LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND) Forum

179 replies [Last post]
LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 29 2010 LEEDuser Moderator Post a Comment

Editor's Note: LEEDuser now has integrated LEED-ND more fully into our site, with credit language posted for each credit and prereq, and more specific forums. Over time we plan to add additional resources such as sample documents.

Please visit our LEED-ND credit and forum pages to post your LEED-ND questions! And thanks for making this forum such a happening place over the last year!

Working on a LEED-ND project? Thinking about it? Bring your questions, answers, tips, and lessons learned here. This is the "official' LEEDuser forum for overall LEED-ND questions. Please start a new thread below and discuss!

179 Comments

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Christopher Law Associate, LEED U.S. Green Building Council
Apr 02 2014
LEEDuser Member
58 Thumbs Up

Apply to LEED Committees by April 10

Hi experts,

Wanted to notify those subscribed to this forum of the ongoing LEED Committee Call for Volunteers. This opportunity is open until next Thursday, April 10th at 8:00 pm EST.

The committees included are Pilot Credit Library Working Group, Implementation Advisory Committee, the Technical Committee, and six Technical Advisory Groups (TAGs), including the Location and Planning TAG. Particularly valuable are those who have experience with diverse project types, including LEED-ND.

More information is available at the following pages:

• Volunteer Opportunity Page: Background on each committee seeking volunteers and the specific expertise areas sought during this round of applications. http://www.usgbc.org/committees/volunteer-opportunities/leed-call

• Application Tool: Online survey to submit your self-nomination and expand upon your professional background. https://usgbc.wufoo.com/forms/2014-leed-committees-call-for-volunteers/

• Blog Post: Original March 10th announcement on USGBC.org, which includes further information on the selection process. http://www.usgbc.org/articles/become-leed-committee-member

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND Neighboring Concepts, PLLC
Jan 13 2014
Guest
320 Thumbs Up

Help! Where can I find ArcEditor 9.3 for the Connections Tool?

Greetings!

According to the Connections Tool resource page on LEED-Online:

"The user must have ArcEditor 9.3 or ArcInfo 9.3. The tool is not compatible with ArcView, ArcEditor 10 or ArcInfo 10."

Unfortunately, the ESRI Support rep informed me that they no longer keep ArcGIS 9.3 media. Does anyone know where I could purchase ArcEditor 9.3?

...If not, does anyone know when (and if) the Connections Tool may be updated to run on ArcGIS Desktop Standard? Has anybody tried to run it on the current version of ArcGIS? Results?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jan 13 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Eric, my firm created the Connections Tool for USGBC and unfortunately it won't run on ArcGIS 10, nor are there plans to upgrade it for 10. So you're left with trying to find a consultant that still uses Arc 9.3; or in lieu of the Connections Tool, you can measure shortest paths in Arc10 using its network analysis function (http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//0047000000450...) or in AutoCAD (http://docs.autodesk.com/MAP/2013/ENU/index.html?url=filesMAPUSE/GUID-C3...).
Eliot

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND, Neighboring Concepts, PLLC Jan 14 2014 Guest 320 Thumbs Up

Thanks Eliot, for those options!

Re: consultant option - that would be a costly option to address an existing project for evaluation, but, unfortunately, I really do need this tool to assist in my actual design work. If you don't mind me asking, what is the main technical barrier represented by Arc10 for incorporating the Connections Tool? Is this something that is addressable?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jan 15 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Eric, the tech barrier is the Connections Tool was written in Visual Basic 6, and ESRI decided to stop supporting VB 6 beginning with Arc 10. Retooling CT for Arc 10 would require migration of the original code and adjustments to it for operating with 10, so it's a cost beyond reason for a single project. I think a better long-term solution for CT might be an open source version that wouldn't be hostage to ESRI's decisions. For your immediate needs, depending on the land area and circulation network complexity of your project, you've got two possible approaches: manual or GIS/CAD. For smaller projects with relatively simple circulation networks, it's ok to manually measure distances between a destination (eg transit stop) and the farthest origin (eg dwelling unit entrance) to demonstrate that intervening origins are within required walking/biking distances. Alternatively, if your project has hundreds or thousands of origin and destination points on a complex circulation network, the only feasible way is GIS or CAD. Within that realm, your options are building your own shortest path queries; acquiring and adapting commercial route analysis software; or hiring a consultant that specializes in transportation network analysis. It's great that you have the opportunity to influence design with feedback from these metrics, and I wish I had better (less costly) ideas for you.
Eliot

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amy ferdinand Jan 29 2014 Guest 10 Thumbs Up

Eliot, I have 9.3. Is the tool still available through your company? If yes, How do I aquire it?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Feb 07 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Sorry I'm late answering Amy, your question got misplaced. My firm no longer has 9.3 or any of our 9.3 applications, but I believe USGBC is still distributing the Connections Tool. If you have ND forms for the walking/biking credits, there's a CT icon download link on them that may still work. Otherwise you should check with ND staff at USGBC for a copy (in addition to the software, be sure to get the user guide).
Eliot

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amy ferdinand Feb 08 2014 Guest 10 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much. I will contact USGBC.

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Marc Mondor Principal evolve LLC
Jun 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
759 Thumbs Up

Meeting GIBp2 and GIBp3 in mixed uUse Buildings not fully leased

Our project will certify buildings under mid rise LEED for Homes using ASHRAE 90.1 Appendex G energy modeling to demonstrate an average 10% improvement in energy efficiency. However the first floor commercial spaces will not be designed and fully leased when we would like to submit for Stage 3 ND Review. What is required of the developer for achieving both of the prerequisites (minimum energy & water efficiency), where commercial tenant spaces are not yet built out...lease language like a core and shell project OR must the future tenants actual do energy modeling and water use calculations to demonstrate compliance to the developer.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jun 04 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Marc, you'll be ok with lease language.
Eliot

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Marc Mondor Principal, evolve LLC Jun 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 759 Thumbs Up

Thankyou Eliot!

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Tyler Baker Urban Designer Urban Strategies
Nov 14 2012
Guest
152 Thumbs Up

MPDp1c and NPDc1j - sidewalk definition

Hello, I have a question about how sidewalk is defined.

We have a sidewalk along the street edge of a park, and the park has a playground in it. The City has requested that we provide a fence between the roadway and the sidewalk for safety reasons. So the configuration would be: roadway, curb, fence (in landscaped area), sidewalk, park. The sidewalk would still be continuous to the rest of the sidewalks, one would just not be able to get to the sidewalk from the roadway for the part adjacent to the park.

The description in the LEED reference guide notes that protection of the pedestrian area is encouraged, I just want to make sure fencing it off won't discount this section from our sidewalk calculations.

I hope that is clear,
Thanks
Tyler

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 14 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Tyler, can you please post your question to the specific credit-by-credit forums we have set up?

http://www.leeduser.com/leed-credits

Thanks.

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Martine Desbois Dec 11 2012 LEEDuser Member 155 Thumbs Up

Hello Tristan, on the credit by credit forum NPD credit 6 is missing. Thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 11 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Martine, I'm sorry about that—I've fixed it. NPDc6 is here.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Oct 22 2012
LEEDuser Moderator

LEED-ND forums and credit language

Hello LEED-ND users!

LEEDuser now has integrated LEED-ND into our site, with credit language posted for each credit and prereq, and more specific forums. Over time we plan to add additional resources such as sample documents.

Please visit our LEED-ND credit and forum pages to post your LEED-ND questions! And thanks for making this forum such a happening place over the last year!

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Karyn Rodrigues Architect consultant, LEED AP-ND, BD+C
Oct 22 2012
Guest
341 Thumbs Up

Exception for NPDp3

Our project boundary encompasses two blocks with a through-street dividing them (just like fig.12b on page 28 of LEED ND Ref. Guide). Based on project's net area the two intersecctions inside LEED boundary are enough to meet 140 inters per sq.mile requirement. However, surrounding neighborhood is composed by large blocks (1078ft X 420ft average) and we aren't able to meet the other part of prerequisite "one through-street intersecting or terminating at the project boundary every 800ft." I wonder if my case falls under exception described on page 179 "If a project shares a boundary with a previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development." parcel that does not have a through-street every 800ft, an exemption is allowed: The project does not need to provide a through connection because no connection can be made" once adopting surrounding streets will not solve our problem and the area within 1/2mile is completely developed with buldings on it (including our project site).

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Oct 22 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Karyn, if your boundary is drawn like Fig 12b, then it technically doesn't have any intersections inside it, creating a problem with both connectivity and through-connections under NPDp3. However, it's difficult to be sure about your circumstances without seeing a project map. If you want to send me one at eliot@crit.com I'll take a quick look and come back online here to share my reaction.
Eliot

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Karyn Rodrigues Architect consultant, LEED AP-ND, BD+C Oct 22 2012 Guest 341 Thumbs Up

Thanks Elliot. I've sent you an email.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Oct 22 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Karyn, thanks for the project map, which does show that your situation is similar to Fig 12b in the Getting Started section of the Reference Guide. With your current boundary placement, there are no right-of-way (ROW) centerlines intersecting inside the boundary, and there are four points on the boundary that are intersected by ROW centerlines. If you relocate your project boundary outward to encompass the adjacent ROWs, similar to Fig 12d, then you'll have 8 ROW centerline intersections inside the boundary, and 11 points on the boundary intersected by ROW centerlines. So boundary placement relative to adjoining ROWs can make a big difference in NPDp3 and c6.

Also, each registered LEED-ND project has a USGBC staff member assigned to provide technical assistance to the project team, and you may want to check with that person to confirm my interpretation in the maps I emailed you. Additionally, I understand that USGBC will shortly publish a credit interpretation that may apply to the same circumstances, so you'll want to inquire about that as well.
Eliot

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Karyn Rodrigues Architect consultant, LEED AP-ND, BD+C Oct 22 2012 Guest 341 Thumbs Up

Elliot, I really appreciate your response. I had already reached the same result that your analysis showed, but as a 'Plan B'. I was wondering what are the consequences of relocating our project boundary outward to encompass the adjacent ROWs? Does the project developer must have control over the other side of the street, such as sidewalks and infrastructure improvements? The project is not registered yet and we are evaluating its eligibility to do so.

I look forward to see credit interpretations of this prerequisite since we are encountering many difficulties in achieving it in other projects.

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Oct 23 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi Karyn,

Moving the project boundary to the opposite side of the street is something we've seen projects do, though it's not usually our first recommendation. As Eliot said, depending on project circumstances there may be a LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. that applies to you. It depends on the acreage of your project. Please email me at mbogaerts@usgbc.org and I can give you better guidance.

Best,
Meghan

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Karyn Rodrigues Architect consultant, LEED AP-ND, BD+C Oct 23 2012 Guest 341 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much Meghan. I've sent you an email.

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND, Neighboring Concepts, PLLC Oct 23 2012 Guest 320 Thumbs Up

I'm interested in knowing which LEED Interpretations are relevant. I'm following this discussion with interest. What Karyn says is right, whether or not to include ROWs within the project boundary is something project teams grapple with at the earliest stage.

This doesn't impact me directly, but it might be helpful to have a access to a resource elaborating on the acreage requirements. Is there a way project teams can get access to the LEED Interpretations database or seek guidance on this question early on?

