LEED Canada Forum

60 replies [Last post]
LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 06 2012 LEEDuser Moderator Post a Comment

If you're working on a LEED Canada project, here's a user forum just for you! Share your questions, confusions, challenges, successes, and lessons learned in this space.

Note that in many respects, LEED Canada, from the Canadian Green Building Council (CaGBC), is very similar to the U.S. version of LEED-NC, and so many questions are answered, and discussions are  taking place, through our LEED-NC resources and forums. But if you're dealing with a uniquely Canadian spin on things, this forum is for you.

60 Comments

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Joyce Kelly Consultant Architectural Fusion
Oct 16 2016
LEEDuser Member
427 Thumbs Up

U.S. Owner building in Calgary wants LEED U.S. vs. LEED Canada

Project Location: Canada

Citing delays in reviews and response to questions as well as unfamiliarity with the Canadian version of LEED, a U.S. based Owner wishes to pursue LEED Silver for a project in Canada with U.S. LEED rather than LEED Canada.
Does anyone know if this is possible? desirable?

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Keith Robertson President, Solterre Inc. Oct 17 2016 LEEDuser Member 794 Thumbs Up

Canadian projects have registered and certified in the US in the past in cases where the rating system isn't offered in Canada (i.e.: Retail, Healthcare.) Version 4 will all be done under the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)./USGBC.

The most certain answer will be from the CAGBC:
CaGBC National Office
47 Clarence Street, Suite 202
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 9K1
Toll-Free: (866) 941-1184
Tel: (613) 241-1184
Fax: (613) 241-4782
Email: info@cagbc.org

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Mike Eikermann
Oct 13 2016
Guest
5 Thumbs Up

Manufactured products and packaging waste

Project Location: Canada

When creating a LEED document for a product line we need to include things like pre & post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. recycled content. We also like to include the manufacturing and extraction sites.
My question will be focusing on the packaging waste of a rolled product such as a peel and stick vapour barrier where you will have a paper or poly release liner.
At what point do you include or not the same information as stated above into your document for the packaging material? Do I really need to disclose the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content of the packaging and would it still be considered packaging?

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Guillaume Martel LEED Project Manager, PROVENCHER ROY + ASSOCIÉS ARCHITECTES Oct 14 2016 Guest 65 Thumbs Up

Hi Mike,

Your question seems to address many of the concerns of LEED 2009. Note new projects registered after Oct. 31st will have to follow the LEEDv4 approach.

I suggest you take a look at the new LEED v4 MR credits : Building Product Disclosure and Optimization. ( Environmental Product Declaration A statement that the item meets the environmental requirements of ISO 14021-1999, ISO 14025-2006 and EN 15804, or ISO 21930-2007./ Sourcing of Raw Material The basic substance from which products are made, such as concrete, glass, gypsum, masonry, metals, recycled materials (e.g., plastics and metals), oil (petroleum polylactic acid), stone, agrifiber, bamboo, and wood./ Material Ingredients) and MR : Construction Waste Management, where the amount of waste per Sq. Ft would be interesting to have.

- Regarding you question directly, the information regarding Recycled content, and material sourcing is very important.
- Regarding the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate., it doesn't apply to the packaging. This only applies to the materials installed inside the weatherproofing membrane. So it's not clear if your product needs to be included.

Note that LEED v4 as requirements for Outdoor applied VOC in the School and Healthcare projects.

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Fayoke Banjo
Aug 23 2016
Guest
16 Thumbs Up

FIT Program vs LEED Points

Project Location: Canada

Hi,
Does it matter if the energy is consumed by the building directly or fed into the grid (what we do with FIT projects) to get the LEED point associated with Renewable energy category.

The power under FIT program is generated by the building but not consumed by the building directly. Does that matter? and Can the building still get the points as farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). it is generating power

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Aug 24 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4358 Thumbs Up

As per CaGBC CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide 776: PV Systems Pursuing FIT:

Yes, a LEED Canada NC 2009 project can take credit for the electricity generated by a PV system installed on its roof under EAc1 and EAc2 in either scenario (Owner owns the PV system or Owner leases roof space to a solar developer).

