LEED for Homes (LEED-H) Forum

135 replies [Last post]
LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 28 2011 LEEDuser Moderator Post a Comment

Update: Since this forum was initially established, LEEDuser has created specific forums for each LEED for Homes credit and prerequisite. Please post your questions and thoughts there! See our rating system directory to navigate to the right forum.

135 Comments

0
0
Mike Stopka Director of Sustainability Solomon Cordwell Buenz
Oct 23 2014
LEEDuser Member
204 Thumbs Up

Can the architect of the project do the LEED for Homes?

Hello. I am having trouble tracking down eligibility information for LEED for Homes.

The reference guide says that "Each project must register through a designated LEED for Homes Provider"

Can the architect be the LEED for Homes Provider or does it have to be a separate 3rd party entity?

Thanks

Post a Reply
0
0
Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant
Oct 22 2014
LEEDuser Member
2112 Thumbs Up

LEED: Homes eligibility?

Project Location: United States

Hello - We are starting major construction of our home, consisting of a gut-reno of the first floor; addition of a 2nd floor plus attic and porch; new mechanical systems, plumbing, electrical, windows, and doors; removal of all interior walls and ceilings; replacement of all siding and addition of insulation; and bringing the basement into the conditioned space and fixing water problems. Basically, it's a new house except for the foundation, and one partial exterior wall.

Do we qualify for LEED: Homes? It seems like we should, but in going through the flow chart tool on LEEDonline for selecting a certification program, it all comes down to how I answer the question, "Is the addition physically distinct from the rest of the building?" If I answer "yes", it says we qualify. If I answer "no" it says we do not. But I cannot find clarification of what this means.

Thanks! (Posted in LEED Rating Selection Forum as well.)

1
2
0
Maureen Mahle Program Manager, LEED for Homes, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. Oct 22 2014 LEEDuser Expert 50 Thumbs Up

Yes, the project qualifies. It's really about the extent of your gut rehab, not the size of the addition. The air sealing and insulation in the rehab would need to be visually inspected (so moderate rehabs don't qualify). Make sure to get a Green Rater on board prior to the start of construction so that the Preliminary Rating and other prerequisites are met. Good luck with the project!

2
2
0
Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant Oct 23 2014 LEEDuser Member 2112 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much!

Post a Reply
0
0
LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy
Jul 08 2014
LEEDuser Member
1485 Thumbs Up

Large footage residence and threshold adjustment

Hello. We are in the very first steps in our first LEED Home. While looking at out options and working on the threshold adjusment, the checklist is telling us we need over 80 points only to be Certified since the residence has a large footage and large number of bedrooms. Our goal was to work for achieving Platinum but with the adjustment the spreadsheet is telling us we practically need to achieve all the points available!

The home has bedrooms available for fulltime housekeepers and we would like to know if this would make the project a mutifamily building and if with this we are required to use the home size adjustment method for mutilfamily buildings?

Would the fact that the structure of the residence already exists (nothing would be added) affect the threshold adjustment?

Thank you!

1
1
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Jul 08 2014 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

The project would still be considered a single-family home. However, the additional bedrooms may be included in the bedroom count, as may any other rooms that might reasonably be used as bedrooms should the space be required for that purpose, so long as the rooms or spaces (such as loft areas) both provide reasonable sleeping privacy and meet code requirements for sleeping rooms -- i.e., emergency egress, daylight, and air.

The fact that the structure already exists has no effect on the threshold adjustment.

Post a Reply
0
0
Ahmed El Attar
Jun 04 2014
Guest
18 Thumbs Up

LEED AP Homes

Dear Sir/ Madam,

i am working and living in Kuwait, may i apply for LEED AP Homes AND BE CERTIFIED IN KUWAIT because i heard that LEED AP Homes is only applicable in the U.S. or is it international as well?

Post a Reply
0
0
Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K
Apr 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
143 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes in Europe

We've been working on LEED CS, NC and CI projects in Poland and now we would like to start working with LEED for Homes certification system. We've searched usgbc.com site and information available in the internet and a few things are still a puzzle:
1. There are no Green Raters in Poland, Europe even! Most of them are USA, Canada or Asia based. Do we have to find one that has some specific international qualifications?
2. From what we read it seems that the Green Rater and the Provider Company are supposed to lead the certification and prepare all the documentation, or is it the role of LEED AP with specialty for homes? What is the difference between the Green Rater and LEED AP?
3. What is the difference between Provider and Green Rater, I mean, can it be the same person? There aren't many information about Providers. For me a Provider is a Green Rater's company, or am I wrong?
I will aprreciate all Your suggestions and help!

1
1
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Jun 16 2014 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

Dear Agata,
1. Yes, there is a list of green raters who are qualified to work on the LEED for Homes International Pilot. To get the list I suggest you contact Courtney Baker, cbaker@usgbc.org or Mika Kania, mkania@usgbc.org.
2. Most of the documentation is prepared by the project team (architect, builder, owner); in general, just the LEED checklist & associated documents are prepared by the rater. The Green Rater's job is verifying completion of the program requirements. The AP is typically a member of the project team, often employed by the architecture firm. The AP frequently is the primary person ensuring that the LEED requirements are being fulfilled during the design process, though not all projects have APs.
3. The Provider (an organization) acts in a quality assurance role, reviewing the documents submitted for the certification process and providing guidance as needed to the Green Rater (an individual) on procedural issues. In some cases, the Provider may employ Green Raters. In other cases, the Green Rater is an independent contractor.

I hope this is helpful!

Post a Reply
0
0
Milind Kulkarni
Jan 17 2014
Guest
74 Thumbs Up

Leed for Homes documentation

Hello sir,
I am new to LEED and am pursuing for the AP. So as to gain knowledge can I get to read any full document set of any certified residencial project. if any of sr. LEED AP could share it would be great.

Milind

1
3
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Jan 20 2014 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

Hi, Milind --
Your best bet is to connect with a LEED for Homes Green Rater in your area and arrange to have her/him serve as your mentor. You will be able to not only see documentation for a LEED for Homes project, but also assist in gathering, verifying, and perhaps even creating that documentation. This is the type of experience that will be necessary to becoming fully qualified to work on LEED for Homes projects.

2
3
0
Milind Kulkarni Jan 20 2014 Guest 74 Thumbs Up

Thanks Ann for the suggestion. But the option is not fesiable for me as I am from India and over here to get a mentor or Gren rater is quite difficult. Hence, I thought of learning from submitted documents.

3
3
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Jun 16 2014 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

Milind, you might reach out to Courtney Baker, cbaker@usgbc.org or Mika Kania, mkania@usgbc.org, to find out if there are active projects in India. If so, you may be able to connect with those project teams. Their experience will be most applicable to you as compared to US teams. If that is not possible, Courtney or Mika may be able to direct you to other potential mentors in Asia or elsewhere who can assist you remotely. Good luck!

Post a Reply
0
0
Omar Katanani
Dec 09 2013
LEEDuser Member
8038 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes (International)

Dear Sirs,

I Was wondering whether the LEED for Homes scheme is now available for international projects. Last year it was still a "Pilot" scheme, if I'm not mistaken.

Also, are all the BD+C schemes now available for international projects (including healthcare, hospitality, data centers)?

Thanks!

1
3
0
Mika Kania LEED Associate, USGBC Dec 10 2013 LEEDuser Member 211 Thumbs Up

Hi Omar,

Residential projects outside the United States may apply to take part in the LEED for Homes International Pilot. A FAQ and application for participation in the pilot can be found on our website: http://www.usgbc.org/leed/certification/homes

The pilot is open to projects of any size in any country.

The requirements for international pilot projects are the same as those in the U.S. and are outlined in the LEED for Homes Rating System: http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-homes-v2008-current-version

A Green Rater is still required to provide verification services on all LEED for Homes projects.

Best,

2
3
0
Omar Katanani Dec 11 2013 LEEDuser Member 8038 Thumbs Up

Thanks Mika, I was just wondering if it is STILL in pilot - but it seems so.

Do you know if ALL LEED v4 BD+C schemes (including healthcare, hospitality, and data centers) are available internationally? I know that NC, CS, and Schools are available.

Thanks!