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Oct 23 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi Eric,

LEED Interpretations are posted in a database, which you can search. This is the current link: https://old.usgbc.org/leedinterpretations/LILanding.aspx

We're in the process of moving the database to our new website, so there might be a revised link in a few months.

The Interpretation I'm talking is not published yet, but should be by next quarter, at which point it will show up in the database. For now, if a project is having problems specifically with NPDp3, it's best that I handle those case by case.

Best,
Meghan

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Oct 23 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Karyn, it sounds like Meghan's going to help you with the upcoming NPDp3 interpretation for small acreage projects. Regarding your question about whether a developer must control the other side of the street if the project boundary is moved outward to encompass an adjacent street right-of-way (ROW), the answer is no. If the boundary is moved to the farther side of the ROW edge, then property facing that edge is not considered part of the LEED-ND project, and it's understood that the encompassed ROW area is under the control of whatever entity the ROW was originally dedicated to, e.g. the municipality. However, municipal or similar public control of a ROW does not relieve a LEED-ND developer from certain credit requirements that apply to existing streets inside boundaries, e.g. NPDc1(i), NPDc11 Option 2, and GIBc9 Option 1. As Meghan indicated, there are definite trade-offs when locating a project boundary and teams may want to test different configurations against intended credits. Table 3 in the Getting Started section of the Reference Guide can be helpful when evaluating boundary placement because it itemizes what kind of existing features inside a boundary are subject to credit requirements.
Eliot

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Karyn Rodrigues Architect consultant, LEED AP-ND, BD+C Oct 24 2012 Guest 341 Thumbs Up

Eliot, thank you very much for clarifying it.

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Karyn Rodrigues Architect consultant, LEED AP-ND, BD+C
Oct 08 2012
Guest
341 Thumbs Up

5ft-tall shrubs along boundary. Gated?

Along the project boundary perimeter, where streets or non-motorized-rights-of-way do not intercept, there are some vegetation. he developers are planning to grow 5ft-tall shrubs in this areas, what would apparently configure it as green-walls, or green barriers along boundary. However, it does not preclude streets and sidewalks to cross project boundary and continue through it. Streets will not be closed at any time and credits requirements about streets/non-motorized-way crossing ou terminating at the project boundary every 800ft will be met.
My point is: would this cenario configure a gated-area?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Oct 08 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Karyn, the scenario you describe does not sound like the definition of a gated area. Under NPDp3, there would have to be a physical barrier across a street or sidewalk before it would be considered gated. As long as the vegetation is planted outside of the rights-of-way used to achieve connectivity requirements, you should be ok.
Eliot

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Karyn Rodrigues Architect consultant, LEED AP-ND, BD+C Oct 08 2012 Guest 341 Thumbs Up

Perfect. Thanks Eliot!

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND Neighboring Concepts, PLLC
Sep 22 2012
Guest
320 Thumbs Up

Definition of "existing transit service" for SLL Credit 3

Greetings forum.

My next question is simple enough: what is the distinction between an "existing service" and a "planned service" for the purposes of identifying an eligible stop to qualify the development for SSLc3?

What specifically does the "service" entail? Are we talking simply about the routes and service levels as defined by daily trips? Does it not include the actual alignment and the stops?

I ask this because my project is temporarily diverting a bus route and its stop areas during construction. My project, of course, is radically altering the street network. The alignment will be restored somewhat similarly to its former shape but the stops are now in quite different locations than they were formerly, and in fact, the transit agency requested an extra stop on the main thoroughfare adjacent to the development, which we will construct. Within a year, the new streets will be in place for the transit service to run again through the site.

Obviously, I would think that you would base the 1/4 mile walk distance on the new location of the stops, technically "planned" right now, not the former locations, correct? Has the "existing service" been disqualified because we altered the alignment and stops of the service? Does the extra stop we added qualify as an eligible "existing service" stop?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Sep 23 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Eric, transit ‘service’ is the number of daily rides at a stop that’s within the required walk distance from origin points. SLLc3 Option 1 allows construction-related service interruptions for up to two years “if the transit agency has committed to restoring the compliant routes with service at or above the prior level.” So your first step should be confirming that existing stops meet the credit’s minimum ride requirements. Assuming they do, then you should be ok with the new locations of the old stops because the “restoring compliant” languages refers to “routes,” not “stops,” in effect acknowledging the necessity of realigned routes and repositioned stops when a street network is redesigned. And the “at or above” phrase should allow you to count rides at the transit agency-requested additional new stop as if it were an existing stop.
Eliot

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND, Neighboring Concepts, PLLC Sep 23 2012 Guest 320 Thumbs Up

Thanks Eliot!

I guess my concern with this interpretation is that it seems to leave a door wide open to allow project teams to harm the transit service by slowing it down. This can happen a number of ways: (1) either by relocating or adding stops in such a way to harm the service performance - especially by adding more stops than necessary, (2) adding dwelling times at the new intersections introduced, which you mostly likely will be if you are striving to meet NPDc6, or (3) by altering the alignment to take extra diversions to better serve units. Isn't this the reason why the intent of the credit is to reward teams for locating at "locations SHOWN to have multimodal transportation choices" versus a planned service that doesn't? What is to prevent a project team from diverting (or extending) an existing nearby route to get a stop near its dwelling units?

I guess I'm now missing the reason for disqualifying "planned service". It seems to me that you should reward a project team that designs its development to be transit ready for a future service if that indeed is a possibility.

Do you know the reasons this credit was structured this way? I'm very curious what the reasoning was behind it. Does the Location and Planning TAGLEED Technical Advisory Group (TAG): Subcommittees that consist of industry experts who assist in developing credit interpretations and technical improvements to the LEED system. have any discussions available on this I can refer to?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Sep 24 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Eric,
The ND Core Committee crafted the rating system’s treatment of existing versus planned transit. Their meeting minutes don’t go into details, but in a nutshell they wanted transit service to be in place from the very outset of project occupancy so that transit mode choice habits can form immediately, and public investment in transit is maximized. The exception under SLLp1 Option 3 for planned service is heavily qualified by the necessity of such investment being fully committed.

A word of caution about my earlier response: being able to count rides at a transit agency-requested post-construction new stop under SLLc3 is only my interpretation of the credit language, and I can imagine others might conclude that the phrase “or above” simply acknowledges the transit agency’s prerogative to increase service, but that increment of new service still doesn’t get counted because of the credit’s base exclusion of new service. If this issue is notable for your project, you should submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide on it.

As you point out, after location the important ways to make a project transit-friendly fall under NPD, especially Credits 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8. By using these and related credits to integrate urban design and transit planning, a project should be able to get a strong endorsement from the local transit agency and generate a superior transit mode share.
Eliot

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND, Neighboring Concepts, PLLC Sep 25 2012 Guest 320 Thumbs Up

Thanks Eliot. That does shed a bit more light. I realize that one can too easily claim that transit service is "planned", so it makes sense to award only existing service.

Walkability and development character is indeed important to transit service, but there's a bit more that goes into transit-readiness in my mind. The most important is location of the alignments and how the development relates to them. For the latter, SLL Prerequisite 1 and NPD Credit 3 do reward for good relation to the stops of planned service.

I'm worried however about the implications of allowing project teams to change routes to suit LEED-ND credits, but not produce great outcomes for the transit network. Adding stops and diversions is bad news. If your transit network, for example, is a pulse network, and you are adding travel time through the LEED-ND development, transit service will have to adjust accordingly. It is not as elastic as we'd assume. So, now a location elsewhere that was shown to be multi-modally served will now potentially be adversely affected. Another example: if you have a potential for a transit connection between alignments and can provide two stops, will the development team space those stops closer together or will they be tempted to space them further apart to reach more of their dwelling units and building entrances? These are just some of the things to think about in terms of the outcomes of transit service.

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND Neighboring Concepts, PLLC
Sep 12 2012
Guest
320 Thumbs Up

GIBp1 & GIBc1 - Which rating systems are eligible to qualify?

Greetings! Does anyone in the forum have experience qualifying buildings as "certified green" for GIBc1 credit with rating systems other than USGBC's? If so, which non-USGBC programs do you know are eligible or likely to qualify?

My understanding is that ANSI is an IAF accreditation body, which would mean ANSI Accredited Standard Developers are eligible. That would mean Green Building Initiative's Green Globes and NAHB's ICC 700 National Green Building Standard are qualifying rating systems. Has anyone hit any snags using buildings certified by one of these rating systems in qualifying square footage to meet GIBc1? Any issues to think about?

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Sep 12 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi Eric,

I'll let others give input based on their own project experiences, but I wanted to point out a guidance document we've put on our website about this: http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=9543

It's important to note that the prerequisite and credit require that the body issuing certifications meet one of the ISO standards listed. That's not necessarily the same thing as being an ANSI accredited standard developer. We're handling the determination on a case by case basis as project teams find rating systems they'd like to use.

Best,
Meghan

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND, Neighboring Concepts, PLLC Sep 14 2012 Guest 320 Thumbs Up

Thanks Meghan.

That is quite a snag to keep in mind. Thanks for the heads up! ...Why do I get the distinct impression this has been rarely attempted successfully before? :)

My investigations have eliminated Enterprise Green Communities from the running. NAHB appears to be working on and committed to meeting the ISO guides, but as Meghan pointed out, their certifications will be handled on a case by case basis.

Since many consultants will be interested in the answer to this question (as well as 100% of developers), I'll try to keep one posted here as I find out more from rating system developers.

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Tyler Baker Urban Designer Urban Strategies
Aug 29 2012
Guest
152 Thumbs Up

LEED ND GIB credit 9 - heat island redcuction

Hi everyone,

For option 1, non roof measures, to measure the area shaded I am doing a shadow study at the prescribed times.

But the Reference Guide makes it seem like only shade from trees or shade structures can be counted towards this.

If I have driveways that are completely shaded by buildings, surely this shaded are would count, correct? We positioned the driveways strategically on the north side of the buildings to take advantage of their shade.

Thanks
Tyler

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Aug 29 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Tyler, you're right, Option 1 is limited to open structures, such as canopied walkways and vine pergolas, and tree canopies. So you'd have to try a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for your adjacent building strategy.
Eliot

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Mario S.
Aug 24 2012
LEEDuser Member
424 Thumbs Up

Time Effort required for LEED ND Consultancy

Hello everyone,

I am curious to know the following:
Based on your experience dealing with large projects applying for LEED ND Certification, what would you say is the time effort per stage required for LEED ND Consultancy in terms of Man-days?

Specifically, I’m preparing a LEED ND Consultancy proposal for an International (outside U.S) mixed-use project that covers around 100 acres of land with a BUA of around 700,000 m2. What do you believe is an approximate time effort needed for such a consultancy?

Many Thanks,

Mario

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND, Ecology & Environment, Inc. Sep 03 2012 Guest 864 Thumbs Up

Hi Mario,

In brief: this is likely to take a lot of man hours. However, you're probably going to have to figure out how many on your own, by detailing how you expect to run the project and exactly what services you will need from your LEED Consultant.

It's impossible to give you anything in Man-days at the level of detail you provide. Many details about how the project is organized can seriously impact the amount of work required (like, by factors of 2 or more).

