International Projects - alternative compliance path

170 replies [Last post]
CEO Geithner Consulting Oct 24 2011 LEEDuser Member
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According to the USGBC about 40% of the newly registered projects are now non-US projects. So finally the USGBC provides new guidelines for international projects.

A guideline for alternative compliance paths for the following credits:

LEED NC 2009

SS c1, SS c3, SS c4.1, SS c4.4, SS c6.1, SS c8

WE c1

MR c5

IEQ P1, IEQ P2, IEQ c1, c2, c3.2, c4.3, c5, c6.2, c7.1, c7.2

Sorry nothing for EA P2 or c1. But I have heard at the Greenbuild that they are working on it. Also if you are using LEED CS, NC Retail, Schools or Healthcare you might still find these helpful.

You can find the draft of those guidelines here. http://bit.ly/tTjUr5

Also new a conversion tool kit and supplemental forms: http://bit.ly/tvnQHT

 

I haven't read through it yet, but I would like to heard what your think and please also post what else you'd like to see. The USGBC likes to read through your posts, too.

170 Comments

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Catie Ryan Project Manager Terrapin Bright Green
Apr 20 2017
LEEDuser Member
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ACP for Certified Wood vs Pilot for Legal Wood

Project Location: Malaysia

The "LEED 2009 Global Alternative Compliance Paths Credit Table" (http://bit.ly/2ovIELH) does not include an ACP for C&S MRc6 Certified WoodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System., but there does exist a pilot for Legal Wood Plant-based materials that are eligible for certification under the Forest Stewardship Council. Examples include bamboo and palm (monocots) as well as hardwoods (angiosperms) and softwoods (gymnosperms).(http://bit.ly/2pIFFnR). The requirements for Legal Wood ("wood products from certified sources as defined by ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services D7612-10") seem like they would suffice for an ACP. How would I go about confirming this as a valid approach?

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jorge calderon earth lab
Dec 08 2014
Guest
627 Thumbs Up

PUBLISHED ACP DOCUMENTATION GUIDANCE FOR PROJECTS OUTSIDE THE US

I opened the link at the top of this page, http://bit.ly/tTjUr5. It indicates that is a draft, dated 2011. Is now a published or new document like this?

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Amanda Johnson Penicaud Green Building Dec 09 2014 Guest 533 Thumbs Up

Yes there are about 7 guides with global ACPs:
http://www.usgbc.org/resources?title=Global%20ACP

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Dec 09 2014 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Jorge,

The draft document you found on our archived page is no longer applicable. The published Global ACP reference guide supplements can be found at http://www.usgbc.org/resources?title=Global%20ACP. Additionally, the credit library at www.usgbc.org/credits contains the Global ACP supplements under the resources section for each credit with a Global ACP.

I hope this helps.

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jorge calderon earth lab Dec 09 2014 Guest 627 Thumbs Up

Sean it helps a lot, thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 10 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

In addition, the Global ACPs have been integrated into the LEED credit language you'll find right here on LEEDuser.

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Mike Barker Principal : Energy / Electrical Engineer, BuildingPhysics South Africa Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Member 2103 Thumbs Up

What if one wishes to use an ACP that is not explicitly published in any of the USGBC Documents ?

For example, we wish to use CIBSE AM10 and AM13 for IEQp1. These Standards are already approved for IEQc2 - there is therefore every reason why judicious use of CIBSE AM10 and AM13 should be allowed ?

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Omar ElRawy Building Engineer, LEED AP BD+C EA Building Consultants
Aug 27 2014
Guest
1442 Thumbs Up

ACP Form

Dear all,
I've got a reviewer comment on SSc6.1 stating that ". Provide a revised form with the pre- and postdevelopment runoff values along with all required documentation for the options chosen. Provide the ACP form which can be downloaded from the Credit Resource tab in LEED online."

While I couldn't find this form under the Credit Resources.
I tried sending feedback for this issue twice but I didn't get an answer.

Knowing that I'am using SSc6.1 v.02 form, If I upgrade to v.05 will I be able to find the ACP form maybe embedded in the new v.05 form?

Thanks

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Aug 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Omar,

The Version 5 form has all of the ACP material embedded in the form as "Option 2. Percentile Rainfall Events." If you use this form, you shouldn't need any additional resources to complete documentation for this credit. I hope this information helps.

Thanks

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Samantha Wolf
May 29 2014
LEEDuser Member
106 Thumbs Up

Foreign currency - Israel

Hello, I have to complete Table L-3. Sustainable Materials, but I have the costs of the materials used in the construction in shekels (Israel currency), my question is, should I change the amount in shekels to dollars? and if so, which date should I consider to exchange from shekels to dollars?
Thank you very much!

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Kath Williams LEED Fellow 2011, Principal, Kath Williams + Associates May 29 2014 LEEDuser Member 2350 Thumbs Up

On 37 certified international projects, our experience is that cost must be in dollars. We have used a variety of exchange rate dates from bid acceptance date to actual purchase dates for materials, which was a farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). more complicated approach. Never had a review comment either way. Maybe others have?

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Jaida Holbrook Enivronmental Engineer, Skanska Sverige AB Jun 27 2014 Guest 1455 Thumbs Up

Our projects use Swedish krona when documenting cost for materials credits etc. As long as you keep the currency consistent through out your project documentation you should have no problem. Remember to keep the LEED cost in the preliminary form with the same currency as well.

Besides the materials credits are looking at precentages it shouldn't really matter what currency you have it in. I recommend to write a note in the preliminary forms so the reviewer is informed.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training Revitaliza Consultores
Mar 19 2014
Guest
2377 Thumbs Up

Healthcare

Hallo,

I would like to volunteer for the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). to create a new ACP for the Healthcare rating system, credit MRc4.2.

Could you please give me some advice?

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Mar 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Gustavo,

Thank you for reaching out with this question. At this time we are not developing additional ACPs for individual credits, but please send me an email off of this chain with more details of what you would like to propose for this credit and we can discuss other options.

Best,
Sean

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Mar 19 2014 Guest 2377 Thumbs Up

Sure,
This is about proposing a standard that meets the maximum lead content for copper pipes required in credit MRc4.2.

After doing some research, I've found out that according to the Official Journal of the European Union, the thresholds are: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2011:174:0088...

Lead (0,1 %) (0.1%=1,000 ppmParts per million.)
Mercury (0,1 %)
CadmiumA naturally-occurring element and source of pigments that were once a staple in paints, but now is largely phased out in architectural coatings except for certain specialty products. High exposure to cadmium can cause a variety of health problems, including kidney damage. (0,01 %)
Hexavalent chromiumA naturally occurring metal used to make chrome, used in some wood treatment compounds, and sometimes used to tan leather. Its usage has been greatly reduced, but it may still be found in some products. Although chromium is an essential nutrient, some chromium compounds are carcinogenic. (0,1 %)

This would make RoHS compliant for copper pipes.

I am still working on finding a standard that meets the lead content for electrical wiring.

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Amanda Johnson Penicaud Green Building
Mar 19 2014
Guest
533 Thumbs Up

LEED CS ACPs for projects outside the US

Hello, I downloaded a Rating System CS with ACPs for projects outside the US (very useful since it includes metric equivalents etc) - but I cannot find this document on the USGBC site. I can only find the LEED NC global ACPs (from october 2012).
Does anybody know if the LEED CS ACPs for projects outside the US is still applicable, and where I can find it again (for updates) if it is?

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E Johnson Mar 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Amanda,
ACP's are still applicable. Although there is a lot of information to dig through, you can do a search on the USGBC website and find ACP documents. Example-http://www.usgbc.org/search/acp

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Amanda Johnson Penicaud Green Building Mar 19 2014 Guest 533 Thumbs Up

Hi Eric,
Thanks for your suggestion - I have definitely looked through everything that comes up and I have not found the specific LEED CS version. I will assume that it is still applicable for the moment (there are alot more ACPs than for the new NC version that just came out!)

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E Johnson Mar 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Sorry I missed that you were just looking for CS ACP's. Try this ACP matrix - http://www.usgbc.org/sites/default/files/LEED%202009%20List%20of%20ACPs.pdf

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E Johnson Mar 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

http://www.usgbc.org/sites/default/files/LEED%202009%20RG%20BD+C-Supplem...
LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Design and Construction For the Design, Construction and Major Renovations of Commercial and Institutional Buildings Including Core & Shell and K–12 School Projects

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Mar 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 4584 Thumbs Up

The ACPs appear to have been fully integrated into the online credit library. That should be the "ultimate" source of what is currently applicable.
I haven't done a comprehensive check, but the ACP for IEQp1 under CS was there so I presume that the rest are as well.

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Amanda Johnson Penicaud Green Building Mar 19 2014 Guest 533 Thumbs Up

OK- thanks both of you - The Rating System I have has more ACPS than listed on the matrix (or un the BD+C guide), I will check in the Credit Library too.
thx

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Mar 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Amanda,

Thanks for reaching out with this. I know that it can be a little bit confusing. The LEED 2009 ACPs for Projects Outside the U.S. were replaced with the LEED 2009 Global ACPs in 2012, and these were fully integrated into the credit language for each credit with an ACP. In this process, a few ACPs were removed. As Michael mentioned, the most up-to-date language is available in the LEED credit library at usgbc.org/credits. You can also find all LEED 2009 Global ACP resources at http://www.usgbc.org/resources?title=Global%20ACP.