3
3
0
Mika Kania LEED Associate, USGBC Dec 11 2013 LEEDuser Member 211 Thumbs Up

Yes, all are available to international projects!

Post a Reply
0
0
Bill Kehres
Oct 03 2013
Guest
32 Thumbs Up

SS2 Landscaping Irrigation and WE2 Irrigation System

How do you get credits for no irrigation? I do not see any automatic points or a way to calculate them.

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Bill, please post your Homes questions to our specific credit by credit forums. Thanks!

Post a Reply
0
0
EAPC Architects Engineers EAPC Architects Engineers
Aug 06 2013
LEEDuser Member
65 Thumbs Up

SS 3 Reduce Local Heat Island Effects

Hi,

I'm looking for an answer regarding credit SS 3 for a LEED Home. What documentation is required for the SRI? For NC there's a table which states the SRI of concrete being >29. There are no guidelines in the LEED for Home reference guide outlining what is necessary to obtain this credit.

Any input is much appreciated.

Regards,

Jenn Whitney, EAPC Architects Engineers

1
3
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 06 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Jenn, great question, and FYI, you can set up your own account to post questions and replies on our forum.

2
3
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Aug 07 2013 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

Jenn, in general it's fine to use the guidance in NC when it's directly applicable, as it is here. That said, I believe the latest is that WHITE concrete has SRI >29, but not gray. Many paving products lack published SRI values. If you can find a material that is comparable in color and sheen that does have a published SRI value, it's admissible to use that value. Another alternative is to see if you can an organization that has a test instrument you can borrow. Here in Northern CA, I've been told there is such an instrument at our utility's tool lending library (PG&E's Pacific Energy Center in San Francisco). Your local utility may have such a service as well.

3
3
0
EAPC Architects Engineers EAPC Architects Engineers Aug 07 2013 LEEDuser Member 65 Thumbs Up

Ann,

Thanks for the update. I'm looking into ways to test for the SRI. I found that we're in need of a pyranometer. I haven't found one locally yet, but plan on continuing to look. The Green Rater has informed me that I'm not able to use the NC guidance to establish the SRI of the material. He recommended contacting the concrete company.

Thanks again for the input!

Post a Reply
0
0
radwa rostom Project engineer
Jul 15 2013
Guest
59 Thumbs Up

Sustainable Sites credit in LEED for Homes

Hi all, I have an inquiry in the sustainable sites category. in 1. site stewardship, point d "build on a lot of 1/7 acre or less, or 7 units per acre" what does "lot" mean? does it mean the zone lot size or the net project area or the gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.)? and in 6. Compact Development, what does the buildable area mean?

Thank you very much

Post a Reply
0
0
Tim Hoeft AIA, LEED AP Straughn Trout Architects, LLC
Jul 05 2013
Guest
550 Thumbs Up

LEED AP (vs) Green Rater (vs) Provider...

As LEED AP, I certified a small commercial project (GOLD & ZEB) and a school (GOLD) - both in the last 4 years. Our design firm does very little residential.

I am now working on designing my own home, and decided to investigate the process of LEED certification. My assumption was that as LEED AP, I could submit most (if not all) of the documentation as I had done in the other previous projects. I am trying to learn about "Green Raters" and "Providers". As a licensed architect with LEED experience, is there any way for me to pursue LEED certification for my home without hiring other design professionals? If not, does anyone care to guess at a budget estimate for these required services for a 3K square foot home in Central Florida?

Although I've considered it, I'm not convinced it makes sense for me to pursue becoming a Green Rater because I would not likely be involved in 2 projects every 2 years.

What exactly is the difference between a Green Rater, a LEED AP for Homes, and a Provider?

Any insight would be helpful, Thanks!

1
5
0
Phil Vanderloo President, Hiline Builders Inc. Jul 05 2013 Guest 169 Thumbs Up

Hi Tim,
I am a LEED AP BD&C and LEED AP for Homes myself, and also a General Contractor in N. California.
You will be required to hire a Provider and Green Rater as these are necessary in the implementation of LEED for Homes Certification.
It's quite a different process than LEED NC or Schools.
I'm not sure if hiring an Accredited Proffessional for Homes is required, but I do know that you aren't able to receive the credit for having a LEED AP on the design team unless he or she is a LEED AP for Homes.
As far as pricing, I'm sure it varies quite a bit by region, (and square footage), but you can expect to pay between 2500-4,000 here for The Provider and Green Rater's services.
Hope that helps and best of luck with your project.
Phil Vanderloo,
President,
Hiline Builders Inc.
www.hilinebuilders.com

2
5
0
Brett Little Director, Alliance for Environmental Sustainability Jul 08 2013 Guest 239 Thumbs Up

Hello Tim.

If you want to learn more about LEED for Homes and the differences between the AP, the Green Raters VS Commissioning agents and Midrise VS commercial, I would recommend checking out the HOMES 252: Understanding LEED for Homes course at the end of this month.

http://www.alliancees.org/education-and-events/homes-252-understanding-l...

I realize it is in Michigan but we have many that come from all over the country.

Make sure to reach out to your local provider.

3
5
0
Binh Duong LEED AP BD+C Mar 11 2014 Guest 38 Thumbs Up

Hi Phil & LEED User,

I am designing 2 villas overseas, targeting LEED Homes. If Raters and Providers are required, and the country does not have Raters and Providers, will this means some raters will have to travel overseas to inspect the residence before the project can get reviewed and later certified as LEED Homes?

Your early reply is appreciated.
Best,
Paul B Duong

4
5
0
Mika Kania LEED Associate, USGBC Mar 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 211 Thumbs Up

Hi Phil,
Yes that is the case- a Green Rater will have to travel to the project site at least twice during construction to do the required on-site verification in order for the LEED for Homes project to be certified.

Best,

5
5
0
Binh Duong LEED AP BD+C Mar 11 2014 Guest 38 Thumbs Up

Hi Mika,

Who will pay for the 2 round trips + accommodation normally - the project owner or the LEED architect in charge of LEED Homes process? On top of LEED documentation hours, this is something, I think, will hinder residential owners from getting their homes LEED certified.

Best,

Post a Reply
0
0
Eva Pong
Jun 25 2013
Guest
28 Thumbs Up

Surface Water Management Credits

(Credit 4.1 states: 'Design the lot such that at least 70% of the buildable landThe portion of the site where construction can occur. When used in density calculations, the calculation for buildable land excludes: public streets and other public rights of way, and land excluded from development by law or other prerequisites of LEED for Neighborhood Development.; not including area under roof, is permeable or designed to capture water runoff for infiltration on site.' )
Is there a minimum percentage of the total site area that must be considered a "buildable" land area for the permeable lot?

Also, what is the definition of a 'steep' slope for permanent erosion control?

Thank you.

Post a Reply
0
0
Mohd Imran Shaikh
Jun 05 2013
LEEDuser Member
125 Thumbs Up

LEED for homes certification in United Arab Emirates

Hi There,

We are currently looking to develop a very energy efficient villa in U.A.E. Does LEED for homes rating is available outside U.S as well? Does anyone have any information about the green raters in this region.

As the project is less than three storey and area approximately 2000sqft- 3500 sqft. LEED NC is not applicable for this.

In this case can LEED be applied for villa projects in this part of the world?Can anyone please provide guidance above.

In anticipation,

Regards,

Imran

1
3
0
Brett Little Director, Alliance for Environmental Sustainability Jun 05 2013 Guest 239 Thumbs Up

Hell Imran - Sanyog Rathod is our International Green Rater who can help you out. Please contact him directly.

Sanyog B. Rathod, AIA, LEED AP + Homes
Principal, LEED for Homes - Quality Assurance Designee & Green Rater
cell 513 939 8400 | office 513 455 8228 | fax 513 455 8227
sanyogr@solconsults.com
www.soldesignconsulting.com

2
3
0
USGBC IP Account U.S. Green Building Council Jun 06 2013 LEEDuser Member 289 Thumbs Up

Hi Imran,

Residential projects outside the U.S. may apply to take part in the LEED for Homes International Pilot. A FAQ and application for participation in the pilot can be found on USGBC's website: http://new.usgbc.org/leed/certification/homes

Best,

Mika Kania
Associate, Residential Program
U.S. Green Building Council

3
3
0
Mohd Imran Shaikh Jun 16 2013 LEEDuser Member 125 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the useful information.