In general, a project will be eligible to achieve points under EAc2 and qualify for renewable energy credits for the system under EAc1 if the project meets the following conditions:
1. The renewable energy system is installed within the boundaries of the project or on the project site.
2. It can be demonstrated that the renewable energy produced would not exceed the annual consumption of the building(s) within the LEED site boundary.

For greater clarity:
- Electricity generated by on-site renewable energy and then sent to the grid is eligible under EAc1 and EAc2.
- The electric renewable energy system connection can be located upstream or downstream of the building utility meter as long as the energy production of the system is metered.
- The owner of the system can choose to retain, retire or sell the environmental attributes.
- For the purposes of LEED Canada NC and LEED Canada CS 2009, renewable energy is only defined as "sold" if the production capacity exceeds the building annual consumption.

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Fayoke Banjo Aug 26 2016 Guest 16 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much for your response.

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Aaron Smith Mechanical Engineer M & R Engineering
Feb 08 2016
Guest
49 Thumbs Up

Minimum Benefit to Achieve ID Credits

Project Location: Canada

Hello,

It seems to me I read at some point in time that the CaGBC wanted to see a minimum measurable benefit for Innovative Strategies. (Note: I'm not asking about Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. where you are achieving the next incremental threshold.) I'm thinking, for example if you were incorporating an innovative waste heat recovery system then they may require (or at least suggest) that it achieve at least the equivalent of one EAc1 point in energy savings.

This is a LEED 2009 project. The Reference Guide simply says that strategies are to have "significant, measurable environmental benefits...".

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Keith Robertson President, Solterre Inc. Feb 08 2016 LEEDuser Member 794 Thumbs Up

Hi Aaron,

I am not aware of any written guidance on what comprises a "significant measurable environmental benefit".

Speaking as an applicant, and not a reviewer, my understanding is similar to yours that demonstrating equivalence with an existing credit is useful. It should also be for a measure that is not accounted for in the system - in the case of your waste heat recovery example, if your energy model is already rewarding you for that measure, then the ID is not likely to be awarded.

The CaGBC did issue an ID credit catalogue for version 1.0.
https://www.cagbc.org/cagbcdocs/ID_Strategies_2012_10_15.pdf
These might not apply to version 2009, but give a reasonable idea of precedent ID credits.

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Aaron Smith Mechanical Engineer, M & R Engineering Feb 08 2016 Guest 49 Thumbs Up

Hi Keith,

Thanks for your feedback. I think I've found what I was looking for and answered my question. Page 208 of the v1.0 Reference Guide said that for strategies that cannot be used to achieve EAc1 credits (e.g. not allowed by ASHRAE 90.1 or MNECB), you can submit for an innovation point if the savings meet the 1 point threshold.

With that being said, I'm aware of the ID credit list but some of the energy savings ones could be quantified and (probably) counted directly towards EAc1 so I wonder if they were able to "double-dip" and get an innovation credit for it as well?

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Eric White Sustainability Coordinator Group2 Architecture Interior Design Ltd.
Sep 17 2015
Guest
58 Thumbs Up

MRc4 / MRc5 - Concrete

Project Location: Canada

I have a question about the reporting of the cost of concrete between these two credits.

Background:

MRc4 - Recycled Content. Concrete manufacturers provide their mix design, $/m³, volume used, etc. on the Supplementary Cementitious Materials calculator. The resulting value is entered into the cost column of the MRc4 template, and designated "SCM Cement," with a post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. recycled content of 100%. Therefore, the cost of the CONCRETE is not counted towards this credit, rather just the cost of the SCM cement. If the cost of the concrete was $100, and $35 was determined to be "SCM Cement," we would count $35 at 100% on our MRc4 template. Fine.

MRc5 - Regional Materials. If a product meets the extraction and manufacturing distance requirements, 100% of its material cost is included toward the total regional materials cost of the project. The $100 worth of concrete that is locally-extracted is recorded as $100 on the MRc5 template.

The issue:
If we say the cost of the concrete on a project, not an insignificant amount in most commercial buildings, is only the "SCM cement," $35 in the example per direction from MRc4, we are losing the benefit of an expensive, local material in MRc5: $35 vs. $100.

Additionally, how do we reconcile this difference when reporting our Actual Materials Cost?

Has anyone worked their way through this?