Thanks,
Sean

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E Johnson Mar 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Sean,
Thanks! Great link! It's very helpful.

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Amanda Johnson Penicaud Green Building Mar 19 2014 Guest 533 Thumbs Up

Yup! Thanks for this and we will only use the global ACPs henseforth!

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C ThemaVerde, France
Oct 03 2013
LEEDuser Member
1097 Thumbs Up

Low flow pre rinse spray valve in Europe

EUROPE: Pre-rinse spray valve 1.6gpm or lower

Our project is an office bldg with a Kitchen Restaurant in Europe.
We are looking for pre-rinse spray valves of 1.6gpm (6L/min) or lower available in France/Switzerland/Germany...
Our Plumbing Engineer is having a lot of troubles finding a low flow version from the European manufacturers he knows.
Has anyone found an American manufacturer that distributes here or an European one?
Thank you all in advance,

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Oct 07 2013 LEEDuser Member 11026 Thumbs Up

I think you'll find that this is not the case. The flow rate just seems lower because it is given at a different pressure. Ask the engineer to check that the flow at pressure relation is the same. If the manufacturer has no data at the american pressure, you need to convert a European flow at European rated pressure to a American flow at American rated pressure. You could employ the Power-law relations (as a good approximation), i.e. Flow=C*dP^n. Your engineer should know all of this.

Quick example:
EU: faucet flow 6L/min at 7bar
American: 5bar...what is the flowrate

Flow=C*dP^n...solve for C
(6) =C*(7)^0.5
therefor C = 2.267786838

Solve American flow using C
Flow=C*dP^n
Flow=(2.267786838)*(5)^0.5
Flow=5.0709 L/min

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E Johnson Oct 07 2013 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Jean,

I think she is looking for a product that meets the requirements?

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C, ThemaVerde, France Oct 07 2013 LEEDuser Member 1097 Thumbs Up

Hi Jean and Eric,
Thanks for your answers.
Yes if you know a product that meets the requirements that would be really helpful.
The current pre-rinse valve specified by the engineer has a flow of 18 l/min at 3 bar, which is way too high for LEED...
But I will certainly let him know that we need a 6L/min at 5bar as you mentioned Jean so that he can run the calc for other products!

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Oct 07 2013 LEEDuser Member 11026 Thumbs Up

1) Just to clarify...that was just an example (I didn't check the rated pressure for these calcs...also, these calcs are IMO an acceptable conversion approximation. That does not mean that they have been given the green light by USGBC. Manufacturer datasheets are always best.)

2) If you're looking for a product, http://www.greenbuildingproducts.eu/datenbank/ is a good database.

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C, ThemaVerde, France Oct 07 2013 LEEDuser Member 1097 Thumbs Up

Thanks Jean for the clarification.
I checked the database, really helpful! Unfortunately did not find any pre-rinse spray valve... but we will keep looking!

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Jan 10 2014 LEEDuser Member 11026 Thumbs Up

Just a bit of an additional note. Most faucets exibit a pretty steady flowrate at quite a wide pressure range, making my powerlaw method null and void. However, I did come accross Neoperl perlators, which can reduce flowrates wonderfully.

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Caroline MORA Green Building Manager, NG Concept SAS Apr 09 2014 Guest 78 Thumbs Up

Dear Charline,
did you finally find a low-flow pre-rinse spray valve in Europe? If yes which brand?

Another question regarding the requirement of 1.6 gpm maximum flow for the pre-rinse spray valve in commercial buildings: if there is an additional tap included in the pre-rinse spray valve equipment (so 2 taps: one designed to remove food waste from dishes prior to dishwashing + one standard tap) should the additional tap follow the requirement also?

Thanks in advance!

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Jens Apel Apr 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 1463 Thumbs Up

I have seen a project using the 5PR-1S00 by equip.tsbrass.com. They do have add-on faucets as well. I would consider the add-on tap a separate tap not required to comply with the 1.6 gpm.

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C, ThemaVerde, France Apr 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 1097 Thumbs Up

Caroline,
I did find one manufactured in the US but is being distributed in France or Germany... if that helps I can look it up and send it to you.
And I would agree with Jens on the add-on tap.

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Jorge López de Obeso Architect / Environmental adviser EA Energia y Arquitectura
Jul 03 2013
LEEDuser Member
1101 Thumbs Up

ACP forms

Hi!
I have been looking for the ACP forms but have not been able to find them. Based on the ACP Documentation Guidance and information provided in posts below, they should be in the Credit Resources section in LEED Online but they are not there. Could anyone please tell me where I could find them? Thank you!

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Jul 08 2013 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Johanna,

With the launch of the Global Alternative Compliance Paths last July, the ACP forms were replaced with options in the LEED Online forms for identifying that the project is using an ACP. You do not have to fill out a separate form when submitting with an ACP.

Additional resources for the ACPs can be found at http://www.usgbc.org/resources?title=Global%20ACP.

I hope this helps, please let us know if you have further questions.

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Jorge López de Obeso Architect / Environmental adviser, EA Energia y Arquitectura Jul 08 2013 LEEDuser Member 1101 Thumbs Up

Hi Sean!!

Thank´s for your response.
I understand this is applicable to the latest form version in LEED Online. What if I haven´t got the latest form, is there any other way to have access to the ACP forms?

Or, would I have to update LEED Online forms?

Thanks in advance.

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Jul 08 2013 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Johanna,

I would recommend updating your forms to the newest version since there will likely be corrections for other issues as well. This is the best way to capture the requirements of the ACPs in your documentation. Once the new forms were released, the ACP forms were removed from LEED Online.

However, if you have already made significant progress in the LEED Online forms you are currently using, you can use these forms and download the new LEED online forms to use as supplemental documentation for the ACPs. To do this, you will need to attach the new form as part of your supplemental documentation and ensure that you have identified how you have met the ACP requirements.

Thanks,
Sean

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Jorge López de Obeso Architect / Environmental adviser, EA Energia y Arquitectura Jul 08 2013 LEEDuser Member 1101 Thumbs Up

That´s a good idea Sean.

It will work for sure in most cases. But I´ve just checked the newest forms available. For example, SSc4.4, the latest form (v04) does not include ACP documentation. Any thoughts on where I could find the excel resources for documenting ACP?

Many many thanks. :)

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Jul 10 2013 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Johanna,

When the Global ACPs were released in July 2012, they replaced the "ACPs for Projects Outside the U.S." The ACP for SSc4.4 was actually removed when this took place. To make sure you are using the most accurate and up-to-date ACPs, I would be sure to explore the resources available at this link: http://www.usgbc.org/resources?title=Global%20ACP. One resource that may be particularly helpful is the table identifying which credits have global ACPs in all applicable rating systems.

Thanks!

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Lolita Wu
Jun 07 2013
Guest
254 Thumbs Up

Campus projects with different rating system

Hi all,
We are working on a master site project with three single buildings in the block. Two office buildings are pursuing LEED CS and one hotel building is pursuing LEED NC. They share the same parking lot, but it might be divided for three buildings according to the designer. As the requirement in SSc4.4, the hotel building will need 5% preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. For employee parking, it refers to the spots that are closest to the entrance used by employees. for carpools/vanpools. But we want to attempt this credit as a campus credit. So how many preferred parking spaces do we need, 5% of hotel parking or 5% of total parking spaces?

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Stefanie Hoffmann HAAGA HELIA OY Ab
May 22 2013
Guest
507 Thumbs Up

Help, please

Dear all,
Having worked on a LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. project in Helsinki, Finland, where we were unfortunately not able to fulfill one of the prerequisites (EAp2), motivated me to dedicate my bachelor's thesis to this particular topic. It is my intention now to create a "guidebook" on how to successfully implement those prerequisites, which are the most challenging in projects outside the US.
Is there anyone who would be willing to share his/her experiences with me over Skype or telephone interview? I am particularly interested in experiences regarding the implementation of prerequisites in projects outside the US.
I would very much appreciate any help and I will of course share my findings with you, too!
Best wishes,
Stefanie

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Daniela Castro Salgado LEED AP BD+C / Architect Edmonds International Ltd
May 14 2013
Guest
1062 Thumbs Up

U-Value Units Conversion

Hi!
I am working with a project in the UK and need to convert BTUA unit of energy consumed by or delivered to a building. A Btu is an acronym for British thermal unit and is defined as the amount of energy required to increase the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit, at normal atmospheric pressure. Energy consumption is expressed in Btu to allow for consumption comparisons among fuels that are measured in different units./(hr ft2 F) used for the U-values in the ASHRAE Standard to W/(m K). Is there any tool to do this conversion or any method you could recommend me to do this? I keep getting very weird result with the converters I find in the internet.
Thank you for your help!!

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E Johnson May 14 2013 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Try SI for HVAC&R-ASHRAE-May 1999
Multiply-By-To Obtain
Btu·ft/h·ft2·°F-1.731-W/(m·K)

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Eleni Thomidou Bilfinger Baugesellschaft mbH May 14 2013 Guest 209 Thumbs Up

We used the same as Eric gives you.
Also to find :
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9780470661093.app1/pdf

look under Thermal conductivity

Good luck in unit conversions generally! ;)

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Daniela Castro Salgado LEED AP BD+C / Architect, Edmonds International Ltd May 14 2013 Guest 1062 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much!! This was really helpfull.