Post a Reply
0
0
Quentin Dantony
Jun 03 2013
Guest
49 Thumbs Up

LEED for HOMES or NC

Hello,

I'm currently working in a french engineering office. We mostly work on LEED - NC buildings and i'm trying to find the limit size for using LEED for HOMES.
We might work on student housing with approximately 40 or 50 studios of 200 sqft in France, so should i refer to LEED NC or HOMES ?

Thanks,

Quentin

1
2
0
USGBC IP Account U.S. Green Building Council Jun 04 2013 LEEDuser Member 289 Thumbs Up

Hi Quentin,

LEED for Homes is required for predominantly projects that are 1 to 3 stories above grade, regardless of size. Projects slightly taller can choose between LEED Midrise or LEED NC.

For LEED v4, Midrise will be required of residential projects 4 - 8 stories above grade.

-Asa

2
2
0
Quentin Dantony Jun 05 2013 Guest 49 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your help !

Post a Reply
0
0
Leigh Jones
Mar 23 2013
Guest
100 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes process question

I am studying for the LEED Green Associate exam and I am finding some conflicting information regarding how one would commence the LEED for Homes certification process. The Rating System linked from the USGBC's website (dated January 2008) says you would contact a Provider, but the USGBC website section for LEED for Homes says you would begin by contacting a Green Rater. Does anyone know which is correct? Has the process changed?

1
3
0
Brett Little Director, Alliance for Environmental Sustainability Mar 23 2013 Guest 239 Thumbs Up

You can contact both first. Preferably though the provider which likely the test answer too.

2
3
0
Leigh Jones Mar 25 2013 Guest 100 Thumbs Up

Thank you! That sounds "most right" to me too. It didn't come up on the test, but at least I passed!

3
3
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Mar 28 2013 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

Either can work. Upon registering a project, you will need to identify the Provider, though not the Green Rater. From a practical perspective, the project team will have very little contact with the Provider, however, so the choice of Green Rater is more significant in terms of the direct human relationships and customer service. And most Green Raters have pre-existing relationships with Providers, so your choice of Green Rater will often dictate your choice of Provider. I therefore recommend first picking a Green Rater you want to work with and let them guide your Provider choice.

Post a Reply
0
0
Lorne Mlotek LEED AP BD+C LeadingGREEN
Jan 08 2013
Guest
883 Thumbs Up

LEED for Existing Homes

Quick question in regards to an existing single family home of 1500SF.

Can existing homes be certified under LEED for Homes, or must they go for LEED for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.?

Thanks!

1
3
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 08 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Neither—there is no current LEED rating system that can be applied to existing homes.

2
3
0
Brett Little Director, Alliance for Environmental Sustainability Jan 08 2013 Guest 239 Thumbs Up

If you plan to do a Gut Rehab to the existing home you can use the LEED for Homes system. You must expose either the exterior walls or the interior walls behind the drywall for the rater to see the insulation and air sealing. You also must show that behind the shower is a moisture resistant barrier and so dry wall will need to be removed there. A lot of points can be earned for re using existing materials in the home. Keep on the Look out though for a LEED for Existing Homes Certification in the near future.

3
3
0
Phil Vanderloo President, Hiline Builders Inc. Mar 23 2013 Guest 169 Thumbs Up

Brett,
You actually have to do a full gut rehab which includes exposing either the inside or outside of the exterior walls to enable insulation and green rater inspections.

Post a Reply
0
0
Lindsey Sutton
Dec 17 2012
Guest
41 Thumbs Up

Roof Heat Island Effect Points

Does the reflective roofing to reduce the heat island effectHeat island effect refers to the absorption of heat by hardscapes, such as dark, nonreflective pavement and buildings, and its radiation to surrounding areas. Other sources may include vehicle exhaust, air-conditioners, and street equipment. Reduced airflow because of tall buildings and narrow streets exacerbate the effect. qualify with a single family home (3 stories including basement)? I found something that said only 4+ stories multifamily homes. I can't seem to find it under Leed for Homes, only under the LEED New Construction.

1
1
0
Brett Little Director, Alliance for Environmental Sustainability Dec 17 2012 Guest 239 Thumbs Up

Yes you can use it in leed for homes. You will need this checklist for leed for homes certification. http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=3658 scroll down to sustainable sites section 3 on the second tab and you will see what you must do for the local heat island effectHeat island effect refers to the absorption of heat by hardscapes, such as dark, nonreflective pavement and buildings, and its radiation to surrounding areas. Other sources may include vehicle exhaust, air-conditioners, and street equipment. Reduced airflow because of tall buildings and narrow streets exacerbate the effect..

Post a Reply
0
0
Sandra E. Project Manager ECO
Dec 07 2012
Guest
79 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes International Pilot - Lima, Perú

Dear LEED User Readers,

Please receive our warmest greetings. We are Ibrid, a Peruvian service company that provides comprehensive resources and tools for sustainable design and construction for commercial, corporate and residential buildings. We provides a comprehensive range of services including initial diagnosis of buildings, implementation reports, LEED ® certification process, green products, energy modelling and audits, and sustainable design and construction.

We are evaluating the possibility of implementing the LEED for Homes International Pilot rating system for a residential project here in the city of Lima, Perú.

Our projects consists of remodeling an existing brick and wood structure located in a low-rise residential area. The current project area is 5,800 sq. ft approx. and it will be 7,100 sq. ft. approx. after the project is completed. We will be using concrete as our main structural material and drywall for all interior partitions and non-baring walls.

The project team has already taken into consideration most of the LEED credit categories, and both the studio and client are committed to building an entirely green home. We are implementing technologies such as photovoltaic panels, graywaterGraywater is untreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater typically includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washer and laundry tubs, though definitions may vary. Some states and local authorities also allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. reuse system, automatization for all lighting and electrical systems, between others.

We would like you assessment on the feasibility of the project and if there are any other project requirements for us to be aware before applying for the LEED for Homes International Pilot rating system

Looking forward on your thoughts,

Best Regards,

Sincerely,

Francesca Mayer, LEED Green Associate

1
2
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

Dear Francesca,

There are a number of aspects of LEED for Homes that were crafted based on specific aspects of the U.S. building industry. Recognizing this, the LEED for Homes International Pilot includes a mechanism for developing country-specific adaptations. This makes it possible for virtually any low-rise or mid-rise residential project, anywhere in the world, to participate in the program. From your description, it seems likely that your project would do very well in LEED for Homes. That said, it would be necessary to know a good deal more about your specific project as well as about how the building industry and building practices differ between the US and Peru, to provide a detailed and accurate response.

For example, one important aspects of certification is the requirement that the project exceed code-minimum energy performance by at least 15 percent, and provide energy simulation to demonstrate that it will do so. How this would be accomplished in Peru is something that would require some dialogue between your organization and the USGBC or a LEED for Homes Green Rater.

Best of luck with the project! It sounds quite outstanding.
Ann

2
2
0
Michael Miller Project Architect Jan 02 2013 Guest 2173 Thumbs Up

Francesca,

Be sure to consider the Home Size Adjuster when estimating the potential LEED for Homes score. It will have a fairly substantial negative impact on the points score of a 7,100 SF house.

Post a Reply
0
0
Shenhao Li Atkins
Dec 03 2012
Guest
272 Thumbs Up

Can Green rater and LEED for Home AP from one same company

Is it allowed by LEED or green rater have to sign something like interest confict statement?

1
1
0
Brett Little Director, Alliance for Environmental Sustainability Dec 03 2012 Guest 239 Thumbs Up

Shenhao Li - It is the responsibility of the Green Rater and Provider to sign the conflict of interest form if the issue arises. I am referring to the one on page 225 - 227 in the Green Rater Manual.