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Keith Robertson President, Solterre Inc. Sep 18 2015 LEEDuser Member 794 Thumbs Up

It is fine to have two different values for concrete. The SCM value ($35 in your example) is the concrete's contribution to MRc4. The full concrete value ($100 from your example) contributes to MRc5.

It is odd that the SCM calculator requires us to report $35 at 100% recycled content instead of $100 at 35%, but that is how CaGBC set it up.

If you are tabulating the actual LEED material cost for the whole project (instead of the 45% default value) I would use the full concrete value, not the SCM value.

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Eric White Sustainability Coordinator, Group2 Architecture Interior Design Ltd. Sep 22 2015 Guest 58 Thumbs Up

Thank you for the advice, Keith. Have you submitted a project using the latter method?
I think we will be submitting a narrative explaining the $100 at 35% (rather than the $35 at 100%) for MRc4.

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Keith Robertson President, Solterre Inc. Sep 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 794 Thumbs Up

I think that a narrative explaining that submission would be fine. We have submitted the other way with no questions asked. We called it "Cast-in-place concrete" in MRc5 and "SCM Cement" in MRc4

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Marie-France Duthilleul Engineer exp Services Inc.
May 27 2015
Guest
48 Thumbs Up

Storm dry pond onsite overflows to stormceptor

Project Location: Canada

Pre condition - open field and grass, a few trees.

Post Condition: Development of a large military type vechicle building with loading docks and paved circulation drive area. Runoff from the site goes to two large grassed dry retention ponds with overflow to a Stormceptor system and than discharges off site.

Looking to prove SS LEEDS Credit 6.1 (SWM - Quantity) and 6.2 (SWM Quality Control)

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Francois Bellefleur Team Leader Tech Service PPG
Feb 23 2015
Guest
27 Thumbs Up

LEED V4 Canada, paint Questions

Project Location: Canada

Good morning, first time here, with the new LEED v4 in Canada I have a few questions about the paint for new construction.
Does the regional distance of 800KM still in place in LEED V4 ?
Does the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. of the colorants added to paint still count for Project in Canada? In the past for Canadian projects the reference was Rule 1113 and Green seal GS-11, and the VOC in the colorant was clear, now with LEED V4 for Canadian projects we need to refer as the Canada VOC limits for Architectural coating but no mention about the colorants.
Thanks for your help

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David Rekker Project Principal, MMM Group Ltd. Feb 24 2015 Guest 149 Thumbs Up

Hello. You'll probably want to get a copy of the v4 reference guide, or look at the credit descriptions on the USGBC website.
"Regional content" is different, with no points being awarded for being within a certain distance. Rather, a product can provide greater contribution towards a point if it is sourced and manufactured within 160km of the project site.
For paint, you are able to use either the US system (CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it., SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.) or the Canadian system (projects outside of the US aren't forced to use a local standard) So, if one standard is more clear for you, use that one.
Both these items are fully explained in the reference guide, so I've purposefully not gone into great detail here (in case I misquote).

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Peak Longhorn
Sep 03 2014
Guest
160 Thumbs Up

LEED IEQ Cr5

Hi,
I'm working on a project that consists of a large warehouse, drive-in bays and a narcotics storage. Currently I have separate ventilation and exhaust units for each space. Indirect heating and ventilation for the warehouse and narcotics storage and direct heating for the bays. I would like to persue this credir but I could not find in the LEED Guide whetther or not I must include MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 filters for both direct and indirect units above. The warehouse and narcotics storage room are considered regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space..

Is there anyone with the similar experience that can provide help on this?
Really apreciste your help!!!
Thank you!

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Sep 04 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4358 Thumbs Up

As per, LEED Canada 2009 - "Filtration should be applied to process both return and outside air that is to be delivered as supply air." The heating units that are not supplying air (overhead, gas fired heaters, I'm assuming) are not required to have ventilation.

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Peak Longhorn Sep 04 2014 Guest 160 Thumbs Up

Thank you John-David!
My overhead rooftop makeup air with gas fired units do supply outside air into the spaces. So I'm assuming MERV13 filters must be installed on these units then?

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Sep 04 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4358 Thumbs Up

Yes, that is correct.

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Peak Longhorn Sep 04 2014 Guest 160 Thumbs Up

You're awsome! Thank you for your help, John!