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Stefanie Hoffmann HAAGA HELIA OY Ab
Mar 12 2013
Guest
507 Thumbs Up

EAp2 - Energy Performance Benchmark

Hi all,

we are working on a LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. project for a university building near Helsinki, Finland.

At the moment we are struggling to fulfill the requirements of EAp2. After entering all data into the Portfolio Manager it became clear that our performance is not good enough to meet the prerequisite (weather normalized source EUI of 145.0).

After talking to a staff member of Energy Star and after reading through documents on the methodology of Portfolio Manager we are quite confused. EAp2 requires comparing the energy performance to the national average whereas Portfolio Manager compares it to U.S. buildings. So what sense does that make for international facilities? The CBECSThe Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. CBECS data is used in LEED energy credits. which is the basis for mostly all benchmarks in Portfolio Manager didn’t include any international facilities and as the staff member of Energy Star explained our project building is compared to U.S. buildings of that type and how they would operate under Finnish weather conditions.

Did anyone of you have similar problems? Or did anyone use a local benchmark instead of Portfolio Manager?

P.S. our project building is only 2 years old, no energy-intensive spaces, all computers are Energy-Star labeled and by comparing our energy consumption to 4 other universities in Finland, our performance was in all cases better.

I’m grateful for any hints or tips.

Best,
Stefanie

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 21 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Stefanie, could you please post this question to our EAp2 forum? Thanks.

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Stefanie Hoffmann HAAGA HELIA OY Ab Mar 25 2013 Guest 507 Thumbs Up

Hi Tristan,

I did post it to the EAp2 forum already and talked about it with a couple of people. But it wasn't helpful because no one had experience with international projects so I thought I'll try it again here.

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John Burnett FAC-LEEDership Mar 31 2013 Guest 656 Thumbs Up

Stefanie.
We recently completed certification for LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. large banking & finance office building in Hong Kong, using Energy Star. This is possible because ES has the weather file data for Hong Kong. Our project include small data centers so is relatively energy intensive, yet with the right building data, including number of PCs, the ES score was reasonable.
My understanding is that ES compares with comparable CBECsThe Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. CBECS data is used in LEED energy credits. buildings, defined by type and size, rather than across the whole range.
If no weather file for your project's location, try a similar US location. This will give you an indication of EUI and EAp2 compliance.

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Stefanie Hoffmann HAAGA HELIA OY Ab Apr 02 2013 Guest 507 Thumbs Up

Hi John,
thank you for your reply!
There is weather data available for Helsinki but when I compare average monthly temperature data to our project location it sometimes differs up to 10 degrees (Celcius). Also average rainfall differs. Does that count already as "similar weather data"?
If not how would I find a U.S. location with more similar climate?

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Apr 02 2013 LEEDuser Member 11026 Thumbs Up

how much historical data are you looking at for your average? weather can vary drastically from year to year. CDDA measure of how hot a location was over a period of time, relative to a base temperature. In this report, the base temperature is 65 degrees Fahrenheit, and the period of time is one year. The cooling degree-day is the difference between that day's average temperature and 65 degrees if the daily average is greater than 65; it is zero if the daily average temperature is less than or equal to 65. Cooling degree-days for a year are the sum of the daily cooling degree-days for that year. and HDD can vary up to 40% from one year to the next. This is the point of TRY weather data. It is not actual weather data AMY. The available set of international TRY weather data from ASHRAE is usually good enough. if you need more info or explanation in this regard, contact the folks at whitebox technologies or weather analytics.

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Stefanie Hoffmann HAAGA HELIA OY Ab Apr 30 2013 Guest 507 Thumbs Up

Hi Jean,
sorry for the late reply. I just checked the internet for weather data so this was probably not that reliable. In the meantime we also dropped the project since we don't meet EAp2 and the weather data was my last attempt to find a reason for our high energy consumption figures.
But thank you for your info anyways!

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Saliha AIT LEED AP BD+C OGER INTERNATIONAL
Jan 30 2013
Guest
473 Thumbs Up

Documentation language for international projects

Hi,
USGBC said in a FAQ document that it is not needed to translate all documents in english but the important part of them.
I would like to have exemples of documents that reviewers asked to translate completely and other not.
For exemple in EAc3 we have to upload the systems manual that covers the commissioned systems. Do we need to translate it in english ? And the contract between the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. and the owner will not be in english does a markup considered as enough ?

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Jan 31 2013 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your question. As the FAQ guidance suggests, entire documents do not need to be translated into English, only the portions that are relevant to ensuring that the project has met the requirements of a given credit or prerequisite. In your example for Enhanced CommissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. (EAc3), the entire systems manual would not need to be translated. Please see the LEED 2009 Reference Guide for Green Building Design and Construction (updated 2010) for the full list of credit requirements. Additionally, it is required that any information found in the Project Information Forms is also translated into English. Mark-ups of these documents and any contracts (as long as they are easily legible) are considered sufficient translation for the purposes of a review. It is noted that the reviewer may ask for additional translations to portions of these documents in the effort to confirm credit compliance.

Please let us know if you have any additional questions.

Best,
Sean

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Saliha AIT LEED AP BD+C, OGER INTERNATIONAL Feb 05 2013 Guest 473 Thumbs Up

Thanks Sean.
When you said to refer to the full list of credit requirements, I assume that you are talking about the EAc3 credit.
Because I have only the first edition of LEED 2009 guide. Does the Reference guide updated in 2010 have additional information related with the documentation langage?

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Feb 22 2013 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Saliha,

I was referring to EAc3 when mentioning the full list of credit requirements. As for updates to the reference content, I recommend using the LEED Addenda and Interpretations database, available at https://www.usgbc.org/leedinterpretations/LILanding.aspx to search for any reference guide addenda for this and any other credit. Search the database for the appropriate credit (in this case, EAc3) and it will provide you with all updates that have been made via reference guide addenda.

Best,
Sean

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Jun 03 2013 LEEDuser Member 11026 Thumbs Up

What should we do about PIfs. They are not credits. They do not have a ACP, but, for example, the mechanical schedules and plans may only contain metric units. Reworking all plans to include imperial units is not feasable.

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Jun 03 2013 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Jean,

I would recommend you use the Metric Conversion tool, available on our website to convert the units needed in PI2 and PI3. The tool can be found on our resources page at http://www.usgbc.org/resources/metric-conversion-tool-october-2012.

As for the required uploads in the PI forms, it is generally best to convert the most pertinent information that relates to LEED credits in these documents. As with the example above, not all information in these documents needs to be converted.

Best,
Sean

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Alexander Benning Project Manager ES EnviroSustain GmbH
Oct 31 2012
LEEDuser Member
366 Thumbs Up

ACP also for Commercial Interiors?

We have a Commercial Interiors project (office refurbishment) in germany.

Specifically, we wonder if we can apply the ACP for IEQc4.3 flooring systems to a CI project?
Generally, are the ACP's applicable to CI projects?

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E Johnson Oct 31 2012 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

From the USGBC website -
"Batya Metalitz, U.S. Green Building Council
The ACPs can be downloaded in the resources section and include both the July 6th releases and the new releases (Healthcare, Commercials Interiors, Retail - CI and Retail - NC), dated October 1. The language has also been incorporated into the credit library."
https://new.usgbc.org/resources?title=Global%20ACP

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Oct 31 2012 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Alexander,

Eric is correct. The global ACPs are available for CI projects (as well as the other rating systems mentioned). The global ACPs for these rating systems were developed to align with those already created for NC, CS, Schools and EB:O&M. No new ACPs were developed in this process. To view the available resources for all global ACPs, please visit the resources page of the USGBC website: https://new.usgbc.org/resources?title=Global%20ACP.

Thanks,
Sean

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Jens Apel
Aug 01 2012
LEEDuser Member
1463 Thumbs Up

ACP forms and documentation guidance

Could anyone please guide me to the current ACP forms and the documentation guidance? I think there were available in the rating system - resources - international section but it seems they are gone (or I can't find them).
Thanks, Jens

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E Johnson Aug 01 2012 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Jens,

Try here - http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=2628
According to the webinar last week the "The Global ACPs have been fully integrated into LEED Online forms for added functionality." and "Offline calculators have been added and modified to include the Global ACPs. These are available in the Credit Resources page in LEED Online."

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Jens Apel Aug 02 2012 LEEDuser Member 1463 Thumbs Up

Thanks Eric. Maybe both the forms and offline calculators are available in newly registered projects or after a project form update by the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)..
If the ACPs are in the forms, shouldn't there be new sample forms (v05?).

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E Johnson Aug 03 2012 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Jens,

Good question, I browsed around LEED Online and if you download the excel file named "LEED Online v3 Form Fix Log" and filter to 2012 you can see that there are indeed version 5 forms listed there. It would be nice if they updated the release notes in the Help section.... If you read the help section for LOv3 Form updates you will also find that you need to request new forms if you want them. "The latest version of the form is automatically provided to all projects registered after the release date and any other projects that have not yet saved data on the specific form. Projects with an older version of the form may request the latest version (see instructions below)."