To give you a (non-exhaustive) list of the types of questions you need to answer in building your estimate:
Are you a Project Owner seeking a LEED Consultant or do you represent the Design Team looking to integrate a LEED Consultant?
Will the consultant be expected to regularly attend meetings in person on location, or will e-mail and phone communication be sufficient in most cases ? How many people are required from the Consultant at a typical meeting ?
Does the consultant already have a presence in the country the project is located in and do they know the rules of that market?
Is your international project in an English-speaking country familiar with green building processes or a non-English-speaking country where no LEED project has ever been tried?
How much design review will your LEED Consultant need to perform?
How much on-call consulting will be needed to answer your design team's (many) likely questions during the process?
Is your design team proficient in LEED, and LEED ND in particular, or will this be their first time?
Will you be requiring your LEED Consultant to do building energy and water modeling, or will that role fall to designers with consultant review?

Good luck!

Daniel

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND Neighboring Concepts, PLLC
Aug 15 2012
Guest
320 Thumbs Up

GIB Prereq 2 - ENERGY STAR "equivalent criteria"

LEED-ND forum,

I am searching for a clarification on which specific ENERGY STAR program(s) the "equivalent criteria" statement applies to in GIB prereq 2. As you know, New Homes v.2 has phased out, so can the term "equivalent criteria" still apply to New Homes v. 2 criteria or must it now necessarily apply to New Homes v. 3 only? Can a Builder Option Package still be used to satisfy the criteria?

Is the "equivalent criteria" hinged on the building's actual start of construction or what applied to the ENERGY STAR New Homes Program in 2009?

Thanks for any guidance!

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Aug 22 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi Eric,

In general, the best way to explain LEED-ND's policies on this kind of thing is to say that we follow the LEED for Homes program (to keep consistency for those teams using both rating systems). So, the analogous Homes rating system, version 2008, does currently allow project teams to use ENERGY STAR version 2 as an "or equivalent" to version 3. Therefore, it's acceptable for an ND project to do the same.

However, I'd encourage you to follow version 3 if you can. Our policies tend to evolve with the market (and as codes are updated), and so may change. Also, if your project is Stage 1 or Stage 2, what you're doing is committing to follow ENERGY STAR when the buildings are built. If that point is more than a year or two in the future, version 3 will be more commonly used in the market anyway.

Best,
Meghan

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND, Neighboring Concepts, PLLC Aug 29 2012 Guest 320 Thumbs Up

Thanks Meghan!

Ok. I have a circular predicament for you concerning a building's energy requirements in my project to meet GIBp2. Perhaps you can shed some light. My largest building is a 4-story multifamily project, which is over 100,000 square feet. According to GIBp2 it then must demonstrate the 10% efficiency improvement via the equivalent modeling methodology of the LEED rating system appropriate to the building, which in this case is the LEED-H Multi-family Mid-rise system. These simulation guidelines must follow the methodology of the EPA's ENERGY STAR Multifamily High-Rise Program Simulation Guidelines.

That's all fine and good. However, we also have to qualify for ENERGY STAR for other reasons, and to do so, we need to qualify the building through the New Homes version 3.0 program (not the Multifamily High Rise program!) because, while the building is over three stories, it is actually ineligible for this program because it has units with independent systems (no central heating, cooling, hot water systems).

So...in order to pursue both, we will have to pull double duty, pursuing in effect, two energy modeling programs, one effort for the whole building simulation and one for each unit. This will add incredible expense to the project. Is there a way we can perhaps reconcile the two, "kill two birds with one stone" in effect? Any chance we can use meeting ENERGY STAR via New Homes version 3 qualification of each unit to meet the prerequisite, even if the building is 3+ stories and over 100,000 sq. ft.?

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Tyler Baker Urban Designer Urban Strategies
Aug 14 2012
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GIB Credit 2

I would just like to confirm the points applicable for GIBc2. For an entirely residential development, if 90% of the buildings comply with the criteria set out in the document, is that worth 2 points?

The number of points is set out for the various thresholds described in the non-residential section.

Thanks!

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Aug 14 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Yes, that's correct. Apologies for the confusion!

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Tyler Baker Urban Designer Urban Strategies
Aug 02 2012
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152 Thumbs Up

LEED ND GIB credit 4 - Water efficient landscaping

I am working on a residential redevelopment in a mature inner suburb. Previously the site was a low density residential neighbourhood.

In the explanation of GIB c4 the Reference Guide notes that "projects with no new or existing landscape irrigation requirements automatically meet the credit requirements."

Previously the landscape of the project was mainly lawn and some trees (as would be typical of a low density suburb). We are proposing a slightly higher density of development, a mix of single detached houses and semi-detached townhouses.

At this point there is no way to know what the landscaping will be for the single detached lots (people can do with them whatever they want when they buy them). However we know the landscape will generally be similar to the pre-existing condition in terms of landscape irrigation requirements - a mix of trees and lawn. In fact, there will be less irrigation required as we have more hard surface. We will not be providing any irrigation infrastructure such as sprinklers in the public park or townhouses.

Am I correct in my understanding of the intent of the credit? The documentation requirements seem to want an imaginary baseline condition, rather than the pre-existing condition. We propose to use the pre-existing condition as the baseline. Is that a correct interpretation?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Aug 06 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Tyler, you're correct that the credit wants an 'imgainery' or good faith estimate of a baseline from which the percent water savings is calculated. But you shouldn't use your pre-existing condition because you describe the new project as having landscape design changes, including less irrigated area. So your baseline should be an estimate of the new design's water needs using reasonable assumptions for landscaping, and other variables itemized in the ND reference guide.
Eliot

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Jodie Clarke Commercial Services Manager O'Brien & Company
Aug 01 2012
LEEDuser Member
181 Thumbs Up

NPD p1 (b)

I have a question regarding building-height-to-street-width ratio. ND says that street width is measured facade to facade, but what if the development is not set up with buildings directly opposite on their respective streets?

My project is small, and includes three rows of houses; rows one and two are separated by both a street and a park. Measured facade to facade, this is likely to exceed the allowable distance. Can I exempt the park from this measurement? The third row of houses faces a street and then undeveloped land (a stand of trees between it and the next development), so there are no facades on the other side of the street to measure to... Can I just measure the width of the street plus the sidewalks?

Finally, rows two and three are separated by a walking path; I can use this path if it meets the required ratio of 1:1. However, both rows of houses back onto the path. Can I use back porch to back porch? Or does it have to be building frontage?

Thanks!

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Aug 02 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Jodie, let me run through the BH-SW calculation, and then answer your questions. First, the ‘street width’ part of the ratio should be converted to ‘street centerline’ or BH-CL. Measuring to the centerline instead of full street width allows you to do each side of a street individually, including internal streets that have two sides or frontages within a project boundary, and bordering streets where only one side or frontage is inside the boundary. Note that NPDp1 applies to both existing and planned streets. For each street frontage (see Fig 13 in the Reference Guide Getting Started chapter for a diagram of the term), determine which buildings on that frontage meet the minimum BH-CL ratio, which is 1:1.5 (or half of the 1:3 BH-SW ratio), or 1:0.5 for non-motorized ROWs. Any side of a building that faces a street must be considered, not just front facades. For each building (existing and planned buildings for NPDp1), divide its height by the façade-to-centerline distance; if the result is less than 1.5 discard the building; if the result is 1.5 or greater, add the width of that building façade to a list of qualifying buildings and sum the total when all buildings have been screened. Then add up the length of all street frontages, and subtract the width of all driveways and alleys on the frontages to get a net total street frontage length. Finally, divide the total width of qualifying buildings by the net total frontage length to see if you make the NPDp1 15% threshold (or 40% if you're attempting NPDc1).

So to your questions:
- Buildings don’t have to be located directly opposite each other on a street because the calculation method treats each side of a street individually regardless of what’s on the opposing side.
- Park frontage isn’t an allowable exclusion from total street frontage, only driveways and alleys.
- The sidewalk you describe between rows two and three can only be used if it’s located in a dedicated right-of-way. If it is in a dedicated ROW, then you can use the houses even if their rear side faces the sidewalk because the calculation is blind to which side of a building is facing the frontage.

Hope this helps, Eliot

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Jodie Clarke Commercial Services Manager, O'Brien & Company Aug 02 2012 LEEDuser Member 181 Thumbs Up

Thanks Eliot - that's super helpful.

One clarification is that I wasn't looking to exclude the park from the street frontage, but rather from the centerline to facade distance. However, I'll go ahead and assume that is still not allowable. Would it make any difference that the park is also in the utility easement, since it functions as (the upper) half of the on-site stormwater system? I'm guessing not.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Aug 02 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

The facade-to-centerline measurement only applies to buildings, so the park never enters that part of the calculation. The only way the park is involved is with its frontage length making up part of total street frontage length.

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Jodie Clarke Commercial Services Manager, O'Brien & Company Aug 02 2012 LEEDuser Member 181 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the clarification, Eliot! Much appreciated.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Aug 02 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Jodie, I need to make a correction to my original answer that I failed to proof read sufficiently. The threshold for a qualifying building is not 1.5, it is 0.66, or the ratio of 1 to 1.5.
Eliot

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Ted Bardacke LEED Faculty (ND), AICP, Senior Associate, Green Urbanism, Global Green USA Aug 21 2012 Guest 413 Thumbs Up

Jodie: We have developed a spreadsheet that essentially automates the calculation procedure that Eliot describes above. If you -- or anyone else on the list -- wants a copy, please send a request to me at tbardacke@globalgreen.org and I'll pass it on.

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Carly Ruggieri Senior Sustainability Consultant Steven Winter Associates, Inc.
Jul 16 2012
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998 Thumbs Up

PI form 1 Assigning Mixed Use Acreage

The PIf1 table PIf1-2 is throwing me off. The only options for mixed use are to provide how many acres are assigned to residential and how many acres are assigned to non-residential. How do I input the acres of a building with ground floor retail and residential above?? I don't want wrong information linking to other forms, but its not clear how to report buildable landThe portion of the site where construction can occur. When used in density calculations, the calculation for buildable land excludes: public streets and other public rights of way, and land excluded from development by law or other prerequisites of LEED for Neighborhood Development. that has both residential and non-residential in the same footprint. Help!

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jul 17 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi Carly,

You can find good instructions about this on page 23 of the Reference Guide. All you do is assign the acreage in the same proportion as the square footage. So if you've got a 100,000 sf building, 10,000 of which is ground floor retail and the rest of which is residential, then assign 10% of the acreage as nonresidential and 9% as residential.

Best,
Meghan

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND Ecology & Environment, Inc.
Jul 09 2012
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864 Thumbs Up

NPD Credit 11: Visitability and Universal Design

Hello all,

My project is considering pursuing NPD Credit 11. We are still narrowing down the various choices available under the credit. How do we determine if we are eligible for Option 2 if we have residential components? What residential components are "not within the scope of Option 1"? It seems like the housing types under Option 1 cover pretty much anything.

Thanks,

Daniel

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jul 09 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Daniel, housing falls under Option 1 if it meets the definition of 'dwelling unit,' i.e. long-term occupancy with cooking/sleeping/sanitation facilities. Option 2 is for housing that may not have all the features of dwelling units, e.g. hotels or dormitory space without cooking facilities.
Eliot

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jul 10 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi, Daniel. The other reason you might have housing that doesn't fall under Option 1 is if you aren't building any new units. Option 1 is only for projects building new dwelling units (vs having some existing housing within the project boundary).

