Design Submital - 1batch only ?

15 replies [Last post]
Apr 29 2011 LEEDuser Member
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Hello,

I was wondering if we could submit the design credits in 2 phases (i.e.one batch submitted now, the other one in 2 months from now).

Would this me we have to pay the USGBC design review fees twice ?

Many thanks,

 

 

15 Comments

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Dave Wortman Program Manager Brendle Group
Jun 16 2011
LEEDuser Member
312 Thumbs Up

Submitting Credits at Very End?

We have a project for which we did a design phase submittal- we are now nearly completion on our construction phase submittal. We are close to the number of points we want, but if we are unable to obtain all of the points we want after we receive comments on the construction phase submittal, can we, in our very last submittal addressing all of the construction phase comments then submit an additional credit? I realize that there would be no opportunity for feedback from USGBC (thumbs up or down), but I wanted to confirm that this is in fact doable?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Jun 16 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17576 Thumbs Up

Yes, it should be possible, but as you note you don't have a chance to respond to any review comments, so male sure what you submit is "audit-proof."

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Jan 24 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15457 Thumbs Up

I have a somewhat similar question. My team has already submitted its Design Submittal and gotten our final review back. We didn't attempt a certain credit nor did we defer that certain Design Submittal credit during the Design Submittal process. Now I would like to open up that Design Submittal credit for two reviews in the Construction Submittal phase. Is that OK? LEED Online seems to be letting me do it but I just wanted to make sure.
Thanks!

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Abril Rueda GPI Jan 26 2013 Guest 36 Thumbs Up

You should defer the design credits to the construction phase by un-checking them when you resubmit your design final review, that way their second round of review is with the construction credits.

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Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Jan 28 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15457 Thumbs Up

I actually received my answer from a GBCI representative:

Assuming the credit was never reviewed, a design credit can be submitted in the construction review with no problems, fees, etc. However, if the credit was reviewed twice in the design review (received review comments), and was denied, it would need to be appealed. (with standard appeal fees applying).

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Shannon Deeb Consultant Mac Company
May 27 2011
LEEDuser Member
381 Thumbs Up

Design Phase Submittals

At what point are design submittals made?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects May 27 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17576 Thumbs Up

Usually, you'd be submitting after construction documents are done, since you need that level of detail to complete the credit forms. Any earlier and it would be hard to be confident that what you submit will actually be built that way.

There's no deadline for the Design Phase submittal, and you can certainly wait until construction is done, but that diminishes the main advantage of getting the design phase review: if you get the preliminary review of those credits, especially the energy model, before construction is complete, there can be time to add or delete certain credits if the project team so desires. Some projects may decide whether to purchase FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. or a Rapidly RenewableTerm describing a natural material that is grown and harvested on a relatively short-rotation cycle (defined by the LEED rating system to be ten years or less). material, or include additional controls or monitoring points depending on the scorecard status after the preliminary design review. Many teams also defer the decision of whether to purchase Green Power or not as late as possible to see where their point totals stand.

It's also typical for projects to go into the final construction review with a few "buffer" points more than their anticipated goal, since many projects are denied a credit or two for any number of reasons.

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Shannon Deeb Consultant Mac Company
Apr 30 2011
LEEDuser Member
381 Thumbs Up

Design Submittal - To do or not to do?

I am working on a project that is only half funded. The A/E firm has been approved for 80% construction docs. It also is going to have a significant amount of leasable space to which tenants have not yet been identified. As the project moves along, the leasable space may become leased and then the use may change which may impact occupancy numbers. Having said all that, would you do a design submittal or not? If yes, when?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 24 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Shannon, what rating system are you using? CS or NC?

Sounds like a design submittal could be complicated. What does the client prefer?

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Shannon Deeb Consultant, Mac Company May 24 2011 LEEDuser Member 381 Thumbs Up

Tristan- Thanks for the reply. We are using NC because 54% of the space has known tenants and/or is owner occupied. The client is looking for my recommendation which I am presenting this week. My recommendation is to hold off until we get approval for 100% construction docs at which time we can reevaluate where we are with funding also. The unknown tenant spaces will probably still be unknown at this time however. Do you or does anyone have previous experience with such a high ratio of unidentified tenant space in using the NC rating system? Any thoughts/recommendations?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects May 24 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17576 Thumbs Up

We've seen similar projects under NC with the owner occupying just over half the building and the rest of the building only built out as a core and shell for future tenant improvements (TIs). If the other tenant improvement spaces are not "controlled" by the building owner or built out as part of the contract for the owner's TI, they can be excluded from the NC submission. Often the other TIs are built by different general contractors and at a different time than the core and shell and owner's TI space, so those would not be considered under the owner's control. Many multi-tenant office building owners feel they cannot require potential tenants to pursue LEED CI for their space, or become part of an NC submission that's already underway since that can increase the costs that the tenants would have to pay for commissioning, documentation, project management, and any material premiums.

For an NC project with some core and shell spaces, the building owner is expected to provide a tenant manual for the other tenant improvements that encourages them to follow LEED guidelines by offering suggestions for material and product selections, explains the benefits of pursuing LEED strategies, and provides guidance to make those options easier to implement such as providing a Construction Waste Management Plan, forms and templates for documenting materials, IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Management Plan for construction, etc.

Hope that helps!

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Shannon Deeb Consultant, Mac Company May 27 2011 LEEDuser Member 381 Thumbs Up

David, Thanks for the above info. If we submit under NC with some C&S space, how do you address the building energy model and water calculations? Does the C&S space get factored into the energy model and water calculations or just the NC space?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects May 27 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17576 Thumbs Up

For the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. numbers that inform the energy model and water calcs you would assume those spaces are built out following default occupancy numbers that are found in the BD&C Reference Guide Appendix 1. For energy modeling of those spaces see Appendix 2, and also the NC and CS 2009 EAp2 forums - there are some related comments there.

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Shannon Deeb Consultant, Mac Company May 30 2011 LEEDuser Member 381 Thumbs Up

David-Thanks so much for all of your guidance. It has been most helpful.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect Wilmot/Sanz
Apr 29 2011
LEEDuser Expert
14432 Thumbs Up

Design Submittal

You can do two things. One, wait the 2 months and submit all design credits together. Two, defer a few of the design credits to the construction credit review. Without knowing why you are wanting to split the design review, I would recommend waiting until all of your design credit documentation was ready. It is easier on your team.

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