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Jul 25 2012
LEEDuser Moderator

International ACPs rolled into credit language

As of the 7/6/12 LEED addenda release, USGBC has integrated the International ACPs into the regular LEED credit language—so rather than reviewing the standalone document, you can see the ACP options within the main LEED credit language on this site and in other USGBC outlets.

I provide an overview of key changes associated with the ACPs in my regular LEED addenda update.

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Maria Kutelova
Jul 05 2012
Guest
1046 Thumbs Up

Currency Conversion

Hi everybody,

I see that many of you here have extensive experience with international projects. How have you handled the MR Calculator for regional, recycled content with the part of the cost? We have all costs in EUR and we want to keep it this way to ensure consistency.
What is has been your experience so farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters).?
Thanks!

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Jul 05 2012 LEEDuser Member 11026 Thumbs Up

As the end results are in %, it really doesn't matter...to be consistant I would stick to dollars.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Jul 05 2012 LEEDuser Member 4584 Thumbs Up

It's worth a try submitting in EUR. If the review team objects then you can always do the conversion for the final submission. I just submitted the cost analysis for an EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. project (IOc3) in EUR - let's see how that is met. Be sure to note that you have submitted in EUR rather than USD.

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Susann Geithner CEO, Geithner Consulting Jul 05 2012 LEEDuser Member 13885 Thumbs Up

We have submitted a few projects. You will be asked by the reviewer to submit in dollar. However there is no requirements for a certain conversion rate. So we applied 1 EUR = 1 Dollar, which is reasonable if you compare the buying power of EUR to dollar (That's actual a more realistic value anyway). Also as Jean was pointing out the percentage stays the same either way. However you are required to provide it in dollar. Some reviewer may not have an issue with you using EURO, but we did have review comments asking us to provide dollar values.

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Angela Saggin
Apr 17 2012
Guest
582 Thumbs Up

ACP

Hi!

I haven't seen if someone has already asked this, so if someone has done it, I'm sorry to be questioning again.

When we choose the alternative compliance, it's also needed to complete the original form to confirm the credit or simply make the upload of the ACP form is enough?

For example, the ACP form for C&S SS Credit 6.1 it's very different from the original form. Is it ok if I only complete the ACP form?

Thanks!

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Apr 18 2012 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Angela,

Thank you for your question. When completing the documentation for all credits, please be sure to follow the directions given in the "ACP Guidance for Projects Outside the U.S." document located on the USGBC website at https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=10341.

Generally, you will need to fill out at least part of the original form in order to properly document compliance with the credit.

I hope this helps.

-Sean

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Angela Saggin Apr 18 2012 Guest 582 Thumbs Up

Hi Sean!

Thanks for your answer. I've read this document and I saw that some credits require filling the original form and others don't, that's why I've had this question.

But your answer just confirm what we actually thought!

Thanks again!

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Tobias Silies Dipl.-Ing. Witte Projektmanagement GmbH
Mar 16 2012
Guest
171 Thumbs Up

ACP

We are working on an 32.980 m2 (354.862 sqf) core an shell office project in Frankfurt, Germany. We plan 20% green areas (roof and external areas) in relation to the site area and therefore comply to SS Credit 5.1. Case 2.

Can you please inform us on the headline in SS Credit 5.1. Case 2. It states ' this case is not available to projects outside the US'. We assume that refers to the text below and the option to donate offsite land?

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Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer, Skanska Sweden Mar 16 2012 LEEDuser Member 3442 Thumbs Up

Hi Tobias
I agree with you that it is a bit fuzzy in this text: http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=8870 But case 2 is definately a case you can use. It's whats in the full version of the Reference Guide. I use it in Sweden!
However it is not an ACP. There is no ACP for SSc5.1 that I can see. You can see at the top of this page which credits have ACP's. Good luck!

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Mar 16 2012 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Tobias,

Maria is correct. The box does refer to the text below, and that case is absolutely available to projects outside the U.S. Good luck with your project!

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Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer Skanska Sweden
Feb 20 2012
LEEDuser Member
3442 Thumbs Up

How do we show compliance with CEN standards in IEQp1?

In order to show compliance with CEN standard for IEQp1, what exactly do I upload? Is it sufficient with a homemade tool that has the exact same parameters as the VRP calculator with the only difference that I swap the required ventilation rates for the ones in CEN? In CEN there are eight different areas: single office, landscaped office, conference room, auditorium, restaurant, classroom, kindergarten and department store. Only the first five of CEN are applicable to an office building. Compare this with ASHRAE’s sixty-three different types of areas! And for IEQc2 I will still go 30 % above ASHRAE since otherwise I’d be over-ventilating a building which leads to unnecessary use of energy. Right? Anyone outside the US who has tried the ACP with CEN standard? Please give me guidance!

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Susann Geithner CEO, Geithner Consulting Mar 14 2012 LEEDuser Member 13885 Thumbs Up

You will probably be one of the first to try this. Have you looked at the LEED Online forms for ACPs in regards to what's required?
I know that the USGBC is working really hard to give you all more guidance in that regards. I have done a lot of projects in Europe and dealt with the US vs Europe differences and am helping the USBGC to figure out a good way of comparing the standards.
If I were you I would document CEN compliance in regards to the same criteria, which ASHRAE is looking at such as outside air supply per room. Use the CEN room types. But pay also close attention to the other requirements in 62.1. such as toilet exhausts and controls.

Good luck with your project.

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Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer, Skanska Sweden Mar 15 2012 LEEDuser Member 3442 Thumbs Up

Susann, How would you do regarding IEQc2? We want to do that one according to ASHRAE.
And where can I find the LEED Online forms for ACPs? I have never seen one of those and have no idea where to find them. If there was one for IEQp1 it would really help. Currently we are making our own tables. Thanks!

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E Johnson Mar 15 2012 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Maria,
The ACP forms can be found at the USGBC web site under each rating system information page.

For example see: Resources-International-ACP Documentation Guidance for Projects outside the U.S. (PDF) -- Step-by-step guidance on documenting compliance with the Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs) for each credit.

http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=220

If you review the Submittal Guidance for using Alternative Compliance Paths for projects Outside the U.S. it will tell you how to document compliance with the CEN standards.

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Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer, Skanska Sweden Mar 15 2012 LEEDuser Member 3442 Thumbs Up

Eric, thank you for showing me where the forms are. Unfortunately there are no forms for IEQp1 and c2, which we need. The step-by-step guidance I had already. The problem with the guidance is that it is unclear how to show compliance. It says "upload, as needed, alternative tables or calculations". We have now made our own calculator. However ASHRAE and CEN have a very different way of showing things so it's a bit fuzzy what they want. We will just have to submit and get feedback.
Does anyone know if there will be "real" LEED Online forms for all ACPs? Like a button or check box in the current form if you want the ACP for international projects?

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Mar 15 2012 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Maria,

We are currently working on integrating the ACP language into our existing LEED Online forms. We will be sure to update you here on LEED User when those forms are available. Thanks for your question!

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Susann Geithner CEO, Geithner Consulting Mar 15 2012 LEEDuser Member 13885 Thumbs Up

Maria, If you are planing on using ASHRAE for IEQ c2 than you might as well use ASHRAE for IEQ P1 also, because you will determine minimum compliance for ASHRAE 62.1-2007 for IEQ P1 and than show how much you are exceeding it.
Some critical items are toilets / restrooms, waste rooms and operating rooms, which require lower outside air rates/exhaust rates in CEN vs ASHRAE, so pay attention to that.
If you are using a lower air quality class in the building for CEN compliance than you certainly have to look at more space types and increase their air supply.
Good luck with your project.

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Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer, Skanska Sweden Mar 16 2012 LEEDuser Member 3442 Thumbs Up

Sean, thank you. Looking forward to that!
Susann, we have 100 % outdoor air throughout the building. No problem complying with CEN standard as it is has the status of a Swedish standard. The problem with using ASHRAE for IEQp1, for several of my projects, is that they have garages. And by checking the box that we comply with ASHRAE sections 4 through 7 we would say that we have exhaust rates of 3,7 l/s and m2 in the garage. No Swedish project that I know of would have exhaust rates that high. The rest of ASHRAE is not that hard for our projects to comply with. So we want to use CEN for that reason.
Also see my thread on: http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/IEQp1 from sep 27, 2011.

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Susann Geithner CEO, Geithner Consulting Mar 16 2012 LEEDuser Member 13885 Thumbs Up

We had that issue also in some projects. First thing you want to look at is, if your garage is open to the surroundings, because it is a bit different if that the case. We have had projects with no exhaust but jet vans to move the air through the garage to the outside.
Another way is to include the volume of the smoke exhaust system in the garage in the equation, which you can do if it's triggered by CO2Carbon dioxide (not just CO) sensors. That basically a two stage demand controlled ventilation.
It's really a common problem and mostly results from the big differences in car emissions in the US vs. Europe. In Europe there is no need for that much exhaust, because the emissions aren't that high. In the US you really need that kind of exhaust rate. I hope that helps.

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Lauri Tähtinen Consultant, Ramboll Finland Oy Mar 23 2012 LEEDuser Member 200 Thumbs Up

Hi Susann,

Did I got this right: If my underground parking has demand controlled ventilation with maximum exhaust rate over 3.7 l/s,m2 it would fulfill the requirements of ASHRAY, even though the average exhaust rate would be much lower?