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Ilan Guest
Jun 22 2012
Guest
21 Thumbs Up

Calculating extent of 'Previously Developed Sites'

Hi Leeders,

Option 1a for Infill Site determination stipulates the following:

"At least 75% of [the project site] boundary borders parcels that individually are at least 50% previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development.", and that in aggregate are at least 75% previously developed."

How does one calculate to what extent a bordering parcel is previously developed?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jun 22 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Ilan, you apply the 'previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development."' definition to each parcel. In other words, how much of each parcel has been altered by construction, paving, or use of the land that would normally require permitting, either currently or in the past. Note that one acre or smaller parcels can be considered 100% previously developed if just one building or similar improvement has been constructed on them. For parcels larger than one acre it's necessary to calculate the amount of land occupied by the previous development footprintThe development footprint is the total area of the building footprint and area affected by development or by project site activity. Hardscape, access roads, parking lots, nonbuilding facilities, and the building itself are all included in the development footprint. and land alterations associated with that footprint. The 'previously developed' definition also includes other detailed guidelines.
Eliot

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND Ecology & Environment, Inc.
Jun 20 2012
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864 Thumbs Up

Construction Impact Zone

Hello LEED User ND forum,

I am preparing my Stage 1 LEED ND project for the SLL Prerequisite Review. In doing so, I noticed that Project Information From (PIF) 3 requires a map specifying the construction impact zone. This zone is described pretty clearly in the definitions in the LEED ND Reference Guide. However, I'm having trouble finding any specific ND requirements that refer back to the construction impact zone.

So, my questions are the following:

1. What, if any, are the requirements for the construction impact zone? Do these requirements go beyond 'stay out of any wetlands, water bodies, or areas with imperiled species and ecological communities'?

2. At this early stage in my project, I cannot know very precisely what the construction impact zone will be. Because this is a greenfield project and it involves a lot of landscape restoration and park development, the impact zone is likely to go a far beyond the development footprintThe development footprint is the total area of the building footprint and area affected by development or by project site activity. Hardscape, access roads, parking lots, nonbuilding facilities, and the building itself are all included in the development footprint.. The safest assumption, although clearly an overestimation, is that nearly everywhere will at some point be subject to some work, even if that is just digging and planting. Is there any reason to think this would be a problem with regards to LEED ND, so long as areas protected by LEED ND prerequisites are kept out of the impact zone and no work happens within them?

Thanks again,

Daniel

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jun 20 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Daniel, the only credit that uses the construction impact zone is GIBc7. Its delineation should include the project's development footprintThe development footprint is the total area of the building footprint and area affected by development or by project site activity. Hardscape, access roads, parking lots, nonbuilding facilities, and the building itself are all included in the development footprint. and your best estimate of other areas likely to be impacted by construction or materials staging.
Eliot

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND, Ecology & Environment, Inc. Jul 09 2012 Guest 864 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Elliott!

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Juan Robles Senior Architect, AIA, LEED AP BD+C RoblesArq Architecture and Planning
Jun 12 2012
LEEDuser Member
180 Thumbs Up

NPD P3- Connected and Open Community

Hello,
I am working on a project in ciudad de Panamá, Panamá. The Master Plan of the project includes residential and commercial areas.
As LEED Consultants we are worried about accomplishing this prerequisite. We find a cultural barrier, since this prerequisite has as requirement that all streets that are counted towards the connectivity are NOT Gated, in Panamá this could be difficult to accomplish because the security is an important thing to consider in a neighborhood development.
The project is located within a new master plan, to be developed completely within the next 10 years. Our project is the first pad built inside this new community. The other development pads will have internal road intersections, but we do not know exactly where and how many. Does future development can be used within this credit calculations?
Is there an alternative compliance path to comply with this prerequisite?

Juan Robles

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jun 13 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi Juan,

I'm glad to hear of your interest in the rating system. There are ways that a project with gates may still pass the prerequisite, but we don't offer a path specifically for international projects based on cultural grounds. So it is possible that your project wouldn't be able to certify. We offer some guidance on this in the International Project FAQ (found here: http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=7586 )

Here's the guidance from the FAQ:
"To fully understand how gates are treated in LEED-ND, review NPD prerequisite 3: Connected and Open Community.
The intent of this prerequisite is to encourage high levels of internal connectivity (intersections and paths for all modes
of travel) as well as connections to the surrounding community. Gates prohibit these connections, but the rating system
does allow them for education and health care campuses and military bases where gates are used for security purposes.
Additionally, if other gates are present, any intersections within those gated areas cannot be counted towards the
project’s connectivity score (the number of intersections per square mile). Therefore, it is still possible that a project
that includes a gated community within its boundaries might be able to comply with this prerequisite. In addition, up to
2% of the area within the project boundary can be excluded from the LEED-ND project; as a result, this enclave would
not be counted towards any credit. A project that is entirely enclosed by a gate would not be able to comply with this
prerequisite as none of the intersections within the gates would count toward the connectivity score."

Best,
Meghan

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Al Wei Senior Associate Principal, Planning & Sustainability, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates PC Jun 20 2012 Guest 172 Thumbs Up

For int'l projects, we have been able to integrate gated enclaves in ways that would still allow us to make the intersection requirements. Gated enclaves can often be restricted to tracts with single family homes (row-houses, town-houses, villas) which cannot benefit from building security. As long as these areas are kept small, and the preponderance of development is planned with other typologies (such as apartment buildings), the intersection requirement under NPDp3 doesn't have to prevent prerequisite compliance.

Note that this will no longer hold under the current draft of LEED ND 2012, however, where a superseding total % area cap on gated tracts has been proposed. The proposed additional requirement will disqualify many international projects, especially in cities where significant and real security issues exist, where single family homes, townhomes and rowhouses cannot afford private unit-level manned security.

Personally, I disagree with this added complexity. If the object is connectedness and openess, then, in my opinion, the intersection test (which is a perfectly fair prerequisite) should be sufficient. The new superseding requirement seems to me to be double-dipping. If I can pass the intersections prerequisite for an open and accessible community, then it seems to me that I would have met the intent of the prerequisite. A catch-all and arbitrary 10% cap on top of it would hardly change the neighborhood quality or otherweise increase its sustainability, would it?

My view is: if the LEED concern is that there are adequate publicly accessible street and ped connections and open and accessible blocks are small enough, the current LEED 2009 prerequisite should be enough. Within it's requirements, I can still make gated enclaves work. I'll just create small mews-like gated enclaves within blocks and make those enclaves small so as not to disrupt the amount of connectedness outside of those blocks. I'd wrap other building typologies, such as condominiums and other strata-titled building types around the edges of those blocks, so as to assure enough permeability to the (outside of the gate) street edge. I can even put some street-front retail there. As those buildings would be larger - with more dues-paying units, they could afford building-level security systems, and thus do not have to sit behind a gate. The neighborhood environment created would be no less pleasant and/or accessible.

Many neighborhoods developed in fast-growing countries like Brazil, Indonesia, South Africa, etc, in cities with high crime rates, are done with combinations of single family (often attached single family) and multi-unit residential buildings. Effectively, the proposed 2012 change in NPDp3 will bias development toward multi-unit buildings and away from equivalently dense town-house/row-house configurations, in those locations. In several ways, the new NPDp3 requirement 10% cap requirement is anti-green building, since the row/ and town-house typologies can be among the best performing from an energy perspective. If I wanted certification, I would have to choose to go with strata-titled apartment buildings - at equivalent density. This cannot possibly be the USGBC's intention, but this is exactly what I will have to recommend to clients in order to circumvent the (essentially pointless) new requirement.

Hopefully there will be another opportunity to comment on this in the coming months, now that the LEED 2012 transition has been postponed. I'd be interested in understanding USGBC's perspective on this issue, to better comprehend why the intersection prerequisite is now being considered insufficient and why that requirement is effectively being replaced with the superseding, absolute cap.

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Al Wei Senior Associate Principal, Planning & Sustainability Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates PC
May 31 2012
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172 Thumbs Up

NPDc3 Diverse uses question

The concept of diverse uses appear in two places in the rating system: SSLp1 and NPDc3.

The intent of SSLp1, as Ted Bardacke confirms in a reply below, is clearly for the project to rely on existing conditions, and I presume that a retail and services survey of some type - say a GIS map indexed to photographs of the storefronts of existing businesses and institutions - will provide sufficient documentation of those conditions needed for completion of the template, assuming that prerequisite path is chosen.

My question is with respect to diverse uses under NPDc3, which the credit description clearly states is prospective and includes services planned for the site. In a well-designed mixed-use project, the number of services planned to become available will presumably be greater - and, in our case, significantly greater - than that which can be documented under the SLLp1 requirements. Schools, churches, playgrounds and such, and other institutions, will be easy to document in detail, as they are included in the design. However, for large suburban sites where the client is a land developer working with multiple sub-developers (a typical case), who in turn will work with multiple commercial leasing agents, it seems unlikely that leasing of retail (such as street-front retail) will be sufficiently progressed to be able to document the planned diverse uses definitively. For example, if the designed building product is a row of 80 ft depth storefronts on a street, I can provide a range of potential tenants. I can tell you how particular tenant types will be facilitated through design (setback sufficient for cafe space, etc). I can also tell you with some high degree of certainty what that mix will be based on market models and my client's leasing strategies. I might even be able to provide letters of intent from a few of them. But I cannot tell you, at Stage 2, and, most likely even at Stage 3, how absorption will occur and precisely which storefront will ultimately be occupied by F&B, a bank branch, a clothing boutique, or a convenience store.

Retail pre-leasing of this type is very rare, and, indeed, a client is presumably interested in getting the LEED certification (or pre-certification) in order to attract tenants, instead of the other way around. Moreover, retail of this nature generally tends to lease much more slowly than the absorption of housing and pre-leased office space and anchor retail, for example, and thus will likely remain empty for some time into the development's stable operations period.

I'm hoping to get some advice on this issue, how NPDc3 can be documented before the tenant mix is known, to reflect the design and planning (and, subsequently) the construction intention of achieving a mixed-use community, before the precise mix could possibly be known with certainty (by which time having the certification to help sell the product is irrelevant and unhelpful to the client, as the project will already have been fully absorbed). It seems to me that this credit has, within it, something of a catch 22.

Any insight would be appreciated.

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jun 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Good morning. This is a valid question, and I know it can be a challenge at times for projects early in development process to provide this kind of information. Typically, project teams make a good faith estimate of the kinds of uses they hope to attract into the project. As you point out, spaces are designed for certain kinds of uses, though perhaps not with the specificity of clothing boutique versus bank branch. Provide your best educated guess. If you do not feel comfortable providing estimated uses in the project you may be able to earn points by relying on surrounding or existing uses. And it's also possible that this credit isn't a good fit for your project in the stage that it's in. It's rare that every credit is appropriate for a given project, which is why there are many more points available than points required to receive certification.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jun 06 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Al, Meghan's correct about submitting a good faith concept plan for leasing non-residential spaces. We've handled several projects that prepared conceptual occupancy schemes based on market analyses they were already doing as part of their project development. And those occupancies can be modified during subsequent stages of ND certification based on refined leasing circumstances.
Eliot

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND Ecology & Environment, Inc.
May 07 2012
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864 Thumbs Up

Documented alternative compliance from ND Pilot Projects?

Hi,

Because of my project's size (very large) and its location (international), I will likely need to submit alternative documentation on several credits. If possible, I'd like to do it in a manner consistent with what has worked previously for project teams and reviewers.