Post a Reply
0
0
Sara Heppe Senior Sustainable Designer Clark Nexsen
Nov 16 2012
LEEDuser Member
496 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes Window SHGC

I am working on a project in a zone 1 climate. Currently our house shows that it has a 34% window to floor area ratioFloor Area Ratio (FAR) is the measure of the density of non-residential land use. It is the total non-residential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for non-residential uses.  For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet of built building floor area.  On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet of built floor area; an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 built square feet and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 built square feet. (WFA). After doing the adjustment for SHGCSolar heat gain coefficient (SHGC): The fraction of solar gain admitted through a window, expressed as a number between 0 and 1. for exceeding an 18% WFA, our final SHGC that we must meet is 0.14.

First, do we need to find a product with an SHGC less than 0.14 to get credit? Secondly, most of our windows are placed in areas with deep overhangs. These windows will never receive direct sunlight no matter what time of year it is. Do we have to count the window area in the overhangs? Seems like if the intent is to reduce solar heat gain, then we would be able to omit these from the WFA calculation.

1
1
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Mar 28 2013 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

Your best bet is to adopt the performance approach (EA1) rather than the prescriptive approach. This will allow you to weigh and trade off a wide range of energy performance factors, choosing a package of features that provides synergistic outcomes. Optimizing for a single variable such as SHGCSolar heat gain coefficient (SHGC): The fraction of solar gain admitted through a window, expressed as a number between 0 and 1. is a "dis-integrated" design approach. So while LEED for Homes does allow this path, I would personally discourage it.

Post a Reply
0
0
Donald Morrill
Oct 04 2012
Guest
54 Thumbs Up

Letters to Material Suppliers & others

Dear Tristan,
We are building a three story multi family structure, that we are working wiht a LEED provider, Davis Energy Group to achieve a PLeLEED Platinum rating. We need to send letters out to suppliers to alert them to our need for recycled, sustainably produced, products in construction. Can you direct me (a member of LEED user) to a source for some sample letters to get us started? Thanks!

Don

1
2
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 04 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Don, yes, with the caveat that LEEDuser doesn't currently offer resources tailored to LEED for Homes, so the letters we have may need to be modified for your purposes. You can find resources like this under the NC v2009 IEQc4.1 Documentation Toolkit, to name one location.

2
2
0
Peggy White White + GreenSpec Nov 02 2012 LEEDuser Member 1874 Thumbs Up

In a single family home that typically does not have specifications other than notes on the drawings, I can understand the need for 'letters' to suppliers. But in a multi-story, multi-family project that has full specifications that clearly define the sustainable requirements in Division 01 and also requires documentation of environmental information along with product data, shop drawings, etc. within the individual technical Sections, the required data for sustainable calculations is gathered via the submittal process.

Post a Reply
0
0
Phil Vanderloo President Hiline Builders Inc.
Jul 22 2012
Guest
169 Thumbs Up

Home size adjustment calculation

Can someone give me a hand on trying to figure out the equation for the LEED for Homes – Home Size Adjustment Calculations.
I'm using the one in the reference guide and I must be missing something because it's not adding up. Am I correct in my interpretation that log=actual home size divided by neutral home size?
Thank You.

1
1
0
Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Jul 27 2012 LEEDuser Expert 558 Thumbs Up

Phil,

The easiest thing to do is download the LEED for Homes Project Checklist at www.usgbc.org/homes, or use this direct link: http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=3658. The first tab (Summary) has a cell for number of bedrooms and conditioned square footage, and will automatically calculate the HSA. Make sure to include all conditioned area (including the basement, if there is one).

-Asa

Post a Reply
0
0
Kathy Kahill PDT Architects
Jun 27 2012
Guest
43 Thumbs Up

Air-tight Drywall Approach/Compartmentalization &Sprinkler Heads

What are people doing out there for sealing quick-response sprinkler heads in mid-rise projects? I've been told that the gasket approach cannot be used with quick-response heads.

Post a Reply
0
0
Phil Vanderloo President Hiline Builders Inc.
May 14 2012
Guest
169 Thumbs Up

What to charge for LEED consulting?

Hi All,
I just acquired my LEED AP credential and am in the process of adding LEED certification consulting to my areas of services offered. I'm wondering if anyone is aware of a good, comprehensive article on how to charge for these services as well as any pertinent disclaimers or things to be aware of.
Thank You

1
1
0
Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 03 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Hi Phil,

You mention having earned your AP credential (congratulations!), but you don't say how much experience you have with taking projects through the LEED certification process. My sense is that you should have completed the process on at least a project or two (and ideally more than that) before you're really qualified to advise others on how to successfully navigate it. 

Also, once you've done that (assuming that you haven't already) you'll have a good sense of how much work is involved, and how much effort you can save your clients, which then becomes the driver for how you set your fees. 

Post a Reply
0
0
Steve Smith
Apr 23 2012
Guest
55 Thumbs Up

EA 10 Renewable Energy

I have a client who wants to install PV panels, but does not have room on the roof of the potential LEED for Homes project. He has suggested two possible options that he can pursue.

1) Install the PV on the neighboring building and run the electricity to the LEED home. ( this is acceptable in LEED NC, so I would think this would be ok for LEED for HOMES)

2) Install PV on a larger roof on a building further away, where the electric can't be used directly by the home. ( I believe this would only count for an BD+C project for Green Power with RECs and not renewable energy, as the power doesn't actually get used "On-site".)

Is my reasoning correct?

1
2
0
Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 03 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Hi Steve,

You're correct about the 2nd option. Before you count on being able to use the first option I would strongly suggest consulting with the LEED for Homes provider and making sure that they are on board with that being acceptable. 

2
2
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

Steve, either of the approaches you describe would require submitting a credit interpretation, which I suggest you do well in advance of relying on the outcome.

Post a Reply
0
0
Andrea Marzullo LEED Specialist OSC/CFEEA
Apr 05 2012
Guest
332 Thumbs Up

Multifamily mid-rise and the IEQ prereq re: ASHRAE 62.2-2007

ASHRAE 62.2-2007 was required in the Florida Building Code in 2007. This basically says that a multifamily building 4 to 6 stories must have a certain amount of outside air introduced into EACH unit, that having enough OA in hallways and common areas isn't enough. LEED also requires meeting 62.2-2007 as a prerequisite. The latest FBC (2010) does NOT require multifamily midrise to meet 62.2-2007 as it brings in too much humidity and negates the point of optimal indoor air quality. The new code has reduced the amount of OA required per unit. Unfortunately, LEED is still requiring us to meet 62.2-2007, which leaves us two options: 1) design and install a humidity override system for each unit which is incredibly cost-prohibitive or 2) (and I personally know of projects where this has been done) just meet 62.2-2007 and keep costs down by not addressing the extreme humidity, which leads to extreme mold problems after occupancy. If we were to execute either of these choices, we would, in my opinion, not comply with the intent of the credit, which is to provide optimal indoor air quality in each unit WITHOUT a drastic cost differential. People always complain about how expensive LEED is and this is one of those instances that supports their claims. What can we do?

1
1
0
Samantha Harrell LEED Project Reviewer certificate holder Apr 06 2012 Guest 2605 Thumbs Up

Hi Andrea,

There's an article from Building Science related to this topic titled "BSD-107: Understanding Ventilation in Hot-Humid Climates". The article concludes that "In order to provide controlled ventilation in new houses constructed in hot humid climates without creating latent load problems it is necessary to take the following measures: Install tight ductwork and air handlers, balance interior air flows, size equipment correctly, provide supplemental dehumidification." So you're right that dehumidification is necessary, but at least you'll get credit for it under EQc3. EPA's Indoor airPLUS construction specifications also require that whole house mechanical ventilation system & controls are installed to deliver the prescribed outdoor air ventilation rate (ASHRAE 62.2 section 4), including ventilation restrictions in ASHRAE 62.2 section 4.5 (e.g., not greater than 7.5 cfm/100 s.f. in “Warm-Humid” climates as defined by IECCInternational Energy Conservation Code Figure 301.1), but this path also requires dehumidification.

Post a Reply
0
0
Ian Johnson Project Director Thornton Tomasetti - Fore Solutions
Mar 28 2012
LEEDuser Member
64 Thumbs Up

Air Sealing between demising walls in Mid-rise

We have a project where the the demising walls go all the way to the underside of the floor trusses and the ceiling drywall is attached to the bottom chord of the floor trusses. The structural engineer has called for deflection clips at all the non-bearing partitions which will include some demising walls. The concern is over the integrity of the seal between the demising wall and the ceiling if the trusses (to which the ceilings are attached) are allowed to move.