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Kelly Searle LEED Green Associate, Sustainable Innovation Specialist Clark Builders
Mar 28 2014
LEEDuser Member
50 Thumbs Up

Option 3 for Catholic and Public Joint Use School

We are building a joint use school and trying to determine the likelihood of achieving 3 credits under SSc4.1 Alternative Transportation: Public Transportation Access - Option 3 (Transportation Demand Management Plan). To do this we have to demonstrate a 25% reduction in SOV trips and the school bus is our only option.

Our school has approximately 1200 FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
so we would require more than 300 students to be using the bus each day to demonstrate a 25% reduction in SOV trips. I believe I read somewhere that you also have to be prepared to prove this is as good or better than other schools in the area.

After speaking to the busing supervisors for each of the schools, I was told that one end user currently has 4 buses servicing the school with approximately 200 students. There is a charge for busing if the student is outside the formation area (kind of the same thing as jurisdiction in public schools) and there is a charge for students who live within walking but want to get on the bus (walking distance is considered under 2.4km from the school.) This would show there is incentive to not take the bus if you don’t have to. It is projected that the new school we are building will have the same number of buses, but will be transporting 230-240 students. This proves better than the first school.

The second end user has confirmed their busing service has approximately 20 buses servicing all the public schools in the town. The buses meet at a common place and students transfer to the bus going to that school. Because of this system, it would probably mean 2 buses will go to this school and as long as those two buses are carrying a reasonable number of students (would need to be 60-70) it would qualify. In fact this would eliminate numerous buses travelling the same roads which greatly reduces greenhouse gas emissions, fuel consumption, and air & water pollution from vehicle.

We could also include some or all of the following information in a report and/or template:
a) A transportation hierarchy example showing modes of transport, including Walking Bicycling, Bus Service, personal vehicle use to show best type of transportation to worst.
b) The school is located in close proximity to many amenities proving that anyone (bused students, those who walk, anyone who has drove) are within walking distance to a variety of choices for lunch.
c) Sidewalks around the school providing safety and comfort to pedestrians which will be cleared on a regular basis throughout the winter.
d) Bike Racks and Showers onsite

Is there something more that I need to attempt this credit? Is there any cost associated with attempting this credit? Based on the information, what is the likelihood of achieving this credit and is it a worthwhile investment to pursue?

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Lilian Seow Principal LSDesignworks @ Vancouver, BC Canada
Sep 18 2013
Guest
1234 Thumbs Up

Interior Living Wall & it's associated drip irrigation

Is the interior living wall and its' associated drip irrigationDrip irrigation delivers water at low pressure through buried mains and submains. From the submains, water is distributed to the soil through a network of perforated tubes or emitters. Drip irrigation is a high-efficiency type of microirrigation. considered as an interior plants/planter in division 12?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 02 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Lilian, there is always a bit of judgement involved in classifying products with MasterFormat. I would use your best and fairest take on the situation. I would put interior green walls under 10 82 23, but I could see them going somewhere else as well.

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Lindsay Austrom Mechanical Engineer Stantec
Sep 05 2013
LEEDuser Member
835 Thumbs Up

LEED Canada v1.0 EQc6.2 - what are acceptable airflow controls?

I have a project with non-perimeter group multi-occupant spacesMulti-occupant spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces.. The Reference Guide notes that they must include 1 airflow control AND 1 temperature control. However, neither the Reference Guide nor CIRs explain what is considered an acceptable airflow control. Can anyone provide clarification?

Can an operable window be considered an airflow control?
What about an exhaust/transfer fan control (on/off or timer switch)?

Can a thermostat linked to a VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. box with reheat coil be considered both an airflow and temperature control? (Reference Guide p403 notes that an underfloor diffuser can be considered both.)

This seems to be a wrinkle unique to this version, while v2009 and US equivalents more generally refer to any thermal comfort controls.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Lindsay, I am only familiar with the LEED v2009, where this would not be an ambiguity.

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Aaron Smith Mechanical Engineer, M & R Engineering Oct 01 2015 Guest 49 Thumbs Up

I'm a little late chiming in on this but the Reference Guide on Page 400 says "VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. Systems for non-perimeter areas can use a 1:1:2 terminal box to controller to occupant ratio to capture this credit". Typical VAV designs have one VAV box per 600-900 sq. ft and serve 3-4 people so you won't meet the credit with standard design but it is possible if you want to spend the money on additional VAV boxes, controls and ductwork.