Is there a resource available to see how successful ND pilot projects that were either large or international responded to various requirements in their submittals?

Thanks,

Daniel

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 01 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Daniel, I haven't heard of such a resource, and I assume that if one existed, that Meghan, Eliot, or someone else would have answered in the affirmative by now. If you find anything particularly useful, please let us know.

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jul 02 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi, Daniel. USGBC is working on a short guidance document for large projects, to ease the submission process a bit. We should be posting that on our webpage soon. If there are other representatives of large projects on these forums, they might also have specific advice on strategies they used to achieve certification. I know it's a topic of interest for a sizable number of projects, and I'll post here if we gather any further resources.

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND, Ecology & Environment, Inc. Jul 09 2012 Guest 864 Thumbs Up

Thanks Meghan, I'll be looking out for that!

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Sam Watters Associate Consultant UHG Consulting
Apr 13 2012
Guest
475 Thumbs Up

Construction Impact Zone

Hello,

I am making the map of our anticpated construction impact zone, and I am wondering about development that is taking place outside of our LEED Boundary. My project is a small development that takes up about 2 city blocks, and will be surrounded by roads that are being built as a separate project (they are outside of the LEED ND Boundary). I have included these features on our maps before in order to give USGBC a sense of what the end development will look like, but am not counting them as part of the LEED ND zone.

In calculating the construction impact zone, do I need to take these additional improvements into account? Or can I extend the impact zone from around my buildings as per the construction documents, and count the land impacted by the Non-LEED portion as a separate project.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Apr 15 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Sam, the ND definition of 'construction impact zone' includes the project's development footprintThe development footprint is the total area of the building footprint and area affected by development or by project site activity. Hardscape, access roads, parking lots, nonbuilding facilities, and the building itself are all included in the development footprint. (i.e. all impervious surfacesSurfaces that promote runoff of precipitation volumes instead of infiltration into the subsurface. The imperviousness or degree of runoff potential can be estimated for different surface materials.), "plus areas around the improvements" impacted by project construction, so it's conceivable that your impact zone could extend beyond the project boundary in cases where a project improvement is close to the boundary. On the other hand, you don't need to account for the external street improvements since they're outside your boundary to begin with and aren't part of your project.
Eliot

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Sam Watters Associate Consultant, UHG Consulting Apr 16 2012 Guest 475 Thumbs Up

Eliot, I think that since we're drawing the project boudnary close to the buildings, I will call the impact zone the boundary plus a buffer around the buildings that has been called out in the construction documents. Thanks for your advice.
Sam

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Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President BuildingGreen, Inc.
Apr 12 2012
LEEDuser Moderator

Existing Building Reuse--all bldgs or only those you renovate?

Hi folks,

I'm looking at the Existing Building Reuse language. I've always assumed that it applies to all existing buildings that are retained within the project area, but I'm hearing from others that it only applies to buildings that are renovated as part of the project. Anyone know?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Apr 12 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Nadav, the key to this is in the Reference Guide’s Implementation section 4 second paragraph: "For buildings that will have new uses or major renovations…” So there isn’t an absolute requirement for renovation, but at a minimum there has to be a change from a previous use to a new use.
Eliot

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Ted Bardacke LEED Faculty (ND), AICP, Senior Associate, Green Urbanism, Global Green USA Apr 16 2012 Guest 413 Thumbs Up

Eliot is most likely to be correct about the Reference Guide, but we have been awarded this credit, via option 2, on a certified project just for the mere presence of existing buildings within the project boundary. Buildings that will remain just as they are. So GBCi may be interpreting it differently.

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council May 04 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

GIBc5 acknowledges that projects that preserve a portion or all of an existing building for reuse to earn the points for this credit. This does not include existing structures in their current use, but rather, as the Ref Guide says, includes existing buildings that will have new uses or major renovations with some portion preserved. An example of the former would be a residential conversion (formerly a residential unit transformed into a neighborhood law office). An example of the latter would be the new NPR headquarters in DC, which is a major renovation with structural portions of the former existing building preserved. If Ted’s project was awarded for existing structures in their current use, this was an accidental oversight by GBCI and will not be allowed in the future.

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Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 08 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Thanks, Meghan! This is getting clearer. But I'm still not entirely clear about how the 20% threshold in the 2nd bullet works. If my project includes a bunch of existing buldings that are untouched during the project, are those included in the total (and therefore count against the 20% achievement) or are they simply ignored in the calculation?

Put another way, is the 20% a calculation of buildings renovated vs. buildings demolished, or buildings renovated vs. buildings retained as-is AND demolished?

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Jun 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi Nadav, I'm sorry for the delay in replying. Do not include existing buildings that are remaining untouched in the credit calculations, either in the numerator or denominator. Buildings undergoing a use change (say, from residential to office) or construction are the basis of the credit. Of those buildings, save 20% of the surface area.

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND Ecology & Environment, Inc.
Apr 11 2012
Guest
864 Thumbs Up

Wastewater management in my project: GIB C14? Innovation Point?

Hello,

The project I am working on will re-use a significant percentage of its wastewater for irrigation purposes.

Wastewater will go to a municipal wastewater treatment facility, where it will undergo treatment to meet local and international water quality standards. Treated water will then be pumped back into an irrigation-specific water distribution network.

I think this meets the intent of GIB C14 because (a) pollution from wastewater will be reduced (there is no current wastewater treatment in the town I am working) and (b) water will be reused, probably to the 2 point threshold (50% of generated volume re-used).

However, there are a couple ways in which this strategy may not meet the reference guide requirements: (a) the new wastewater treatment plant is being built outside the project boundary as a separate project, (b) the treatment plant is not only linked to my LEED ND project, but to the whole municipality (c) it will not be possible to say that the exact wastewater generated in my project will be what is pumped back through the distribution network, as the treatment plant will also receive wastewater from the rest of the town. We can estimate volumes out and volumes back in, though.

My project's strategy does not appear to meet options 2 or 3 of the pilot Sustainable Wastewater Management credit.

Any thoughts? Could this strategy successfully apply for GIB C14? Would it require a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide? Or is it a different type of strategy that requires an innovation (IDP) credit?

Thank you much as always,

Daniel

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Apr 11 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Daniel, the requirements language stipulates that wastewater be retained "onsite" and that treatment for reuse occur "onsite," so you'd have to try a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for the municipal approach. I'm not sure an innovation credit proposal would work since there are many municipal reuse systems in operation, and GIBc14 is already covering the topic. Regarding pilot credit 10/Sustainable Wastewater Mgmt, only Option 3 is available for ND projects.
Eliot

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND, Ecology & Environment, Inc. Apr 11 2012 Guest 864 Thumbs Up

Elliot: Thanks for the response!

To clarify: the level of treatment and type of reuse proposed are unprecedented in the country I am working in. Does this change your assessment on CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide vs. IDP?

Also, do you think not going for onsite treatment would seriously compromise the CIR?

Thanks,

Daniel

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Apr 11 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Daniel, sorry, I didn't realize you're outside the U.S., in which case both a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide and IDP take on different prospects since the ND credit was written for U.S. projects. I can't recommend a CIR vs IDP or predict outcomes, but you could try one first and if that fails try the other.
Eliot

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND, Ecology & Environment, Inc. Apr 11 2012 Guest 864 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Eliot!I will continue my inquiries with our internal staff and contacts.

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Karyn Rodrigues Architect consultant, LEED AP-ND, BD+C
Mar 23 2012
Guest
341 Thumbs Up

Can I still earn NPD pre 3?

I am working on a LEED ND Project which involves only commercial office buildings and small retail spaces. The neighborhood around the project boundary is already developed and connected, but the project site has one predeveloped portion and one that is intact, densely vegetated and with some slopes over 15%. We are preserving this contiguous area, and developing only on portions already constructed. Because of that, the street network inside the project is extremely poor, since we have 2 streets connected as a circle surrounding and connecting the buildings (swerving the preserved area) and no valid intersection. Also, to enter and exit the project site we use the same intersection because the green area is bordering one side of the project site. (The other borders of the site are still unconstructed but we can’t invade the neighbor’s land with a street, so we are in a sort of an island in a only-one-way to get in the project site). I am afraid we can’t earn this prerequisite, so my questions are: 1.Can I choose to apply for Option 2 “Projects with no internal streets” in NPD pre requisite 3 – Connected and Open Community although we have this internal circular street surrounding the buildings? 2: To calculate the intersections per square mile can I exclude from the calculations this whole green area (which is around 5.5 hectare) although some parts of it don’t have steep slopes?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Mar 25 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Karyn, re your first question, if your project is creating internal streets that meet the ND definition of 'street,' i.e. a dedicated ROW that's addressable for mail, then you're obligated to use Option 1, or seek a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for extenuating circumstances. If, on the other hand, your internal streets aren't dedicated ROWs but more like driveways, then Option 2 becomes possible. Re your second question, a 'green area' with slopes under 15% can only be excluded from the square mileage used for calculating intersection density if it's a 'park' as defined by ND, or otherwise non-buildable because a local code or other ND requirements prevent construction on it.
Eliot

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Karyn Rodrigues Architect consultant, LEED AP-ND, BD+C Mar 26 2012 Guest 341 Thumbs Up

Thanks Eliot. I'll check with the developers about the address, but I guess (in this case) its much more like a big condo of commercial office buildings, which, in my opinion, the "streets" are not formally addressable for mail purposes. Am I right? ALso, is there any LEED-definition for "driveway"?

For the green area, it will be protected by law and consequently non-buildable, so the exclusion may apply.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Mar 26 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Karyn, in addition to whether the 'streets' are addressed for mail delivery, you'll want to determine if they're located in dedicated right-of-ways since that's the big difference between streets and driveways. The latter isn't defined in ND, but a reasonable interpretation would be a travel way constructed on land that is not a dedicated right-of-way.
Regarding the green area's legal protection from development, you'll want to confirm that the protection is codified so as to apply to all similar green areas in the jurisdiction, not just to this specific project site. For example, a project development agreement negotiated between a developer and local government, and containing a green area set-aside provision, would not be considered a 'codified' protection under ND.
Eliot

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Karyn Rodrigues Architect consultant, LEED AP-ND, BD+C Mar 26 2012 Guest 341 Thumbs Up

Thanks again Elliot. Ok, for the green areas. I understand that our streets are not rights-of-way because they are not an 'easement'. But now, another question just came up: Considering that my project has only driveways, not streets, how do I apply for NPD pre 1, since it is required to have a minimum building-height-to-street-widht ratio and driveways and alleys are to be excluded? Remember I don't have bordering streets.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Mar 26 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

If your project is found to not have existing/planned internal or bordering 'streets' as defined in ND, then the NPDp1 BH-SW requirement won't apply since that's only for 'streets.'

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Karyn Rodrigues Architect consultant, LEED AP-ND, BD+C Mar 26 2012 Guest 341 Thumbs Up

Ok. Thank you very much Elliot!

