreciated. Thank you.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Mar 30 2012 LEEDuser Expert 14864 Thumbs Up

This is actually protected information. They may make some of it available (non-project revealing). You would have to contact the USGC and be a qualified researcher.

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Nathan Lee Project Engineer SGS Korea
Mar 13 2012
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464 Thumbs Up

Must Receive Credit in all Categories?

Hello All,

I have a really basic question so please bear with me. Does a project need to achieve at least one credit from all Categories?

I understand that a Project must achieve all prerequisites, but does it also need to achieve credits from all categories as well?

For example, all prerequisites are met, but I do not want to pursue any MR credits (beyond the prerequisites). Can I still achieve certification?

I would appreciate any guidance you could provide.

Thank you.

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Andrew Gil Architect, Associate, LEED AP BD+C. USGBC NY Upstate Board of Directors, HOLT Architects, P.C. Mar 13 2012 Guest 997 Thumbs Up

Nathan,

Simple answer: You need only to pay registration + certification review fees, satisfy the Minimum Program Requirements, and achieve the prerequisites and the 40-point minimum number of credits (including I&D and Regional Priority credits) to get certification. Good Luck.

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Kendal Neitzke LEED Administrator, LEED AP O&M, Assoc. AIA MSI General Corporation
Mar 06 2012
LEEDuser Member
643 Thumbs Up

LEED Project Boundary & underground piping that extend beyond

We are working on a LEED 2009 NC project where the client is building a staffed methane pumping facility at an existing landfill. The processed methane gas is piped underground to a power generation facility off site via an existing underground gas piping network. The LEED Project Boundary currently only includes the immediate construction area of the new pumping facility and does not encompass the entire landfill and does not cover the proposed route of the underground methane piping from the pumping facility to the existing main pipeline in county road right of way.

The current LEED Project Boundary was determined by the land area disturbed to construct the Methane Pumping Facility.

The question remaining, do we also include the disturbed land area of the pipeline trench between the pumping facility and the existing main pipeline in county road right of way?

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Patrick Gilbert principal Gresham, Smith and Partners
Feb 22 2012
LEEDuser Member
47 Thumbs Up

Minimum Program Requirements - Complete Interior space

I am working on a LEED CI v2009 project. It will be constructed as one project but there are two distinct tenants and two sources of funding. Project "one" is a dining servery and dining room renovation. Project "two" is a interior renovation of the entire lease space of a former university bookstore into a student union, office space and small servery. There is a distinct "party wall" between project one and two demarcating the lease line of the former bookstore. Can I interpret the definition of Complete Interior Space to just include project "two"? The client is not wanting LEED certification for project "one".

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Apr 18 2012 LEEDuser Expert 17765 Thumbs Up

If the two spaces have different tenants, funding, and are separated by a party wall it sounds reasonable to pursue certification for only one space.

When you say "constructed as one project" - if that means two separate work contracts happening at the same time, that is okay, but if there is only one construction contract things get messy. Depending on how different the materials are, it can be very hard to track material costs and quantites for the MR credits on just one space if materials are purchased for both spaces. Construction waste will also need to tracked separately, so it may not be as simple as it sounds.

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Marni J Evans Principal Revitaliza International
Feb 22 2012
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102 Thumbs Up

Asbestos and LEED Site Boundary on Campus

Our LEED NC project is built, and is currently pending final review from GBCI. We're on the cusp of Platinum.

The project is a community building that serves a factory campus and is a replacement of the previous community building that was built in the 50's and is contaminated with asbestos. The campus owner has a plan to remediate the asbestos per the local standard, but currently the asbestos building is still intact but not in use.

The new building is across the street from the old building, and we're considering if we can use the MPR Supplemental Guidance to include the contaminated building for credit achievement, but not include it in the site boundary. Currently, the LEED boundary is drawn around the new construction site boundary.