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Amanda Ross Principal A Ross Architecture
Aug 29 2013
LEEDuser Member
309 Thumbs Up

RPc1 Durable Building- Consultant Responsibility

Hi there. Does anyone have experience submitting documentation for the Durable Building Credit? My building envelope consultant, who has the contract for the durability credit deliverables, is refusing to review the contractor's Quality Management Plan for compliance with the CSA S478-95 (2007) standard. He says that it's outside his scope of work and in conflict with APEGBC policy. If you've submitted for this credit before, has your consultant signed off on everything as per the LLT? If not, what did you do? If yes, then which consultants did you use? I'd like to know who to hire next time if this does not work out.

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Sep 17 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4358 Thumbs Up

I would review the contract. Yes, the building envelope consultant, in my opinion includes all the responsibilities of the credit. This is included in our RFP and contract.

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Lilian Seow Principal, LSDesignworks @ Vancouver, BC Canada Nov 05 2013 Guest 1234 Thumbs Up

Hi John
The building envelope consultant is responsible for this Durable Plan credit. What are the deliverables expected from the Construction Management party?
We have been asking for a copy of the Durable Plan and Quality Management Plan from the consultant since below-grade works. We are now at storey 10 (another 16 storeys) and still no news from the consultant.

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4358 Thumbs Up

It has been my experience that when a consultant does not truly understand his responsibilities, I will give her/him copies from the Reference guide and of the LEED letter template (LEED-NC or LEED 2009), sometimes even highlighting tasks and responsibilities.

You are correct in the fact that the concept of building durability starts in the design phase. The first requirement is to "Develop and implement a Building Durability Plan" The consultant should be making site visits and reports as construction continues, including reviewing the foundation.

Good luck

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Lilian Seow Principal LSDesignworks @ Vancouver, BC Canada
Aug 06 2013
Guest
1234 Thumbs Up

Irrigation System

Is irrigation system considered as a division 15-mechanical ?
Our project spec places this system in division 2-landscape. This will impact the material-cost calculation for MR credit.

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Sep 17 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4358 Thumbs Up

CSC Masterformat places Irrigation systems in 32 80 00, so technically, you could include it.

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Lilian Seow Principal LSDesignworks @ Vancouver, BC Canada
Jul 23 2013
Guest
1234 Thumbs Up

Window Treatment - Roller Blinds - IEQ 4 ?

Hi
I'm working on a LEED 2009 CS registered commercial project. Which credit does the window roller blinds fall into the IEQ 4.# ? And which reference standard does it apply to, eg. Green Guard ?

Thanks

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Lorne Mlotek BASc., LEED AP BD+C, O+M, LeadingGREEN Training and Consulting Inc, Viridis EC LLC Jul 23 2013 Guest 1600 Thumbs Up

Hi Lillian,

The only way window roller blinds would actually fall into the IEQ4.X credits is if it contains ADHESIVES AND SEALANTSA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid., or is painted in which case there would be VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits.

However, these blinds could help with IEQc6.1 CONTROLLABILITY OF SYSTEMS: LIGHTING as it provides a way for occupants around the perimeter (exterior) of the building to control the amount of lighting. It could also potentially help with EAc1.0 OPTIMIZE ENERGY PERFORMANCE if the blinds are automatic and allow heat into or reject heat from the outside sun. In this case it would have to be modelled correctly.

Hope this helps and if I am misunderstanding your question let me know

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Lilian Seow Principal, LSDesignworks @ Vancouver, BC Canada Jul 23 2013 Guest 1234 Thumbs Up

Thanks Lorne.
Sorry that I didn't make my question clearer though your reply is a good reminder to to know the other benefits of the window treatment on other credits. What I actually want to ask is if there is any indoor air emission control/requirement for window blinds like the way carpets would have with CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. Green Label program. Often times, I noticed a strong 'new material' odor whenever new window blinds are installed.