Has anyone dealt with a similar issue of airtight drywall sealing and deflection?

Thanks,

Post a Reply
0
0
Jamison Lenz
Mar 23 2012
Guest
59 Thumbs Up

Pre Approved ID Credits for Homes

I'm wondering if there is a list of all the pre-approved ID credits that qualify for LEED for Homes?

1
4
0
Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Mar 23 2012 LEEDuser Expert 558 Thumbs Up

Yes.

On the LEED for Homes checklist, which you can download at www.usgbc.org/homes, a list is included in the 'Guidance Docs' tab. In addition to specific pre-approved ID credits, there is a link to available pilot credits.

2
4
0
Michelle Cottrell President, Design Management Services Jan 11 2013 LEEDuser Member 732 Thumbs Up

Asa- Do you happen to have an updated link for the pre-approved ID credits for a Homes project?

3
4
0
USGBC IP Account U.S. Green Building Council Jan 11 2013 LEEDuser Member 289 Thumbs Up

Michelle,

All pre-approved ID points are still linked to directly from the LEED for Homes checklist, on the Resources tab.

You can also look at the Pilot Credit library for additional ID points.

-Asa

4
4
0
Michelle Cottrell President, Design Management Services Jan 11 2013 LEEDuser Member 732 Thumbs Up

Thank you Asa! I was hoping for a bigger list :(

Post a Reply
0
0
mary marcinko
Mar 07 2012
Guest
50 Thumbs Up

Water Demand Calculator - Green Roof

I wanted to double check if anyone knows that a new green roof qualifies as a "landscaped area" for the LEED for Homes Credits SS2.5 and WE 2.3.

If we are adding an extensive green roof without irrigation, I'm assuming we would get the credit for not using irrigation, according to the LEED for Homes Water Demand Calculator. There are no other landscaped areas on site.

Does anyone have experience submitting LEED for Homes Water Demand Calculator for a new green roof? Is there anything I'm missing?

1
1
0
Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Mar 23 2012 LEEDuser Expert 558 Thumbs Up

Mary,

You can decide whether or not you want to count the green roof in the landscape calculations. It will almost certainly be to your advantage to use the Water Demand Calculator treating the green roof as a landscaped area.

Post a Reply
0
0
Jennifer Berthelot-Jelovic Director of Sustainability Shangri-La Construction
Feb 09 2012
Guest
584 Thumbs Up

Durability Evalution links don't work

Does anyone have a good site for determing average annual wind and rainfall? The links from our durability evaluation form isn't working.

1
2
0
David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Feb 13 2012 LEEDuser Expert 17786 Thumbs Up
2
2
0
Lorne Mlotek LEED AP BD+C, LeadingGREEN Oct 23 2012 Guest 883 Thumbs Up

Hi David,

Do you know of one for Canada or even INTL.

Thanks

Post a Reply
0
0
Sam Watters Associate Consultant UHG Consulting
Feb 01 2012
Guest
475 Thumbs Up

Minimum Thresholds for Landscape Credits

My project is pursuing LEED for Homes: Multifamily Midrise, and I'm, wondering if it has enough landscaped area to qualify for some of the water efficiency and other landscaping credits.

The building in question is a 4 story multifamily unit that is located within a 3 building development that all share a common courtyard. We were initially planning on drawing the LEED boundary at the building line, as the rest of the parcel is pursuing LEED ND certification. There are, however, plant beds that run adjacent to the building along most of the perimeter, as well as several trees and shrubs in planters. In addition, some of the patio adjacent to the building will be pervious.

My question is this: If we want to extend the project boundary out 5 ft or so from the building's exterior walls, is will be be able to capture some of the landscape related points? I know that it will depend on the actual ratios of hard- to softscape, but does anyone know if there are minimum area requirements in order to qualify for landscape-related credits?

I've tried looking in the Homes and Midrise rating systems to no real avail, does anyone have any recommendations for other places to look?

Thanks,
-Sam

1
3
0
David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Feb 13 2012 LEEDuser Expert 17786 Thumbs Up

Its sounds reasonable to include the plantings around the perimter of the project, especially if they are within the scope of work of the building or required by zoning codes for that project. The LEED boundary can be defined by the project team as long it's reasonable and consistent across all credits. Start with the "scope of work" or site plan for your building and see if that works.

Being part of ND shouldn't be a problem - but if there are other NC or Homes projects you have to be careful to not "double dip" by including site area in more than one building certification.

2
3
0
Sam Watters Associate Consultant, UHG Consulting Feb 16 2012 Guest 475 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your response David, it looks like we shouldn't have a problem capturing some of those credits.

I do have another question that pertains to drawing the LEED boundary.

The residential structure is part of a larger building that includes a sub-grade bus garage and a large 4 story parking garage. The buildings are completely self-contained, and the parking garage is separated from the residential area by a firewall.

We are currently planning on including only the residential portion in the LEED boundary, cutting off the LEED project at the firewall (between the parking garage and residential).

Since the residential portion and the parking garage are connected structurally, must we count the garage as part of the LEED project? It seems to me as though a "reasonable" boundary would be this firewall, especially considering that the garage also services the rest of the development (hotel and bus station) as well.

Any guidance is greatly appreciated, thanks for your help

3
3
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Sam, I am not a LEED for Homes expert, but in the world of the other LEED rating systems, as governed by the Minimum Program Requirements, setting the boundary at that fire wall would be fine.

Post a Reply
0
0
Wing Ho Associate Arup
Jan 17 2012
Guest
131 Thumbs Up

LEED Homes International Pilot

Currently I'm conducting the LEED Homes International Pilot project in China. After consulting with USGBC (Kelsey and Courtney) since year 2010, the project was gone thru registration process smoothly and much better understanding on the whole certification process including the roles of Green Rater / Energy Rater / QAD. The project is finally under construction since couple months ago. Now we're facing many obstacles in terms of technical challenges from the Green Rater.

Basically, the key challenge is the fundamental design and construction practices are so different between China and US. My perception is that USGBC try to build a US residential home in China because all the credits are referenced to US standards. Theoretically, the design team including client can meet most the credit requirements including import US products. However, there’re some unreasonable design end up will implement in the house (in my opinion) which I’m afraid the end product will be criticized a lot by the local market. (e.g. excessive insulation in southern China climatic conditions, unrealistic low window SC factor, limited product availability in China, etc.) The most challenging is using REM to gauge the HERS indexA scoring system established by the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) in which a home built to the specifications of the HERS Reference Home (based on the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code) scores a HERS Index of 100, while a net zero energy home scores a HERS Index of 0. The lower a home's HERS Index, the more energy efficient it is in comparison to the HERS Reference Home. for residential in China…. Personally, I’ve no objection of the REM software. But it is not flexible as other LEED commercial rating using DOE-2 that allow some trade-offs. I wish there will have alternative compliance path available to deal with this energy credit in near future. However, LEED for Homes rating system is quite unusual that relies a lot on Green Rater rather than USGBC itself.

Although I raised these questions to our Green Rater and USGBC (Kelsey) many rounds already, I’m afraid I still can’t persuade their thoughts. (I can understand they’ve to protect the integrity and reputation for LEED Home). I hope this post won’t sounds like a complaint. I just want to voice out to other people going to pursue LEED Homes outside of US better notice this kinds of challenges.

1
3
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Wing, I have heard a lot of similar complaints over the years about international compliance with LEED-NC. Recently USGBC put out a series of Alternative Compliance Paths for international projects to make this easier. I guess that since we are still in a pilot phase of LEED for Homes internationally, that just hasn't happened yet, but I hope your feedback will be acocunted for.

2
3
0
Sara Heppe Senior Sustainable Designer, Clark Nexsen Oct 15 2012 LEEDuser Member 496 Thumbs Up

My team is about to begin the schematic design phase for a military residential project in Hati. The project mandates that all of the housing units will be LEED for Homes Silver. Could you please expand upon any more issues you have run into while attempting to implement LEED for Homes in China? Even though they are different countries and climates, I'm sure we will run into similar issues.