Thoughts?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Mar 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 14864 Thumbs Up

In for a penny, in for a pound. If you want to include the old building for (and I'm assuming here) the BrownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination (may include hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants). They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. (EPA) Redevelopment credit, then it needs to be in the site boundary and the MRc2 calculations. Are there plans to demolish that old structure?

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Todd Bundren Director of Sustainabilty - Architectural Project Manager Lawrence Group
Feb 21 2012
LEEDuser Member
1137 Thumbs Up

Non-reviewable Portion of Building

I am working on a renovation/addition project for a governmental agency, we are attempting LEED NC-Silver Certification. A small portion (under 10%) of the building is considered "top secret" and requires governmental background checks and clearance to view the plans. How should I identify and submit this portion of the building for review?

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Mara Baum Healthcare Sustainable Design Leader, LEED Fellow, HOK Feb 21 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7841 Thumbs Up

Todd, GBCI is very used to working on high security projects for DOD, CIA, FBI, etc. We have always been able to find an acceptable way to submit these projects. You should contact GBCI directly.

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Ameet AA
Feb 15 2012
LEEDuser Member
1228 Thumbs Up

GFA Defination

Hi Iam planning to register a project, may i know do i have to include the internal voids into the GFA (Gross Floor AreaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.))
Can this information be updated after the registration?so incase i get it wrong now, i can still correct it as the project progresses.

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Donald R. Able Director of Sustainability, BSA LifeStructures Feb 15 2012 Guest 379 Thumbs Up

Some software programs can provide space square footages that include to the center of the intervening walls (that is how Engineers figure their heating -cooling loads), but usually that takes more steps. Easiest solution to get from net to gross is with a grossing factor. You need to match your gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. with your cumulative net and it requires that you make up the difference.

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Ameet AA Feb 16 2012 LEEDuser Member 1228 Thumbs Up

Thank you Donald,
Can we change the GFA information after the registration?
If i dont get it accurate during the registation,i can still correct it as the project progresses and more data available.

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Donald R. Able Director of Sustainability, BSA LifeStructures Feb 16 2012 Guest 379 Thumbs Up

The Administrator can always update.

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Jason Biondi Managing Director Energy Cost Solutions Group
Feb 07 2012
Guest
269 Thumbs Up

Too small?

Hi all,
I would like to certify a small environmental center which is the permanent location for 1 college staff member.
The building gross sq. footage is 589. There is an exterior patio area, over hung by the roof and contiguous to the building of 445 sq ft.
Does this qualify under the 1000 sq ft minimum program requirement? If not is there a way to seek approval from USGBC / GBCI for a project of this size?
Thanks in advance
Jason Biondi

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Feb 08 2012 LEEDuser Expert 17765 Thumbs Up

By the book, it would be under the 1000 sf threshold, since that refers to enclosed, conditioned space. You could always try to make your case, so you might try starting with USGBC customer service, especially given the visibility and function of the building. We've found that the smaller the project, the more challenging it can be to certify, so be careful what you wish for!

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Jason Biondi Managing Director, Energy Cost Solutions Group Feb 13 2012 Guest 269 Thumbs Up

Thanks David,
What we went C.I.? Would that be a viable option?
J

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Feb 13 2012 LEEDuser Expert 17765 Thumbs Up

Yes, CI could work.

On second look, check the "Specific building type guidance" in MPR Guidance, Revision #2, page 28. You could consider submitting a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide to see if the covered, exterior space would be qualify as "program area" if it contains significant lighting, displays, materials or other systems. You technically don't meet the definition of gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.), but the glossary indicates that in some cases areas outside of gross floor area may contribute to MPRs. It's a long shot, but in case NC is a high priority, it might be worth submitting the question.

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Antony Ho
Feb 06 2012
Guest
87 Thumbs Up

MPR rev.#2 on Vertically Attached Buildings

After reading many threats here, I'm still quite a bit puzzled how to encircle "LEED Boundary" if there would be some portions of a building floors designated for completely different usage, i.e. hotel vs office.

I would like to express my understanding on Part 2 of MPR rev.#2. and your views would be really helpful to me...!