Thanks

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Lorne Mlotek BASc., LEED AP BD+C, O+M, LeadingGREEN Training and Consulting Inc, Viridis EC LLC Jul 23 2013 Guest 1600 Thumbs Up

Hi Lillian,
None that I am aware of, unless the paint used for them from the manufacturer contains more than X amount of VOCs....which you can always ask them.

But, don't make it harder for yourself! Good luck!

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Laura Long Project Manager NORR
May 17 2013
LEEDuser Member
393 Thumbs Up

Canada-NC 1.0 -- EAc1

We are going through the third party reviewer portion of the credit and have one final hiccup. A garage type space is heated and conditioned with an energy recovery unit with gas heating. The baseline system is modeled with a constant volume rooftop unit with an ERV wheel, same as the proposed, but gas heating and DX cooling.

The reviewer is now stating that since the baseline system has cooling, then the proposed (built by now) building needs cooling. ASHRAE 90.1-1999 is the design guide line and section 11.4.3(d) was quoted as stating this is the design criteria. My version of ASHRAE 90.1-1999 states, "Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates shall be the same for both the budget building design and the proposed building. Heat recovery shall be modeled for the budget building design in accordance with 6.3.6.1."

My question is does any one agree with the reviewer regarding the cooling requirement? If the inspector is correct, where do I find this in ASHRAE 90.1 as I cannot find it? Are there different versions of ASHRAE 90.1-1999?

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Lorne Mlotek BASc., LEED AP BD+C, O+M, LeadingGREEN Training and Consulting Inc, Viridis EC LLC Jun 03 2013 Guest 1600 Thumbs Up

If I understand the issue correctly, I partially agree with the 3rd party reviewer. The baseline and proposed must be consistent, IE if you're cooling the space with DX in your baseline, it must be cooled by X system in your proposed building. However, if you are strictly heating the garage type space with the ERV and not providing any cooling, I believe the fix is pretty simple. Separate the garage space from the building and only model the space to be heating with a cooling load equal to zero. Clearly, if the building is already constructed, this space does not need to be cooled as I assume it is operating fine. If you strictly alter your base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). to eliminate the cooling element it will lower your modeled electricity savings but should satisfy the 3rd party's demands.

If I understand the issue is more one of consistency between base and proposed buildings rather than an additional cooling system.

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Amanda Ross Principal A Ross Architecture
Mar 25 2013
LEEDuser Member
309 Thumbs Up

LEED Letter Templates Corrupting, New Versions

I was about to submit my documentation to the CaGBC, when I noticed that my LLT was not functioning properly on the WEp1c3 tab. The final result was right, but some of the numbers were coming out wrong in the middle. I've also had and heard of other people having trouble with fields that get corrupted. I really don't want to have to enter all my data into a new LLT all over again, so I downloaded a new LLT, entered the data for just that credit, printed the pdf and included that in my submission to the CaGBC with a note in the narrative explaining that the LLT had been corrupted.

Has anyone tried this before?

Also, if I fill in all the data for one LLT, and then a new one is uploaded to the website, do I need to fill it all in again, or can I just use the old one?

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Lorne Mlotek BASc., LEED AP BD+C, O+M, LeadingGREEN Training and Consulting Inc, Viridis EC LLC Apr 18 2013 Guest 1600 Thumbs Up

Amanda,
I have experienced enough trouble with the old LLTs. The CaGBC has been pretty understanding when one or two of the LLT's credit templates malfunction. Just explicitly explain the issue in the narrative as well as summarize the outcomes for the water efficiency credits. If the reviewer ever has an issue with the submission they are not shy to tell you...so unless they say there is a problem, I am sure they will be fine with it as they have in the past. Going forward, use the new LLTs.

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Charling Li LEED Specialist, Energy & Engineering, Canada Green Building Council Nov 27 2013 Guest 56 Thumbs Up

Hi Laura,
Your approach to include a narrative with the letter template to be included with the certification documentation is fine but that feedback won't reach the CaGBC until the project is submitted for certification. For more immediate feedback please email info@cagbc.org with details of the error. We do track errors and issue updates to the letter templates periodically.