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Susann Geithner CEO, Geithner Consulting Mar 28 2012 LEEDuser Member 13885 Thumbs Up

Yes. If your system can handle 0.75 cfm per sf even if the CO2Carbon dioxide sensors make it run at much lower levels all the time, it is OK for ASHRAE. Just make sure to set CO2 levels triggering the sensor appropriately.

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Elodie DUMAS ALTO Ingénierie Jun 04 2012 LEEDuser Member 1053 Thumbs Up

Hello Sean,

I am currently working with LEED certification in France for an office building.

It is mentioned in the ACP guidance for IEQ P1 :
“For “Upload IEQp1-1”, upload the ventilation rate calculations for all applicable spaces including the design
outdoor ventilation rate based on the requirements of Annex B of Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN)
Standard EN 15251 ».

As Maria said before, CEN standard has 8 areas where ASHRAE 62.10 has more than sixty ; therefore is it compliant to provide an homemade tool with same parameters as the VRP calculator (based on this 8 areas) ?

Morever, do we need to comply with the entire ASHRAE 62.10 or just with the ventilation rate ?
(as mentioned in the ACP guidance for IEQ P1 : “Under “Mechanical Ventilation”, check the box with the declaration of “Mechanical ventilation systems are designed
using local code, which is more stringent than the ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 Ventilation Rate Procedure”.” ; this sentence is quite disturbing…)

Thanks for your answer,

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Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer, Skanska Sweden Jun 04 2012 LEEDuser Member 3442 Thumbs Up

Review Response to ACP for IEQp1

I have received response for my project now. The home made tool was accepted! The only comment we got, that resulted in “pending”, is that they wanted the Ventilation Systems Designer sign the ASHRAE-box although we are not using ASHARE. I have no idea why. So we are going to sign, but write in special circumstances that our signature means that we comply with CEN and not ASHRAE as farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). as we are concerned. (Of course we comply with the whole of ASHRAE too, except for exhaust rates in the garage, which we refuse to alter).

Just wanted to let you all know.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Jun 04 2012 LEEDuser Member 11026 Thumbs Up

The known get-around for exhaust rates in the parking garage has been to install a CO2Carbon dioxide Demand Ventilation System. Usually those axial "jet" fans are part of the smoke exhaust scheme.

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Elodie DUMAS ALTO Ingénierie Jun 04 2012 LEEDuser Member 1053 Thumbs Up

Thanks for this prompt answer Maria,

So you use ASHRAE for both IEQ P1 and IEQ C2 or only CEN standard ? i didn't quite understand your last sentence : "Of course we comply with the whole of ASHRAE too, except for exhaust rates in the garage, which we refuse to alter"

Thanks

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Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer, Skanska Sweden Jun 04 2012 LEEDuser Member 3442 Thumbs Up

Loïc, in this case we used CEN on both. The problem with garages is that ASHRAE uses four times higher exhaust rates than we do here. We have lower emissions, and in a cold country we can’t over-ventilate. This is the only reason we use CEN instead of ASHRAE. Since we have 100 % outside air in our offices it is no problem complying with ASHRAE in all other senses.

Jean, in another of my projects we said that we comply with everything in ASHRAE, except for in the garage, where we instead install CO-monitors, (which we always have). This was also ok according to reviewers.

So we are just testing options for the same problem that I have in all my inner city projects and that has caused us a lot of concern

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E Johnson Jun 04 2012 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Maria,
While the vehicle emissions might be lower in Europe every time I leave a parking garage here I always seem to take with me a cough, teary eyes, and "eau de exhaust" on my clothes. Maybe it's just my allergies?

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MARIA GARCIA
Feb 08 2012
Guest
464 Thumbs Up

LEED CI

Dear all,
Do you know if we can use these alternative compliance paths also for the CI projects??
Thanks a lot!!

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E Johnson Feb 08 2012 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Maria,
If you go to the USGBC site. http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=2346 it looks like CI is not included yet.
See below
Learn more about ACPs for specific rating systems:
New Construction
Schools
Existing Buildings: Operation & Maintenance
Core & Shell

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Feb 08 2012 LEEDuser Member 4584 Thumbs Up

Eric is right, but if the credit is very similar to the NC/CS credit and the standard approach doesn't work then I would encourage you to at least try it.

There doesn't seem to be too much international customization in the LEED 2012 documentation yet, but I saw a few things (particularly related to VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. testing) that could prove useful. Again, not guaranteed, but if you are following their rules and fulfilling the credit intent then you should have a strong case.

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MARIA GARCIA Feb 09 2012 Guest 464 Thumbs Up

Thanks a lot!
I knew that CI was not included, but just in case someone had heard anything about ACPs for CI.
Thanks again!
María

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Susann Geithner CEO Geithner Consulting
Jan 31 2012
LEEDuser Member
13885 Thumbs Up

Material and Product certifications in LEED EBOM

I have received a couple of emails and inquiries from especially European project teams in regards to the standards referenced in LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. for Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices..
So here is the current situation. In order to meet the requirements of "Green Cleaning—Purchase of Sustainable Cleaning Products and Materials" your cleaning products will have to meet either Green Seal or environmental choice CCD standards. Both are certification common in North America, but uncommon international.
This results in the fact the international projects (non US, or Canada) can not apply any of those credits (I know that from talking to colleges in Europe and my own projects). I have checked the new ACPs as well as LEED Interpretations and there is nothing to help with this issue. Also the draft of LEED 2012 does not address that issue. So at the moment there is no solution.
However I have found one work around for projects with ionized tap water in lieu of chemical cleaning solutions. see credit interpretation ruling 11/1/2011 ID# 10141 This is also incorporated in the new LEED 2012 draft.

Nevertheless there is a growing demand for LEED EBOM on the international market and for quiet a few credits there is no alternative approach for international projects. So now you may say, how about showing equivalence of European standards like Ecolabel, Blauer Engel, ... with Green Seal or CCD. or even the products itself. This is very comprehensive, expensive and for a certification of operations and maintenance also something that can change very quick with products selection. This is the reason I keep hearing, when asking why do you not do that.

Here is another problem often mentioned by the US-certification representatives, the requirements in Green Seal do not translate one to one into for instance the European Eco Label. Some contents are not covered, others are measured differently. This is also due to the fact that Europe as a lot of regulations already that prohibit the use of certain chemicals or limit others.

My personal opinion in this matter is that this needs a solution proposed by the USGBC written in the LEED 2012. It's costly and not maintainable for project teams to work on showing compliance of one standard vs another.

I hope to hear more from other projects teams in regards to this matter or even solutions and ideas.

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Feb 01 2012 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Susann,

Thanks for your comment. As Deon mentioned below, we are currently seeking feedback on the LEED 2009 ACPs for Projects Outside the U.S. via a quick feedback form on our website. It would be wonderful if you could also make your comments in the forms!

You can view the feedback forms on the LEED NC, CS, Schools & EB:O&M rating system pages through this link: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=222 or through the LEED International Program page here: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=2346.

Using the feedback forms allows us to more easily track user comments and suggestions, enabling us to integrate your feedback more efficiently. Thanks again!

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Deon Glaser Director, LEED International Technical Development U.S. Green Building Council
Jan 30 2012
LEEDuser Member
957 Thumbs Up

Form Now Available for Non-US Project Feedback on ACPs

Hello everyone! As promised, we finally have feedback forms for the LEED 2009 ACPs for Projects Outside the U.S. available for you on the USGBC website. LEED is built on the input and feedback we receive from the green building community, and this dialogue allows LEED to remain flexible and responsive.

You can view the feedback forms on the LEED NC, CS, Schools & EB:O&M rating system pages through this link: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=222 or through the LEED International Program page here: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=2346. We hope to hear from you soon!

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Eirini Matsouki Atkins
Dec 12 2011
Guest
466 Thumbs Up

Older projects elegibility for APC

Am i right to assume that all non-US projects registered under the LEED 2009 version (rating systems: NC, C&S, Schools, EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.), before October 2011, have the option to comply either with the original credit requirements or the ACP?

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Deon Glaser Director, LEED International Technical Development, U.S. Green Building Council Dec 12 2011 LEEDuser Member 957 Thumbs Up

Hello Eirini,

You are correct. All non-US projects registered under the LEED 2009 rating systems with ACPs for projects outside the US may use either the original credit requirements or the ACPs. Because ACPs are alternative compliance paths they are merely additional options for projects and not required for use. If the original credit language is more applicable a project may use that path.

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Eirini Matsouki Atkins Dec 12 2011 Guest 466 Thumbs Up

Many thanks for your prompt reply Deon.

This approach will help us a lot for a project we have in Europe and struggling a bit with the floorscore....

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Deon Glaser Director, LEED International Technical Development U.S. Green Building Council
Nov 15 2011
LEEDuser Member
957 Thumbs Up

Feedback on the LEED 2009 ACPs for Projects Outside the U.S.

Hello everyone,

After working at USGBC for the past 5 1/2 years, I have recently transitioned into a role overseeing the LEED 2009 ACPs for Projects Outside the U.S. and am happy to see such great dialogue going on in this LEEDuser forum.