1.) First of all --- addition on existing VS. entire new built:-
if the portion of desired LEED boundary (say hotel floors) are addition on top of an existing building, then there might be a chance to only certify the new part. Otherwise, an entirely new built tower should undergo LEED completely no matter how the floor usage-mix being designed.
If the above is the true case, it narrows down the spectrum and new built should not possess any fantasy to "dissect & extract" some levels to undertake LEED NC/CS.

2.) Vertically Attached, LEED-EB:OM & Major Renovation Projects:-
In Part 2 III, clause (1) is quite confusing to me especially with the "AND/OR". I can interpret it with 2 different understandings.
--> Interpretation 1: Project is undertaking "LEED-EB:OM / Major Renovation", either vertically attached or not, by satisfying condition (a) & (b), it can be separated from other portion. If the project is vertically attached to other non-LEED-certified building, clause (4) & (5) apply.
--> Interpretation 2: Project is satisfying condition (a) & (b), it can be LEED-separated from other portion no matter it is vertically attached to other parts, or undertaking LEED-EB, or undertaking Major Renovation. Again, clause (4) & (5) are applicable for vertically attached projects.

Since I'm not English-native, the answer might be trivial. Your advice is much appreciated...!

Many thanks.

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Feb 18 2012 Guest 7763 Thumbs Up

 

Antony,

I have made a few assumptions in order to answer your questions. They are:

1. You are trying to determine how to certify a building, which is a vertically attached addition to an already existing non-LEED certified building.

2. The building will have multiple floors with different uses.

(If these assumptions are incorrect please let me know. If you are trying to certify only specific floors of an entirely new building, not an addition, then I would reccomend using LEED-CI.)

To answer your first question:

It is possible to certify only the vertically attached addition of an existing non-LEED Certified building. It is not possible to certify only some floors of an entirely new building using LEED-NC or CS; USGBC does not want people to pick-and-choose which floors of a building will be certified.

To answer you second question:

I believe this is the language you are referencing: 

III. BUILDINGS ATTACHED TO NON-LEED CERTIFIED BUILDINGS

1) VERTICALLY ATTACHED, LEED-EB: O&M, AND MAJOR RENOVATION PROJECTS 

If the certifying project is certifying under LEED-EB: O&M OR is a major renovation AND/OR is vertically attached to the non-certifying building, then it must be separated from the attached building by the following:

a) Ownership

     AND

b) Management OR space usage type

The "AND/OR" clause refers only to the immediately preceding language "is a major renovation." In other words, this applies to major renovations of existing non-LEED certified buildings AND vertically attached additions to non-LEED certified buildings. The "AND/OR" means that you could have a major renovation of an existing non-LEED certified building, which is also a vertically attached addition, or not: both conditions apply.

The key here is the title "III. BUILDINGS ATTACHED TO NON-LEED CERTIFIED BUILDINGS" becuase this means that the language only refers to buildings attached to non-LEED certified buildings. Which means it does not apply to entirely new buildings.

Ultimately this means neither of your interpretations were correct.

I hope this clears things up. Please let us know if you have any more questions.

 

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Suraj Shah Owner Green Footprints
Jan 31 2012
Guest
135 Thumbs Up

LEED MPR not very clear...

There are 2 different projects which we want to get certified.

Case 1: A tenant located in a LEED CS certified building. The tenant occupies the whole building on lease. The tenant fitouts are carried out about 2 years ago. The tenant now wants to pursue LEED rating for the fitouts as the high end HVAC & envelope is not in their scope. Is it possible to apply for CI now after the fitouts are completed about 2 years ago assuming it is able to meet all prerequisites & minimum number of points? Or can only the fitouts apply for Leed EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.?

Case 2: Its a major renovation project where in the our client owns the 30 year old, 5 storey building. Out of 5 floors the owner is occupying only 4 floors & the ground floor is leased out to another user. The building owner does not have control over the ground floor fitouts, but can get watever data/ info is required. The owner is also modifying the envelope, i.e changing facade for better daylighting. The building owner also has control over the site. The HVAC services are not shared with the ground floor tenant. Can the building owner apply for LEED NC rating just for the floors they are occupying, in this case just 4 floors?