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michelle xuereb quadrangle architects limited
Mar 25 2013
Guest
64 Thumbs Up

SSc6.2 Pollutant Management Plan

As part of this credit, LEED Canada 2009 requires the owner to implement a management plan to minimize pollution and eutrophication1. Eutrophication is the increase in chemical nutrients, such as the nitrogen and phosphorus often found in fertilizers, in an ecosystem. The added nutrients stimulate excessive plant growth, promoting algal blooms or weeds. The enhanced plant growth reduces oxygen in the land and water, reducing water quality and fish and other animal populations. 2. The process by which bodies of water are starved of oxygen and light by algae and other plants that multiply due to excessive concentrations of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous. Typical sources include fertil­izer runoff and poorly managed wastewater treatment systems, frequently including home septic systems. of waterways from excess nutrient pollutants such as nitrogen and phosphorus. My civil engineer who had agreed to provide this initially is no longer answering my emails. As such I am attempting to write this myself. My site is a commercial office building on a sea of parking with a cistern, inimal landscaping and permeable pavers at the low end. My plan addresses the cleaning agent for the building exterior meeting Greenseal or Ecologo annual testing of soil (for nutrient levels) followed by aeration and minimal fertilizers on sod. Is this adequate?

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Lorne Mlotek BASc., LEED AP BD+C, O+M, LeadingGREEN Training and Consulting Inc, Viridis EC LLC Mar 25 2013 Guest 1600 Thumbs Up

The requirements for LEED credit SSc6.2: Stormwater Management, Treatment, are to construct a stormwater treatment system designed to remove 80% of the average annual post-development total suspended solids (TSSTotal suspended solids (TSS) are particles that are too small or light to be removed from stormwater via gravity settling. Suspended solid concentrations are typically removed via filtration.) and 40% of the average annual post-development total phosphorous (TPTotal phosphorus (TP) consists of organically bound phosphates, polyphosphates, and orthophosphates in stormwater, the majority of which originates from fertilizer application. Chemical precipitation is the typical removal mechanism for phosphorus.).

To demonstrate compliance you are definitely on the right track. Be sure to indicate the phosphorous content of all fertilizer to be < 1%. Also indicate the products, equipment and services for all sodding work needed on the project over its life, including sched, maintenance, materials and how the work will be carried out. Be sure to have signed documentation from your landscaping contractor exemplifying that they understood how work is to be carried out in order to achieve the credit.

I would also suggest product sheets for you permeable paver, cistern and a list of the greenseal/ecologo products to be used.

See CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide#265 for a useful Canadian specific question/answer. The submission date is May 2, 2008, but it is still relevant.

Hope this helps!

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Meghan MacSween Morrison Hershfield Inc.
Jan 30 2013
Guest
88 Thumbs Up

LEED Canada SS Credit 6.1 - Stormwater - Cistern Sizing

Hi,
The 2009 version of LEED included an interpretation for the SS6.1 credit stating that controling site discharge using storage such as cisterns could meet the credit requirements even if the entire discharge eventually ends up in the municipal system as long as the stormwater is held long enough to reduce the 24-hour peak rate and quantity. However, it states that the cistern has to have enough capacity to account for rainfall stored in the cistern from previous days (you can't assume its empty when the 2 year storm starts. Does anyone know what volume you are expected to assume is still in the cistern from previous days?

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Lindsay Austrom Mechanical Engineer, Stantec Jan 31 2013 LEEDuser Member 835 Thumbs Up

Hi Meghan,
On past projects I have done a daily cistern volume analysis including all water in (rain from drainage area) less water out (irrigation, release to municipal storm main, etc) to show how much capacity is available in the cistern. You can find daily rainfall data on the Environment Canada website: http://www.climate.weatheroffice.gc.ca/Welcome_e.html

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Meghan MacSween Morrison Hershfield Inc. Feb 07 2013 Guest 88 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your response Lindsay. We'll give this a try.

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Lindsay Austrom Mechanical Engineer Stantec
Jul 24 2012
LEEDuser Member
835 Thumbs Up

LEED Canada v1.0/2009 IEQc7.1 - ASHRAE 55-2010 acceptable?

Tristan, thanks for creating this forum! I hope fellow Canadian users will share their experiences to build on the information already available in the other US forums.

I just posted this on the NC 2009 IEQc7.1 page, but I'd like to hear from others on Canadian projects. Is ASHRAE 55-2010 (and therefore the ASHRAE Thermal Comfort Tool v2) acceptable in place of 55-2004?