3
3
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

The LEED for Homes International Pilot was designed to include the development of country- or region-specific adaptations. Ideally, your Green Rater would have assisted you in anticipating the issues you have raised, and addressing them in advance by facilitating an extended dialogue with USGBC to develop a better understanding of the differences between the building practices and industries in the two countries. If that has not unfolded to your satisfaction, I would encourage you to pursue that dialogue even now.

The outcomes of the pilot are incredibly important in informing how the rating system will be implemented post-pilot, and therefore its ultimate usability in China (and elsewhere). The pilot is the best opportunity to correct some of the shortcomings in the system's applicability to a specific building context. If you have an interest in continuing to use LEED for Homes, please do pursue the problematic issues you are facing.

The intent statements of the credits are the heart of the LEED rating systems. If you can frame your concerns in the context of how best to meet those intents -- responding both to the current reality of China's building industry and the goal of transforming it to greener practices -- you will have the greatest success.

Best of luck --
Ann

Post a Reply
0
0
Judy Landwehr Product Compliance & Training Manager Masonite Architectural
Jan 16 2012
Guest
745 Thumbs Up

FSC and New Wood in LEED for Homes

Regarding FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System.-Is the calculation in LEED for Homes the same as in LEED NC as it pertains to only allowing "new wood" and if so, where is this referenced.

1
2
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Judy, I think so, but I can see some ambiguity in the wording.

2
2
0
Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Expert 558 Thumbs Up

For the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. prereq, any wood coming from the tropics needs to be FSC certified. If it is reused or reclaimed wood, it is exempt. For the credit, at least 90% of a component must meet credit requirements. There are some exeptions for existing materials in gut rehab products. Consult with your Green Rater for more details.

Post a Reply
0
0
Omar Katanani
Jan 16 2012
LEEDuser Member
8038 Thumbs Up

Appeal Process - Submitting all credits at once ?

Dear all,

Do any of you know if we are supposed to submit all the appeals at once ? or can we submit them gradually ?

Thank you for your help,

1
2
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 25 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

George—I think the answer is somewhere in between. You don't have to submit them all at once, but there is a time limit. If you are unsure on your project specifics I would definitely check with GBCI.

2
2
0
Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Expert 558 Thumbs Up

There is no formal appeals process in LEED for Homes. If there are questions on credits or rulings, either consult with your Green Rater, or you can submit a Formal Interpretation.

Post a Reply
0
0
Michael Miller Project Architect
Jan 04 2012
Guest
2173 Thumbs Up

Homes Mid-Rise ambiguities - additional documentation?

Our first Homes Multifamily Low-Rise project is now in construction. In order to make Homes function well in a commercial-construction environment, we obviously had to do quite a bit of work to integrate the Homes Low-Rise requirements into our specifications.

We are now in design on our first Mid-Rise project (with several more to follow). I am finding, however, that there are some major holes in the information that I need in order to accurately update our Low-Rise specs to Mid-Rise requirements. It is very helpful that there is an actual updated Multifamily Mid-Rise Rating System with the changed credits, but there are documents available for Homes and/or Low-Rise which do not appear to have Mid-Rise equivalents yet. For example:

1. Updates to the Homes Reference Guide itself. There is obviously quite a bit of additional detail in any LEED reference guide compared to its (freely downloadable) rating system document, addressing how credits are implemented, measured, documented, etc. This doesn't exist for Mid-Rise.
2. Submarket Guidance for Low-rise Multi-family Buildings: This four-page document was the only real basis for differentiating between basic Homes and Low-Rise, so to a great extent it has been supplanted by the Multifamily Mid-Rise Rating System document. However, it contains clarifications to credits that are not explicitly changed in Mid-Rise; do those still apply?
3. Verification and Submittal Guidelines: These two documents (one for project teams, one for verification teams) were invaluable as I developed specs. There doesn't appear to be any equivalent document(s) that specifically address documentation requirements unique to Mid-Rise.
4. EA 1.2 Testing and Verification for MID-RISE states simply: “Meet all of the EPA Multifamily High-rise Program Testing and Verification Protocols requirements.” The T&V Protocols is a daunting document. Our Homes provider has stated that this requirement has been changed, but there is nothing formally available yet.

The Homes provider on this project has told me that they are working on developing some of this information internally, but that they don't have anything formal from USGBC yet. Does anyone know any more specifics about any of this documentation?

1
1
0
Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Jan 05 2012 LEEDuser Expert 558 Thumbs Up

Michael,

Great comments and observations. For EA 1.2 - USGBC has put out an official, formal Alternative Compliance Pathway. Email me and I'll send it to you - afoss@usgbc.org. I can also help you track down the other resources that you need.
-Asa

Post a Reply
0
0
Loretta Newcomer Principal Bork Architectural Design, Inc.
Nov 28 2011
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

Water Calculations for Landscape Irrigation

I don't really have a question at this point. We have completed our project and submitted the paperwork; however, I would like to voice my frustration over the water calculation tool. I feel that the prescriptive path and performance are two very different things. The water demands spelled out by the water calculator are far from our experience after living in the house for a year and a half now. We have used far less water than the calculator specified. In fact after the first two weeks of establishment, we have never watered our drought-tolerant, native plants and shrubs, and they are thriving. We live in drought-ridden Georgia, so the rainwater has not been plentiful, yet the landscape is doing just fine. I feel like we should have gotten more credit for our landscape choices than the water calculator has deemed. Is there anything we can do to make things more performance based?

Post a Reply
0
0
Maged Samy
Nov 24 2011
Guest
40 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes overseas!

i have a client who is intrested in LEED home for his Signle Family development, about 300 signle family home, in Saudi Arabia any experiance, to share...

1
1
0
Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Jan 05 2012 LEEDuser Expert 558 Thumbs Up

You should contact Courtney Baker at USGBC about this project. His email is cbaker@usgbc.org.

Post a Reply
0
0
Mike Barker Principal : Energy / Electrical Engineer BuildingPhysics South Africa
Oct 11 2011
LEEDuser Member
1479 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes - OPR ?

While it is not required officially by LEED for Homes ( i think ? ), has anyone ever seen an example of a Owners Project Requirements document for residential developments ?

This would make good sense for multi-unit residential. Anyone keen to work with me to develop one ?

1
1
0
Barry Howard Jan 14 2012 Guest 27 Thumbs Up

Mike I am working on a 336 unit 5 story mid rise and we decided to do an OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. and the associated BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. as it relates to multifamily design requirements to achieve LEED certification. I worked with the owner to prepare the OPR, and the Mechanical Engineer to edit the BOD. I realize your post is a few months ago, but I would be happy to share the draft we have completed.

Post a Reply
0
0
Ricky Li
Sep 15 2011
Guest
97 Thumbs Up

EA 6.1 Good HVAC Design and Installation

There is a note stating that "Homes with no heating must follow the performance approach (e.g. EA1), and may not use the prescriptive pathway". I cannot find any explanation in the LEED for Homes material, would anyone be able to explain the reason behind this?

1
1
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

The prescriptive approach includes requirements regarding heating equipment that would not apply; therefore, the performance approach is the only option.

Post a Reply
0
0
Roberto Chauriye ARCHITECT ENERGY ARQ
Sep 05 2011
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

LEED for HOMES: Threshold adjustment

Can someone explain me step by step how I apply the THRESHOLD ADJUSTMENT formula?

Are there any missing parenthesis in the formula that apperas in the guide?

thanks in advanced, Roberto.

1
1
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

The threshold adjustment is applied automatically when you enter the required information about project size, number of bedrooms, etc., into the LEED for Homes Checklist spreadsheet. If it is a single-family home, all the required information is in the first ("Summary") worksheet; if it is a multifamily project, you will also need to enter data in the "Multi-family" worksheet.

Post a Reply
0
0
Hsin Yi Hsieh
Sep 04 2011
LEEDuser Member
385 Thumbs Up

Midrise 4-6 Stories

Can a 4-6 story multifamily use LEED for Homes instead of LEED for Midrise?

1
1
0
Sharon Block LEED AP + Homes, LEED for Homes Green Rater, Bright Green Strategies Sep 10 2011 LEEDuser Member 95 Thumbs Up

LEED Mid-rise is part of the LEED for Homes rating system. It is defined as a multifamily building 4-6 stories.