We are currently working on creating a feedback form so that we get input from practitioners like you on what is working with these ACPs and what we need to improve going forward. I will provide a link for you all as soon as we get it finalized - we'd love to hear from you.

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E Johnson Nov 15 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Deon,
Welcome to the international market. It's great to hear there will be a feedback form for us to provide input on the ACP's. For the most part the items I have reviewed are a good step forward.

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Susann Geithner CEO, Geithner Consulting Nov 15 2011 LEEDuser Member 13885 Thumbs Up

Thanks a lot for sharing the information.

Many users will love to here that they are being heard. I know Jean and I have had many headaches applying an US rating system to projects in another country.
I personally will be more than happy to share experiences, suggestions and improvement idea from past and future projects.
Please also feel free to ask us questions. Many user here are dealing with the LEED documentation of international project every day and know what will or will not help them.

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Deon Glaser Director, LEED International Technical Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jan 27 2012 LEEDuser Member 957 Thumbs Up

Happy Friday everyone! As promised, we finally have feedback forms for the LEED 2009 ACPs for Projects Outside the U.S. available for you on the USGBC website. LEED is built on the input and feedback we receive from the green building community, and this dialogue allows LEED to remain flexible and responsive.

You can view the feedback forms on the LEED NC, CS, Schools & EB:O&M rating system pages through this link: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=222 or through the LEED International Program page here: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=2346. We hope to hear from you soon!

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Ian McCall Environmental Engineer Apr 03 2015 Guest 1569 Thumbs Up

Hello Deon Glaser & welcome to International World of LEED!
Do you know of any equivalencies for the NFRCNational Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is a non-profit organization that provides uniform, independent rating and labeling used to measure and compare energy performance of windows, doors, skylights, and attachment products. 100,200,300 & 400 procedures for International / European projects?
Regards,
Ian

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E Johnson Apr 07 2015 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Ian,
Your energy modeler should be able to confirm the proposed envelope elements meet/exceed the NFRCNational Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is a non-profit organization that provides uniform, independent rating and labeling used to measure and compare energy performance of windows, doors, skylights, and attachment products. procedures.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Apr 10 2015 LEEDuser Member 11026 Thumbs Up

As an energy modeller, I would say the manufacturer should supply this information. The NFRCNational Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is a non-profit organization that provides uniform, independent rating and labeling used to measure and compare energy performance of windows, doors, skylights, and attachment products. norms contain more than just how to deturmine the rating values.

Now if the manufacturer won't supply this information, I can painstakingly construct the frame and window in THERM and WINDOW and produce the NFRC rating values, but I would still require engineering drawings in dxf/dwg and sections in the same of the element. As I don't do this often, it's probably going to take 1-2 days for me to do it and like I said, I'll need quite a bit of info on the individual elements constituting the assembly.

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E Johnson Apr 10 2015 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

A little old but perhaps helpful-IEA-Issues paper for Policy pathway for windows and other glazed areas
This voluntary program has over 21,000 approved projects; however, limited NFRCNational Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is a non-profit organization that provides uniform, independent rating and labeling used to measure and compare energy performance of windows, doors, skylights, and attachment products. ratings exist for commercial projects. This implies LEED applicants are using alternative methods to comply with the LEED energy and atmosphere requirement.
The USGBC’s LEED program requires numerous measures to ensure good environmental and energy performance. Window energy policy is embedded in the energy and atmosphere requirement by referencing ASHRAE 90.1-2004. As described in this document, ASHRAE 90.1 references NFRC 100/200 for window energy performance rating and requires maximum U-factors and SHGCs by climate zoneOne of five climatically distinct areas, defined by long-term weather conditions which affect the heating and cooling loads in buildings. The zones were determined according to the 45-year average (1931-1975) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days (base 65 degrees Fahrenheit). An individual building was assigned to a climate zone according to the 45-year average annual degree-days for its National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Division.. This is a mandatory requirement and the user may also achieve a higher LEED rating or score by exceeding the ASHRAE 90.1 minimum criteria.

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Ian McCall Environmental Engineer Apr 10 2015 Guest 1569 Thumbs Up

Thank-you for your comments.
From what I understand to date is that the alternative methods are acceptable for NFRCNational Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is a non-profit organization that provides uniform, independent rating and labeling used to measure and compare energy performance of windows, doors, skylights, and attachment products. 100, 200 & 300 if they comply with the LEED requirements.

The procedure that I am most "concerned" with the is NFRC 400 "Procedure for Determining Fenestration Product Air Leakage".

In France we do air leak tests but they are quite different (temperature, pressure, flow rates etc..) from the NFRC 400.

Are there any instances where we can use the standard European / France air-leak tests?

Regards,

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E Johnson Apr 10 2015 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

You could try Bureau Veritas? I believe EU air leakage standards are generally much harder than US requirements.

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Ian McCall Environmental Engineer Apr 10 2015 Guest 1569 Thumbs Up

Unfortunately I have a feeling that many international projects just "bluff" their way through the LEED quality assurance reviews for certain credits; notably credits that involve electronic signatures and that are never reviewed by the USGBC a second time in the construction review.
EAp2 is a perfect example; a design stage electronic signature and no review at the construction as we say is pretty "easy-peasy".

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E Johnson Apr 10 2015 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

If someone wants to cheat (or cut corners) in any system it can be done (See many real world examples beyond green building certifications). Maybe I've been lucky but every project I've worked on the people involved really wanted to create a more sustainable project and do it the right way, that's one of the great things about working in this space.

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Susann Geithner CEO Geithner Consulting
Nov 15 2011
LEEDuser Member
13885 Thumbs Up

LEED CS international projects

Here are the ACP Documentation Guidance for Projects outside the U.S. for LEED CS 2009 projects http://bit.ly/rXfh1q

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Susann Geithner CEO Geithner Consulting
Nov 15 2011
LEEDuser Member
13885 Thumbs Up

LEED for Schools - international projects

Here are the ACP Documentation Guidance for Projects outside the U.S. for Schools http://bit.ly/tIWT0i

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Susann Geithner CEO Geithner Consulting
Nov 15 2011
LEEDuser Member
13885 Thumbs Up

LEED EBOM - International Guidelines

In case you don't know where to find the ACP Documentation Guidance for Projects outside the U.S.:
http://bit.ly/uabXDm
Also available there are supplemental forms and the conversion tool kit.

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Susann Geithner CEO, Geithner Consulting Nov 15 2011 LEEDuser Member 13885 Thumbs Up

Alternative compliance paths are included for the following credits/prerequisites:
SS c4, SSc6,
WEc3, WEc4.1-4.2,
EAp2, EAc1, EAc6,
MRc1, MRc2.1, MRc2.2, MRc3, MRc4, MRc5,
IEQp1, IEQp2, IEQc1.2, IEQc1.3, IEQc1.4, IEQc1.5, IEQc2.3

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert
Nov 15 2011
LEEDuser Member
11026 Thumbs Up

Developement on EAp2?

Are there any plans to do the same sort of thing with EAp2? The problem areas here are things like NFRCNational Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is a non-profit organization that provides uniform, independent rating and labeling used to measure and compare energy performance of windows, doors, skylights, and attachment products. 100,200,300,400 measurement protocols (for everything from "leakiness" of doors to visible light transmittance of windows). Some things are easy to prove equivalency, others not so easy.

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Susann Geithner CEO, Geithner Consulting Nov 15 2011 LEEDuser Member 13885 Thumbs Up

Not yet, but they did say they are working on it and it is about time. These issues have been very time consuming and cost prohibitive for no good reason. It would be nice if the USGBC starts rethinking it's requirement for cooling in a building. If I even have an IT closet in the building or a big conference room with cooling I have to consider the whole building to be cooled even though it is not and never will be. There are a lot of things under EA P2, which I think need to be critical revisit with an international view of building practice.

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Ian McCall Environmental Engineer Apr 03 2015 Guest 1569 Thumbs Up

Hello,
I know this is an old post but has the USGBC found local equivalencies for the NFRCNational Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is a non-profit organization that provides uniform, independent rating and labeling used to measure and compare energy performance of windows, doors, skylights, and attachment products. 100,200,300 & 400 procedures for International / European projects?
regards,
Ian

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E Johnson
Nov 13 2011
LEEDuser Member
6055 Thumbs Up

LEED EBOM 2009 EA Prerequisite 2 & Credit 1 - ACP

Has anyone else noticed that some of the ACP documents state that international projects can't use Energy Star for energy benchmarking or energy performance? This is like changing the rules to the game in the middle of the game. The change will have major impacts on market transformation and the time, cost, and ability of international (in my case European) projects to earn any level of certification.

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal , ecocentric cc Nov 14 2011 LEEDuser Member 2072 Thumbs Up

i haven't seen this per se - where is this documented? would be very keen to see this, since this would potentially affect us as well (haven’t run the numbers yet).

my understanding so farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). has rather been that international projects are now ALLOWED to use Option 2 to demonstrate compliance, which may make it a whole lot easier for some projects, while maybe not for others? international projects have never been able to use the ES PM other than for benchmarking, providing a score rather than a certificate.