Only 55-2004 is referenced (with no addenda) for v1.0, while 2009 allows addenda to be used if applied for all credits. Technically, 55-2010 is a compilation of all 2004 addenda so I think it is acceptable. I'd appreciate feedback from others to verify or refute my assumptions. Thanks!

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Lorne Mlotek BASc., LEED AP BD+C, O+M, LeadingGREEN Training and Consulting Inc, Viridis EC LLC Jul 24 2012 Guest 1600 Thumbs Up

Hi Lindsay,

We have been using 55-2004 for all of our LEED2009 projects. Mainly because it is exactly what's referenced in the reference guide. I cannot speak for CaGBC, but I would bet that they would require a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide to use 55-2010 in conjunction with ASHRAE Thermal Comfort Tool v2.

Looking at the current CIRs on the website, there is nothing mentioned about 55-2010. Also, if you can find a CIR on USGBC that would be a good indicator if this is an OK method. However, the CaGBC will most likely ask for a CIR of their own.

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Charling Li LEED Specialist, Energy & Engineering, Canada Green Building Council Nov 27 2013 Guest 56 Thumbs Up

Hi Lindsey, please refer to CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide 859 which provides direction on using newer versions of standards.

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Lorne Mlotek BASc., LEED AP BD+C, O+M LeadingGREEN Training and Consulting Inc, Viridis EC LLC
Jul 24 2012
Guest
1600 Thumbs Up

LEED Canada 2009 Letter Templates (LLT)

Hi Everyone,

If anyone has a question regarding the how the LLTs for CaGBC's LEED 2009 program function, just ask away.

I was wondering if someone has had experience with entering IEQc6.2 - Thermal Comfort. When I put in any space, regardless if I state there is a thermal control, the LLT spits back that the space is 100% controlled.

Anyone have a similar experience / found a quick fix?

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Braden Kurczak Aug 21 2012 Guest 127 Thumbs Up

Hi Lorne,
We (Enermodal) helped the CaGBC in completing the updates to the Canada NC 2009 LEED Letter Template file which was issued at the start of August (2012).

The item noted here, as well as a number of other issues, is corrected in the updated template file (version b).

Version b also includes direction for the split submission approach (design/construction submissions).

Another update is coming out soon to address Regional Priority, based on the results of the recent LEED AP vote.

Download the new version of the templates at: http://bit.ly/NDHavq

This is also a good chance to download and review the updated MPRs and MPR checklist (same link, above)

If you find future errors in the template files, direct those issues to CaGBC's Customer Service, who track errors and coordinate updates.

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Lorne Mlotek BASc., LEED AP BD+C, O+M, LeadingGREEN Training and Consulting Inc, Viridis EC LLC Aug 29 2012 Guest 1600 Thumbs Up

Hi Braden,

Thanks for the reply! We have updated all of our LLT files and are good to go for our new projects, as well as the ones that are split review.

We are not sure if this is possible at the office, but you would be the best person to ask!

Is there anyway to transfer tabs from an older version of the LLT onto a newer version considering they are locked.

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Braden Kurczak Aug 29 2012 Guest 127 Thumbs Up

No. Because there were some logic changes to each of the tabs you can't just bring in old tabs.

FYI - with the pending release of Version C (in about a week), I would hold off on updating, if you can, to get the full functionality for the RP points (lets you select province and region, then tells you what is available as an RP point).

Watch the CaGBC website for more info.

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Peak Longhorn Sep 19 2014 Guest 160 Thumbs Up

Hi,

Can anyone let me know where in the LEED 2009 Guide stating that AHSRAE weather design conditions must be used i.e 1% for cooling and 99.6% for heating?
Thank you!

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Sep 19 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4358 Thumbs Up

Use the climate zones in the National Building Code of Canada.

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Peak Longhorn Sep 19 2014 Guest 160 Thumbs Up

Thank you, John!
So 1% for cooling and 99.6% for heating will not apply?

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Sep 19 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4358 Thumbs Up

I do not believe so, it depends on the region......

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Peak Longhorn Oct 29 2014 Guest 160 Thumbs Up

Hi,

Can someone please let me know if cooling or heating is allowed to be oversized and by how much before getting penalties?

Thank you so much in advance!

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