Post a Reply
0
0
Ekta Khuller Green Living LLC
Aug 29 2011
Guest
46 Thumbs Up

Comparison: LEED for Homes to LEED-NC for a Multifamily Project

We have a client who is interested in persuing LEED for Homes for a Multifamily project in Maryland. We are trying to research the advantages and disadvantages of doing a LEED for Homes rating rather than LEED for New Construction. Since LEED for Homes - Multifamily Midrise 2010 is still in its pilot version, we were wondering if anyone else was in a similar situation. Would persuing LEED for Homes be cheaper than New Construction? Are there any tax rebates associated with LEED for homes? LEED NC follows ASHRAE 62.1 and Homes follows ASHRAE 62.2, how different are the two versions of ASHRAE?

1
2
0
Sharon Block LEED AP + Homes, LEED for Homes Green Rater, Bright Green Strategies Sep 10 2011 LEEDuser Member 95 Thumbs Up

Generally speaking and in my opinion, the two main advantages for going with LEED for Homes is
1) You work with a regional LEED for Homes Provider so there is better responsiveness both for technical feed back and the certification process is faster. Once you submit your package for certification, your project can be certified in 2-3 weeks.

2) Commissioning is not required as in LEED NC with the current version of LEED for Homes. In a sense, commissioning is "built-in" to the LEED for Homes process by way of the LEED Green Rater. Field verification and testing is an integral part of the LEED for Homes process. This is the role of the LEED Green Rater.

2
2
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

For better or worse, LEED for Homes Midrise now requires commissioning, via the incorporation of Energy Star as a prerequisite. Even so, the Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. requirements MAY be less onerous than in LEED-NC; it's worth looking at them closely! From a cost perspective, for larger projects in particular, the USGBC and Provider fees as well as the Cx costs should be compared for LEED-NC vs. LEED for Homes.

If costs prove not to be a deciding factor, as Sharon says, a major benefit of LEED for Homes is the ability to work with a real live human being (your Green Rater), who should run interference for you with the Provider and USGBC, as well as providing important quality management services.

The real significance of your connection with the Green Rater is a much higher level of certainty as the project unfolds as to your final score and rating level, and greater control over those outcomes. Rather than tossing documents over the transom into the Bermuda Triangle (to mix metaphors somewhat horrendously), you will get guidance as the project progresses as to whether X or Y will earn credit. As you get answers about issues that may give rise to uncertainty, you have the opportunity to correct course.

And finally, remember that LEED for Homes was developed specifically to respond to the nature of residential buildings, so you are likely to find fewer credits that seem wacky or irrelevant than you might find in LEED-NC -- less fitting a round peg into a square hole.

Post a Reply
0
0
Christopher Robert Taylor Owner/Founder - Business Consultant Sovereign Harmony
Aug 24 2011
Guest
53 Thumbs Up

FSC Wood tracking for MR c2.2 in LEED for Homes

Hello,

I have worked mostly with commercial LEED projects where FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. is calculated by percentage of total wood cost for the project. In reading through LEED for Homes criteria it appears that FSC wood is tracked in terms of percentage by weight or volume.

Is this correct for LEED for Homes? In other words, is it a matter of having 90% FSC by volume for framing and 45% by volume for flooring without regard for wood cost?

Thanks!

1
3
0
anastasia harrison Aug 24 2011 Guest 284 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your comments, my experience too is in the commercial realm and this is so much different. NO tropical woods are allowed in a LEED H project unless they are FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts.: it is a prerequisite! This door is not FSC, and it is my opinion is that it is reclaimed: it was ordered for one family, installed, and then deciced it was not what they wanted. The lumber company took it back ordered a new Mahogany door for the owners and took back the first one. It has been put into a junk pile to be sold off. It is my understanding that this would fall under 'reclaimed'. Although it is not 40 years old, I did not order it and it was previously in a different house. I just want to be sure we can use it because this non FSC tropical wood usage is a prerequisite. So the installation of one wrong door could blow all of this hard work!

2
3
0
Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 24 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

HI Anastasia,

This is definitely a "gray area" that could be interpreted either way. I think you have a pretty good case that it should be accepted as "reclaimed", but, as you say, this is a prereq so you don't want to mess around. On a non-residential LEED project you'd submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide to confirm. In LEED for Homes your best bet is to work with your LEED for Homes provider, as they are responsible for making the call. Ask them, and let us know what they say!

3
3
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

Christopher, you're correct; in LEED for Homes the % of the given building component is in terms of either weight or volume. In some cases (say, flooring), surface area is a reasonable proxy. Your Green Rater should be able to help you with this type of question, as will the Reference Guide.

Anastasia, depending on your Provider and Green Rater, either one might make this judgment call. If I were your Green Rater, I would say that if you can produce paperwork that backs up your claim, you're good, and I wouldn't feel the need to say, "Mother, May I?" to the Provider. But that's me.

Post a Reply
0
0
anastasia harrison
Aug 11 2011
Guest
284 Thumbs Up

Reclaimed Mahogany on Homes Project

Is it permissible to use a reclaimed mahogany door that is not FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. on a project? It was manufactured for a different home, installed and quickly changed. (fickle client) it has since been put into salvage. The No tropical hardwoods except FSC rule is very clear. But unlike BD+C or CI Homes is not completely clear on reclaimed items.

1
2
0
Peter Kennedy LEED AP, GreenPoint Rater, Bright Green Strategies Aug 22 2011 Guest 609 Thumbs Up

We have a LEED H project in California using a lot of reclaimed teak. This is allowed, near as I can see. Our provider has confirmed it. Look at p. 251 of the Ref Guide: "...reused or reclaimed materials are exempt." Please let me know if you hear anything different.

2
2
0
Peter Kennedy LEED AP, GreenPoint Rater, Bright Green Strategies Aug 25 2011 Guest 609 Thumbs Up

I just heard back from our provider. You might want to look at CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide MR 02-89, where they mention a re-used door specifically.

Post a Reply
0
0
Mike Barker Principal : Energy / Electrical Engineer BuildingPhysics South Africa
Aug 01 2011
LEEDuser Member
1479 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes - outside the USA ?

The usual question from the international market ? How do we rate houses outside continental USA ?

Could we make use of a LEED for Home AP who works in the USA ?

1
1
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

USGBC has qualified a specific list of LEED for Homes Green Raters to work on the International Pilot. I believe they are all US-based.

Post a Reply
0
0
Roxanne Button AIA, MRAIC, LEED AP Architect & Sustainable Design Consultant Design Synergies Architecture P.C.
Aug 01 2011
LEEDuser Member
605 Thumbs Up

Costs for Green Rater & Provider

I've worked on half a dozen LEED projects, and am about to start my first LEED-H home. I'm putting together a proposal, but I have no idea how much the fees would be for the Rater & Provider. Does anyone have any experience with this? Any rules of thumb?

Thanks -
Roxanne

1
3
0
Nate Steeber LEED Consultant & Designer, Sol Developments Aug 01 2011 Guest 94 Thumbs Up

Roxanne,

The price for providers and green raters varies depending on who they are. Other factors that can alter the cost are: size (both number of units and sq. ft.), certification target, proximity to the green rater. The best thing you can do is visit this website: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=1554
and pick the provider that is closest to the project location and call them. They should be able to give you a clear idea about the costs.

2
3
0
Roxanne Button AIA, MRAIC, LEED AP Architect & Sustainable Design Consultant, Design Synergies Architecture P.C. Aug 01 2011 LEEDuser Member 605 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Nate - I've also reached out to a Green Rater that I know in our region. I'll contact the Provider for this area as well.

3
3
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

Roxanne, many Providers offer services well beyond their HQ location, and their service fees vary significantly, as do their scopes of work. I encourage you to comparison shop to find the best fit for your needs, and the best value for the services offered. You may also want to consider that the direct relationship is the one you will have with the Green Rater, so you want to be sure to pick one you'll work well with; the Provider(s) they work with, then, may be a determining factor in your choice of Provider.