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E Johnson Nov 14 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Jutta,
The documentation is constantly changing and conflicting, but the original ACP EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. documentation released around October 9th states the following:
CASE 1. Projects Eligible for Energy Star Rating-This CASE is not available to Projects outside the U.S.
CASE 2. Projects Not Eligible for Energy Star Rating OPTION 1-This CASE is not available to Projects outside the U.S.
CASE 2. Projects Not Eligible for Energy Star Rating OPTION 2-Note for Projects Outside the U.S. - Projects outside the U.S. can use Option 2 but are limited to Option 2B or 2C, as outlined in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.
The original LEED EBOM manual states this:
"For building types covered by ENERGY STAR but located outside the United States, use Case 1 to obtain an ENERGY STAR rating. The Portfolio Manager tool provides a list of locations outside the United States, but it is not complete. If the location for an international project is not listed, consult ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Appendices B and D to determine a comparable US city."
The issue is that there is no national energy data available outside the US, like CBECSThe Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. CBECS data is used in LEED energy credits.. See the excerpt from an EU energy research committee.
"Breakdown of Energy Consumption
Information on the average breakdown of total energy consumption for different end-uses in nonresidential buildings is not available for most countries or is limited for the other countries. In cases when information is available, most of the data refer to the last decade.
Breakdown of Energy Consumption in Different End-Use Buildings
Information on the average breakdown of total energy consumption for different end-uses in nonresidential buildings is not available for most countries or is limited for the other countries."

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E Johnson Nov 14 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

The problem with Options 2B and 2C is the following:
"Enter at least 3 consecutive years of historical energy use data into Portfolio Manager, in addition to the current year's data."
ACP Problems:
OPTION 1. Benchmark Against Comparable Typical Building CASE 1. National Energy Data Available - No Data available
OPTION 1. Benchmark Against Comparable Typical Building CASE 2. National Energy Data Not Available - Finding three typical, comparable buildings with permission to use their energy bills. Requires 12 months of data.
OPTION 2. Demonstrated Energy Efficiency Improvement-The building must have at least four consecutive years of site energy data.
The certification process for some buildings just jumped from 12 months to 48 months or longer for buildings that are a few years old but didn't LEED certify previously....

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal , ecocentric cc Nov 14 2011 LEEDuser Member 2072 Thumbs Up

thanks for the posting and this doesn't sound very encouraging at all!

i hadn't seen these and hadn't actually delved into these, since from all i heard at toronto and from all i read in the documentation guidance and on the usgbc website is that following the ACP remains optional: we may either use the ACP or the original credit requirement. maybe a formal clarification from international@usgbc.org would help sort this out?

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E Johnson Nov 14 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Jutta,
I plan on submitting a rather lengthy document to the USGBC once I review all of the conflicting documentation detailing my view on the impacts.
The current ACP document is totally different from the previous form. It would be nice if they would put version numbers on documents rather than October 2011.

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E Johnson Nov 14 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Good news. Looks like it was just a mix up.
"Thanks for your question about EAp2 and EAc1 for EB projects outside of the U.S. The language stating that Case 1 was not available to projects outside of the U.S. was erroneously included in the Rating System with ACPs. The case IS available to projects outside of the U.S. and the box stating otherwise has been removed from the Rating System."

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Nov 15 2011 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Thanks for posting that response, Eric. Also, thank you for noticing that the language is still included for EAc1. We will work to remove that language as soon as possible and update the rating system to reflect this.

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E Johnson Nov 15 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Sean,
Thanks for the quick response.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Mar 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 3651 Thumbs Up

Just to say, I've completed the process now with Energy Star for an EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. project in Vietnam. A few small bumps but I received my rating and the energy intensityThe ratio of consumption to unit of measurement (floorspace, number of workers, etc.) Energy intensity is usually given on an aggregate basis, as the ratio of the total consumption for a set of buildings to the total floorspace in those buildings. Conditional energy intensity and gross energy intensity are presented. The energy intensity can also be computed for individual buildings. score as required. I did get confused due to some aspects of the Energy Star site. They said that my project could apply for the Energy Star Rating, but following that link, I quickly found that it is really only possible with US projects, or US Government-owned projects. It must be signed off by a US-registered architect or engineer. LEED on-line reponses clarified: What you need for LEED is only to generate the energy intensity and the comparison with other projects and that is done automatically and can be documented in a PDF format called an SEP, which is provided via another link on the Energy Star summary page for your project. This SHOULD also show the carbon emissions, but like others I found that it didn't show up on the SEP so I used a screen shot of the relevant part of the summary page to record the CO2Carbon dioxide data. By sharing data with the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). I assume the rest is straightforward. The only other quirk I noted was that for some reason choosing my final data month didn't work (February), I had to choose January as my end month. I still don't know why, but this allowed me to generate the report as required. I have no idea if that last quirk was temporary/to do with my data/or otherwise, but its effect was minor. Hope that helps.

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Reinhard Oppl Independent consultant on VOC issues formerly with Eurofins Product Testing A/S
Nov 03 2011
Guest
2598 Thumbs Up

ACP for EQ 4.3 credit

There are two major drawbacks on page 25/26:

The text only refers to equivalency with Carpet and Rug Institute Green Label Plus, not to equivalency with FloorScore - there is no reason to see wha that.

On top of page 26 the document requires to address the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content of a list of chemicals, while the referenced CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. GLP is about VOC emissions of those chemicals.

As this is for international projects, the same wording about alternative pathways as in draft LEED 2012 could have been selected.

This deserves improvement, I should say.

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Nov 15 2011 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Reinhard,

It appears as though you are referring to the ACP Documentation Guidance Document. To be clear, this document is designed to assist project teams using ACPs to prove credit compliance in LEED Online. To view the ACPs themselves, please visit our website at www.usgbc.org/leed.

I hope this clears things up a bit!

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert
Oct 28 2011
LEEDuser Member
11026 Thumbs Up

MR Credits: What nothing on CSI Masterformat Alternatives

In Germany we use the DIN 276, in the UK I think it is SMM7. As almost all MR credits are based on percentage cost with the cost denominator calculated as per the CSI categories, these credits are major headaches and usually abandoned. This issue needs addressing.

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Oct 31 2011 LEEDuser Expert 22673 Thumbs Up

Jean,

This is the opposite situation here in the US, the MR credits are fairly easy. How are these credits major headaches? Is it a lack of alignment with the CSI formats?

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Susann Geithner CEO, Geithner Consulting Oct 31 2011 LEEDuser Member 13885 Thumbs Up

It starts with CSI categories being different from European categories, it goes on with contractors being unfamiliar with the process and definition of for instance post vs pre consumer recycled content and translation into English. For the regional materials, it's more so the level of detail for documentations, which makes projects shy away from it. Most projects have no problem using materials within 500 miles. The majority does that anyway.
Looking at LEED 2012 this isn't getting any easier.

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E Johnson Nov 08 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

However the costs are categorized for a building they still all have the same material elements. Carpet is carpet in Germany, the UK, or the US. Revising the material cost budget may be an additional step that seems unnecessary, but it doesn't seem as difficult as completing an energy model or convincing the project to go greener?

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Nov 08 2011 LEEDuser Expert 22673 Thumbs Up

I agree, translating ASHRAE standards to other standards does seem more difficult. But the MR discussion reminds me of the early days of LEED (2001 - 2002) and calling every manufacturer, explaining LEED and asking questions. I know I wasn't the only one. But now we have manufacturers who understand the program and address it up front.

Here is a link to the MasterFormat sections names by Division. It is a long document and it is only in English but maybe it starts to help with the MR problem.
http://www.csinet.org/Home-Page-Category/Formats/MasterFormat/About-MF/n...

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Nov 11 2011 LEEDuser Member 11026 Thumbs Up

I disagree. Usually costing is done by a Qualified Quantity Surveyor. I'm not one of them, and the architectural firm doesn't have one that is familiar with the costing splits. Yes, a carpet remains a carpet, but into which category it falls is a problem. We in Europe simply have big problems with this. Architects working for the client often want as little to do with LEED as possible and are often downright unwilling to cooperate. If I, the LEED AP can't do it, it doesn't get done. That is the real life situation.

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E Johnson Nov 11 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Jean,

I know a European QS firm who would be happy to provide you the costing service. :)

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Nov 15 2011 LEEDuser Member 11026 Thumbs Up

Could you post me a web-link please? I'll follow it up. Thanks.

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E Johnson Nov 15 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Jean,

You can contact me through LEEDuser if you want and I'll get back to you.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert
Oct 28 2011
LEEDuser Member
11026 Thumbs Up

ACP for IEQ Credit 7.1:using EN 15251 + + ISO 7730 thermal comf

EN 15251 + ISO 7730, combination is almost identical to ASHRAE 55...doesn't make this credit any easier.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert
Oct 28 2011
LEEDuser Member
11026 Thumbs Up

MERV8 = F5 and MERV13 = F7

There you have it folks. It's official.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert
Oct 28 2011
LEEDuser Member
11026 Thumbs Up

All ACP for international projects allow Metric Unit submittals

All ACP for international projects allow Metric Unit submittals...if I understand the impact properly.

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E Johnson Nov 08 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Jean,
It seems like the USGBC has just provided a tool to help with the conversion process.
"Complete all your metric (SI) to imperial (IP) unit conversions for LEED documentation, with one consolidated tool." - http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=220

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Maria Kutelova Nov 09 2011 Guest 1046 Thumbs Up

Hi Jean,
I believe you stand correct: GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). now accepts metric measures not only for the ACP but also for the drawings. I have inquired about this in an official e-mail.