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Ilana Judah Director of Sustainability FXFOWLE
Mar 21 2012
LEEDuser Member
332 Thumbs Up

LEED NPD c6 and SLLc1

Hello, I am working on a 1/2 block Neighborhood Development located within Manhattan. Because of the existing Manhattan grid structure (long blocks), the project is unable to achieve any points under NPD c6 and only 2 of the 5 connectivity points for SLLc1. Do you know if there any sort of exemption/consideration for existing city grid networks?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Mar 21 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Ilana, there haven't been any CIRs issued to date that address the issue you're raising, but that's an avenue (bad pun) to pursue.
Eliot

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Ilana Judah Director of Sustainability, FXFOWLE Mar 21 2012 LEEDuser Member 332 Thumbs Up

Thanks Eliot. Along similar lines, do you know if schools which take up a full city block or a portion of a block would count as excludable land area? I know that school campuses are allowed to be excluded, but can school and/or church facilities be excluded? Is there a certain minimum size?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Mar 21 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Excluding churches would be a stretch; that's never happened. But school property is regularly excluded as a 'public facility campus.' There's no minimim size.

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND, Neighboring Concepts, PLLC Mar 21 2012 Guest 320 Thumbs Up

Interesting. On a related note, if a parcel dedicated for school use in the project is bordering the Project Boundary, must a right-of-way connection be developed every 400 feet at the boundary along the school site? Does NPDc6 assume that 5-15 acre school sites have right-of-way connections through these sites? If so, can a pedestrian connection developed by the school within school property count as "right-of-way"?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Mar 21 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Eric, the NPDc6 requirement for ROW through-connections or terminations every 400 ft on the project boundary is blind to the land-uses that occupy property between the ROWs, including schools. A non-motorized pedestrian connection is explicitly allowed to meet the 400 ft interval, but the ped route has to be located in a dedicated ROW. So just constructing a pathway on school property wouldn't qualify. But you could try a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide if you think there are special circumstances.
Eliot

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Sam Watters Associate Consultant UHG Consulting
Mar 21 2012
Guest
475 Thumbs Up

Comparison of Standards

I'm trying to work through how much more efficient my project will be over ASHRAE 90.1 2007, and I wondered if anyone had experience with how the standard compares to IEC 2006.

The local building code requires that all new residential buildings be built to 30% better than IECCInternational Energy Conservation Code 2006. If we meet this, can we expect an equivalent improvement over ASHRAE?

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Mar 26 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi Sam,

USGBC has not done a formal comparison of any standards to 90.1, so you may have to get anecdotal evidence from others who are familiar with both standards. I hope someone on this forum has enough experience with both to offer some advice.

Best,
Meghan

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Mar 26 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Sam, I'd try one of the LEED building forums rather than ND since there's been much more energy credit experience in programs other than ND.
Eliot

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Sam Watters Associate Consultant, UHG Consulting Mar 26 2012 Guest 475 Thumbs Up

Thanks Meghan and Eliot, I'll see what I can dig up elsewhere.
-Sam

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND Ecology & Environment, Inc.
Mar 21 2012
Guest
864 Thumbs Up

NPD P3: Extra non-motorized connectivity

Hello all,

After several positive experiences on this forum, I return with another question.

I am working on a project with internal streets. This project has a boundary, and that boundary is intersected every 240 ft or less by a right-of-way. 80% of these rights-of-way are streets that allow vehicle traffic, 20% are nonmotorized. Also, there are more than 140 intersections per square mile within the project boundary. So far, so good, right?

However, there may be extra nonmotorized rights-of-way that also intersect the boundary. Do I have to count those, and mess up my 80/20 ratio in the submittal? Or will these be considered as an extra bonus, enhancing overall connectivity, but not taking away from the fact that the basic technical requirement is met?

Thanks,

Daniel

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Mar 21 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi Daniel,

Consider the requirements separately.

For the through-connections at the boundary, stop counting the non-motorized ones once you reach the 20% cap. If you can meet the required interval without them (and it sounds like you can), that's fine.

For the intersection count, different rules apply (see definition of connectivity). You can count the non-motorized streets toward the intersection density regardless of what eventually happens with a given street at the boundary, as long as those streets meet all the rules of the connectivity definition.

Meghan

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND, Ecology & Environment, Inc. Mar 21 2012 Guest 864 Thumbs Up

Thanks again, Meghan!

(Btw, this has no impact, but my boundary is intersected every 240 meters or less, i.e. 800 ft or less, not 240 ft. or less)

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND Neighboring Concepts, PLLC
Mar 13 2012
Guest
320 Thumbs Up

"Stub-outs" and future development (NPDc6)

Greetings all,

My project is surrounded by adjacent development/redevelopment opportunities - all of which will in time be redeveloped to connect to our street and pedestrian grid, but probably not in the near future, so we have many stub-outs terminating at the boundary. According to the LEED ND Reference Guide, stub-outs are considered "culs-de-sac" and subject to the 10% limitation of culs-de-sac without pedestrian or bicycle connections. Needless to say, because the streets are stubbed so are the sidewalks, for we don't have control of the adjacent properties to develop connections. If the planned street doesn't connect yet to existing external streets, must a pedestrian through-connection still be provided to an existing street regardless? (The fact that they are mentioning the cul-de-sac rule seems to imply this.) Or, is the Reference Guide simply stating that the stub-out be developed to accommodate future pedestrian/bicycle through-connection as well?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Mar 13 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Eric, your last sentence is the correct interpretation.
Eliot

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND Ecology & Environment, Inc.
Feb 01 2012
Guest
864 Thumbs Up

Exemplary Performance in Stage 1

Hello,

I am working on Stage 1 submittal templates and have noticed that some templates for credits which offer exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. per the reference guide (e.g. GIB C4, GIB C14) do not give the 'exemplary performance' option.

Is this deliberate, because these credits essentially rely on developer commitments at Stage 1? Or is something missing, and can I anticipate that it will get fixed by GBCI in revisions of the LEED Online submittal templates?

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Feb 01 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi Daniel,
Your guess is correct - there are some credits where exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. is not available at Stage 1 because those credits are based solely on commitments at that point. Should the project return for future stages, exemplary performance would be available.

Meghan

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Sam Watters Associate Consultant UHG Consulting
Jan 30 2012
Guest
475 Thumbs Up

Subdivivided, Previously Developed Land

Our project sits on a lot that was subdivided out from a larger parcel in the past. The original, combined lot, was about 50% paved and has two buildings on it, and continues to be used as a car dealership. The portion of the property that was subdivided off is unpaved but is bare dirt and rock and has been used as storage for the years since.

Does anyone have resources or knowledge about how LEED ND treats subdivisions like this? Can we call our portion of the original lot "previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development."" since it was originally part of a lot that was developed on? Where might I turn to look further into this?

Thanks,
Sam

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jan 30 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Sam,
The determination of 'previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development."' can only be made for a parcel as currently platted, so previous platting circumstances aren't relevant. However, be sure to look at the definition of 'previously developed' to see if the storage activity you mentioned could qualify as use of the land that meets the definition threshold.
Eliot

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal ecocentric cc
Jan 26 2012
LEEDuser Member
1646 Thumbs Up

LEED boundary changes permitted?

we will be preparing our ND project for Stage 2 certification in the course of the next few months and we have the LEED boundary pretty much staked out.

the developer has just announced that they may look at purchasing a further piece of land at some stage in the future, where the idea would be that it will be incorporated into the overall ND project. would we be allowed to change the LEED boundary once we get to Stage 3 certification, provided that there are no major changes to the overall LEED ND goals that we are committing to in the Stage 2 application?

many thanks!

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jan 26 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Jutta, yes, a project boundary may be enlarged between stages. The added area will be subject to a full review for compliance with prerequisites and attempted credits.
Eliot

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Sam Watters Associate Consultant UHG Consulting
Jan 11 2012
Guest
475 Thumbs Up

Bordering Parcels

Hello All,
So my project spans several different parcels, although the project boundary does not necessarily run along their property lines. In determining if the site can be called an infill, I am wondering what the status of each of these parcels is.

For example, the project boundary runs along the border of a new street that was put in for the project. The street cuts through an existing parcel that is owned by the project owner but is not entirely bounded by the project boundary. Does the remaining portion of this parcel count as "bordering" my project? The rest of the parcel (a pretty small area) is undeveloped and will remain undeveloped for the immediate future, so I would like to be able to count the developed parcel just beyond it as bordering the project.

How much does LEED care about specific parcel borders? Am I better off classifying the project boundary as the borderlines of all occupied parcels?

Any help would be huge, Thanks

-Sam

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jan 11 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Sam, ND does care about boundary placement. Its definition of project boundary requires placement on platted property lines, except on publicly-owned campuses where a sphere-of-influence can be used. Therefore, whether "the remaining portion" of a parcel counts as bordering your project is moot because the project boundary must either completely include or exclude all of that parcel. However, in determining whether you can reach infill site status, keep in mind that subsection (b) of the infill site definition allows you to "borrow" a neighboring parcel when making the 75% previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development." perimeter check, i.e. the project site, in combination with bordering parcels, forms an aggregate parcel whose boundary is 75% bounded by parcels meeting previous development requirements. What’s noteworthy is the definition doesn’t require that the "borrowed" bordering parcels be previously developed. So you can borrow a neighboring undeveloped parcel in order to jump over it to a developed parcel that lies on the other side of the neighbor. This is illustrated in Figure 3(b) of the ND Reference Guide.
Eliot

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Sam Watters Associate Consultant UHG Consulting
Dec 20 2011
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Project Boundaries and New ROW

Hello,

The project that I'm working on is going to involve construction of additional rights of way in the form of a collector street/woonerfA Dutch word that means "street for living." In practice, it is common space shared by pedestrians, bicyclists, and low-speed motor vehicles. They are usually streets raised to the same grade as curbs and sidewalks. Vehicles are slowed by placing trees, planters, parking areas, and other obstacles in the street, so that motorists travel at walking speed. running through the project and connecting to existing streets at both ends. In determining the project boundary for LEED ND, my understanding is that the boundary must be drawn along property lines or public-access rights of way.

My question is: Can we use the boundary of our to-be-constructed right of way as the project boundary when applying for Stage 3 certification?

Thanks

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Dec 20 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Sam, it's ok to use right-of-way boundaries for project boundaries, but if you're submitting for Stage 3 then the project must be fully constructed, so having a ROW "to-be-constructed" would be inconsistent with a Stage 3 submission.
Eliot

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Sam Watters Associate Consultant, UHG Consulting Dec 20 2011 Guest 475 Thumbs Up

Thanks Eliot,
Sorry if my language was off, when we do apply for Stage 3 certification the project will be built, so at that time the new street will be an existing right of way. I'm glad to hear that we can use our own new ROW as the project boundary.
-Sam

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Eamon Geary Sustainability Director - Facilities Michael Baker Jr, Inc.
Nov 02 2011
LEEDuser Member
643 Thumbs Up

LEED-ND & LEEDUser

Love the LEEDUser layout - intiutive and much easier to browse then the Reference Guides. Is there any plan to bring LEED-ND into the LEEDUser family outside of this thread?

Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 13 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Eamon, thanks for the feedback!

We at LEEDuser would love to more fully support LEED-ND projects, but we don't have immeidate plans to do so.

Let me know if you have any specific recommendations or suggestions relative to the development of such a resource.

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND Ecology & Environment, Inc.
Oct 19 2011
Guest
864 Thumbs Up

"building floor area" and "conditioned square footage"

Hello,

I've struggled for a while with the exact definition of various floor area related terms in LEED ND. Can anyone give me any guidance on the typical elements that are included and excluded in "building floor area" and "conditioned square footage"?