To complicate matters, Green Raters do not necessarily work exclusively with a single Provider. And Providers may or may not require that a Green Rater be on their "approved" list in advance. Be sure to ask about these things!

Post a Reply
0
0
Natalie Connor
Jul 11 2011
Guest
43 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes - MR 2.2

This is my first time working on a LEED project for a residential construction company and I'm trying to finish up the final paperwork (basically the MR 2.2 section). I am not LEED certified and our LEED consultant has been really busy.

What is the best way to approach this section? I have the LEED for Homes Rating System PDF from USGBC but, no other reference material.

Is it correct that one material must make up 90% of a component in order for it to be eligible for points?

For example, would 90% of all the counters in the Kitchen + Bathrooms in the whole house have to be made from the same material to count OR is it okay if the materials are different OR is it on a room by room basis (like if 90% of the cabinets in the kitchen were LEED compliant, would they be eligible)?

I'm trying to get this section filled out correctly as soon as possible. I have a lot more questions, is this section supposed to be really tedious? or am I doing something wrong? Is there some other reference material that would help me answer these kinds of questions?

Any advice on LEED for Homes and specifically the MR 2.2 section would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

1
1
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

Natalie, if you're going to work on LEED for Homes projects it's probably worth investing in the Reference Guide. Your Green Rater should also be able to help with questions like this.

Meanwhile, here's the answer to this particular question: 90% of an ENTIRE, project-wide component -- i.e., all counters in the house -- need to be made of a qualifying material or combination of qualifying materials in order to earn credit.

It's true that this credit can be quite research-intensive and can be a pain in the neck, which is why some of us have developed tracking tools! I suggest you ask your LEED for Homes Green Rater if s/he has any that will help you out. If not, as you're doing your research, document what you learn. For example, as you select counter materials, keep an organized record of how you learned that they qualify for credit -- a PDF or URL showing the attribute that defines the product as "environmentally preferable" and the specific threshold, if applicable (e.g., 25% post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. recycled content). That source document (or link) will give the Green Rater what s/he needs to verify that the product complies.

Bottom line is that most of the work is in selecting materials that are environmentally preferable; after that, it goes into your library and becomes a resource for future projects. It's all part of building your organization's capacity to deliver greener projects. The documentation piece is incidental if you're well-organized.

This credit is a great example of the LEED principle that credit is given not for the amount of effort involved, but for the benefit(s) derived. It may take a fair amount of research to round up enough aesthetically pleasing, budget-compliant, LEED-qualifying counter materials to satisfy your clients.

Like all other choices involved in a project, the client needs to decide if having counters (or cabinets or doors or windows, etc.) that meet environmentally preferable criteria provides sufficient value to justify the investment. LEED credit isn't the primary benefit; it's merely an outcome of making choices that address the project goals.

Post a Reply
0
0
Kathy Buck Senior Project Manager Neumann/Smith Architecture
Jun 22 2011
LEEDuser Member
1518 Thumbs Up

MRc2: VOC standard question

On the table for Environmentally Preferable Products (Table 1 in the reference guide for MR2), under Roof AND floor AND wall for the insulation component, which version of the California "Practice for Testing of VOC's from Building Materials Using Small Chanbers" should be used? There are at least (2) version out there.

Which should be used? There appears to be a 2004 version and a 2010 version.

Any guidance would be appreciated.

1
1
0
Kyle Anders Mindscape Innovations Jun 22 2011 Guest 41 Thumbs Up

I would think since the standard was released in 2008, it wouldn't be referring to 2010. Likely the 2004.

Post a Reply
0
0
Marian Keeler Senior Associate Thornton Tomasetti / Sustainability
May 18 2011
LEEDuser Member
3508 Thumbs Up

LEED - H compared to LEED - NC

Tristan-Have you ever seen a formal comparison done between Homes and New Construction (2009)? We're trying to determine if a low-rise multifamily project is better off certifying under Homes or NC -- in terms of cost only. We'd like the client to maximize the green opportunities compared to the relative costs (bang for the buck). Any thoughts? Something recent would be great. Thanks.

1
3
0
David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects May 18 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17786 Thumbs Up

The LEED Homes Provider for your area may have some data for comparison as there are a number of variables and assumptions in your question. It may be worth getting a preliminary fee proposal if you haven't already.

In general, we've seen soft cost savings with LEED Homes for mid-rise residential projects compared to NC, mostly from the smaller work scope needed for commissioning, energy modeling, and preparing documentation. It may be harder, though, to get all the right decision makers, especially representing energy analysis and HVAC design, around the table early enough for the integrated project planning requirements. These are often tasks that get bid and contracted much later in the process.

In some cases, if the units are quite small, the home size adjuster can make the threshold for achieving a particular certification level, Gold or platinum, easier to reach than under NC. In both systems, there are obvious advantages for being in densely developed areas with access to transit.

In some regions, incentive programs may be tied to a level of LEED certification, but not all incentive programs treat LEED Homes and NC the same.

For hard costs, take a careful look at the Homes requirement for meeting ASHRAE 62.2 instead of 62.1: operable windows alone won't be sufficient for ventilation, nor will make-up air coming from a shared corridor via an under-cut entry door.

Overall, it's really great to having a local LEED-H provider as part of the process - you can get faster, specific, and targeted input on your project instead of waiting for the review process or submitting CIRs. It's more in keeping with the spirit of integrated designAn integrated design process (also called "integrative" design by some proponents) relies on a multidisciplinary and collaborative team approach in which members make decisions together based on a shared vision and holistic understanding of the project. Rather than a conventional linear design process in which a design is passed from one professional to another, an integrated process has all key team members talking together through out the design and construction process as they share ideas and use feedback across disciplines to iteratively move toward a high-performing design..

Hope that helps.

2
3
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 19 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Marian, I'm not sure you have a choice in the matter. Aren't residential projects of that scale required to use LEED for Homes?

David provides some great points, and I haven't seen a summary other than that, perhaps because it's not perceived as an either/or.

3
3
0
Sam Watters Associate Consultant, UHG Consulting Apr 27 2012 Guest 475 Thumbs Up

David,

I found your comment while trying to determine whether we will satisfy the EQp4.1 requirements in our 4 story multiunit residential building. My reading of the LEED for Homes rating system, and that of the Multifamily Midrise system is that the whole unit ventilation system just has to comply with ASHRAE 62.2-2007. As the ASHRAE standard does not specify that windows cannot serve as ventilation, I was hoping that you might be able to explain whether units with both operable windows and a continuous exhaust fan would satisfy the prereq?

Thanks in advance for your help,
Sam

Post a Reply
0
0
Richard McKay
Apr 28 2011
Guest
92 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes

I am currently a LEED AP but have not worked with LEED for Homes. What would you recommend to get started. Also, do I need to be "Home" accredited to work on a LEED for Homes project?

1
2
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 24 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Richard, you don't need to be LEED AP-H to work on a Homes project, but you do need that accreditation to earn the LEED AP credit under that rating system.

2
2
0
Ann Edminster founder/principal, Design AVEnues LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Expert 354 Thumbs Up

I would further add that it would be in your interest and your client's to do quite a bit of homework; ideally, read both the Rating System and the Reference Guide cover to cover. LEED for Homes is quite a different animal from the other members of the LEED family. You would also do well to settle on a Green Rater soon so that you have someone to go to with your questions.

Post a Reply
0
0
mike diess Engineer LNI, inc.
Feb 01 2011
LEEDuser Member
382 Thumbs Up

EQ6.2 Return air flow

EQ6.2 a) states:"Size the opening to 1 sq inch per cfm of supply air (this area may include free area undercut below door)." When using a grille are they specifying gross or net area? Our firm typically specifies the transfer grilles by gross area.

1
1
0
Rob Moody consultant, USGBC LEED® Faculty™, LEED® AP Homes, RESNET HERS Quality Assurance Designee, organic think inc Mar 24 2011 Guest 47 Thumbs Up

I asked Asa Foss, the USGBC LEED for Homes Technical Director. Asa said that EQ 6.2 references the free, or net area of the grille. That is specified in EnergyStar Version 3 and EPA's Indoor airPlus programs.

Post a Reply

Start a new LEED comment thread

Oct 24 2014
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2014 – BuildingGreen, Inc.