The MPR or the supplemental guide isnt really helping us decide in either of the cases. Can someone help us out on this? Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Suraj, in case one I think too much time has passed to apply a D&C rating system -- you must go with EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems..

Case 2, LEED-NC is generally a whole-building rating system and I would want to include the whole building.

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei
Jan 30 2012
LEEDuser Member
4624 Thumbs Up

Historical Building

We are doing a feasibility study to green a campus where a Confucius Temple is located within. The temple is about 200 years old. There is no air conditioning system installed. It has minimum lighting. The Confucius Temple uses natural ventilation. This temple complex consist of a main temple in the middle of the court yard and a C shaped building surround the main temple. There is a detached public toilet room behind the C shaped building. Does this Confucius Temple meet LEED MPR? Can it be LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. certified?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Simon, I would say that it could be LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. certified—I don't see anything that would exclude it. I would, however, think through whether EBOM makes sense and is applicable to such a building. Many EBOM credits have to do with purchasing, cleaning, soid waste management, etc.—it might be an odd fit.

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Lisa Logan LEED AP BD+C Green Ideas
Jan 27 2012
Guest
631 Thumbs Up

no FTE

so if my project (a church) has no FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories., then I can't get any IEQ credits? People will be using the church - they just won't be there 40 hours a week. It just seems unreasonable to say that low emitting materials, daylight (which contributes to energy savings) etc, won't earn you any credit in the IEQ category. Am I understanding this correctly??

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Jan 27 2012 Guest 7763 Thumbs Up

I understand that if you have a space like this you can count the transients as FTEs. Calculate how long they will spend in the building and get your FTEs that way. I have not done this personally, so I reccomend getting an official answer from GBCI. For spaces such as you describe they are usually willing work with you. 

The FTE requirment, as I understand, is really to discourage buildings who really won't have anyone using them regularly. Sounds like this building will be occupied regularly so it's likely GBCI will be able to work something out with you.

Does anyone have experience using this approach?

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Donald R. Able Director of Sustainability, BSA LifeStructures Feb 07 2012 Guest 379 Thumbs Up

Your building requires a minimum FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. of 1 to qualify. Let's assume that your 'transients" (400 people) are there for a 1 hour service per week. Divide the total number 400 x 1 hour / 8 hours/day / 40 hours/week = 1.25 FTEs. Your facility qualifies. You may have other transients that also can be considered.

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Mara Baum Healthcare Sustainable Design Leader, LEED Fellow, HOK Feb 15 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7841 Thumbs Up

There is a supplemental guidance document that lists this exact example, with Donald's explanation - see http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=6473 for the details.

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Sandra Silla
Jan 25 2012
Guest
775 Thumbs Up

Energy and Water Usage Reporting - Manually Tracking

Does anyone have experience with assisting the owner to manually track energy and water usage using Energy Star's Facility Excel Templates? Any first hand information from LEED Certified projects that selected this option where the data was requested from USGBC? Trying to understand the requirements if owner chooses not the track with Energy Star Portfolio Manager, so any advice is appreciated.

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April Rice Sustainability Director, RDG Planning & Design Feb 09 2012 LEEDuser Member 234 Thumbs Up

I am having the same issues. My owner's are asking questions, and I do not know anyone that has gone through this process yet.
thanks!

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Sandra Silla Feb 09 2012 Guest 775 Thumbs Up

Perhaps this is a bit of a moving target. Ironic that LEED requires an owner signature on something that hasn't been completely defined. Makes it hard for the design professionals.

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Felipe Duran
Jan 17 2012
Guest
340 Thumbs Up

NC High Residential Building

I am working on a Mining Camp Project outside US. We are pursuing LEED New Construction certification like High Residential Building. The building is placed on a slope, because of this, some part of building is one story high and others are 4 stories high but the building is mostly less than 4 floors. My question is if it can still be certified as NC High Residential Building?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Felipe, a residentail building of about 4 stories could be certified LEED-NC, if that's what you want to do, especially being outside the U.S.