As far as I can tell, LEED ND does not provide a standard reference for these terms and they can vary pretty significantly from one jurisdiction to another if one uses local zoning or building codes as references.

Thanks,

Daniel

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND, Ecology & Environment, Inc. Oct 19 2011 Guest 864 Thumbs Up

I should note that "conditioned square footage" appears in GIB P3 (water efficiency). "Building floor area" is part of the definition for density (NPD P2 and C2) and is also mentioned in GIB P2 (energy efficiency).

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Oct 27 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Daniel, "building floor area" is equivalent to "gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.)" as defined in the ND Addenda issued on 8/1/2011. You're correct that there's no formal definition of "conditioned square footage" in the rating system, but it's meant to include any portion of a building that is space heated and/or cooled.
Eliot

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND Ecology & Environment, Inc.
Sep 12 2011
Guest
864 Thumbs Up

Streets vs. Alleys vs. Paseos

Hi! I'm working on a project that includes a large number of "pedestrian streets" and I can't seem to categorize them in a consistent way with respect to the various LEED ND prerequisites and credits.

Basically, the "pedestrian streets" are rights-of-way that will be privately built and then dedicated to public usePublic or public use applies to all buildings, structures, or uses that are not defined as private or private use.. They will allow pedestrians and bicycles but not motor vehicles. They are nearly always wider than 10 ft, and at many points will be wider than 12ft.

Some buildings will face pedestrian streets only. Most will have a "regular street" front facade and some form of private or semi-public outdoor space facing the "pedestrian street" side.

Functionally, these "pedestrian streets" are mid-block cut-throughs that behave like paseos, but the LEED ND Reference Guide mentions that "paseos" can't be wider than 12 feet. One might count them as an alley, but they won't allow motor vehicles, which is part of the "alley" definition in the Reference Guide. Also, they won't necessarily serve the usual alley functions of services and delivery... The definition for a "street" in the ND reference guide seems like it could include the "pedestrian street", but frequent references are made in various other parts of the guide to a distinction between "streets" and "nonmotorized rights-of-way" (NPDp3 and NPDc6).

So should these count as streets, alleys or paseos?

Thanks,

Daniel Costantino

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Gurpreet Misra President/CEO, Greenap Inc Sep 29 2011 Guest 305 Thumbs Up

Is the purpose of this question to determine if it is possible to include the described street design in connectivity/intersection calculations? If so, chapter in reference guide on Getting Started could resolve the puzzle.

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND, Ecology & Environment, Inc. Sep 29 2011 Guest 864 Thumbs Up

Hi Gurpreet!

Thanks for your interest. The issue at hand is building frontage and distance from the street (NPD Credit 1 requirements a, b and c).

The basic "block" concept of the project is the following:
1. A block is square and delimited by 4 regular streets. It is crossed by 2 mid-block "pedestrian streets".
2. Building frontages and entrances face the regular street, and have short setbacks or no setback from regular streets.
3. Mid-block "pedestrian streets" are mostly bordered by courtyards, gardens, private back entrances etc.
4. Occasionally, a building will be placed to front onto a "pedestrian street".

In case (3), buildings have good street frontage on the regular street but are set back a fair bit from the "pedestrian street". Will that affect my project's ability to claim that we have satisfied NPD credit 1 requirements (a) and (b)?

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Gurpreet Misra President/CEO, Greenap Inc Sep 29 2011 Guest 305 Thumbs Up

What is nature of the project, mixed use commercial/residential?

Thanks!

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Sep 30 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Daniel, if the pedestrian ROWs are addressable for mail, they're "streets," and more specifically "non-motorized streets" wherever that term appears. Alternatively, you could submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide seeking a 'paseo' exception for widths wider than 12 ft.
Eliot

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Sep 30 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Daniel, I didn't see your follow-up NPDp1 question when I wrote my first response. If your "ped streets" are, for purposes of ND, 'non-motorized streets,' then: NPDp1 (a) isn't really affected since that's about bldg entries; (b) is only affected if you opt to count the ped streets toward the 15% BH-SW requirement (note that non-motorized streets must hit a ratio of 1:1, not 1:3); (c) is ok because your entire street is a sidewalk; and for (d) you have to include the ped streets when making the 20% calculation because the requirement doesn't distinguish motorized vs non-motorized.
Eliot
Eliot

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND, Ecology & Environment, Inc. Oct 02 2011 Guest 864 Thumbs Up

Gurpreet: This is a large mixed-use project.

Eliot: Thanks for the advice! I hesitate about posting a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for a paseo as I've heard that paseos have not been included in the LEED ND 2012 drafts. Also, as you correctly point out, NPD prerequisite 1 isn't too much of a worry here. However, I'm not sure what to make of a,b, and c in NPD *Credit* 1. Do you have any advice?

Thanks so much to both of you,

Daniel

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Oct 14 2011 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi, Daniel. With respect to your question about NPD Credit 1, the requirements of a, b, and c apply to all streets. It's important to be consistent between credits. If you determine that your non-motorized streets are streets as defined by LEED-ND (and explained by Eliot above), then you should treat them as streets for NPD Prerequisite 1 and Credit 1.

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND, Ecology & Environment, Inc. Oct 19 2011 Guest 864 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Meghan, that clears up the applicability of the rule nicely.

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Gurpreet Misra President/CEO Greenap Inc
Aug 22 2011
Guest
305 Thumbs Up

LEED ND International - India

Hello: This project is in Rural India. Water and Waste Water systems are generally responsibility of developers rather than municipalities. Although the site is in municipal boundry, the municipality doesn't take responsibility of planning water and wasterwater system but will give permission to developer to build it. I am submitting the form called SLL pre-requisite survey detailing that local government is not responsible to provide this service to the site and has not delineated this area yet. I am hoping this should be ok. I would appreciate your comments.

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Gurpreet Misra President/CEO, Greenap Inc Aug 22 2011 Guest 305 Thumbs Up

Just to explain it more, the site will not be under 'planned' water and wasterwater system as the way it works in rural India is plan per demand. And my confusion is how this will impact the requirement under SLL for site to be located in existing or planned water and waste water infrastructure.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Aug 26 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Gurpreet, the fact that Indian local governments do not maintain existing or planned water and wastewater service areas is an SLLp1 complication that you may want to resolve by submitting a credit interpretation request (CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide) before proceeding any further. By submitting a CIR first, you'll obtain a ruling that will allow you to proceed with confidence on SLLp1.

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Gurpreet Misra President/CEO, Greenap Inc Sep 01 2011 Guest 305 Thumbs Up

Thank you so much for your reply. We are planning on submitting CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide before registering the project.

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Gurpreet Misra President/CEO, Greenap Inc Sep 01 2011 Guest 305 Thumbs Up

We also have to resolve the issue of septic tanks as LEED ND, septic tanks are not allowed, but in this region of India, even in some mature city/towns that is the way it is done.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Sep 02 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Gurpreet, it is important to note that SLLp1 requires a project location inside water and wastewater service areas, and the provision of such services, but not necessarly from government systems. In other words, as long as a project can demonstrate that it's within a community-accepted area of infrastructure service, the project is free to use any independent means or technologies to achieve the service, e.g. onsite septic treatment, as long as the technologies are accptable to local regulatory officials.

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Allison Wildman Urban Designer SERA Architects
Aug 17 2011
Guest
96 Thumbs Up

LEED-ND 2012 - Stages and Expiration Policies

I am in the process of reviewing the LEED-ND 2012 redlines and have questions about the plight of the Stages and their associated expiration policies. Are the Stages being dropped entirely? Related, if one were to pursue the Neighborhood Development Plan (LEED-ND 2009, Stage 2), are there expiration dates associated with it?

Anyone in the know?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Aug 17 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Currently, an ND 2009 Stage 2 certified project has up to seven years to register for Stage 3 at no additional cost. For 2012, Stages 1 and 2 are being combined into a single 'ND Plan' certification, and Stage 3 becomes an 'ND' certification.

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Allison Wildman Urban Designer, SERA Architects Aug 17 2011 Guest 96 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Eliot! To clarify, under ND 2012, will ND Plans have the same expiration as the ND 2009 Stage 2 cert? (Which I understood to be 7 years, plus a re-registration opportunity for another 3 years, for a total of 10 years.)

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Aug 17 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Yes, that's the current plan.

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Eric Orozco Urban Designer, LEED AP ND, Neighboring Concepts, PLLC Mar 24 2012 Guest 320 Thumbs Up

I understand the third public comment period for LEED ND 2012 just closed, and the ballot to approve is in June. If approved, when is the actual date that projects teams will be eligible to register under LEED ND 2012?

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Mar 26 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

No formal date has been set yet. The ideal date would be mid-November of this year, but it's a little early to say for sure.

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Serge Atherwood IBI Group, Inc.
Jul 18 2011
Guest
93 Thumbs Up

Diagramming conventions

Are there any conventions or standards for maps and diagrams submitted in support of the prerequisites and credits under SLL and NPD? I've been looking for a simple method to portray, for instance, the intersection density of SLL Prerequisite 1, Option 2. An aerial photo of the site seems too visually cluttered, while using Google Maps' satellite or terrain view might be too simplistic. I don't know of any other resource that could offer what I need without a lot of tedious CAD tracing. I also am curious if there are any standard elements, such as property lines and building footprints, that should appear.

Many thanks.

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jul 18 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Serge, the Getting Started chapter of the Reference Guide has a Mapping section that may be helpful. There are no absolute conventions or standards, other than use of consistent base maps for the project site and surrounding vicinity. Each online form stipulates what features each uploaded map needs to show. Many projects use GIS mapping provided by the city or county in which the project is located.

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Serge Atherwood IBI Group, Inc. Jul 18 2011 Guest 93 Thumbs Up

Eliot, thank you for your fast reply! GIS maps -- I should have figured. I'll also definitely review the mapping section in the Guide.

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Angelica Ospina Alvarado
Jul 11 2011
LEEDuser Member
479 Thumbs Up

NPD Prerequisite 3 - Connected and Open Community

Hi all,
Regarding NPD P3, Is it necessary for achieving this prerequisite to include the green open space areaOpen space area is usually defined by local zoning requirements. If local zoning requirements do not clearly define open space, it is defined for the purposes of LEED calculations as the property area minus the development footprint; it must be vegetated and pervious, with exceptions only as noted in the credit requirements section. Only ground areas are calculated as open space. For projects located in urban areas that earn a Development Density and Community Connectivity credit, open space also includes nonvehicular, pedestrian-oriented hardscape spaces. into the net area used to calculate the intersections per sp. mi?
(equation 1, Intersections per sq. mi. = total intersections/net area)

Thank you

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Gonzalo Mosquera, AICP LEED AP-ND Principal & Founder, Pristis Sustainability Advisors Jul 12 2011 Guest 62 Thumbs Up

Angelica, como estas?
The calculation of square mileage excludes, among other things, only parks larger than 1/2 acres, slopes over 15%, and areas nonbuildable under law. If the local code does not specify open space allocation then it is assumed all is buildable and cant be excluded from the net area.
Saludos, Gonzalo

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jul 13 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

Gonzalo is essentially correct, but the exclusion for codified non-buildable areas can be for any purpose, not just open space. The full list of exclusions includes: water bodies, parks over 1/2-acre, public facility campuses (eg schools, hospitals), airports, railyards, slopes over 15%, and areas non-buildable under codified law or the rating system. So if a local code prohibits construction for any reason on land within the connectivity-shed, then it’s excludable.