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E Johnson Nov 10 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Maria,
I will jump for joy when metric units are accepted! I do see that some of the ACP forms (7 out of 49 credits) will accept both units; however I don't see an explicit statement allowing this in the website documentation and the November 1, 2011 LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Design and Construction Addenda, for example, still reference the following language "Units of Measurement Guidance
In order to facilitate certification review by U.S. based reviewers, it is necessary to submit pertinent aspects of review-related documentation in English and convert units to U.S. Standard (i.e. Imperial) units of measure, unless noted otherwise in the credit or prerequisite description. It is not necessary to translate every aspect of every construction document into English and imperial units, but only those necessary for evaluation of criteria. The project team should be prepared to provide additional translation(s) if requested by the reviewer in their preliminary review comments." from 11/3/2010. Perhaps it's just a case of not coordinating the official documents? Please share any official response you receive.
By the way did you see the requirements for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. energy benchmarking? It might be a really big problem for European projects....

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E Johnson Nov 11 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Additional information
I was re-reading the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance  With Alternative Compliance Paths For Projects Outside the U.S. and on page iii is the following:
"Please note that LEED Online is written in English and that all metrics used within LEED online are Imperial (IP) units. All projects are required to submit documentation in English, using Imperial units., Project teams that typically work in Metric (SI) units should use the ACP Conversion Tool to convert measurements to Imperial units."
Dear USGBC / GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). please clarify the metric-imperial issue?

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Maria Kutelova Nov 23 2011 Guest 1046 Thumbs Up

Hi Eric, here is the response I got on the question regarding drawings and metric system:
"To answer your question, projects can now submit their documentation in Metric units. We understand that most projects outside of the U.S. use Metric, so we want to be as accommodating as possible to these project teams. Please note that we have not been able to convert all of our LEED Online forms to Metric, therefore, we have created a conversion tool that should help teams using Metric convert any measurements to Imperial units for use in the forms."
I believe we can submit the drawings with metric, but still convert the forms and calculations to imperial.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Nov 23 2011 LEEDuser Member 4584 Thumbs Up

One of my colleagues recently asked USGBC International the following question:

Considering the fact that the update introduces metric conversions for all current LEED measurements, is it already acceptable by reviewers to provide project documentation and drawings in metric system? Or it is still a subject to discussion with the respective reviewing team.

The response was as follows:

To answer your question, projects can now submit their documentation in Metric units. We understand that most projects outside of the U.S. use Metric, so we want to be as accommodating as possible to these project teams. Please note that we have not been able to convert all of our LEED Online forms to Metric, therefore, we have created a conversion tool that should help teams using Metric convert any measurements to Imperial units for use in the forms.

We interpret this to mean that the LEED On-line forms still need to be filled out with imperial measures but that metric drawings are now accepted.

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E Johnson Nov 23 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Maria and Michael,
I sent an e-mail to Deon and Sean and hopefully they will clarify the issue for us. I asked them to post the answer back here.

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Maria Kutelova Nov 23 2011 Guest 1046 Thumbs Up

Eric, it was exactly Sean who replied to our inquiry. Will be interesting to hear their comment on the rest of the documentation and submittals. Thanks!

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Nov 29 2011 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi everyone,

Maria is correct, projects are now allowed to submit supporting documentation in Metric units (plans, specifications, etc.). As mentioned previously, we have not been able to convert all of our LEED Online forms to Metric, therefore, we have created a conversion tool that should help teams using Metric convert any measurements to Imperial units for use in the forms.

We will be sure to clear up any confusing language in the rating systems.

Thanks!

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E Johnson Nov 29 2011 LEEDuser Member 6055 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the clarification. It's a great step forward to be able to submit the supporting documents in metric units!

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Mike Barker Principal : Energy / Electrical Engineer, BuildingPhysics South Africa Jan 31 2012 LEEDuser Member 2103 Thumbs Up

At one stage we had to regenerate the reports - one in metric, and one in imperial. We then submitted the two Trane Trace reports.

If the LEED system did the conversion in the background back to imperial for the US-based invigilators, then no one would be disadvantaged.

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Elodie DUMAS ALTO Ingénierie Jun 13 2012 LEEDuser Member 1053 Thumbs Up

Hello,

We are currently developing an office building near Paris, and our client is considering LEED as an important option for its project.

I have two questions concerning the gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) definition.

1/ Should I consider the US gross floor area definition since we are using a similar definition in France
(with one difference : a headroom height of 1.8 meters or greater)?

2/ If I have to use the US gross floor definition, should I consider a headroom height of 2.2m (LEED) or 2.3m (ASHRAE) ?

In the LEED document : “Rating System Selection Guidance, version 4, last update 1 September 2011”, the gross floor area is defined as :

"Gross Floor Area: (based on ASHRAE definition) Sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements must be taken from the exterior faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED-CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non-enclosed (or non-enclosable) roofed-over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. Note: while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits."

While it is defined in the ASHRAE 90.2007 as : ANSI / ASHRAE STANDARD 90.1-2007 :

"the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 2.3 meters or greater.
It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimney, roof overhangs, and similar features."

Thanks for your help !

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Sean Fish Project Manager, LEED, U.S. Green Building Council Jun 13 2012 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Hi Loic,

When determining the gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) for your project, please use the ASHRAE height of 2.3 meters or greater for headroom.

Please contact GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). technical customer service at http://www.gbci.org/org-nav/contact/Contact-Us/Project-Certification-Que... if you have any further questions about which space types should be included in the gross floor area for your project.

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Elodie DUMAS ALTO Ingénierie Jun 18 2012 LEEDuser Member 1053 Thumbs Up

Hello Sean,

Thanks for your answer, actually i have sent this question to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). and waiting the answer.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert
Oct 28 2011
LEEDuser Member
11026 Thumbs Up

ACP for IEQp1 uses EU Ventilation Norms

Adhering to EN 15251 and EN 13779. In some instances EN 15251 is stricter than EN 13779 and visa verse, but if you know your way around these norms, this is a good alternative path.

The requirements and procedures (in principle) are almost identical to ASHRAE 62.1, with a few small differences (for example toilet exhaust rates).

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Susann Geithner CEO, Geithner Consulting Oct 31 2011 LEEDuser Member 13885 Thumbs Up

Agreed. A lot of projects have way more outside air than required by ASHRAE 62.1, a lot of dedicated outside air systems and 100% OA but the toilet exhaust is less.

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Bernadette Stauder-Buschlinger Bilfinger Bauperformance GmbH Dec 02 2011 LEEDuser Member 127 Thumbs Up

I appreciate the new possibilities given by the ACP for projects outside the U.S. Is it possible to use the EN 15251 and EN 13779 for the IEQ category and ASHRAE for EAp2 and c1? Then two regulations will be applied to one project. What is your opinion?

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Deon Glaser Director, LEED International Technical Development, U.S. Green Building Council Dec 02 2011 LEEDuser Member 957 Thumbs Up

Hello Bernadette, thank you for your question and your thoughts on the ACPs. The LEED 2009 ACPs may be used individually by project teams as they are needed. This means that projects may use the ACP for IEQp1 but not for EAp2 if teams wish. Therefore, the CEN Standard EN 15251 & EN 13779 may be used for the related credits in IEQ and ASHRAE 90.1-2007 may be used for the related credits in EA.

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Maria Kutelova Jan 10 2012 Guest 1046 Thumbs Up

Dear Deon,
Is it possible to opt for ACP after preliminary design review feedback has been received. The ACP for int. project were issued after we have submitted for design review.
Any feedback is welcome. Thanks in advance!

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Deon Glaser Director, LEED International Technical Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jan 10 2012 LEEDuser Member 957 Thumbs Up

Hello Maria, and thank you for your question. Project teams are able to apply the LEED 2009 ACPs to their project even after their design review is complete. However, each credit will still only be given two rounds of review (preliminary and final) before an appeal is required. This means if a credit was reviewed without using the ACP during the preliminary design review phase and the ACP strategy was applied during the final design review phase the ACP strategy will only be reviewed once before an appeal is required.

We hope this resolves your issue. In the future please feel free to submit your questions on the certification and review process by going directly to http://www.gbci.org/contactus. This will allow you to submit your project information so GBCI can review your project when answering your inquiry and giving you a more detailed answer.

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Petr Vogel Specialist Consultant, EkoWATT CZ Oct 04 2012 Guest 489 Thumbs Up

Dear Deon, dear all,

when following ACP EN 13779:2007 in CS.IEQp1 and CS.IEQc2 we do experience a very uncertain conditions given by this method in terms of IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. – fresh air supply. Acc. to EN 13779:2007 it is possible to set classes from low to high IAQ (IDA 4 – IDA 1). This is then significantly implying the amount of fresh air needed.

Is this really flexible for us/investor to freely set the targeted class of IAQ or is it somehow more specified? I did not find any further specification what class should be taken.

What is the implication on the credit IEQc2 of the classes IDA 1-4 + 30%? Also very flexible then plus the credit makes no sense then if it is free to set IDA class of IAQ.

Please could somebody clarify this?

Thanks,
Petr

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 23 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Petr, I would recommend posting your question to our IEQc2 forum. Thanks.

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