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Wing Ho Associate Arup
Jan 17 2012
Guest
131 Thumbs Up

Mixed Use Development vs MPR #2

This probably one of the old questions being asked before. Anyone can point me a right direction are much appreciated.

Currently, there is a new construction development contains 2 high-rise towers sitting on top of retail podium and basement carpark (typical development in many Asia countries nowadays). One of the towers will contain office (~80% GSF) and hotel (~20% GSF) portions. From the updated "Supplemental Guidance Rev 2", we understood that GBCI allow to certify one single tower as long as it meets "vertically attached building" scenario. However, my client further questioning - will GBCI accept to certify the office portion of that tower only (say LEED 2009 CS)? Or it must be entire tower under assessment?
My initial thought is entire tower need to be under assessment to keep "entirety", not allow to certify partially. But after reading some posts at here, it seems there're some exceptions.

Any suggestion is welcome.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Wing, generally the MPRs favor certifying buildings in their entirety, but there are exceptions for "vertically attached" projects discussed in the MPR supplemental guidance.

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Nick Morgan PE, LEED AP, CxA CMW, Inc.
Jan 12 2012
Guest
174 Thumbs Up

Construction Fire in LEED Building

We have a building under construction that had an unexpected fire. The damage was minimal but is there anywhere in the reference guide that addresses any impact on LEED certification?

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Jan 12 2012 Guest 7763 Thumbs Up

Nick,

I have not seen any reference to fire in the reference guides. I would suggest contacting GBCI directly.

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Lee Dingemans LEED AP Wightman & Assoc.
Jan 06 2012
Guest
644 Thumbs Up

LEED Boundary

We have more or less decided that either LEED NC or LEED HC rating system is the best way for us to go with this project, and only certify the addition. Thank you to all who responded. This does bring up another question. The original building (6,000sf) was certified under LEED NC v2.2 and most likely had a LEED Project Boundary. We are adding a Building addition (3,000sf) and I am not sure where to draw our LEED Project Boundary. This is for several reasons?
1) This entire or most of this site has been used in the original building LEED certification. Can I (and if I can how can I) redraw a new LEED project boundary as needed for our addition that is most likely including property out of the first LEED boundary area?
2) When the original building was certified it earned some of the site credits like SSc5.2 (Maximize Open Space). When I draw a new LEED boundary using the existing LEED site I will be reusing some of the property originally used for various credits. Is this an issue and if it is what is the best way around this?
3) I don’t know what the original project boundary was for the original building and even if it ever existed, how can I find out? If the owner cannot provide this to me can the USGBC?
4) Between the two building parts (existing and proposed addition) is where the LEED boundary will go?
It would be much appreciated if someone could help me out with these four questions.
Thank you,
Lee

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Lee, I think you should find good guidance on all these questions in the LEED Minimum Program Requirements supplemental guidance document -- under "BUILDINGS ATTACHED TO LEED CERTIFIED BUILDINGS."

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Marco Marco
Dec 22 2011
Guest
216 Thumbs Up

LEED CI - Subleased Spaces / Spaces not fitted out

Dear LEED Users,

we are going to do a LEED CI certification for a office building with 6 floors. The lessee (who requires LEED CI) is going to sublease one of his floors for the first 5 years and later the floor should be added to the other office space. This area will not be fitted out, instead the new sublessee should provide the interior fitout.

The question: Is it possible to include the floor which will not be fitted-out at the beginning in the LEED CI certification?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Marco, I don't think so, because the CI rating system assumes that everything will be installed.

On the other hand, it almost seems like a situation where LEED-CI mostly fits, so it could be pursued.

Back to the first hand, since that floor could just be excluded from the project boundary and that would make the CI certification cleaner and stronger, then it would make sense to exclude it.

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