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Angelica Ospina Alvarado Jul 14 2011 LEEDuser Member 479 Thumbs Up

Gonzalo, Eliot,

Thank you very much!

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Wayne Ding Green Building Consultant AECOM Beijing Office
May 19 2011
LEEDuser Member
119 Thumbs Up

GIBc8—Stormwater Management

The credit requires "the percentile rainfall event is the total rainfall on a given day in the record that is greater than or equal to X percent of all rainfall events over a 20-to 40+-year period". Can anybody explain to me what this means?

Thanks
Wayne

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jun 02 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

A detailed description of the requirement appears in the ND Reference Guide. In practioce, the requirement allows a project team to select the amount of rainfall that will be managed on-site and not discharged to a community stormwater system. If a project desires to manage the maximum amount of stormwater, it would select the 95th percentile event. This mean the quantity of rainfall to be managed is the 24-hour rainfall amount equal or greater than 95% of all rainfall events over the past 20-40 years. The number of years used should correspond to the length of local rainfall records.

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Shenhao Li Atkins
May 10 2011
Guest
272 Thumbs Up

Building Height to Street Width Ratio Issues

NPD P1 Walkable Street requires at least 15% of existing and new street frontage within and bordering the project has a minimum "building-height-to-street-width ratio" of 1:3.

Can anybody explain the definition of street frontage? Can I understand that it is a building facade runs parallel to an street?

There is a community in my hand that most of its building facade are not designed alongside the street, how can I identify the eligible ratio then?

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Eliot Allen AICP, LEED AP-ND, CNU-A, Principal, Criterion Planners LEED Faculty, LP TAG Jun 02 2011 LEEDuser Expert 2332 Thumbs Up

"Street frontage" is diagrammed in Figure 13 of the Getting Started chapter of the ND Reference Guide, and means the distance from one end of a block to the other end of the block. Buildings whose facades don't face a street cannot be counted toward the minimum 15% of streets with a minimum 1:3 BH-SW ratio.

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Roger Moquin
Mar 21 2011
Guest
123 Thumbs Up

SLL Prerequisite 3 HELP!!!

I have a lot of trouble with that prerequisite. Our project is in Canada and there is water everywhere here!!! First, we have a little water body in border of the road near our project. It is a kind of ditch. How to know if it is a water body to be consider? The metodology is well documented for wetland, but for water bodies, nothing. Secondly, we have wetlands into our
boundary. The local authorities permitted us to do any impacts on wetland but asked us a compensatory mitigation outside of the site. Is it "OK" for LEED ND?

Thank you.

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Ted Bardacke LEED Faculty (ND), AICP, Senior Associate, Green Urbanism, Global Green USA Apr 06 2011 Guest 413 Thumbs Up

On your first question, the prerequisite specifically addresses things like linear wetland/waterbody caused by exisiting rights-of-way. Also the glossary definitions of both wetland and waterbody have specific language regarding ditches.

On your second question, LEED-ND is more strict that your local authority in the sense that off-site mitigation is not allowed. If you have a good stormwater management strategy and decent density, then you can build on a percentage of the 50/100 ft buffer land. But otherwise, you've got to stay away from them.

Also remember that you can impact the buffer, if that buffer is previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development.".

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Peter Doo President Doo Consulting, LLC
Mar 17 2011
LEEDuser Member
3133 Thumbs Up

Certification Requirement

The Reference Guide states that the final step to certification occurs when "certificates of occupancy for buildings...have been issued..." Does this mean that 100% of the buildings must be constructed before a LEED ND certification is awarded?

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Ted Bardacke LEED Faculty (ND), AICP, Senior Associate, Green Urbanism, Global Green USA Apr 06 2011 Guest 413 Thumbs Up

For a Stage 3 certification, all buildings must be completed. But you can get a Stage 2 pre-certification anytime after receiving 100% of entitlements and up to 75% constructed. And you can get Stage 1 (conditional approval) even before entitlements.

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Michelle Robinson Re:Vision Architecture Apr 13 2011 LEEDuser Member 711 Thumbs Up

But you only get the plaque after Stage 3 -- so no plaque until everything is built. (Stage 2 is a certificate, while Stage 1 is a letter.)

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal ecocentric cc
Mar 17 2011
LEEDuser Member
1646 Thumbs Up

GIB prereq 4 for projects registered during stage 2

we have a LEED ND project in South Africa, which we registered early this year at Stage 2. Some of the roads and infrastructure have been constructed and at the time of first registering, construction of one building was well under way.

GIBp4 specifically requires that an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan is in place for the entire project. Our project has an EMP (environmental management plan) in place - for the overall precinct as well as the buildings, which conforms with South African environmental legislation. Erosion and sedimentation is dealt with in the EMP, but certainly not to the same detail that the referenced standard requires.

Going forward we are now writing an ESC plan into the EMP for all other buildings and overall further infrastructure development within the precinct, but what ramifications - if any - will there be for our project given that we were not in full compliance with all GIBp4 requirements from the word go?

Many thanks!

Jutta

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Ted Bardacke LEED Faculty (ND), AICP, Senior Associate, Green Urbanism, Global Green USA Apr 06 2011 Guest 413 Thumbs Up

This is CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide territory. I would imagine that if you can describe the prior ESC plan in detail and show that for the major issues the BMPs are similar and appropriate, they would grant you some flexibility.

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Peter Doo President Doo Consulting, LLC
Feb 27 2011
LEEDuser Member
3133 Thumbs Up

GIB Credit 7 Minimize Site Disturbance

Project site includes upen space that is undeveloped but previously "disturbed" in that it is a turf field (no trees or native plants). Developer proposes to build on this land. How do we classify this land for the purposes of calculating our "undisturbed" area?

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Michelle Robinson Re:Vision Architecture Apr 13 2011 LEEDuser Member 711 Thumbs Up

If this area of land meets the requirements of not being "previously developedPreviously developed sites are those altered by paving, construction, and/or land use that would typically have required regulatory permitting to have been initiated (alterations may exist now or in the past). Previously developed land includes a platted lot on which a building was constructed if the lot is no more than 1 acre; previous development on lots larger than 1 acre is defined as the development footprint and land alterations associated with the footprint. Land that is not previously developed and altered landscapes resulting from current or historical clearing or filling, agricultural or forestry use, or preserved natural area use are considered undeveloped land. The date of previous development permit issuance constitutes the date of previous development, but permit issuance in itself does not constitute previous development."", I think as long as you are not disturbing it as part of this project, then it will also count as "left undisturbed." (I believe the cutoff point in time for if it has been "disturbed" as part of this project should be per the "preproject" definition in the glossary.)

If the developer wants to build on this land, which was NOT "previously developed" then it will be disturbed, and therefore will not count towards the min. area left undisturbed.

(So if they're building on it, the area of this land will contribute to the "land that has not been previously developed" but will not contribute to the "undisturbed" area.)

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Peter Doo President Doo Consulting, LLC
Feb 26 2011
LEEDuser Member
3133 Thumbs Up

SLL Credit 3 Reduced Auto Dependence

Requirements emphasize "existing" transit service. I assume that new transit service is negotiated as part of the project plan will also count. Please confirm.

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Ted Bardacke LEED Faculty (ND), AICP, Senior Associate, Green Urbanism, Global Green USA Mar 07 2011 Guest 413 Thumbs Up

New transit will only count as existing at Stage 3. See the comment below on definition of existing. For SLLp1, Option 3, you can use planned (and funded) transit. The rating system and reference guide give precise definitions to what you can count as planned for the prerequisite.

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Daniel Costantino Urban Planner, LEED AP ND, Ecology & Environment, Inc. Sep 08 2011 Guest 864 Thumbs Up

I'm a little bit confused by some of these definitions. Perhaps someone can help. Any assistance would be highly appreciated.

Under SLLp1, Option 3 (b), "the transit agency must certify that it has an approved budget that includes specifically allocated funds sufficient to provide the planned service [...] and that service [...] will commence no later than occupancy of 50% [...]".

There's no indication as to the time span that that commitment needs to cover. Many transit agencies change service levels from one year to another based on variations in available operating funds. How long of a commitment to the required levels is required for LEED ND?

Thanks!

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Peter Doo President Doo Consulting, LLC
Feb 26 2011
LEEDuser Member
3133 Thumbs Up

SLL Prereq 1

I'm working on a predeveloped 95 acre site at the end of a peninsula. One drives through and existing residential neighborhood that does not have many diverse uses. The existing site was a hospital campus that will be redeveloped into mixed use. the majority of "diverse uses" will be developed on this site. Can we count the "diverse uses" entirely within our site? I assume that all of the diverse uses will have to be built and C of O's issued to get certification.

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Ted Bardacke LEED Faculty (ND), AICP, Senior Associate, Green Urbanism, Global Green USA Mar 07 2011 Guest 413 Thumbs Up

The answer to your question depends on what Stage of LEED-ND you are pursuing. For Stage 1 or 2, you cannot count diverse uses to be created as part of your project to be existing, as the date of existing is established at the date of LEED-ND submission. Per this definition of existing, at Stage 3 you could conceivably count uses created as part of the project as existing. However, this is a risky strategy as it: 1) may be seen as a loophole and 2) waiting until Stage 3 on ND could get you into some unforeseen trouble. I would suggest that you use another Option (1, 2, or 3) to get through SLLp1.

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Tamera Pullen
Oct 29 2010
Guest
49 Thumbs Up

LEED ND Exam

Hello All,

Currently I am studying for the ND exam using the Reference Guide and came across what I think is a rather serious ambiguity. Can someone please confirm for me whether the land-use density calculation DOES actually include "site area parking?" That is to say, I must include the AREA that parking will reside on the site but not, of course the floor area. There are quite a few references throughout that say "exclude portions of parking structures exclusively devoted to parking." But please see page 14, Figure 5, where parking is "buildable" and page 169, end of para 3. I think I need to include the area of site parking in the calculation. What do think?

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Nov 20 2010 LEEDuser Expert 6277 Thumbs Up

Tamera- the way I understand it, the parking should be included in the buildable area (the denominator) of the FAR calculation, but not in the SF of the numerator.

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Ted Bardacke LEED Faculty (ND), AICP, Senior Associate, Green Urbanism, Global Green USA Mar 07 2011 Guest 413 Thumbs Up

Allison is correct.

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Tyler Baker Urban Designer, Urban Strategies Aug 17 2012 Guest 152 Thumbs Up

I have asked two previous questions, and appreciate all the guidance so far.

For GIBc7, we have a tree survey by an ISA arborist which identifies all of the trees on our site as “fair”. We therefore are not required to preserve any of these trees, but we are preserving a number of these trees anyway.

Are we required to stipulate in CC&R that these trees must be preserved in perpetuity, or does that only apply to “good” and “excellent” trees?

Thanks

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Meghan Bogaerts Manager, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council Aug 20 2012 LEEDuser Member 740 Thumbs Up

Hi Tyler,

If the trees you're preserving on your own initiative aren't covered under the credit (both bullet lists of tree types), then you aren't required to protect them via CC&Rs (though perhaps it would be a good idea, if you're going to the trouble to save them).

Meghan

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